jerryking + susan_krashinsky   46

Torstar cuts jobs, internship programs; board chair says the company is fighting for survival - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 13, 2018 | |

Torstar Corp. is fighting for survival......The struggles precipitated by declining print advertising, and by a booming digital economy that has been dominated largely by Facebook and Google – at the expense of others who would survive on digital advertising – have led to widespread job cuts. On Monday, the company tightened its belt one more notch, cutting 13 jobs in its digital and sales operations, slashing the Toronto Star's travel and freelance budgets and suspending its summer and year-long internship programs. The Star's internships were among the most prestigious in the country for training young journalists.

While cutting costs, Torstar is also attempting to establish its digital future....... What is your view of the impact consolidation has had in Canadian media? How much more consolidation is to come?

As you know, we just announced a consolidation deal. [In November, Torstar and Postmedia Network Canada Corp. swapped 41 newspapers and subsequently shut down most of them.] Publishing newspapers – dailies and weeklies – is becoming more and more challenging. In an effort to lengthen the runway, give us more time, these amalgamation deals have been done.
Susan_Krashinsky  Torstar  digital_media  digital_strategies  newspapers  digital_first  cost-cutting  subscriptions  paywalls  layoffs  consolidation 
february 2018 by jerryking
Kenneth Cole on keeping retail fashionable in a modern age
Nov. 2, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON.

About a year ago, your company announced the closing of all but two of your stores in the United States. Why?

The retail model needs to be re-imagined. We're looking to focus on the brand experience in the virtual universe, and then recreate a new physical experience.

How much of your sales in the future do you envision coming from the brick-and-mortar space?

Everyone is trying to figure it out. The shopping experience needs to be very different. It's happening really fast. It will be an interesting time. A lot of people will not survive it. At the end of the day, you'll have a stronger, more efficient marketplace.

More than three decades into the business, how has your view of advertising changed?

In the past, my goal was to sell my brand. Over the past five years, it seems everybody is their own brand – they wake up every day and curate it on their Facebook, their Twitter feed, their Instagram feed. My goal is to hopefully convince you to allow me to be part of your brand. All of that is changing.
Kenneth_Cole  brands  Susan_Krashinsky  retailers  fashion  bricks-and-mortar  cause_marketing  advertising  store_closings  shopping_experience  physical_experiences 
november 2017 by jerryking
Toronto's Air Canada Centre to be renamed Scotiabank Arena in $800-million deal
August 29, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON , JAMES BRADSHAW AND JEFF GRAY.

Toronto's Air Canada Centre (ACC) is being renamed Scotiabank Arena in an $800-million deal over 20 years that marks one of the biggest investments in naming rights in North America.

The agreement announced on Tuesday by Bank of Nova Scotia and Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment Ltd. (MLSE) is 10 times the annual $4-million Air Canada paid to attach its name to the home of the Toronto Maple Leafs, the Toronto Raptors and a number of A-list concerts and other events. Other recent naming deals for coveted sports venues in the United States have gone for significantly less. Last year, the NBA's Golden State Warriors agreed to name its new arena the Chase Centre, in a deal with JPMorgan Chase estimated at more than $300-million (U.S.) for 20 years, the largest at the time.

The play is Scotiabank's latest move to market itself as "Canada's hockey bank." Scotiabank sponsors community hockey clubs across the country, all seven Canadian NHL teams, and is the official bank of the NHL. To allow another company or even another bank to take top billing at one of Canada's premier venues would be to risk giving up Scotiabank's dominant position as a sponsor of hockey in Canada......The deal is also a representation of a boom in sponsorship spending in general, as marketers struggle to find new ways to reach consumers in an increasingly cluttered media environment.

Companies spent $1.98-billion on sponsorship fees in Canada last year, according to the most recent Canadian Sponsorship Landscape Study, conducted by Ohio University professor Norm O'Reilly in association with sports marketing firm T1. And "activations" that make people aware of those sponsorships, such as advertising, promotions and events, accounted for roughly another $1-billion. Those numbers have doubled in the past 10 years, according to the research.

