jerryking + steve_lohr   69

Microsoft Is Worth as Much as Apple. How Did That Happen?
Nov. 29, 2018 | The New York Times | By Steve Lohr.

Just a few years ago, Microsoft was seen as a lumbering has-been of the technology world.....the company had lost its luster, failing or trailing in the markets of the future like mobile, search, online advertising and cloud computing.....It’s a very different story today. Microsoft is running neck and neck with Apple for the title of the world’s most valuable company, both worth more than $850 billion, thanks to a stock price that has climbed 30 % over the past 12 mths.

So what happened?

* The company built on its strengths

There is a short-term explanation for Microsoft’s market rise, and there is a longer-term one.

The near-term, stock-trading answer is that Microsoft has held up better than others during the recent sell-off of tech company shares. The more enduring and important answer is that Microsoft has become a case study of how a once-dominant company can build on its strengths and avoid being a prisoner of its past. It has fully embraced cloud computing, abandoned an errant foray into smartphones and returned to its roots as mainly a supplier of technology to business customers.

* It bet big on the cloud and won …
Microsoft’s path to cloud computing — processing, storage and software delivered as a service over the internet from remote data centers — was lengthy and sometimes halting.... it did not have an offering comparable to Amazon’s until 2013. Even then, Microsoft’s cloud service was a side business. The corporate center of gravity remained its Windows operating system, the linchpin of the company’s wealth and power during the personal computer era. That changed after Mr. Nadella replaced Steven A. Ballmer, who had been chief executive for 14 years. Mr. Nadella made the cloud service a top priority, and the company is now a strong No. 2 to Amazon.....Microsoft has also retooled its popular Office apps like Word, Excel and PowerPoint in a cloud version, Office 365......“The essence of what Satya Nadella did was the dramatic shift to the cloud,” said David B. Yoffie, a professor at the HBS. “He put Microsoft back into a high-growth business.”

* … while walking away from losing bets
When Microsoft acquired Nokia’s mobile phone business in 2013, Mr. Ballmer hailed the move as a “bold step into the future.” Two years later, Mr. Nadella walked away from that future, taking a $7.6 billion charge, nearly the entire value of the purchase, and shedding 7,800 workers.

Microsoft would not try to compete with the smartphone technology leaders, Apple, Google and Samsung. Instead, Microsoft focused on its developing apps and other software for business customers. Microsoft products, in the main, are about utility — productivity tools, whether people use them at work or at home. And its Azure cloud technology is a service for businesses and a platform for software developers to build applications, a kind of cloud operating system.

Mr. Nadella’s big acquisitions have been intended to add to its offerings for business users and developers. In 2016, Microsoft bought LinkedIn, the social network for professionals, for $26.2 billion.

“It’s really the coming together of the professional cloud and the professional network,” Mr. Nadella explained at the time.

This year, Microsoft paid $7.5 billion for GitHub, an open software platform used by 28 million programmers.

* It has opened up its technology and culture
Under Mr. Nadella, Microsoft has loosened up. Windows would no longer be its center of gravity — or its anchor. Microsoft apps would run not only on Apple’s Macintosh software but on other operating systems as well. Open source and free software, once anathema to Microsoft, was embraced as a vital tool of modern software development.

Mr. Nadella preached an outward-looking mind-set. “We need to be insatiable in our desire to learn from the outside and bring that learning into Microsoft,” ......“The old, Windows-centric view of the world stifled innovation,” .....“The company has changed culturally.
cloud_computing  kill_rates  Microsoft  outward_looking  Satya_Nadella  Steve_Lohr  strengths  turnarounds  big_bets 
november 2018 by jerryking
As Silicon Valley Gets ‘Crazy,’ Midwest Beckons Tech Investors
NOV. 19, 2017 | The New York Times | By STEVE LOHR.

The rationale for investing in the Midwest combines cost and opportunity. A top-flight software engineer who is paid $100,000 a year in the Midwest might well command $200,000 or more in the Bay Area. The Midwest, the optimists say, also has ample tech talent, with excellent engineers coming out of major state and private universities in the region.

But they also point to technology shifts. As technology transforms nontech industries like health care, agriculture, transportation, finance and manufacturing, the Midwest investors argue that being close to customers will be more important than being close to the wellspring of technology.

