jerryking + art   158

Opinion | Can We Slow Down Time in the Age of TikTok?
Aug. 31, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jenny Odell. Ms. Odell is a writer and artist.

"I can’t give my students more time. But I try to change the way they think about and value it."

Ms. Odell, a writer and artist at Stanford, wishes her students would slow down, be allowed to focus on one thing--particularly in an era where "Time is precious; time is money". Students spend their time responding to their phones and to social media which is a drawback to their capacity to concentrate......The attention economy demands not just consumption but also the production and upkeep of a marketable self. The work of self-promotion fills every spare moment. In the age of the personal brand, when you might be posting not just for friends but potential employers, there’s no such thing as free time.....Odell's students includes many who aren’t art majors, some of whom may never have made art before. She gives them the same advice every quarter: Leave yourself twice as much time as you think you need for a project, knowing that half of that may not look like “making” anything at all. There is no Soylent version of thought and reflection — creativity is unpredictable, and it simply takes time. .....When Odell is bird watching (a favorite pastime that is, strictly speaking, “unproductive,”), she's noticed that her perception of time slows down. All of her attention is collected into a single focal point, kept there by fascination and genuine, almost unaccountable interest. This is the experience of learning that she want for her students — that she wants for everyone, actually — but it’s a fragile state. It requires maintenance.........That’s why she's built time into her classes for students to sit or wander outside, observing something specific — for example, how people interact with their devices. She takes one of her classes on a hike, using the app iNaturalist to identify plants and animals. Students don’t just need to be brought into contact with new ideas, they also need the time for sustained inquiry, a kind of time outside of time where neither they nor their work is immediately held to the standards of productivity......Odell wants people to make work that is *deliberately useless* in a way that pokes at prevailing notions of usefulness. Art seeks not to resolve or produce, but remains (and, indeed, luxuriates) in the realm of questioning......the attention economy makes time feel contracted into an endless and urgent present. A simple awareness of history can help cultivate a different sense of time.......reading history about the past trials and successes of activism, or taking historical walking tours of a city can counter feelings of despair and distraction.....Taking a longer view can help to stop feelings of being an unmoored producer of work and reaction and all you to see yourself as an actors grounded in real, historical time. This, just as much as the capacity to follow one’s own curiosity at length, might be the best way to fortify yourself against the forces that splinter our attention.....If we want students to be thinkers, then we need to give them time to think....Let's all agree: to just slow down.
advice  art  attention_economy  buffering  Colleges_&_Universities  creativity  focus  idleness  mindfulness  monotasking  noticing  op-ed  personal_branding  reflections  self-promotion  slack_time  Slow_Movement  students  sustained_inquiry  thinking  timeouts 
15 days ago by jerryking
Where Does Major American Art Come From? Mapping the Whitney Biennial.
July 5, 2019 | The New York Times | SCOTT REINHARD, DEREK WATKINS, ALICIA DeSANTIS, RUMSEY TAYLOR, and SIDDHARTHA MITTER.

The first Whitney Annual in 1932 was transgressive.....In 1973, the exhibition became a Biennial, and its history is the history of American modern and contemporary art. Or, at least one version of that history: one centered in New York City, one heavily white and male. That is no longer the case. This year, a majority of the show’s artists are women, and they are racially and ethnically diverse. New York, however, remains home to nearly half of them.

Until 1975, the exhibition catalogs listed the addresses of the artists who were included each year. Mapping these locations tells a story of influence and power — but also one of friendships and creative communities, of housing prices and economic change, of landscape and light. Here are some of its facets.
art  artists  bohemians  Chicago  contemporary_art  creative_class  creative_types  diversity  gentrification  geographic_concentration  Greenwich_Village  location  Los_Angeles  Manhattan  mapping  museums  New_York_City  overlay_networks  prestige  proximity  SoHo  transgressiveness  white_men 
10 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion | The Dominance of the White Male Critic
July 5, 2019 | The New York Times |By Elizabeth Méndez Berry and Chi-hui Yang. Ms. Méndez Berry and Mr. Yang started a program to amplify the work of critics of color.
aesthetics  art  artists  art_reviews  blind_spots  criticism  culture  cultural_criticism  cultural_interpretation  curation  engaged_citizenry  opinions  opinion_makers  TIFF  white-saviors  white_men 
10 weeks ago by jerryking
The Arts in the 90s –
May 28, 2008 | Stabroek News | By Barrington Braithwaite.
'90s  art  art_galleries  artists  creative_class  culture  dance  drama  Guyana  Guyanese  history  nostalgia  playwrights 
may 2019 by jerryking
Private Libraries That Inspire
April 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Katy McLaughlin.

Difficult to build and maintain, these elaborate spaces contain the passions and obsessions of their owners. Libraries That Inspire -- These spectacular rooms house the owners’ collections of books, antiques, art and ephemera representing their unique, life-long passions and interests.

Forget the Dewey Decimal System: Entrepreneur and inventor Jay Walker’s 25,000 books, manuscripts, artifacts and objects are organized in his personal 3,600-square-foot library “randomly, by color and height,” he said. When he walks into his library, part of his Ridgefield, Conn., home, the room automatically “wakes up,” glowing with theatrical lighting, music and LED-lit glass panels lining various walkways. He finds items to peruse by a system of memory, chance, and inspiration, he said.

The Walker Library of the History of the Human Imagination is a dramatic example of the rarest of residential amenities: A vast, personal, custom-built repository of intellectual stimuli. In the age of the e-reader, it is a status symbol on par with wearing a Patek Philippe watch when the cellphone already tells the time. For wealthy homeowners, personal libraries provide both a quiet refuge from the world and a playground for their minds—as well as a solution to the challenge of warehousing books from which they cannot bear to part......To create enough shelf space and to counteract the visual heaviness of walls lined with books, private libraries may aim for two or more open stories......The private library is a classic example of a highly personal amenity that is expensive for the builder of a dream home to create and hard to recoup upon resale. .......the library has stimulated new ideas that have translated into an array of inventions and helped him make many new friends.

For some private library owners, especially those who aspire to world-class book collections, the serious expenditure isn’t in the physical structure, but in the contents. “It is not uncommon for collectors at this level to be spending in excess of $1 million a year” on books ......
antiques  antiquities  art  bespoke  books  collectibles  collectors  curation  design  high_net_worth  ideas  inspiration  insurance  Katy_McLaughlin  life_long_learning  personal_libraries  physical_place  owners  passions  shelf_space  status_symbols  uniqueness 
april 2019 by jerryking
How a Businesswoman Became a Voice for Art’s Black Models - The New York Times
By Melissa Smith
Dec. 26, 2018

Curator Denise Murrell focused on the works of 19th century [ ] Édouard Manet....
Revealing that maid’s identity became the foundation of Ms. Murrell’s doctoral dissertation, and the driving force behind her exhibition “Posing Modernity: The Black Model From Manet and Matisse to Today,” currently on view at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University.....“A person of color who is standing right there before you, and being ignored, is something that is part of the condition of being” part of the African diaspora to begin with. Art historians play a significant role in shaping our understanding of the past. It bothered her that their narratives would rewrite, subjugate or exclude the history of black people.......Ms. Murrell went on to reconsider Matisse’s use of black models in light of his trips to New York during the Harlem Renaissance, and circled back to the question that triggered her entanglement with art to begin with: How have contemporary black and nonblack artists reflected on these black figures in their work? “You can’t really understand African-American art and visual culture and artistic production without understanding a lot of what it is reacting to,”......Scholarship around black representation is growing, though gaps remain. And museums are increasingly addressing the full range of their communities, and the needs of a public more attuned to issues of race — approving exhibitions, like Ms. Murrell’s, that probe what blackness really means in the context of art history.....When Ms. Murrell ran into roadblocks, she found funders and strong-armed institutions for loans. Ms. Murrell said that while curators, art historians, gallery owners and others in the art community are sincere when they talk about diversity, they are also reluctant to dismantle established norms, including those that work against people of color. Larger institutions want to play it safe, and often refrain from funding unconventional scholarship. “There’s the concern that if you talk about race or any other kind of marginalized subject, how broad is the interest going to be?” Ms. Murrell said. Leaning on a mentorship model borrowed from her time in the corporate world, Ms. Murrell said she wants to create an incubator for minorities with new ideas.
African-Americans  art  art_history  blackness  curators  exclusion  exhibitions  marginalization  PhDs  artists  playing_it_safe  visual_culture  race  women 
december 2018 by jerryking
France urged to return museum artefacts to Africa
November 23, 2018 | Financial Times David Pilling, Africa Editor.