Such deals are particularly important for what's known as "earned media" exposure – as opposed to "paid media" such as ads – because they mean that the sponsor's brand is baked in to coverage of everything happening at the venue. Media include the name in their coverage of teams and big-ticket matches; the brand appears in TV images of major events through permanent ads in and around the venues; on digital properties associated with bookings there; and the buildings themselves act as giant billboards. Contrast that with a media environment in which consumers are bombarded with digital, outdoor, print and broadcast ads, seemingly at every turn......MLSE will also benefit from Scotiabank's efforts to use digital and mobile technologies to communicate with the bank's customers – using its insights to connect to fans both at the rink and watching at home, Mr. Hopkinson said. The bank can also give MLSE access to its analytics team to assist in crunching large sets of data to better understand hockey fans, Mr. Doig said, and the deal will give MLSE a window into Scotiabank's Scene loyalty program, which has more than eight million members. Many of those are young people that the NHL has an interest in courting as future fans.
10x  Susan_Krashinsky  Jeff_Gray  MLSE  sports  naming  Scotiabank  Bay_Street  sponsorships  arenas  earned_media  paid_media 
august 2017 by jerryking
Airbnb's CMO reflects on 'marketing that matters' - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017
marketing  Susan_Krashinsky  Airbnb  CMOs 
february 2017 by jerryking
How automation is shaking up the advertising industry - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON AND SHANE DINGMAN
NEW YORK AND TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 26, 2015
programmatic  advertising  automation  Susan_Krashinsky  online_advertising 
february 2017 by jerryking
The Canadian connection to P&G’s 'Like a Girl' campaign - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 02 2015
Susan_Krashinsky  P&G  Super_Bowl  television  advertising  girls  daughters 
february 2015 by jerryking
Shelly Lazarus: A front seat witness to advertising's gender shift - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 29 2015

You started at Ogilvy when David Ogilvy was still around. What was the best advice he ever gave you?

If you attract the right people and you create an environment where they’re as successful as they can possibly be, everything follows from that. ... He judged the output vigorously. He would have divine discontent, we would say. Nothing was ever good enough. If we said, okay, the work could be better, how do we get there? He would go back to either better people, or a better environment where they could do better work. Every answer came back to the quality of the people.
advice  advertising_agencies  Shelly_Lazarus  women  advertising  people_skills  resilience  bouncing_back  dissatisfaction  Managing_Your_Career  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Susan_Krashinsky  David_Ogilvy  Pablo_Picasso  professional_service_firms  the_right_people 
february 2015 by jerryking
Why empty shelves killed the Target brand - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 15 2015
retailers  Target  Susan_Krashinsky  crossborder  exits  branding 
january 2015 by jerryking
Big Data rewards come with tricky set of risks for companies - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014

It was a sign that Loblaw Cos. Ltd. was taking a specific strategy with its loyalty program: telling people who shop at the company’s stores that their purchases would be recorded and tracked, but that they would be offered something of value in return: rewards for buying the things they like best.

In an age of “Big Data,” companies are scrambling to better target their communications with customers. If done right, businesses hope that this will eliminate more of the irrelevant advertising that makes people tune out at best and irritates them at worst.

But it has also thrown the advertising industry into a potentially damaging situation. As more of our behaviour is tracked, both online and off, many consumers are becoming wary about how their information is stored and used. Combine that with repeated instances of massive breaches of data security, and the corporate world faces the threat of losing the trust of consumers altogether....One area where consumer data is particularly important is in mobile advertising, where companies send people real-time offers on their mobile phones. But consumers are cautious. In supermarkets, 66 per cent of Canadians said that offers on their phones would make them uncomfortable.

“The complexity of the context is something that, if a marketer doesn’t feel their way through that, they can misstep,”
massive_data_sets  Loblaws  Susan_Krashinsky  data_breaches  mobile  contextual  advertising  loyalty_management  Aimia  privacy  risks  location_based_services  missteps 
november 2014 by jerryking
Loblaw targets food-savvy Canadians in major marketing overhaul - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 17 2014

Loblaw has partnered with Google Inc. to build a “food pulse index,” which will track online conversations about food across Canada. It will publish the results on a regularly updated map on the corporate website, which will show food trends by region.