“The value will come from marrying industry knowledge with technology,” said Mr. Olsen of Drive Capital. “There’s an arrogance in Silicon Valley that we don’t need industry expertise. That’s going to be less and less true in the future.”.....Referring to the troubles chronicled in his book, Mr. Vance said that “at least a partial solution is to get more investment capital into this part of the country.”....Mr. Case and Mr. Vance talk of the need to create “network density” by bringing together more entrepreneurs, customers, partners and investment capital. The trips can and do yield investment candidates for Revolution, but start-up evangelism is the main theme.
investors  Silicon_Valley  start_ups  Hillbilly_Elegy  venture_capital  vc  Midwest  Steve_Lohr  J.D._Vance  industrial_Midwest  rust_belt  Steve_Case  industry_expertise  network_density 
november 2017 by jerryking
A.I. Is Doing Legal Work. But It Won’t Replace Lawyers, Yet. - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR MARCH 19, 2017

An artificial intelligence technique called natural language processing has proved useful in scanning and predicting what documents will be relevant to a case, for example. Yet other lawyers’ tasks, like advising clients, writing legal briefs, negotiating and appearing in court, seem beyond the reach of computerization, for a while......Highly paid lawyers will spend their time on work on the upper rungs of the legal task ladder. Other legal services will be performed by nonlawyers — the legal equivalent of nurse practitioners — or by technology.

Corporate clients often are no longer willing to pay high hourly rates to law firms for junior lawyers to do routine work. Those tasks are already being automated and outsourced, both by the firms themselves and by outside suppliers like Axiom, Thomson Reuters, Elevate and the Big Four accounting firms.....So major law firms, sensing the long-term risk, are undertaking initiatives to understand the emerging technology and adapt and exploit it.

Dentons, a global law firm with more than 7,000 lawyers, established an innovation and venture arm, Nextlaw Labs, in 2015. Besides monitoring the latest technology, the unit has invested in seven legal technology start-ups.

“Our industry is being disrupted, and we should do some of that ourselves, not just be a victim of it,” John Fernandez, chief innovation officer of Dentons, said.....Artificial intelligence has stirred great interest, but law firms today are using it mainly in “search-and-find type tasks” in electronic discovery, due diligence and contract review,
artificial_intelligence  e-discovery  lawyers  automation  Steve_Lohr  NLP  IBM_Watson  technology  law  lawtech 
march 2017 by jerryking
Goodbye, Ivory Tower. Hello, Silicon Valley Candy Store. - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR SEPT. 3, 2016

A number of tech companies are luring Ivy League economists out of academia with the promise of big sets of data and big salaries.

Silicon Valley is turning to the dismal science in its never-ending quest to squeeze more money out of old markets and build new ones. In turn, the economists say they are eager to explore the digital world for fresh insights into timeless economic questions of pricing, incentives and behavior....Businesses have been hiring economists for years. Usually, they are asked to study macroeconomic trends — topics like recessions and currency exchange rates — and help their employers deal with them.

But what the tech economists are doing is different: Instead of thinking about national or global trends, they are studying the data trails of consumer behavior to help digital companies make smart decisions that strengthen their online marketplaces in areas like advertising, movies, music, travel and lodging.

Tech outfits including giants like Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft and up-and-comers like Airbnb and Uber hope that sort of improved efficiency means more profit....“They are microeconomic experts, heavy on data and computing tools like machine learning and writing algorithms,”
Silicon_Valley  massive_data_sets  economists  Steve_Lohr  Airbnb  Hal_Varian  digital_economy  academia  microeconomics  Ivy_League  insights  consumer_behavior  war_for_talent  talent 
september 2016 by jerryking
Tony Fadell Steps Down Amid Tumult at Nest, a Google Acquisition - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHRJUNE 3, 2016
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Steve_Lohr  NEST  exits  CEOs  Google 
june 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Textile Industry Turns to Tech as Gateway to Revival - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR APRIL 1, 2016
...a functional fabrics project represents “the future of apparel.”..The broad linking of government, universities and corporations to both advance research and develop new markets is a model advocated in a new book, “The New ABCs of Research: Achieving Breakthrough Collaborations” (Oxford University Press), by Ben Shneiderman, a professor of computer science at the University of Maryland. In an interview, Mr. Shneiderman called the advanced fabrics project “a well-crafted plan.”
textiles  fabrics  sensors  technology  Steve_Lohr  books  innovation  apparel  renewal  revitalization 
april 2016 by jerryking
As Tech Booms, Workers Turn to Coding for Career Change - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR JULY 28, 2015