France should permanently return tens of thousands of cultural artefacts plundered from Africa during colonialism, according to a report commissioned by President Emmanuel Macron that could send tremors around the museums of Europe.

In the report, submitted to the French leader on Friday, the authors accused museums with large African collections — much of which was ransacked or purchased under duress — of being part of “a system of appropriation and alienation” that deprived Africans of the “spiritual nourishment that is the foundation of their humanity”.

....more than 90 per cent of the “material cultural legacy” of sub-Saharan Africa — including palace doors, thrones, carved heads and bronzes — was outside the continent. Europeans, it said, were straining to justify their continued possession of such treasure, while “Africans find themselves struggling to recover the thread of an interrupted memory”.

France alone, the report said, had at least 90,000 African objects, including from modern-day Chad, Cameroon, Madagascar, Mali, Ivory Coast, Benin, Republic of Congo, Senegal and Guinea. French collections also had artefacts from Ethiopia and the former British colonies of Ghana and Nigeria. Many items labelled as “gifts” were the spoils of war, it said.
colonialism  France  restitution  museums  Africa  sub-Saharan_Africa  Emmanuel_Macron  artifacts  repatriation  heritage  antiquities  art  art_history  collectibles  cultural_institutions 
november 2018 by jerryking
Boom amid the bust: 10 years in a turbulent art market | Financial Times
July 27, 2018 | FT| by Georgina Adam.
September 15 2008, the date of Lehman Brothers' bankruptcy filing, was also the first day of a spectacular gamble by artist Damien Hirst, who consigned 223 new works to Sotheby’s, bypassing his powerful dealers and saving millions by cutting out their commissions........The two-day London auction raised a (stunning) total of £111m.......o the outside world, though, the Hirst auction seemed to indicate that despite the global financial turmoil, the market for high-end art was bulletproof....in the wake of the Hirst sale, the art market took a severe dive.... sales plunging about 41% by 2009, compared with a market peak of almost $66bn in 2007. Contemporary art was particularly badly hit, with sales in that category plunging almost 60 % over 2008-09. Yet to the surprise, even astonishment, of some observers, the art market soon started a rapid return to rude health...the make-up of the market has changed. The mid-level — works selling between $50,000 and $1m — has been sluggish, and a large number of medium-sized and smaller galleries have been shuttered in the past two years. However, the high-performing top end has exploded, fuelled by billionaires duelling to acquire trophy works by a few “brand name” artists....A major influence on the market has been Asia....What has changed in the past 10 yrs. is what Chinese collectors are buying. Initially Chinese works of art — scroll paintings, furniture, ceramics — represented the bulk of the market. However, there has been a rapid and sudden shift to international modern and contemporary art, as shown by Liu and other buyers, who have snapped up works by Van Gogh, Monet and Picasso — recognisable “brand names” that auction houses have been assiduously promoting......Further fuelling the high end has been the phenomenon of private museums, the playthings of billionaires....In the past decade and even more so in the past five years, a major stimulus, mainly for the high end, has been the financialization of the market. Investment in art and art-secured lending are now big business....In addition, a new layer of complexity is added with “fractional ownership” — currently touted by a multitude of online start-ups. Often using their own cryptocurrencies, companies such as Maecenas, Feral Horses, Fimart or Tend Swiss offer the small investor the chance to buy a small part of an expensive work of art, and trade in it.....A final aspect of the changes in the market in the past decade, and in my opinion a very significant one, is the blurring of the art, luxury goods and entertainment sectors — and this brings us right back to Damien Hirst....Commissions are probably also lucrative. E.g. a Hirst-designed bar called Unknown was unveiled recently in Las Vegas’s Palms Casino Resort. It is dominated by a shark chopped into three and displayed in formaldehyde tanks, and surrounded by Hirst’s signature spot paintings. Elsewhere, Hirst’s huge Sun Disc sculpture, bought from the Venice show, is displayed in the High Limit Gaming Lounge. ...So Hirst neatly bookends the decade, whether you consider him an artist — or a purveyor of entertainment and luxury goods.
art  artists  art_finance  art_market  auctions  boom-to-bust  bubbles  contemporary_art  crypto-currencies  Christie's  Damien_Hirst  dealerships  entertainment  fees_&_commissions  fractional_ownership  high-end  luxury  moguls  museums  paintings  Sotheby's  tokenization  top-tier  trophy_assets  turbulence 
july 2018 by jerryking
How Financial Products Drive Today’s Art World
July 20, 2018 | The New York Times | By Scott Reyburn.

How does one invest in art without going through the complications of buying and owning an actual artwork?

That is the question behind financial products for investors attracted by soaring art prices but intimidated by the complexity and opacity of the market..... entrepreneurs are trying to iron out the archaic inefficiencies of the art world with new types of financial products, particularly the secure ledgers of blockchain...... “More transparency equals more trust, more trust equals more transactions, more transactions equals stronger markets,” Anne Bracegirdle, a specialist in the photographs department at Christie’s, said on Tuesday at the auction house’s first Art & Tech Summit, dedicated to exploring blockchain......blockchain’s decentralized record-keeping could create a “more welcoming art ecosystem” in which collectors and professionals routinely verify the authenticity, provenance and ownership of artworks on an industrywide registry securely situated in the cloud...... blockchain has already proved to be a game-changer in one important area of growth, according to those at the Christie’s event: art in digital forms.

“Digital art is a computer file that can be reproduced and redistributed infinitely. Where’s the resale value?”.....For other art and technology experts, “tokenization” — using the value of an artwork to underpin tradable digital tokens — is the way forward. “Blockchain represents a huge opportunity for the size of the market,” said Niccolò Filippo Veneri Savoia, founder of Look Lateral, a start-up looking to generate cryptocurrency trading in fractions of artworks.

“I see more transactions,” added Mr. Savoia, who pointed out that tokens representing a percentage of an artwork could be sold several times a year. “The crypto world will bring huge liquidity.”......the challenge for tokenization ventures such as Look Lateral is finding works of art of sufficient quality to hold their value after being exposed to fractional trading. The art market puts a premium on “blue chip” works that have not been overtraded, and these tend to be bought by wealthy individuals, not by fintech start-ups.....UTA Brant Fine Art Fund, devised by the seasoned New York collector Peter Brant and the United Talent Agency in Los Angeles.

The fund aims to invest $250 million in “best-in-class” postwar and contemporary works,...Noah Horowitz, in his 2011 primer, “Art of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market,”.... funds, tokenization and even digital art are all investments that don’t give investors anything to hang on their walls.

“We should never forget that in the center of it all is artists,”
art  artists  art_advisory  art_authentication  art_finance  auctions  authenticity  best_of  blockchain  blue-chips  books  Christie's  collectors  conferences  contemporary_art  digital_artifacts  end_of_ownership  fin-tech  investing  investors  opacity  post-WWII  provenance  record-keeping  scarcity  tokenization  collectibles  replication  alternative_investments  crypto-currencies  digital_currencies  currencies  virtual_currencies  metacurrencies  art_market  fractional_ownership  primers  game_changers 
july 2018 by jerryking
Christie’s Jussi Pylkkanen and superauctions
NOVEMBER 10, 2015 | FT | John Gapper.

....Of all his crafty sales tactics, the one used to greatest effect by Christie’s 52-year-old global president — the auctioneer on top of the wave of wealth in the world’s art market — is the query: “Are you sure?” He asks it as one of the last two bidders in an auction drops out, threatening to finish it. As he halts the action for a few seconds — what he calls “the auctioneer’s pause” — pressure builds on the reluctant bidder.

'Are you sure, sir?'

Auctions are unusual in the 21st century - most things, even luxury items such as watches and clothes, sell at fixed prices although there is some room to haggle. Even many items on eBay, the electronic platform, are sold at fixed prices. In The Dynamics of Auction , Christian Heath, a professor of work at King's College, London, describes them as "a somewhat anachronistic method of selling goods, more common perhaps to traditional agrarian societies than post-industrial capitalism."