And the content on the site and on Loblaw’s social media channels will be determined by what people are talking about. If beets are a hot topic, for example, the retailer will serve up images, recipes, polls and information about the root vegetable. If people are wondering about gluten-free Thanksgiving meals, Loblaw will respond.

The Google trends will influence not just marketing, but also product development at the retail giant.
Susan_Krashinsky  Loblaws  marketing  branding  brands  Google  product_development  trends 
october 2014 by jerryking
Online retailer Etsy gives artisans a marketing boost - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 29 2014,
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  Etsy  Susan_Krashinsky  Indigo  marketing 
september 2014 by jerryking
From healthy fries to segways: Why most products fail - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 18 2014,

The vast majority of new product launches end up failing.

In fact, 72 per cent of new products are failures, according to a global study released by Bonn, Germany-based marketing consultancy Simon-Kucher & Partners. The firm surveyed 1,615 managers in 40 countries. It found that most newly launched products fail to meet their profit targets “because companies neglect or ignore essential pricing and marketing activities in their new product development processes.”.... set aside a budget for research to measure customer demand for the product, as well as what people are willing to pay for it......So many products are launched that haven’t established basic things, such as research into the need of the product, the efficacy of the product, testing the product with consumers,”

marketing a new product:

1. Is there a market for the product?
2. Can you own the name?
3. Do you have data that prove the idea has merit?
4. Do you have a credible, knowledgeable spokesperson who can talk about the product?
5. Have consumers or customers used the product and will they talk about their experience (hopefully positively)?
6. Have you had everyone you are talking to sign an NDA (non-disclosure agreement)?
7. Can you identify a third party who can corroborate that the world needs this product that will go on record?
8. How long will it take to manufacture the product and will you meet the deadline for the market (season, trade show, holiday)?
9. Do you have money to capitalize the manufacturing and launch of the product?
10. Do you have a business plan and a budget?
11. What is your day job and can you do both?
attrition_rates  stage-gate  failure  marketing  Susan_Krashinsky  new_products  product_development  products  product_launches  kill_rates 
september 2014 by jerryking
Sweet salvation: Can stevia be food producers' Holy Grail? - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 08 2014
Susan_Krashinsky  stevia  sugar  Loblaws  private_labels 
august 2014 by jerryking
Ugly fruit campaign prompts consumers to rethink what they buy - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 31 2014
Susan_Krashinsky  advertising  fruits  fresh_produce 
august 2014 by jerryking
Marketing sponsorships relying on blind faith - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 11 2014

“One out of about every five marketing and communications dollars are going to sponsorship,” said Norm O’Reilly, a professor at Ohio University who specializes in sports marketing and a senior adviser with TrojanOne. “On one end there are those doing unbelievably sophisticated [return on investment measurement]. The Cokes and Pepsis of the world ... and there are a lot that just don’t.”
marketing  sponsorships  metrics  Susan_Krashinsky  ROI 
july 2014 by jerryking
Rogers ramps up NHL ad buys - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail (includes correction)
Published Sunday, Jul. 06 2014

Rogers’ 12-year, $5.2-billion deal for National Hockey League broadcast and multimedia rights went into effect on July 1. As the company prepares for the new season, even in the height of summer, it’s latching on to any event that brings Canadian sports fans together to remind them who will soon be bringing them their hockey.

