jerryking + carding   21

Cause or effect? The link between gentrification and violent crime
July 12, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Nathan Brooker YESTERDAY.

London, which is experiencing a sustained increase in violent offences as crime rates in other global cities such as New York, Sydney and Hong Kong continue to fall......The escalation of violence has been linked to provocation on social media, increased competition in the drugs trade, a reduction in police measures such as stop and search and an overall drop in police funding— the Met has seen its annual budget cut by about 20 per cent since 2010-11, and it has lost 10 per cent of its police officers in that time......However, one factor that is often overlooked and, according to professional and academic observers, has played a key role in exacerbating London’s recent crime wave, is its gentrifying property market.

Areas of London that have higher levels of deprivation also tend to have higher crime rates.........The level of violence you see is getting much more extreme......Gentrification has had a significant impact on the area....“One of the issues young people have in Hackney Wick is the lack of aspiration, the lack of hope,” says Allen. “They’re all living in a rich, diverse city, but it still feels very separate to them. It’s not their development; it’s somebody else’s. They think they won’t be able to live in the area they were brought up in because they’re not going to be able to spend £600,000 on an apartment.”.........gentrification has not only affected gang recruitment..... it has fundamentally altered how some gangs operate.........“It changed their idea of territory, since some senior members were forced out of the area [by the redevelopment] and had to commute in, for want of a better term,” he says. “Ten years ago there was a very strong connection to territory. There was an emotional connection. But the redevelopment changed that. The only territory that was left was the market place — the drugs market place — and that needs to be protected.”

It’s the protection of that market — one both lucrative and highly nebulous — that is behind some of the increase in violent crime. Without the clear boundaries an estate or a postcode might provide, he says, and with the high value of the drugs trade upping the stakes, transgressions are met with more intense violence.....The reasons behind the dramatic decline in New York’s murder count are much argued over: the growing economy, the end of the crack epidemic have all been put up as possible causes. Yet improvements to policing brought in under former New York police commissioner Bill Bratton cannot be overlooked.

Bratton’s policies, which included clampdowns on various low-level offences, and an increase in stop-question-and-frisk, are often mischaracterised as a zero-tolerance approach to policing, he says.

“What he really did was a management innovation.” Bratton, who was in the office 1994-96 and returned in 2014-16, introduced CompStat, measures that used computer programs to map where and when crimes were taking place, and how police resources were being shared. “When [Bratton] took over, the largest number of cops were on the day shift, but the largest number of crimes took place on the evening shift and the night shift,” he says. Bratton reallocated officers accordingly. They had a slogan: “Put cops on the dots”.......the most important thing Bratton did, Kleiman says, was make management more accountable, hauling in three precinct captains each week to grill them on their CompStat data. During his first year as commissioner, Bratton replaced something like two-thirds of the city’s 76 precinct commanders......The problem with fear is that it’s an unhelpful response. Fear raises money for private security firms, not community programmes; it improves funding to free schools, not failing academies; it promotes only the most brutal, careless forms of policing. In communities that are undergoing gentrification, fear further divides the haves and the have-nots: decreasing the kinds of relationships that might aid social mobility and better connect disadvantaged youth with the city they live in.

And what gets forgotten, says Allen, is that fear goes both ways. “A lot of the young people that get caught up in youth violence are caught up because they’re vulnerable and they’re frightened,”
accountability  Bill_Bratton  carding  causality  CompStat  criminality  criminal_justice_system  data  deprivations  disaffection  fear  gentrification  homicides  killings  London  New_York_City  organized_crime  policing  property_markets  United_Kingdom  violent_crime  youth  NYPD 
july 2018 by jerryking
The end of carding is just the beginning - The Globe and Mail
AKWASI OWUSU-BEMPAH
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 09, 2015
carding  Toronto_Police_Service 
june 2015 by jerryking
NDP MPP Jagmeet Singh’s quest to quash carding in Ontario - The Globe and Mail
JANE TABER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 05, 2015
carding 
june 2015 by jerryking
Mayor John Tory pledges to end carding in Toronto - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH CHURCH AND RENATA D’ALIESIO
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jun. 07, 2015
policing  John_Tory  carding  Toronto  Michael_Thompson  Desmond_Cole  African_Canadians 
june 2015 by jerryking
Trust in police is at a low ebb. Here’s one way to fix it - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 22 2015

The erosion of trust is a crisis. Modern policing in Canada is an outgrowth of the Peelian Principles, a set of guidelines developed by Sir Robert Peel, the British home secretary who established London’s first professional police force in 1829. Chief among them is the idea that the public is policed by consent, not by the authority of the state. The ability of police officers to do their job is dependent on the public’s approval of their existence, actions and behaviour. We need the police, and the police need us.