They are still used for art because every painting is different and has no intrinsic value - it does not yield anything and the cost of manufacture is usually tiny. They are also a good way to get high prices - when buyers compete against a deadline, they behave differently. The desire not only to acquire it but to beat others causes what Deepak Malhotra, a Harvard professor, terms the "emotional arousal" of auctions.

"We know that the Modigliani [being sold on Monday] is the artist's greatest work," says Pylkkanen, never short of an extravagant compliment for his inventory. "We know that it was painted in 1917. We know that it is being sold 100 years later, and that nobody in their lifetime has had an opportunity to buy it on the open market. We're all individuals and when we get a chance, it's like, 'That's the one. I've got to go [for it].' "

The task of the auction house is to gather as many people as possible - especially wealthy people - in a saleroom, or on the end of a phone line to the room, and to create the atmosphere for such moments to occur. The auctioneer must be charming, relaxed, and pleasantly ruthless. "You need poise, control and an element of openness because you're inviting people to this thing. You're making them compete without pushing too hard."
art  art_market  auctions  books  Christie’s  collectors  collectibles  high_net_worth  intrinsic_value  Jussi_Pylkkanen  power_of_the_pause  pricing  sales_tactics 
may 2018 by jerryking
Charlie Parker and the Meaning of Freedom
AUG. 29, 2017 | The New York Times | By ARTHUR C. BROOKS.

The jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker, also known as Bird, was born on Aug. 29, 1920.

Freedom in Parker’s music was the freedom to work within the melody and chords to make beautiful, life-affirming music. That meant the self-mastery to dominate his craft through years of careful practice, and the humble discipline to live within the rules of the music itself.

Many artists have known this truth. Leonardo da Vinci said, “You can have no dominion greater or less than that over yourself.” But the lesson goes far beyond art. Indeed, this is one of life’s great lessons for all of us......The lesson: To be truly free to enjoy the best things in life, set proper moral standards for yourself and live within them as undeviatingly as Charlie Parker did in his music.
art  Arthur_Brooks  boundaries  constraints  jazz  Leonardo_da_Vinci  musicians  restraint  self-discipline  self-mastery  self-restraint  soul-enriching 
august 2017 by jerryking
How to Navigate Art Galleries in Any City - The New York Times
By SHIVANI VORA AUG. 1, 2017
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art  galleries  travel  howto  museums 
august 2017 by jerryking
Art market ripe for disruption by algorithms
MAY 26, 2017 | Financial Times | by John Dizard.

Art consultants and dealers are convinced that theirs is a high-touch, rather than a high-tech business, and they have arcane skills that are difficult, if not impossible, to replicate..... better-informed collectors [are musing about] how to compress those transaction costs and get that price discovery done more efficiently.....The art world already has transaction databases and competing price indices. The databases tend to be incomplete, since a high proportion of fine art objects are sold privately rather than at public auctions. The price indices also have their issues, given the (arguably) unique nature of the objects being traded. Sotheby’s Mei Moses index attempts to get around that by compiling repeat-sales data, which, given the slow turnover of particular works of art, is challenging.....Other indices, or value estimations, are based on hedonic regression, which is less amusing than it sounds. It is a form of linear regression used, in this case, to determine the weight of different components in the pricing of a work of art, such as the artist’s name, the work’s size, the year of creation and so on. Those weights in turn are used to create time-series data to describe “the art market”. It is better than nothing, but not quite enough to replace the auctioneers and dealers.....the algos are already on the hunt....people are watching the auctions and art fairs and doing empirics....gathering data at a very micro level, looking for patterns, just to gather information on the process.....the art world and its auction markets are increasingly intriguing to applied mathematicians and computer scientists. Recognising, let alone analysing, a work of art is a conceptually and computationally challenging problem. But computing power is very cheap now, which makes it easier to try new methods.....Computer scientists have been scanning, or “crawling”, published art catalogues and art reviews to create semantic data for art works based on natural-language descriptions. As one 2015 Polish paper says, “well-structured data may pave the way towards usage of methods from graph theory, topic labelling, or even employment of machine learning”.

Machine-learning techniques, such as software programs for deep recurrent neural networks, have already been used to analyse and predict other auction processes.
algorithms  disruption  art  art_finance  auctions  collectors  linear_regression  data_scientists  machine_learning  Sotheby’s  high-touch  pricing  quantitative  analytics  arcane_knowledge  art_market 
june 2017 by jerryking
Modern African Art Is Being Gentrified
MAY 20, 2017 | The New York Times | By CHIKA OKEKE-AGULU.

.Sotheby’s held its first auction of modern and contemporary African art on Tuesday, where 83 pieces by artists from Cameroon to South Africa sold for a total of nearly $4 million.....The sale at Sotheby’s, the granddaddy of auctioneers, most likely signals the beginning of a more serious interest from Western museums, which may finally start to consider such work worthy of inclusion in their permanent collections........Now that it is seen as high culture, the art and artists are gaining value, investors are jostling to get a piece of the action, and private collections are growing in Africa and around the world.....African contemporary artists have also moved beyond nationalism and are more likely to sound off about globalization and complex identities. But the continent’s masses will be the biggest losers. ...That’s because whole countries in Africa cannot boast of a single art museum of any renown......During the colonial era, bands of looters — missionaries, scholars, security forces and fortune hunters — fanned out across the continent and, by force or guile, carted away vast quantities of Africa’s artistic heritage. Many of these masterpieces of ancient and traditional African sculpture now reside in major private and public collections in the West, with little chance of ever returning to Africa......We cannot let this history repeat itself. But what is to be done?

African collectors and those based in Africa must participate in this market, for it is more likely that their collections will stay on the continent......As Africa overcomes years of dictatorships and civil wars, its fledgling democracies have seen the rise of a wealthy, cosmopolitan class interested in supporting art and culture........The spread of private collections is, however, not the long-term goal. Rather, it is a step toward a future in which well-run public collections are supported by governmental and nongovernmental institutions.....and thus serve the greater cultural good........Even so, Africa cannot solely rely on the good will of individual collectors. State agencies and municipal governments must foster a richer cultural experience for their citizenry. And they can do this by building and maintaining museums in major cities. The usual practice of treating art and culture as a superfluous aspect of the human experience undeserving of public support is not tenable.

If museums exist and are run well, the art will come.
Sotheby's  Africa  museums  collectors  collectibles  human_experience  patrons  art  artists  artwork  auctions  contemporary_art  gentrification 
may 2017 by jerryking
Guaranteed to Raise a Smile
May 19, 2017 | WSJ | By Dominic Green

Pop music, psychedelia and nostalgia fused together in the album that defined the 1960s.

Universal Music Group, which owns Capitol Records, is marking the anniversary by issuing a multi-disc box set. There is also a box-full of books intended to reintroduce to us the act we’ve known for all these years. Brian Southall, a pop journalist when the band was together, handled publicity for EMI in the 1970s. Mike McInnerney designed the sleeve of the Who’s “Tommy.” Lavishly illustrated, their books reflect the synthesis between pop entertainment and thoughtful art that the Beatles were after......The 1960s formed the Beatles. The Beatles, with a little help from their friend, producer George Martin, made “Sgt. Pepper.” Now “Sgt. Pepper” defines the ’60s............“Pepper” endures not just because it caught the mood of the Summer of Love, or because it married pop music to the modernist techniques of the collage and the tape loop, or because it sounds quaintly futuristic. “Pepper” endures because it entered the past so quickly. On June 25, 1967, little more than three weeks after the album’s release, the Beatles joined Maria Callas and Picasso in the first live international satellite broadcast, for which they performed a new song, “All You Need Is Love.” The event initiated our age of simultaneous global media and announced the triumph of television. Like its Edwardian costumes and parping brass, “Pepper” was a colorized document from history—from a past in which music, not the visual image, could still change the world.
Beatles  '60s  anniversaries  music  iconic  cultural_touchpoints  pop_music  psychedelic  nostalgia  art  1967  kaleidoscopic 
may 2017 by jerryking
Why Warren Buffett Keeps Framed Reminders of Awful Moments in Economic History
Olivia B. Waxman
Jan 26, 2017