Whether the on-ramp proves to be a lasting pathway to high pay and stimulating work remains to be seen. The boom-to-bust cycles in the tech business can be wrenching, like the last downturn in the early 2000s after the dot-com bubble burst. Nearly everyone in the industry was hit. Yet software development and engineering jobs held up better than ones in finance, marketing, sales and administration.

For now, at least, it is a seller’s market for those who can master new technology tools for lowering a business’s costs, reaching its customers and automating decision-making — notably, cloud computing, mobile apps and data analytics.

Companies cannot hire fast enough. Glassdoor, an employment site, lists more than 7,300 openings for software engineers, ahead of job openings for nurses, who are chronically in short supply. For the smaller category of data scientists, there are more than 1,200 job openings. Demand is highest in San Francisco. Nationally, the average base salary for software engineers is $100,000, and $112,000 for data scientists.
coding  software  Steve_Lohr  software_developers  boom-to-bust  software_development  programming  career_paths 
july 2015 by jerryking
On the Case at Mount Sinai, It’s Dr. Data - NYTimes.com
MARCH 7, 2015 | NYT |By STEVE LOHR.

“Data-ism: The Revolution Transforming Decision Making, Consumer Behavior, and Almost Everything Else,” by Steve Lohr,
Steve_Lohr  data  data_driven  data_scientists  Wall_Street  Facebook  hospitals  medical  books  Cloudera  consumer_behavior 
march 2015 by jerryking
Banking Start-Ups Adopt New Tools for Lending
JAN. 18, 2015 | - NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.

When bankers of the future decide whether to make a loan, they may look to see if potential customers use only capital letters when filling out forms, or at the amount of time they spend online reading terms and conditions — and not so much at credit history.

These signals about behavior — picked up by sophisticated software that can scan thousands of pieces of data about online and offline lives — are the focus of a handful of start-ups that are creating new models of lending....Earnest uses the new tools to make personal loans. Affirm, another start-up, offers alternatives to credit cards for online purchases. And another, ZestFinance, has focused on the relative niche market of payday loans.
Steve_Lohr  tools  banking  banks  massive_data_sets  start_ups  data_scientists  Earnest  Affirm  ZestFinance  Max_Levchin  consumer_finance  credit_scoring  fin-tech  financial_services  consumer_behavior  signals 
january 2015 by jerryking
Digital Lessons From the Museum and Art World
OCTOBER 27, 2014 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.

....institutions are using digital technology and data not just for marketing and social media, but also to enrich the museum experience for visitors, reach new audiences online and transform scholarly research. And there are also new kinds of art being made with digital tools and data....How do you intelligently use digital technology to enhance your business rather than being overrun by it? The physical and the digital sides of your business should work together, so that your investments in the physical world remain a powerful asset.

That fundamental challenge for museums is similar to the one facing retailers, manufacturers, consumer goods makers and perhaps traditional media companies. (More than one museum official I interviewed talked about the importance of being a “content manager.”) The museum curators and administrators seemed to have a clear notion of the need for balance — that just as we all increasingly live in a world that is a blend of the physical and digital, so too institutions of all kinds must learn to operate in a blended, hybrid environment.
art  atoms_&_bits  content  CPG  cyberphysical  digital_media  digital_strategies  manufacturers  mass_media  museums  physical_assets  physical_world  retailers  Steve_Lohr 
october 2014 by jerryking
M.I.T.'s Alex Pentland: Measuring Idea Flows to Accelerate Innovation - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.com
April 15, 2014 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.

Alex Pentland --“Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread — The Lesson From a New Science.”

Mr. Pentland has been identified with concepts — and terms he has coined — related to the collection and interpretation of all that data, like “honest signals” and “reality mining.” His descriptive phrases are intended to make his point that not all data in the big data world is equal....Reality mining, for example, examines the data about what people are actually doing rather than what they are looking for or saying. Tracking a person’s movements during the day via smartphone GPS signals and credit-card transactions, he argues, are far more significant than a person’s web-browsing habits or social media comments....Central to the concept of social physics is the ability to measure communication and transactions as never before. Then, that knowledge about the flow of ideas can be used to accelerate the pace of innovation.