If that approval is missing, then police can’t function with any democratic legitimacy. Absent that, the only power they have derives from the inertia of their existence – they’re not going anywhere, and you can’t live without them, so what are you going to do if they misbehave?
policing  Toronto  carding  community_policing  street_justice  police_brutality  professionalization  public_approval  trustworthiness  legitimacy 
may 2015 by jerryking
Through the good and very bad, Bill Blair remained himself. We were lucky to have him - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 24 2015

The handling of security around 2010's G20 Summit, carding and the police budget are exhibits in the case against the chief and reasons why the police board didn’t renew his contract when it came up last summer.....In the end, there really is only one Bill Blair. Toronto was lucky to have him[???]. He helped make the city a safer place. He ran the police force with integrity and intelligence. He always faced criticism squarely and never shied away from scrutiny of his conduct. He is a decent man who did a hard job exceptionally well.
G20  mistakes  carding  Bill_Blair  Toronto_Police_Service  legacies  Marcus_Gee  Toronto 
april 2015 by jerryking
Mark Saunders to be named as Toronto’s chief of police: sources - The Globe and Mail
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Apr. 19 2015,

The new chief will take over the force at a time of high public pressure on two points: cost and race relations.

After years of quickly escalating costs, the province’s Sunshine List showed this year that more than half of all Toronto officers made at least $100,000. The police board stressed in their job ad for the new chief that limiting spending would be key. Board members said they were looking for pitches of how to reorganize the force, and for someone willing to make unpopular changes.

A police practice that has long drawn anger from Toronto’s black communities has drawn a new wave of public debate in the past few months. Police have been criticized for “carding,” or questioning people who aren’t suspected of a crime, with many saying they’re more likely to stop non-white Torontonians.
appointments  CEOs  Toronto_Police_Service  carding  Mark_Saunders  racial_profiling  Toronto_Police_Services_Board  budgets  cutbacks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Toronto Police’s carding reform is built on a good foundation - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 01 2015 |The Globe and Mail |MARCUS GEE.

Chief Blair promises that the force will train officers in how to conduct engagements with the public respectfully and within the law; that it will report to the board regularly on the engagement policy; that it will refrain from imposing carding quotas on officers; and that it will take care not to gather or keep masses of irrelevant data.

None of this will be enough for many of the activists, human-rights organizations and community groups that have besieged the board over the carding issue. They don’t like the fact that officers will be able to initiate contact and gather information as long as there is a “valid public safety purpose,” a pretty broad authorization. They don’t like the fact that police will not be required to issue a receipt to those it contacts (instead, officers will have business cards they can hand out) or inform people whom they stop that they have the right to walk away.
Toronto_Police_Services_Board  boards_&_directors_&_governance  racial_profiling  Bill_Blair  reforms  carding  Marcus_Gee  Alok_Mukherjee  civilian_oversight  community_policing 
april 2015 by jerryking
Cop Watch app records police-citizen interactions | Toronto Star
By: Antonia Zerbisias Feature Writer, Published on Tue Jan 28 2014

Cop Watch Toronto , which was released last week on iTunes.

“Sadly, it’s been years and years of seeing violence in (the black) community,” he said. “Only the fatal ones get serious media attention, but there are dozens and dozens of incidents that happen that get no attention at all — but they are just as traumatic to the people involved.”

The app, which costs 99 cents, is not a new concept. In the U.S. last year, similar apps, such as “ Stop and Frisk Watch ” for New Yorkers, have been released.

Although the aims are the same as Cop Watch Toronto, the operation is not. What Cop Watch does is begin shooting automatically once it’s opened, and as soon as recording is stopped, instantly uploads to YouTube. At the same time, an email is sent to the community-based Network for the Elimination of Police Violence , with the videographer’s location and an URL for the video.
African_Canadians  uWindsor  alumni  mobile_applications  police  police_force  policing  carding  racial_profiling  racial_disparities 
january 2014 by jerryking
Is the real problem here crime or systemic racism?
May 31, 2005 | G & M |Margaret Wente.

What the study did was record the age, race and gender of everybody stopped by police in the course of a year. What it found was that blacks (who make up only 1 per cent of Kingston's population) are stopped nearly three times as often, per capita, as whites. Therefore, it concluded, the police are racially biased.

But if that's true, then the police are also ageist and sexist. Only 7 per cent of the people stopped by police were 55 or older, while 35 per cent were between 15 and 24. And roughly three times more men were stopped than women. Does this mean the police are also biased against young people and men? Most crimes are committed by young men, and a disproportionate number of crimes are committed by young black men. Only 9 % of Toronto's population is black, but more than half of Toronto's 20 "most wanted" are black.
Margaret_Wente  Toronto  African_Canadians  disproportionality  statistics  Kingston  systemic_discrimination  zero-tolerance  expulsions  high_schools  criminality  Toronto_Police_Service  carding  racial_profiling  racial_disparities 
september 2012 by jerryking

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