"I wanted to put on the walls days of extreme panic in Wall Street just as a reminder than anything can happen in this world," he says in this clip provided exclusively to TIME, from the upcoming HBO documentary Becoming Warren Buffett. "It's instructive art."
Warren_Buffett  Berkshire_Hathaway  web_video  panics  economic_history  art  unpredictability  unthinkable  imagination  uncertainty  HBO  documentaries  artifacts  reminders 
february 2017 by jerryking
How to See: Looking, Talking, and Thinking about Art: David Salle: 9780393248135: Amazon.com: Books
How does art work? How does it move us, inform us, challenge us? Internationally renowned painter David Salle’s incisive essay collection illuminates the work of many of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. Engaging with a wide range of Salle’s friends and contemporaries—from painters to conceptual artists such as Jeff Koons, John Baldessari, Roy Lichtenstein, and Alex Katz, among others—How to See explores not only the multilayered personalities of the artists themselves but also the distinctive character of their oeuvres.
books  art  Amazon  perception  empathy  inferences  Communicating_&_Connecting  observations  incisiveness 
december 2016 by jerryking
Center for the Future of Museums: Painting in Blue
Thursday, December 1, 2016
Painting in Blue

Often, I must repeat what I do for a living. You teach police about art? Not exactly. I teach them to improve their observation and communication skills by learning to analyze works of art. Paintings, sculptures, and photographs have proven to be transformative tools in professional training programs for authorities in law enforcement, intelligence, and counterterrorism. Agencies from around the country and around the world are turning to museum collections to bolster their efforts to combat crime, terrorism, and unrest in our increasingly threatened and complex world....The US spends about $15B each year to train doctors, and over $100B per year to train and maintain police forces. Shouldn’t museums, drawing a direct line from their resources to improved outcomes for these and other critical social needs, be included in that support? ..... In 2001, as Head of Education at The Frick Collection, I instituted a program for medical students, The Art of Perception. Based on a model program at the Yale Center for British Art, the course took medical students from the clinical setting into an art museum to teach them to analyze works of art—big picture and small details—and articulate their observations. When they returned to the hospital, they would, we reasoned, be better observers of their patients. (You can find an assessment of the program in Bardes, Gillers, and Herman, “Learning to Look: Developing Clinical Observational Skills in an Art Museum, Medical Education, vol 35,no.12, pp.1157-1161.) Humanities in medical training has a strong historical precedent and this program underscored the value of critical thinking and visual analysis in the disciplines of both medicine and art history.
perception  empathy  law_enforcement  policing  art  museums  Communicating_&_Connecting  inferences  observations  the_big_picture  historical_precedents  training_programs 
december 2016 by jerryking
Auction houses embracing digital technology to sell to the new global rich
SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 by: John Dizard.

....The auction houses have been under pressure to adapt to this changing universe. While the most visible aspect of the houses’ digital revolution may be their online auctions, the most essential is in the systematising and networking of their customer, market and lot information. Without that, the auctioneers would lose control of their ability to charge gross margins in the mid-teens as intermediaries of the $30bn global art auction market....Within the quasi-duopoly of Christie’s and Sotheby’s at the top of the auction world, Christie’s has now moved to implement what it calls its “digital strategy”....Christie’s now has James Map (as in founder James Christie), a sort of private internal social network that allows specialists, client service staff, support staff and executives to see what is known about a client and his tastes. Past auction records, relatives’ purchases and sales, statistical inferences on how likely clients are to move from buying an expensive watch online to participating in a high-end evening sale – it all can be in the mix.

The idea, Murphy explains, was “to create an internal app that spiders into our database of information and brings up on our internal [screen] environment lots of connectivity. This is faster and better than the email chains [that it replaced].”....This summer, Sotheby’s announced a partnership with eBay, the online auction giant. While the details of the partnership are still being developed, it is understood eBay will distribute live Sotheby’s auctions to its global audience of 150m buyers.

Ken Citron, Christie’s head of IT

The digital strategy is also making it easier to take part in auctions. Even with all the unseen know-your-customer checks now required by financial supervisory agencies, it has become much faster and easier to register as an auction house client. About half now do so online.