The best decision-making environment, Mr. Pentland says, is one with high levels of both “engagement” and “exploration.” Engagement is a measure of how often people in a group communicate with each other, sharing social knowledge. Exploration is a measure of seeking out new ideas and new people.

A golden mean is the ideal....[traders] with a balance of diversity of ideas in their trading network — engagement and exploration — had returns that were 30 percent ahead of isolated traders and well ahead of the echo chamber traders, too....The new data and measurement tools, he writes, allow for a “God’s eye view” of human activity. And with that knowledge, he adds, comes the potential to engineer better decisions in a “data-driven society.”
Alex_Pentland  books  cross-pollination  curiosity  data_scientists  data_driven  decision_making  massive_data_sets  MIT  Mydata  sensors  social_physics  Steve_Lohr  idea_generation  heterogeneity  ideas  intellectual_diversity  traders  social_data  signals  echo_chambers 
april 2014 by jerryking
More Data Can Mean Less Guessing About the Economy - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: September 7, 2013

measurement shortfall in the small-business sector, and a series of other information gaps in the economy, may be overcome by what experts say is an emerging data revolution — Big Data, in the current catchphrase. The ever-expanding universe of digital signals of behavior, from browsing and buying on the Web to cellphone location data, is grist for potential breakthroughs in economic measurement. It could produce more accurate forecasting and more informed policy-making — more science and less guesswork.... THE economics profession is gearing up to exploit new sources of digital data. In a recent paper, “The Data Revolution and Economic Analysis,” two Stanford economists, Liran Einav and Jonathan Levin, concluded that “there is little doubt, at least in our minds, that over the next decades ‘big data’ will change the landscape of economic policy and economic research.”

At Intuit, the small-business data portray a sector that was “hurt much more than big business by the recession and its recovery has been far worse,” says Ms. Woodward, the economic consultant. Over the last three and a half years, payroll employment for all companies has increased 6.9 percent, while small-business employment has risen far less, just 1.9 percent. Hiring among the small companies, though still sluggish, has inched ahead in the last three months.
data  Steve_Lohr  massive_data_sets  Intuit  information_sources  small_business  measurements  Freshbooks  economy  Erik_Brynjolfsson  economics  indicators  real-time  forecasting  economic_data  information_gaps  signals  economists  data_driven 
september 2013 by jerryking
A Tech Veteran Takes on the Skills Gap - NYTimes.com
July 19, 2013, 12:50 pm 9 Comments
A Tech Veteran Takes on the Skills Gap
By STEVE LOHR

Gary J. Beach, “The U.S. Technology Skills Gap: What Every Technology Executive Must Know to Save America’s Future” (John Wiley & Sons).
Steve_Lohr  book_reviews  books  skills  skills_training  skills_shortage  skills_gap 
july 2013 by jerryking
Sizing Up Big Data, Broadening Beyond the Internet - NYTimes.com
June 19, 2013 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.

The story is the same in one field after another, in science, politics, crime prevention, public health, sports and industries as varied as energy and advertising. All are being transformed by data-driven discovery and decision-making. The pioneering consumer Internet companies, like Google, Facebook and Amazon, were just the start, experts say. Today, data tools and techniques are used for tasks as varied as predicting neighborhood blocks where crimes are most likely to occur and injecting intelligence into hulking industrial machines, like electrical power generators.

Big Data is the shorthand label for the phenomenon, which embraces technology, decision-making and public policy. Supplying the technology is a fast-growing market, increasing at more than 30 percent a year and likely to reach $24 billion by 2016, according to a forecast by IDC, a research firm. All the major technology companies, and a host of start-ups, are aggressively pursuing the business.