To do this, Rogers is embarking on one of the biggest years of marketing spending yet for its Sportsnet channel....The campaign marks a shift in Sportsnet’s marketing: In past, all advertising for the sports channels was produced by Rogers’s in-house advertising team; for the NHL campaign, that team collaborated with the company’s ad agency, Publicis, for the first time. The agency will be doing more advertising work as Rogers Media kicks its NHL plan into high gear. In the fall, the messaging will shift to more concrete information on the different ways that Canadian viewers can watch hockey through Rogers properties. For now, the campaign kick-off aims for a more emotional connection.
marketing  Rogers  NHL  Susan_Krashinsky  advertising  Publicis  hockey 
july 2014 by jerryking
Aldo seizes ‘put up or shut up’ moment for shoes - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 27 2014,

Aldo announced the biggest investment in development that the company has made in its 41-year history. Over the next five years, it will spend $363-million and hire roughly 400 people in an effort to better market itself to customers who have more options than ever.

“We’re being confronted with more competition from so many different angles at this point. It’s basically a ‘put up or shut up’ moment,”....Fundamentally, Mr. Bensadoun sees this as a marketing problem.

Clothing retailers have the luxury of showing you a shoe in its proper context – in other words, as part of an outfit. One of the things Aldo is planning for its store of the future is more screens in-store (e.g. digital signage) that will help to do that, in the absence of any apparel stock.

The store could choose a top 10 looks of the week, Mr. Bensadoun suggests, which could be browsed on the screens (and on a mobile-friendly version of the same service for people on smartphones.) Those looks would specify which shoes to wear with them so that customers could pick footwear based on an overall style they identify with. It would also go the other way: for those who pick up a shoe they like, it will be possible to see how to wear it, and with what....Data are another key part of this transformation project.

Part of Aldo’s multimillion-dollar investment will be devoted to building a better data analytics team as well as hiring research and behaviour experts. This is a priority for all marketers, who face a buying public that has never been more inundated with messages – on television, on their mobile phones, tablets, and computers.

“The consumer insights and analytics department at Aldo was very much in its infancy, up until very recently,”
Aldo  shoes  retailers  e-commerce  marketing  analytics  data  Susan_Krashinsky  SHoeMint  ShoeDazzle  Zappos  customer_insights  consumer_research  contextual  seminal_moments  consumer_behavior  in-store  footwear 
july 2014 by jerryking
Growth in ‘brand value’ of Canadian firms slowing - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May. 27 2014
Susan_Krashinsky  brands  valuations 
june 2014 by jerryking
Digital rethink: Google's new high-tech pitch to marketers - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 05 2014,

The former chief marketing officer of L’Oreal Canada is just a few weeks into her new role at Google Canada as the liaison with marketing executives like her. She’ll be selling marketers on how Google can play a bigger role in their communication with customers. Her role – director of consumer packaged goods and branding for Canada – did not exist before. (She is also marketing director for Quebec.)...Within the past year, Google has been making a greater effort to woo both advertisers and their agencies on its technology. At its root is an attempt to get a bigger slice of ad budgets by persuading clients and agencies to think about digital as a more central part of their advertising....“In old marketing it used to be, if we had the right price, the right communication in the marketing, the right [point of purchase strategy] and the right TV ad, we were great,” she said. “The brand ecosystem has enlarged. It’s not about when the brand wants to talk to the consumer; it’s when the consumer feels like hearing it … it’s the consumer coming to the brand where it’s relevant – assuming the brand is there.”...But Google wants to show marketers how others have used its APIs – the coding that can enable digital campaigns – so that they can see what already exists without needing to build a campaign from scratch.

“Marketers understand they need to talk the way consumers talk,” Ms. Lamothe said. “… They don’t see it as, ‘Here’s a campaign from this brand, and then three months later there’s another campaign.’ They just think of the brand. If it’s always on, it always exists, and I find the brand where they’re relevant. The consumer is way ahead of the industry in the way they consume digital, because they make it part of their everyday life … and yet we don’t market that way.”
APIs  brands  campaigns  Susan_Krashinsky  marketing  Google  L'Oreal  CMOs  digital_media  advertising_agencies  advertising  LBMA  CPG 
june 2014 by jerryking
Ad executive Winston Binch preaches the importance of invention - The Globe and Mail
May. 15 2014 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Q: You spoke about the way advertising is migrating more toward inventing things – a big trend for advertisers looking to get noticed.