But while the online revolution may have left some auction houses behind, for others it is generating new business. Auction houses used to regard the sale of smaller, cheaper objects from, for example, estate liquidations as an annoying loss-leader business that just wasted their specialists’ time. Now, however, many are making money selling objects for $2,000-$3,000; it’s just a matter of cutting transaction costs. “We have a new app with which you can take a picture, push a button, and it goes to a specialist, with a description. Then the specialist can decide if it might fit into an auction,” says Citron.
auctions  Sotheby's  Christie's  data  art  collectors  high_net_worth  partnerships  eBay  duopolies  digital_strategies  CRM  IT  margins  intermediaries  internal_systems  loss-leaders  transaction_costs  cost-cutting  know_your_customer  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  estate_planning  liquidity_events  online_auctions  digital_revolution 
november 2016 by jerryking
30 things about art and life, as explained by Charles Saatchi
He rarely gives interviews, but a new book offers an intriguing insight into what drives the enigmatic collector's passion for art
You've been successful at discovering new artistic talent. But are there not always great artists who go undiscovered?
By and large, talent is in such short supply that mediocrity can be taken for brilliance rather more than genius can go undiscovered.
You have been described both as a "super-collector" and as "the most successful art dealer of our times". Looking back on the past 20 years, how would you characterise your activities?
Who cares what I'm described as? Art collectors are pretty insignificant in the scheme of things. What matters and survives is the art. I buy art that I like. I buy it to show it off in exhibitions. Then, if I feel like it, I sell it and buy more art. As I have been doing this for 30 years, I think most people in the art world get the idea by now. It doesn't mean I've changed my mind about the art that I end up selling. It just means that I don't want to hoard everything for ever.
Your practice of buying emerging artists' work has proved highly contagious and is arguably the single greatest influence on the current market because so many others, both veteran collectors and new investors, are following your lead, vying to snap up the work of young, relatively unknown artists. Do you accept that you are responsible for much of the speculative nature of the contemporary art market?
I hope so. Artists need a lot of collectors, all kinds of collectors, buying their art.
Do you think you have messed up anybody's life by flogging off all their work?
I don't buy art just to make artists happy any more than I want to make them sad if I sell their work. Don't you think you're being a bit melodramatic?
Before you went into advertising, what other career did you consider?
"Consider" isn't quite how it was. At 17 and with two O-levels to show after a couple of attempts, a career path wasn't realistic, nor a chat with the Christ's College careers officer, who wouldn't have recognised me in any event as my absenteeism record was unrivalled. I answered a situations vacant ad in the Evening Standard for a voucher clerk, pay £10 weekly. It was in a tiny advertising agency in Covent Garden, and a voucher clerk had to traipse round all the local newspaper offices in Fleet Street – of which there were hundreds at the time – and pick up back copies of papers in which the agency's clients had an advert appearing. The voucher clerk's role was to get the newspaper, find the ad, stick a sticker on it so the client could verify its appearance, and the agency could get paid. Vital work, obviously. One of the advantages of it being a tiny agency was that one day they got desperate when their creative department (one young man) was off sick, and they asked me if I could try and make up an ad for one of their clients, Thornber Chicks. This ad was to appear in Farmer and Stock-Breeder magazine, and hoped to persuade farmers to choose Thornbers, as their chicks would grow to provide many cheap, superior quality eggs and a fine return. I didn't know how you wrote an ad, or indeed how to write anything much other than "I will not be late for assembly", for which I had been provided much practice. So I looked through copies of Farmer and Stock-Breeder and Poultry World, chose some inspiring-sounding words and phrases, cobbled them together, stuck on a headline – I think I stole it from an old American advertisement – and produced "Ask the man who owns them" as a testimonial campaign featuring beaming Thornber farmers. The client bought it.
Does a love of art, particularly Renaissance art on a biblical theme, make one feel closer to God?
I believe God must be very disappointed in his handiwork. Mankind has clearly failed to evolve much in all these years; we're still as cretinous and barbaric as we were many centuries ago, and poor God must spend all day shaking his head at our vileness and general ineptitude. Or perhaps, we might just give him a good laugh. But of course, I hope God likes our art enough to forgive us our sins, particularly mine.
I like the new gallery but hated your gallery in County Hall. What were you thinking!
I was stupid, stupid, stupid. I got bored with knowing my first gallery in Boundary Road too well, so well in fact that I could hang my shows to the centimetre while sitting on a deckchair in Margate. Plus, I wanted to introduce new art to as wide a public as possible, and I went for somewhere with a much bigger footfall on the South Bank next to the London Eye. So I gave up the airy lightness of Boundary Road for small oak-panelled rooms, and nobody liked it. I saw it as a challenge, but one which I clearly wasn't up to.
Which artists do you display in your own home? Are you constantly changing the works you have there? Is there a core of favourites which stay there?
My house is a mess, but any day now we'll get round to hanging some of the stacks of pictures sitting on the floor.
Who are the artists you are most pleased with discovering?
Over the years I have been very lucky to see some great artists' work just at the start of their careers, so that I could feel "pleased with discovering" them. However, I have also "discovered" countless artists who nobody but me seemed to care much for and whose careers have progressed very slowly, if at all. So I certainly don't have an infallible gift for spotting winners. I think it's fair to say that I bought Cindy Sherman in her first exhibition in a group show, with some of her black-and-white film stills framed together in those days as a collage of 10 images, and went on to buy much of her work for the next few years. I bought most of the work from Jeff Koons's first exhibition in a small and now-defunct artist-run gallery in New York's East Village, which included the basketballs floating in glass aquariums and the Hoovers and other appliances in fluorescent-lit vitrines. But this is getting too self-congratulatory and the truth is I miss out on just as many good artists as I home in on.
Are paintings a better investment than sharks in formaldehyde? The Hirst shark looks much more shrivelled now than it used to, but a Peter Doig canvas will still look great in 10 years and will be much easier to restore.
There are no rules about investment. Sharks can be good. Artists' dung can be good. Oil on canvas can be good. There's a squad of conservators out there to look after anything an artist decides is art.
Why do overseas museums have better collections of Britart than the Tate?
Because the Tate curators didn't know what they were looking at during the early 1990s, when even the piddliest budget would have bought you many great works. But I'm no better. I regularly find myself waking up to art I passed by or simply ignored.
Looking ahead, in 100 years' time, how do you think British art of the early 21st century will be regarded? Who are the great artists who will pass the test of time?
General art books dated 2105 will be as brutal about editing the late 20th century as they are about almost all other centuries. Every artist other than Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Donald Judd and Damien Hirst will be a footnote.
If you were commissioning your own portrait, in which medium would you choose to be represented?
I'd rather eat the canvas than have someone paint me on it.
What is it like being married to a domestic goddess?
She's too good for me, I know, but she knows it too and reminds me every day.
Do you ever do the cooking?
I can do eggs. And cornflakes.
Do you encourage your children to look at your art and go to museums and galleries?
My children think it's very uncool to have anything to do with my gallery. But they quite like the gallery shop.
What advice do you and your wife give your children?
Nigella's mum gave her an invaluable insight into nice behaviour. According to Nigella her advice went something like this: "It is better to be charmed than to charm." By this she meant that what makes people feel good about themselves is feeling as if they have been charming, interesting; in short, have been listened to. For her, the notion that one should oneself be riveting or aim to be quite the most fascinating person in the room was a vulgarity and just sheer, misplaced vanity. Trying to be charming is self-indulgent; allowing oneself to be charmed is simply good manners.
Should the country be spending money on saving old masters for the nation, or buying up works by the next generation of artists?
At the risk of being lynched – again – by the art crowd, I don't think there is a great need any more to save paintings for the nation at the cost of supporting new art. What difference does it make if a Titian is hanging in the National Gallery, the Louvre or the Uffizi? This isn't the 18th century: people travel, so there's no need to be nationalistic about the world's art treasures. Much more important is to back living artists.
What is your favourite museum in the world?
The Prado in Madrid. I have a weakness for Goya, but the museum itself is so unfussy, and clearly loves to display its many masterpieces as unshowily as possible, each visit reinforces my belief in the enduring importance of art.
I know very little about contemporary art but have £1,000 to invest. Any advice?
Premium bonds. Art is no investment unless you get very, very lucky, and can beat the professionals at their game. Just buy something you really like that will give you a thousand pounds' worth of pleasure over the years. And take your time looking for something really special, because looking is half the fun.
What is your proudest achievement?
I don't do pride. That's not to say I don't have an ego the size of an aircraft hangar, but I'm not even very proud of that.
How much money have you lost in the recession?
I daren't look.
Aren't those dot paintings [by Damien Hirst] just like wallpaper?
You may as well say that Rothko paintings look like nice rugs. There's no crime in art being decorative.
With Mark … [more]
art  collectors  Saatchi_gallery  Reality_TV  Art_and_design  Culture  Media  The_Observer  Features  via:millersashley  art_market 
november 2016 by jerryking
The Dynamics of Auction | Organisational Sociology | Cambridge University Press
Each year art and antiques worth many billions of pounds are sold at auction. These auctions consist of numerous, intense episodes of social interaction through which the price of goods rapidly escalates until sold on the strike of a hammer. In this book, Christian Heath examines the fine details of interaction that arises at auctions, the talk and visible conduct of the participants and their use of various tools and technologies. He explores how auctioneers, buyers and their representatives are able to transact the sale of diversely priced goods in just seconds. Heath addresses how order, trust and competition are established at auctions and demonstrates how an economic institution of some global importance is founded upon embodied action and interaction. The analysis is based on video recordings of sales of art and antiques gathered within a range of national and international auction houses in Europe and the United States.

Highly distinctive contribution to understanding talk and interaction in work and organisation
Unique analysis of embodied interaction and multimodal communication
Contributes to understanding of economic action and the operation of markets
books  auctions  art  antiques 
november 2016 by jerryking
Pamela Joyner: collector of ‘Afropolitan abstraction’
SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 | FT| by Julie Belcove.

.....Joyner and Giuffrida are not merely acquisitive in the vein of so many collectors but are activist. “We think of ourselves as stewards of their careers,” Joyner says of their artists. “Our philanthropy is focused on getting works of the artists who we support into museums....Joyner and Guiffrida donate paintings to leading museums in the UK and the US. Joyner introduces those museum curators to talented-but-lesser-known artists for whom she advocates. She also organizes trips domestically and internationally (.e.g South Africa) for museum curators....Joyner and Guiffrida created an artist’s residency on their property in Sonoma, California, in 2014.....Artists return the loyalty and remark that Joyner and Guiffrida never ask for a discount....Joyner has made collecting — and sitting on boards — her primary occupation. “Now I have a strategy, I have a budget,” she says. “I run it like you’d expect an MBA to run it.”...“Race is a really bad lens through which to view art. I could make an argument that Zander Blom is far more African than I am.”....“I was really struck by these artists who were determined to create an aesthetic that was compelling to them, which was abstraction, and there were no rewards for that if you were an African-American artist at the time,” Joyner says. “The traditional art world expected African-American artists to create identifiably black subject matter. ....The daughter of two public school teachers, Joyner, 58, grew up on the South Side of Chicago, where she attended the prestigious University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and frequented the Art Institute of Chicago. A serious ballet dancer, Joyner took a year off from Dartmouth College to try to break into the professional ranks in New York. “What I discovered was, I was really average,” she says frankly. “That was a good thing to discover early. I decided at that juncture that I would become a patron of the arts.”

Patronage requires money, so Joyner went on to Harvard Business School, then a successful career in finance.....With 300 to 400 artworks by roughly 100 artists, among them contemporary masters Glenn Ligon, Julie Mehretu, Mark Bradford and Kara Walker, the collection is the subject of a new book, Four Generations: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection of Abstract Art, written by a Who’s Who of top curators. In October 2017, a travelling exhibition of the collection’s highlights will open at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans.
art  collectors  women  African-Americans  curators  Diaspora  artists  museums  philanthropy  marginalization  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  Afropolitan  activism  race  HBS  abstractions  books  stewardship  Pamela_Joyner  contemporary_art  champions 
october 2016 by jerryking
Righting Wrongs and Generating Attention for Art of the African Diaspora
OCT. 16, 2016 | The New York Times | By TED LOOS.