Demand is brisk for people with data skills. The McKinsey Global Institute, the research arm of the consulting firm, projects that the United States needs 140,000 to 190,000 more workers with “deep analytical” expertise and 1.5 million more data-literate managers, whether retrained or hired, by 2020.
massive_data_sets  Steve_Lohr  data_scientists  data_driven  open_data  neighbourhoods  decision_making  public  McKinsey 
june 2013 by jerryking
Where the Singles Are: A Dating Guide by ZIP Code - NYTimes.com
February 11, 2013, 7:40 pm2 Comments
Where the Singles Are: A Dating Guide by ZIP Code
By STEVE LOHR
dating  real_estate  Steve_Lohr  relationships  data  data_driven  neighbourhoods 
february 2013 by jerryking
Big Data Is Great, but Don’t Forget Intuition
December 29, 2012 | NYTimes.com |By STEVE LOHR.

A major part of managing Big Data projects is asking the right questions: How do you define the problem? What data do you need? Where does it come from? What are the assumptions behind the model that the data is fed into? How is the model different from reality?...recognize the limits and shortcomings of the Big Data technology that they are building. Listening to the data is important, they say, but so is experience and intuition. After all, what is intuition at its best but large amounts of data of all kinds filtered through a human brain rather than a math model?
Andrew_McAfee  asking_the_right_questions  bubbles  conferences  critical_thinking  data_scientists  Erik_Brynjolfsson  failure  hedge_funds  human_brains  information-literate  information-savvy  intuition  massive_data_sets  MIT  models  problems  problem_awareness  problem_definition  problem_framing  questions  skepticism  Steve_Lohr  Wall_Street 
january 2013 by jerryking
Big Data: Rise of the Machines
December 31, 2012 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.

What is different between "analytics" and "Big Data"? Data volumes have been steadily increasing for decades, Mr. Davenport noted, though the pace has accelerated sharply in the Internet age. “More than the amount of data itself, the unstructured data from the Web and sensors is a much more salient feature of what is being called Big Data,” he said.

I also asked David B. Yoffie, a technology and competitive strategy expert at Harvard, who is not part of the Big Data crowd, what he thought. The Internet, he observed, has been a mainstream technology for 15 years, and so has the ability to monitor and mine Web browsing behavior and online communications, even if those skills are much improved now.

Still, Mr. Yoffie is most impressed by the rapid spread of low-cost sensors that make it possible to monitor all kinds of physical objects, from fruit shipments (sniffing for signs of spoilage) to jet engines (tracking wear to predict when maintenance is needed).

“The ubiquity of sensors is new,” Mr. Yoffie said. “The sensors make it possible to get data we never had before.”

Machine-generated sensor data will be become a far larger portion of the Big Data world, according to a recent report by IDC. The research report, “The Digital Universe in 2020,” published in December, traces data trends from 2005-20. One of its forecasts is that machine-generated data will increase to 42 percent of all data by 2020, up from 11 percent in 2005.

“It’s all those sensors, the Internet of Things data,” said Jeremy Burton, an executive vice president at EMC, which sponsored the IDC report.

The implication is that Big Data technology will steadily move beyond the consumer Internet.
massive_data_sets  Steve_Lohr  Thomas_Davenport  unstructured_data  Industrial_Internet  David_Yoffie  data  saliencies  sensors  analytics 
january 2013 by jerryking
G.E. Looks to Industry for the Next Digital Disruption - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: November 23, 2012

G.E. resides in a different world from the consumer Internet. But the major technologies that animate Google and Facebook are also vital ingredients in the industrial Internet — tools from artificial intelligence, like machine-learning software, and vast streams of new data. In industry, the data flood comes mainly from smaller, more powerful and cheaper sensors on the equipment.

Smarter machines, for example, can alert their human handlers when they will need maintenance, before a breakdown. It is the equivalent of preventive and personalized care for equipment, with less downtime and more output.... Today, G.E. is putting sensors on everything, be it a gas turbine or a hospital bed. The mission of the engineers in San Ramon is to design the software for gathering data, and the clever algorithms for sifting through it for cost savings and productivity gains. Across the industries it covers, G.E. estimates such efficiency opportunities at as much as $150 billion.

Some industrial Internet projects are already under way. First Wind, an owner and operator of 16 wind farms in America, is a G.E. customer for wind turbines. It has been experimenting with upgrades that add more sensors, controls and optimization software.