A: Agencies have been making products for a long time. Alcohol brands have been invented by plenty of agencies, for example. But it used to be an idea and you’d outsource the production. What’s different now is a lot more of it is technology, it’s digitally based. That requires new people in the building. ... There’s a lot of talk about invention right now in advertising. It’s startup culture."....The difficult thing is selling [invention/innovation] to clients. A lot of our clients all know they need to do it, and they want to, but it’s hard to find room for it given the demands of their businesses, particularly the Fortune 500s. ... They’re more concerned with short term than long term. Innovation is seen as a long-term thing. And also hasn’t been in marketing organizations; usually IT, product design and R&D, not the marketing side. How do we sell more invention products to our clients?
Susan_Krashinsky  inventions  advertising  advertising_agencies  hard_to_find  data_driven  digital_media  long-term  innovation  ideas  storytelling  experimentation  Fortune_500  product_development  large_companies 
may 2014 by jerryking
Super Bowl advertising won’t wait for commercial breaks - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER

TORONTO — The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 30 2014
Susan_Krashinsky  Oreo  Facebook  brands  public_relations 
february 2014 by jerryking
Bell planning to use customers' data to target ads - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 22 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.

Bell Canada is planning to use information about its customers’ accounts and Internet use to target ads to them.

The information Bell will be using includes Internet activity from both mobile devices and computers, including Web pages customers have visited and search terms they have entered; customers’ location; use of apps and other device features; television viewing habits; and “calling patterns.” Account information shared will include product use including type of device, payment patterns, language preferences, postal codes, and demographic information.
Susan_Krashinsky  Bell_Canada  data  data_driven  data_mining  demographic_information  massive_data_sets  target_marketing  behavioural_targeting  online_behaviour  metadata 
november 2013 by jerryking
Rogers to offer promotional ads by text - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY

MARKETING REPORTER — The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Oct. 02 2013
marketing  geotargeting  Rogers  retailers  Susan_Krashinsky  text_messages  location_based_services 
october 2013 by jerryking
How foodies influence the things we eat - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 27 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.

Foodies’ impact on the industry has never been greater. “Particularly over the last five years, we’ve seen a real, dramatic shift in consumer behaviour as it relates to food,” says Robert Carter, executive director of food service at NPD, a market research company,...Taking on the mantle of a foodie brand means that already food-obsessed product developers have to work harder to stay on top of the trends than ever before. And at the same time, they have to be careful not to jump on every bandwagon – it’s a fine balance between finding the next hot item and becoming too niche.

To draw inspiration, they go where the foodies are. That means eating out in restaurants regularly and attending food shows. But it goes even farther; most trends are informed by international cuisine, and so Loblaws developers spend a lot of time on planes....Geoff Wilson, president of food-service consulting firm FSstrategy.
Loblaws  foodies  Susan_Krashinsky  management_consulting  food  product_development 
october 2013 by jerryking
Dave Nichol: The man who revolutionized branding, and made simple exotic
Sep. 26 2013, | The Globe and Mail |SUSAN KRASHINSKY And MARINA STRAUSS

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday,
obituaries  marketing  private_labels  Loblaws  retailers  Marina_Strauss  Susan_Krashinsky  branding  supermarkets  grocery 
september 2013 by jerryking
Loblaw’s big bet on thinking small - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 16 2013 | G&M | SUSAN KRASHINSKY AND JOSH KERR.
(Charles Waud & WaudWare)
The push into the small-format direction is driven by changing consumer habits, as demands on time force consumers to look for more one-stop shopping solutions in their neighbourhoods, without having to drive to bigger retailers. The convenience store industry has already responded by attempting to alter its down-market image and offering more fresh foods. Loblaw has integrated pharmacies, as well as health and beauty products, into its locations. And along with Shoppers, drugstores have increasingly been selling everything from digital cameras and iPods to milk and dry goods, household items, and expanded beauty products.

This not only helps those retailers to market themselves to busy, younger urban shoppers, but it also addresses Canada’s aging population. Seniors are the fastest-growing demographic group in the country, and prefer to stick closer to home when running errands, Mr. Tyghe observed. “It’s very much about proximity and convenience.”