A profile of Pamela J. Joyner, a prolific art collector and supporter of artists of African descent..... Later, Ms. Joyner donated money to buy another Gilliam, “Whirlirama” (1970), and next year there are plans to exhibit both when the Met reinstalls its modern collection. “Pamela is such an informed champion of her artists,” Ms. Wagstaff said.

That trip to Washington was one of the many ways that Ms. Joyner, 58, exerts her power as an art-world influence behind the scenes. She has relinquished a successful business career to become what she calls a full-time “mission-driven” collector of a very specific niche: Abstract art by African-Americans and members of the global African diaspora. Now she leverages her relationships with the Met in New York, the Tate in London, the Art Institute in Chicago and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to help these artists gain traction in the wider world.

“It’s no less ambitious than an effort to reframe art history,” said Ms. Joyner, who sees herself as righting a wrong. “First, to include more broadly those who have been overlooked — and, for those with visibility, to steward and contextualize those careers.”....“There was a keen sense in my household that you had to be prepared for whatever was going to happen,” Ms. Joyner said. “You needed these literacies, and cultural literacy was one of them.”
African-Americans  Diaspora  art  artists  collectors  museums  overlooked  philanthropy  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  women  marginalization  Pamela_Joyner  stewardship  reframing  mission-driven  champions  art_history  exclusion  prolificacy 
october 2016 by jerryking
Is loyalty to an art gallery outdated? — FT.com
SEPTEMBER 23, 2016 by: Harriet Fitch Little.

Dealer-client relationships have been founded on what he terms “proper social conversations”: dinners out, trips taken and “[the collector’s] ability to share with the gallery the enthusiasm, the sheer admiration and wonder at an artist’s work”.

But art fairs, auctions and the internet have rendered conversations with dealers a choice rather than a necessity for buyers. In Selling Contemporary Art (2015), [North York Central Library, Book Lang & Lit 5th Fl Nonfiction In Library 706.88 WIN] which charts how the market has transformed since 2008, author Edward Winkleman uses a phrase he acquired from the Los Angeles-based collector Stefan Simchowitz to describe the shift: “cultural Lutheranism”. Collectors now have the tools to evaluate and purchase art without the hand holding of a gallerist — perhaps without ever even visiting an exhibition....the fickleness of the contemporary art market, where artists are “on the top ten hits parade for a while and then you never hear of them again” makes the dealer whose taste one trusts an indispensable guide....art lovers stick with particular dealers if they demonstrate a commitment to art that goes beyond the financial....for a gallerist, “Where you have a choice is the artists you choose to work with, the clients you choose to work with,” -- “The key for the whole thing is trust.”
trustworthiness  David_Bowie  mentoring  collectors  collectibles  art  dealerships  galleries  loyalty  taste-makers  books  contemporary_art  relationships  high-touch  art_market  customer_loyalty 
september 2016 by jerryking
Anatomy of a Hit: How Success Is Measured in Different Creative Fields - Speakeasy - WSJ
Dec 18, 2015 | WSJ | By JON KEEGAN. How do you define a hit podcast, Broadway show or typeface? Explore the nature of cultural hits.

when it comes to other cultural works, defining a hit is not as easy. We set out to explore how success is measured—what factors matter in assessing a hit in various creative categories ranging from books to tweets:

Audience – How many people viewed the work?
Sales – How much money was made?
Longevity – How long has the work been available?
Critical acclaim – What praise did the work receive?
art  creative_class  hits  measurements  music  paintings  blockbusters  entertainment  entertainment_industry  creative_economy  auctions  YouTube  Twitter 
december 2015 by jerryking
Kate Taylor: Why Toronto’s Aga Khan Park risks becoming a white elephant - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 28 2015

the museum’s permanent collection, a selection of historic Islamic art drawn from the family holdings of the Aga Khan, the European billionaire businessman and noted humanitarian who is the 49th hereditary leader of the Ismaili Muslim community. The collection includes magnificent pieces of Persian ceramics dating back as early as the 10th century, a selection of fine Indian miniatures from the 1500s and 1600s and a few rare Asian robes that had miraculously survived for centuries, as well as illuminated copies of the Quran, decorated tiles and handwoven rugs.

The museum has good international connections and also offers first-rate temporary exhibitions:
Ismaili  museums  Islamic  Toronto  Don_Mills  art  white_elephants 
may 2015 by jerryking
How to Buy Art: A Beginner’s Cheat Sheet - NYTimes.com
MAY 7, 2015 | NYT| By WILLIAM GRIMES and ROBIN POGREBIN.

EDUCATE YOUR EYE Go see as much as you can — at galleries, museums and art fairs and by trolling online. The more art you see, the more you will develop clear judgment. Knowledge can help put things in context, but expertise isn’t a prerequisite. Marc Glimcher, president of Pace Gallery, says: “Go to a museum first and see what speaks to you. Identify which thread of art history is meaningful to you before heading to the galleries or the auction.”

Photo

THE LONG VIEW Budding collectors shouldn’t just buy what initially captivates them. “Ask yourself how something might look when you know more, how something might look over time,” said Amy Cappellazzo, co-founder of Art Agency, Partners, an art advisory firm. “The best thing to do is put yourself in a position where the first purchase actually challenges you a little — you’re not sure you like something, but you can’t stop looking at it. Imagine your smarter self looking at it in five years.”
auctions  art  artwork  art_galleries  museums  howto  self-education  judgment  Colleges_&_Universities  art_schools  students  contextual  long-term  collectors  collectibles  investing  investment_advice  pitfalls  mistakes 
may 2015 by jerryking
Black faces in art history begin with the Pharaohs - FT.com
March 13, 2015| FT | Martin Peretz.

Sir, In a standfirst to the review by Ariella Budick of the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibit of Kehinde Wiley’s paintings, the FT makes a horrendous mistake by asserting that “Black faces have long been excluded from art history” (“Old Masters remixed”, Life & Arts. Of course, if one were to do a count of black faces among the countless general chronicles in the field, that would be true. But the past quarter century has changed all that. More to the point, the founder of the Houston-based Menil Collection, Dominique de Menil, underwrote a vast project that has culminated in a five-volume, illustrated and gorgeous study of The Image of the Black in Western Art, (http://www.imageoftheblack.com/) edited by David Blackman and Henry Lewis Gates Jr.

It begins with the pharaohs and ends only yesterday.
letters_to_the_editor  art  Africans  books  Henry_Louis_Gates  museums  imagery  portraiture  exclusion  art_history 
march 2015 by jerryking
With Misattributed Constable Masterpiece, a Rare Look Into the Imprecise World of Art Identification - NYTimes.com
By LORNE MANLY MARCH 7, 2015

At a time when the attribution of paintings can be so litigious that many experts have retreated from the field, the startling reassessment of the “Cathedral,“ and its sudden explosion in value, provides a rare window into the often imprecise, and debate-riddled, field of identifying the authorship of artworks.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has twice changed its mind in the past four decades over whether its portrait of Philip the IV is a masterpiece by Velázquez (the current view), or a fine painting by an also-ran. Sotheby’s was sued after it sold what it had determined to be a copy of Caravaggio’s “The Cardsharps” for £42,000 (about $83,000) in 2006, only to have a scholar later declare it was actually by the master himself.

This time it is Christie’s that is facing questioning over whether it bungled the attribution of a painting. “We understand that there is no clear consensus of expertise on the new attribution,” the company said in a statement.
art  artwork  art_history  art_appraisals  art_authentication  auctions  imprecision  painters  paintings  provenance  Sotheby's 
march 2015 by jerryking
Take a page from Hemingway for your next meeting - The Globe and Mail
SHIRLEE SHARKEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 16 2015
Do it. Creating great art or innovative business solutions is about discipline and hard work. Effort and commitment are needed to cultivate the environment for that magic beanstalk to take root.
Work with your team to schedule creative time and stick to it.
Clock it. Similar to routines, specific time constraints can also allow creativity to blossom. Ernest Hemingway set aside each day, from 7 a.m. until noon, to write between 500 and 1000 words. Even with such a creative and vivacious personality, he knew discipline was a key element of artistic expression.
Be it. bringing that kind of energy into your organization takes commitment and devotion to the outcome. I am certainly not suggesting crash diets or extreme behaviour, but I think we can learn from these techniques to foster a better focus.