The new sensors measure temperature, wind speeds, location and pitch of the blades. They collect three to five times as much data as the sensors on turbines of a few years ago, said Paul Gaynor, chief executive of First Wind. The data is collected and analyzed by G.E. software, and the operation of each turbine can be tweaked for efficiency. For example, in very high winds, turbines across an entire farm are routinely shut down to prevent damage from rotating too fast. But more refined measurement of wind speeds might mean only a portion of the turbines need to be shut down. In wintry conditions, turbines can detect when they are icing up, and speed up or change pitch to knock off the ice.

Upgrades on 123 turbines on two wind farms have so far delivered a 3 percent increase in energy output, about 120 megawatt hours per turbine a year. That translates to $1.2 million in additional revenue a year from those two farms, Mr. Gaynor said.

“It’s not earthshaking, but it is meaningful,” he said. “These are real commercial investments for us that make economic sense now.” ...
breakdowns  GE  Industrial_Internet  disruption  Steve_Lohr  sensors  artificial_intelligence  machine_learning  digital_disruption  downtime 
november 2012 by jerryking
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class - NYTimes.com
September 24, 2012, 1:21 pm4 Comments
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class
By STEVE LOHR

patents have become a new asset class.

Traditionally, patents sat on corporate shelves and were occasionally used as bargaining chips in cross-licensing deals with competitors. But that began to change in the 1990s, when technology companies like Texas Instruments and I.B.M. started to regard their patent portfolios as sources of revenue, licensing their intellectual property for fees.

Today, companies routinely buy and sell patents, mostly in deals that draw little attention, for millions of dollars instead of billions. The question, experts say, is how big the market will become.

“Patents are a tricky asset to trade,” said Josh Lerner, an economist at the Harvard Business School. “But there is clearly a huge amount of value in intellectual property. And I think what we’re seeing is the beginning of a lot more monetization and trading of intellectual property rights.”

A sizable specialist industry has developed to build the marketplace for trading ideas. The players include patent aggregators like Intellectual Ventures and RPX, patent brokers like Ocean Tomo and ICAP, hedge funds, investment banks and law firms.
smartphones  patents  intellectual_property  law_firms  asset_classes  Steve_Lohr  valuations  Ocean_Tomo  markets  monetization  portfolio_management  cross-licensing 
september 2012 by jerryking
The Internet Gets Physical
By STEVE LOHR
Published: December 17, 2011

The next wave of computing does not step away from the consumer Internet so much as build on it for different uses (posing some of the same sorts of privacy and civil liberties concerns). Software techniques like pattern recognition and machine learning used in Internet searches, online advertising and smartphone apps are also ingredients in making smart devices to manage energy consumption, health care and traffic.
Industrial_Internet  sentiment_analysis  sensors  IBM  GE  Steve_Lohr 
december 2011 by jerryking
Lean Start-Ups Reach Beyond Silicon Valley’s Turf - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
December 5, 2011

The newer model for starting businesses relies on hypothesis, experiment and testing in the marketplace, from the day a company is founded. That is a sharp break with the traditional approach of drawing up a business plan, setting financial targets, building a finished product and then rolling out the business and hoping to succeed. It was time-consuming and costly.

The preferred formula today is often called the “lean start-up.” Its foremost proponents include Eric Ries, an engineer, entrepreneur and author who coined the term and is now an entrepreneur in residence at the Harvard Business School, and Steven Blank, a serial entrepreneur, author and lecturer at Stanford.

The approach emphasizes quickly developing “minimum viable products,” low-cost versions that are shown to customers for reaction, and then improved. Flexibility is the other hallmark. Test business models and ideas, and ruthlessly cull failures and move on to Plan B, Plan C, Plan D and so on — “pivoting,” as the process is known.
Steve_Lohr  entrepreneurship  start_ups  lean  experimentation  speed  business_models  pivots  minimum_viable_products  testing  Plan_B  culling  flexibility 
december 2011 by jerryking
Steve Jobs and the Power of Taking the Big Chance - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: October 8, 2011

DO WHATEVER IT TAKES TO DELIGHT CUSTOMERS
GOOD IDEAS TAKE TIME
DON’T DWELL ON MISTAKES.
PASSION COUNTS FOR A LOT
Steve_Jobs  Steve_Lohr  lessons_learned  risk-taking  failure  mistakes  passions  delighting_customers 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Genius of Steve Jobs: Marrying Tech and Art - WSJ.com
AUGUST 27, 2011