While the new general store model has worked for Shoppers – the price per share of Loblaw’s offer represents a 27-per-cent premium to Shoppers’ closing price a day before the announcement – there is room for Shoppers to improve in its food offerings, said Doug Stephens, author of The Retail Revival. The challenge, he said, will be to augment that section with some of Loblaw’s products without disrupting the overall shopping experience.

“They have to be very careful with the Shoppers Drug Mart model – a lot of allegiance there,” Mr. Stephens said.

Ultimately, the advantages for Shoppers stem from the buying power the chain inherits, which will allow it to provide whatever product mix works for changing consumer habits at a lower cost.

The “buying clout and synergies” Shoppers would gain post-acquisition will prompt competitors to find ways to match these benefits, said Kevin Grier, a senior market analyst at the George Morris Centre
big_bets  buying_power  convenience_stores  digital_cameras  downsizing  grocery  Loblaws  mergers_&_acquisitions  one-stop_shop  pharmacies  post-deal_integration  proximity  retailers  Shoppers  size  small_spaces  store_footprints  supermarkets  supply_chains  Susan_Krashinsky  synergies  time-strapped 
august 2013 by jerryking
Marketing matters: The 'small' problem with mobile ads - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Saturday, Jun. 29 2013
mobile_phones  mobile_advertising  problems  Susan_Krashinsky 
august 2013 by jerryking
Why retailers love customers who shop on their smartphones - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 18 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.
The study found that, unsurprisingly, even the most plugged-in consumers do not tend to click on digital ads. Of the smartphone owners surveyed, two-thirds said they “rarely” or “never” click on online advertisements, with the minority reporting that they do so regularly. It helps when an ad is personalized. In that case, 49 per cent said they would regularly click on ads. But even then, just over half still said they would rarely or never consider it. The greatest opportunity for marketers is arguably not in advertising to those digitally connected consumers; it is in offering them something they will find useful....“We are witnessing a seismic change in consumer behaviour due to the emergence of social and digital platforms and the significance and ubiquity of mobile as a consumer platform,” Mr. Schultz told analysts on a conference call in April to discuss the company’s earnings. The data Starbucks can now collect on those users are crucial for it as a marketer.

“Retail has historically been a rather anonymous transaction for many,” said Lori Bieda, executive lead for consumer intelligence at SAS Canada. “… Mobile makes a consumer known to retailers.”...The SAS research showed that people want their phones to act as “personal shoppers.” Those surveyed said they would be more likely to return to a store that sent them offers on their mobile devices – but that’s highly contingent on those offers being relevant and targeted to that person’s preferences.
bricks-and-mortar  consumer_behavior  customer_loyalty  Indigo  market_research  mobile_applications  mobile_phones  online_advertising  personal_shoppers  retailers  seismic_shifts  smartphones  Starbucks  Susan_Krashinsky 
july 2013 by jerryking
With Shoppers, Loblaw targets coveted urban market - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jul. 15 2013
Loblaws  retailers  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  urban  Susan_Krashinsky  Shoppers 
july 2013 by jerryking
Cirque, Sid Lee team up to create marketing ‘events’ - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Cirque du Soleil is bringing its sense for spectacle to the marketing world, teaming up with Montreal ad agency Sid Lee to launch a branded entertainment company. The joint venture will aim to help brands create experiences that people actually want to watch, listen to, and experience. The joint venture, Sid Lee Entertainment, has been a year and a half in the making, and is an attempt to address a fundamental shift in advertising: away from pushing messages to consumers, and toward creating engaging content....Marketers have been approaching Cirque for years to develop entertainment projects, Mr. Lamarre said, but the company was unable to figure out how to do that without having it conflict with its own brand.

The goal is to create events engaging enough that the brands behind them can sell tickets, Mr. Cesvet said – and to potentially create a new economic model for an industry in flux.