Be creative.Change the environment and embrace new situations. Take your team on a field trip to meet a competitor; go to a movie together; have your meeting in a fast food restaurant – or a gallery.
Blow it. Actors who don’t perform well on auditions; writers who can’t find a publisher; artists who can’t sell their work – failure, followed by the long crawl back to the drawing board – is a vital step to creating great things.
inspiration  meetings  leaders  failure  creative_renewal  art  discipline  creativity  Pablo_Picasso  routines  focus  hard_work 
february 2015 by jerryking
Explore Toronto’s libraries, one illustration at a time - The Globe and Mail
SEAN LILLANI
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 13 2015,

Daniel Rotsztain’s prints are available at allthelibraries.ca/prints.
TPL  libraries  art  artists  architecture  Toronto 
february 2015 by jerryking
Chilliwack artist celebrates flag's 50th - Chilliwack Times
by  Greg Laychak - Chilliwack Times
posted Feb 5, 2015 at 4:00 PM
art  artists  Canadian  inspiration  symbolism  flags 
february 2015 by jerryking
How the AGO’s Jean-Michel Basquiat retrospective confirms the late artist’s staying power - The Globe and Mail
JAMES ADAMS
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 06 2015

Jean-Michel Basquiat: Now’s the Time opens Saturday at the Art Gallery of Ontario for an exhibition concluding May 10. Toronto is the show’s sole North American stop. Details of opening hours, Basquiat-themed events and programs are at ago.net.
galleries  museums  African-Americans  AGO  art  artists 
february 2015 by jerryking
If the artists starve, we’ll all go hungry - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH RENZETTI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 19 2015

After 20 years in the music business, she says she’s seeing songwriters “leaving in droves. If you can’t make a living, if you can’t afford go to the dentist, you’re going to leave.” This is a lament you’ll hear from artists everywhere these days: We can’t afford to do this any more. The well has dried up. Freelance rates are what they were when the first Trudeau was in power. Rents rose, and royalties fell. Novelists are becoming real-estate agents; musicians open coffee shops.

The evidence of this culture shock is in front of our eyes, in the shuttered book shops and video stores and music clubs, yet it’s remarkably unremarked upon. Artists don’t actually to like to complain publicly about their lot in life, knowing the inevitable backlash from those who still believe that creating is not “a real job.... American journalist Scott Timberg argues in his new book, Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class.
artists  Elizabeth_Renzetti  Pandora  streaming  creative_types  songwriters  musicians  free  creative_class  entertainment  piracy  copyright  entertainment_industry  downloads  blockbusters  creative_economy  books  art 
january 2015 by jerryking
Corporate sponsors of the arts missing creative opportunities - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 16 2015 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.
...the necessary bridge between creativity and innovation is collaboration – the act of allowing someone else’s experience to change the way you see the world....
It’s time to entirely rethink corporate sponsorship of the arts. Forget the silly logo on the back of the program or the complimentary tickets to the play. What artists can offer is much more valuable: a chance to peer into the mind of a choreographer, a singer, a set designer, a writer. How do they solve complex problems? And what insights can this bring to corporate leaders who are trying to solve problems of their own?

In the end it comes down to something neurologists know very well. If you want to become a creative person, you have to force your brain to see new patterns, unfamiliar terrain and uncomfortable situations. Sitting in a boardroom full of people with the same university degree and the same clothes (think dull blue suits and boring shoes) will do nothing to foster creative, innovative visionaries.

Why don’t artists offer those corporate suits something really valuable? The pitch should be: “Give us $100,000 and we’ll show you how we solve problems and design solutions. You’ll think we’re crazy – and quite possibly we are – but if you allow yourselves the chance, you’ll start to change the way your brain operates. Creativity can’t be taught, but it can be developed.”

Companies can transform the way their leaders think.
Todd_Hirsch  arts  philanthropy  branding  creativity  artists  critical_thinking  skepticism  problem_solving  sponsorships  art  creative_renewal  ideality  collaboration  rethinking  missed_opportunities  heterogeneity  crazy_ideas  radical_ideas  creative_types  neurologists  complex_problems 
january 2015 by jerryking
Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine’s School for Innovation - WSJ
By JOSH EELLS
Nov. 5, 2014

“There are a lot of other programs around the country that marry business and technology,” says Erica Muhl, the dean of USC’s Roski School of Art and Design and the Iovine and Young Academy’s first executive director. “But they’re all missing that arts and cultural component. The difference with us is we start with the arts part.” Says Iovine: “We want kids who can work at Beats or at Apple.”
hip_hop  Apple  moguls  innovation  music  art  entrepreneurship  streaming  Beats  education 
december 2014 by jerryking
Are book publishers blockbustering themselves into oblivion? - The Globe and Mail
RUSSELL SMITH
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Nov. 28 2014

Whatever they mean, they certainly cannot mean a shrinking talent pool.

So they must mean that they are not, in fact, interested in the real talent pool, or in a wide variety of literature. What they are looking for are bestsellers, which tend to be particularly narrow kinds of books. Most of the gargantuan advances that have made headlines in the U.S. recently are for science-fiction and fantasy books. Every publisher is looking for exactly the same book – basically, they are looking for The Hunger Games again and again. When they say “quality,” they mean “mass appeal.”...But in concentrating on bestsellers to the detriment of other literature, the publishers are simply following the model of all the entertainment industries. Providing an eclectic variety of entertainments to please a diverse audience, as the free Internet can do, just hasn’t been lucrative for the conglomerates that own film studios and recording labels. They are in constant search of blockbusters.

As they grow larger and concentrate their efforts and investments on massive, sure-fire hits – the next Marvel movie, the next Taylor Swift album – the cultural landscape seems paradoxically smaller. It becomes even more difficult to get an indie film made – the huge projects suck the oxygen (financing, distribution, media coverage) out of the biosphere.

In following this larger trend, book publishers are shortsighted. By reducing their involvement in original and challenging art, they relinquish literary fiction to the tiny presses and online magazines, and so become artistically irrelevant and, in the long run, uninteresting even as suppliers of entertainment. Pursuing mainstream popularity with ever-larger sums of money is ultimately self-destructive....Yes, such high-mindedness is all very well for someone who doesn’t have to keep a money-losing, employment-providing company afloat. And Le Guin’s vague rejection of capitalism is not a solution to the immediate problems facing publishers. But her point about taking the long view – about concentrating on valuable literature for the sake of the industry’s general health – is surely a practical one as well.
books  publishing  Russell_Smith  literature  blockbusters  art  short-sightedness  conglomerates  indie  winner-take-all  Amazon  writers  long-term  self-destructive  talent_pools 
november 2014 by jerryking
The Art World’s High-Roller Specialist - WSJ - WSJ
Nov. 6, 2014 | WSJ | By KELLY CROW.

Ms. Xin is a leading player in the art business’s central game right now: a race to match a small number of $10 million-plus masterpieces with a small number of mega-collectors, who are increasingly coming from Asia.

Ms. Xin is one of the latest auction stars to emerge amid this high-stakes backdrop. Her profile rocketed after she helped her contemporary-art clients place bids or win half of Christie’s top 10 priciest works in May. Nearly 6 feet tall, she was easy to spot standing between colleagues in the saleroom’s phone banks, wielding three cellphones at a time and lobbing bids at a regular clip. By sale’s end, she helped her Chinese clients win as much as $236 million of art. François Curiel, a four-decade veteran of the firm, said he’s never seen one specialist account for that large a haul in a sale.

Ms. Xin’s quick ascent comes amid China’s expanding clout on the global art stage. Most specialists are art experts who build up a career doggedly over decades. Ms. Xin, however, never saw a work of art until she was 19. But since she joined the auction business nearly seven years ago, she has homed in on finding masterpieces—and collectors who could afford them.
art  art_advisory  auctions  China  Chinese  Christie's  collectibles  collectors  economic_clout  high_net_worth  match-making  Sotheby's 
november 2014 by jerryking
Digital Lessons From the Museum and Art World
OCTOBER 27, 2014 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.