“With advertising, we’re still selling hours,” he said. “What we want to do with this entertainment division is transform the revenue stream of our business … what clients expect from agencies is a lot more complex. You have to do an app, you have to do interactive experiences. I don’t think the value is recognized.”
marketing  branding  brands  Cirque_du_Soleil  Montreal  advertising_agencies  partnerships  joint_ventures  events  event_marketing  ideaCity  product_launches  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  content_creators  live_performances  interactivity  inbound_marketing  entertainment  Sid_Lee  Susan_Krashinsky  creating_valuable_content  fascination 
june 2013 by jerryking
Mining the TV-Twitter connection
Apr. 25 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER. The birth of 'social tv'
television  Twitter  Susan_Krashinsky 
april 2013 by jerryking
Advertisers zeroing in on where, as well as who, you are
Apr. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Susan Krashinsky.

The typical response rate for one of these campaigns is about 1 per cent. The location-specific campaign increased that by 400 per cent on average.

“There’s been a wholesale change in the amount …of data available and the tools available to actually understand it. It’s turning that data into knowledge that is the biggest task,” Mr. Okrucky said.

In an age where we transmit data from devices in our pockets many times a day, using information such as postal code profiles, housing statistics, and demographics by district may seem like an old-fashioned marketing tactic. And it is. But the processing of that information is changing rapidly: the ability to sort through massive data sets, to cross-reference them, and create detailed targets, has accelerated.

“It really gets to the cloud computing capability. We do programs with all these data sets very quickly. And some of the data sets can be absolutely massive,” said Phil Kaszuba, vice-president and general manager at DMTI.
Susan_Krashinsky  location  location_based_services  personalization  target_marketing  CDC  flu_outbreaks  massive_data_sets  advertising  data  databases  online_behaviour  behavioural_targeting  Aimia  LBMA  DMTI  specificity  response_rates  cloud_computing 
april 2013 by jerryking
How to battle a dominant brand
Nov. 29 2012| The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

This emphasis on customer service, insinuating that dominance has made the competitor lazy because they can afford not to try as hard, is one way to challenge a highly dominant competitor.

Another way is to chip away at a niche segment the competitor may not be looking at. The sweetener product Stevia is currently attempting this. It is facing a very crowded market for sugar alternatives: Globally, roughly 50,000 tonnes of high-intensity sweeteners will have been consumed by the end of 2012. Aspartame accounts for about half of the market in terms of volume, according to Euromonitor International. Saccharine and sucralose, the ingredient in Splenda, also each have a healthy share.

The marketing for Stevia, like other sweeteners, revolves around a reduced calorie option for consumers attempting to keep a healthy lifestyle; with one difference. While other sweeteners are associated with being highly processed, chemical products, Stevia markets itself as natural.

“There’s such a demand for reduced calorie products, and because Stevia has that added natural benefit, it’s doing fairly well and competing for space,” said Lauren Bandy, an ingredients analyst with Euromonitor. That is despite the healthy debate around just how natural the product really is.

That niche demand has helped it land deals to be included in some high-profile company’s products, such as PepsiCo’s reduced-sugar juice Trop50, in Coca-Cola’s Sprite on a test basis in France and Australia, and in some Danone yogurt products. Stevia still only has about 2 per cent of the global market in sweeteners by volume, but that’s doubled since last year. Euromonitor expects its growth to continue at a compound annual rate of 23 per cent from 2011 to 2016.

But that strategy can also be used against underdog brands. One of the most powerful ways for a company to protect its dominance is to fragment the market pre-emptively, giving challenger brands no niche to use as a foot in the door, said Niraj Dawar, a marketing professor at the Richard Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario.
brands  Nike  Stevia  Susan_Krashinsky  Google  search  Bing  market_leadership  Microsoft  underdogs  branding  product_extensions  niches  fragmentation  customer_service  pre-emption  sweeteners  sub-brands  category_killers  habits  barriers_to_entry 
december 2012 by jerryking
From Twitter to TV, McDonald’s offers answers - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Last updated Tuesday, Oct. 02 2012,
McDonald's  Susan_Krashinsky  Twitter  social_media 
october 2012 by jerryking

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