....institutions are using digital technology and data not just for marketing and social media, but also to enrich the museum experience for visitors, reach new audiences online and transform scholarly research. And there are also new kinds of art being made with digital tools and data....How do you intelligently use digital technology to enhance your business rather than being overrun by it? The physical and the digital sides of your business should work together, so that your investments in the physical world remain a powerful asset.

That fundamental challenge for museums is similar to the one facing retailers, manufacturers, consumer goods makers and perhaps traditional media companies. (More than one museum official I interviewed talked about the importance of being a “content manager.”) The museum curators and administrators seemed to have a clear notion of the need for balance — that just as we all increasingly live in a world that is a blend of the physical and digital, so too institutions of all kinds must learn to operate in a blended, hybrid environment.
art  atoms_&_bits  content  CPG  cyberphysical  digital_media  digital_strategies  manufacturers  mass_media  museums  physical_assets  physical_world  retailers  Steve_Lohr 
october 2014 by jerryking
Ismaili Centre: place of prayer, cradle of friendship - The Globe and Mail
THE AGA KHAN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 17 2014
Ismaili  museums  Islamic  Toronto  Don_Mills  art 
september 2014 by jerryking
Sotheby's and Christie's Race to Find New Art Collectors - WSJ
By KELLY CROW CONNECT
July 31, 2014

If you're even remotely curious about starting a blue-chip art collection, there's a good chance the world's biggest auction houses already know who you are, and exactly how much you might spend to own a masterpiece. Gone are the days when auctioneers simply mailed sale catalogs to strangers after reading reports of their newfound fortunes. Today, climbing art values and an influx of new international collectors have thrown Sotheby's BID -1.32% and Christie's into a global frenzy of research and genuflection. They've dispatched armies of experts to identify potential bigwigs, and satisfy their ever-expanding art whims.

A third of Sotheby's 1,550 employees are assigned to look after at least 9,000 top collectors, a job that entails everything from researching bidders' financial standing to digging through catalogs for objects that might intrigue them...Behind the scenes, auction houses say they are ferreting out collectors by teaming up with insurers to offer art appraisals. In India, Christie's joined with a luxury hotel chain to tap its Rolodex two years ago, in exchange for giving occasional art lectures at several hotels.
Sotheby's  Christie's  art  collectors  auctions  insurance  art_appraisals  whims  blue-chips 
july 2014 by jerryking
When it comes to the arts, here’s what Toronto needs in a mayor - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jun. 30 2014

In their statement, they say they want a Toronto that is ambitious, creative, accessible, forward-thinking, responsive, collaborative and imaginative.

They say the city needs a mayor who has a strategic vision, consensus-building leadership skills and a passion for Toronto; who embodies inclusiveness in all interactions; and who balances the budget.

They also identify five things Toronto needs in order to thrive: a creative and innovative economy, healthy and productive citizens, a vibrant cultural sector, affordable and accessible transportation, and beautiful and connected neighbourhoods and green spaces.
cultural_institutions  art  museums  Toronto  elections  mayoral  ROM  AGO  TIFF  neighbourhoods  parks  public_spaces  forward-thinking  green_spaces 
july 2014 by jerryking
The Lost Art of Finance
15 Mar. 2014| Financial Times | Gillian Tett.


'Back in the days when "money" meant sacks of gold coins, artists had something tangible to paint'

Last month I received a striking request fro...
Gillian_Tett  art  finance  Wall_Street  from notes
may 2014 by jerryking
Look beyond the obvious to understand an artwork
Sir, Gillian Tett (" The lost art of finance ", March 15) rightly argues that a more creative approach to finance would be beneficial and that art can be a useful means of gaining a fresh perspective....
finance  Wall_Street  art  museums  fresh_eyes  letters_to_the_editor  artists  artwork  art_galleries  Gillian_Tett  perspectives  paintings  interpretation  latent  art_appreciation  from notes
may 2014 by jerryking
When Diamonds Are Dirt Cheap, Will They Still Dazzle? - NYTimes.com
APRIL 19, 2014| NYT | ROBERT H. FRANK.

In many domains, perhaps even including signed baseballs, it’s becoming possible to produce essentially perfect replicas of once rare and expensive things.

That’s true, for example, of diamonds and paintings. Renowned art originals will always be scarce, and so will high-quality mined diamonds, at least while De Beers holds sway. But what will happen to the lofty prices of such goods if there is an inexhaustible supply of inexpensive perfect copies? Economic reasoning can help answer this question. It can also shed light on how new technologies might alter traditional ways in which people demonstrate their wealth to others, or might change what society embraces as tokens of commitment and other gifts....Not even perfect replicas, however, will extinguish strong preferences for original paintings and mined diamonds. In the short run, price premiums for such goods are likely to persist, as collectors scramble for certificates of authenticity.

Longer term, those premiums may prove fragile
...Tumbling prices will transform many longstanding social customs. An engagement diamond, for instance, will lose its power as a token of commitment once flawless two-carat stones can be had for only $25.

Replication technologies also raise philosophical questions about where value resides.
...Technology won’t eliminate our need for suitable gifts and tokens of commitment, of course. And such things will still need to be both intrinsically pleasing and genuinely scarce. But technology will change where those qualities reside.
art  De_Beers  collectibles  artifacts  collectors  authenticity  inexpensive  replication  scarcity  valuations  digital_artifacts  high-quality 
april 2014 by jerryking
As Iceland shows, the arts can be a valuable business asset for Canada - The Globe and Mail
TODD HIRSCH
As Iceland shows, the arts can be a valuable business asset for Canada Add to ...
Subscribers Only

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Mar. 27 2014
Todd_Hirsch  Iceland  art  artists  culture  arts  cultural_institutions  creativity  prosperity  creative_class  funding  fine_arts 
march 2014 by jerryking
Need help focusing? Start doodling - The Globe and Mail
DAVE McGINN
Five ways doodling improves thinking

Focus: Information retention:
Creative problem-solving:”

Information integration:
Emotional:
art  Communicating_&_Connecting  thinking  focus  sketches 
february 2014 by jerryking
Hedge-Fund Managers Playing Larger Role in Art Market - WSJ.com
By
Kelly Crow,
Sara Germano and
David Benoit
Jan. 23, 2014

Hedge-fund managers, who play a vital but disruptive role in the broader financial markets, are increasingly throwing their weight around the art market: They are paying record sums to drive up values for their favorite artists, dumping artists who don't pay off and offsetting their heavy wagers on untested contemporary art by buying the reliable antiquity or two. Aggressive, efficient and armed with up-to-the-minute market intelligence supplied by well-paid art advisers, these collectors are shaking up the way business gets done in the genteel art world.....Today, are applying their day-job tactics to their art shopping, dealers say.

Corporate raiders a generation ago typically held their art purchases for at least a decade. Today, the average holding period for contemporary art is two years, according to a former Sotheby's specialist. That is enough time to reap a tidy profit on a rising-star artist but hardly enough for art history to rule on the artist's lasting merits.
art  artists  collectors  Wall_Street  hedge_funds  contemporary_art  moguls  Sotheby's  investors  dealerships  Citadel  Ken_Griffin  volatility  Christie's  market_intelligence  herd_behaviour  aggressive  art_advisory  real-time  holding_periods  art_market 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Christie’s Auctioneer Jussi Pylkkanen on Working the Room - NYTimes.com
Interview by ANDREW ROSS SORKIN
Published: January 3, 2014

How much do you think the auctioneer affects sale prices?
It’s very difficult to judge, but I think that a good auctioneer can certainly bring 20 percent to the value of major works of art.

Just as Detroit finally seems to be at the beginning of a revival, it faces the prospect of trying be once again be a great city without a great museum. Imagine New York without the Met, or Chicago without the Art Institute. If the DIA is forced down this road, the very collectors mentioned above, from Asia, Russia, and the Middle East, will snap up a collection that has required 128 years and the generosity and foresight of thousands of people to create, and which would likely never be seen in public again.
Andrew_Sorkin  collectors  art  auctions  Christie's  foresight  long-term  museums  far-sightedness  Detroit  generosity 
january 2014 by jerryking
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