The Genius of Jobs
Marrying Tech and Art
Steven Johnson
Steve_Lohr 
august 2011 by jerryking
Hewlett-Packard's Look-East Strategy - NYTimes.com
August 25, 2011, 10:53 am
Hewlett-Packard’s Look-East Strategy
By STEVE LOHR
HP  Steve_Lohr 
august 2011 by jerryking
Mining of Raw Data May Bring New Productivity, a Study Says - NYTimes.com
May 13, 2011 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.
(fresh produce) Data is a vital raw material of the information economy, much as coal
and iron ore were in the Industrial Revolution. But the business world
is just beginning to learn how to process it all. The current data surge
is coming from sophisticated computer tracking of shipments, sales,
suppliers and customers, as well as e-mail, Web traffic and social
network comments. ..Mining and analyzing these big new data sets can
open the door to a new wave of innovation, accelerating productivity and
economic growth. ..The next stage, they say, will exploit
Internet-scale data sets to discover new businesses and predict consumer
behavior and market shifts.
....The McKinsey Global Institute is publishing “Big Data: The Next
Frontier for Innovation, Competition and Productivity.” It makes
estimates of the potential benefits from deploying data-harvesting
technologies and skills.
massive_data_sets  Steve_Lohr  McKinsey  data  consumer_behavior  data_driven  data_mining  analytics  Freshbooks  digital_economy  fresh_produce  OPMA  Industrial_Revolution  datasets  new_businesses  productivity 
may 2011 by jerryking
When There’s No Such Thing as Too Much Information
April 24, 2011 | HeraldTribune| STEVE LOHR. “The biggest
change facing corporations is the explosion of data,” says David
Grossman, a tech analyst at Stifel Nicolaus.“The best business is in
helping customers analyze & manage all that data.”..The productivity
payoff from a new technology comes only when people adopt new
management skills & new ways of working [i.e. marginal improvements]. “It’s never pure technology
that makes the difference,”It’s reorganizing things — how work is done.
And technology does allow new forms of organization.”...Is there real
evidence of a “data payoff” across the corporate world? New research led
by Erik Brynjolfsson, an economist at MIT, suggests that the beginnings
are now visible...Brynjolfsson and colleagues, Lorin Hitt, (Wharton),
& Heekyung Kim, a grad student at M.I.T., studied 179 large
companies. Those that adopted “data-driven decision making” achieved
productivity 5 to 6 % higher than could be explained by other factors,
including how much the companies invested in tech.
Steve_Lohr  information_overload  analytics  data_driven  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Thomas_Davenport  MIT  Northwestern  books  data  massive_data_sets  organizational_design  productivity_payoffs  marginal_improvements 
april 2011 by jerryking
China’s Race for Patents to Build an Innovation Economy
Jan 1, 2011 | NYT | STEVE LOHR. China is trying to build an
economy that relies on innovation rather than imitation & intends to
engineer a more innovative society. The Chinese are focusing on
spiking the indigenous generation of “utility-model patents,” which
typically cover items like engineering features in a product & are
less ambitious than “invention patents.” China intends to roughly
double: (a) its # of patent examiners, to 9,000, by 2015. (The U.S. has
6,300 examiners); & (b) the # of patents that its residents &
companies file in other countries. To lift its patent count, China has
introduced incentives including cash bonuses, better housing for
individual filers & tax breaks for companies that are prolific
patent producers...DESPITE China’s inevitable rise, Kao says, the U.S.
has a comp. adv. because it is the country most open to innovation,
forgiving failure, tolerating risk & embracing uncertainty,” “the
future lies in being the orchestrator of the innovation process,”
competitiveness_of_nations  John_Kao  China  patents  industrial_policies  innovation  innovation_policies  Steve_Lohr  taxonomy  Silicon_Valley  bounties  orchestration  incentives  risk-tolerance  prolificacy 
january 2011 by jerryking
Unboxed - To Generate Jobs, Nurture Start-Ups (Big or Small) - NYTimes.com
September 11, 2010 | New York Times | By STEVE LOHR.
Research published last month by three economists, working with more
recent and detailed data sets than before, has found that once the age
of the businesses is taken into account, there is no difference in the
job-producing performance of small companies and big ones.

“Size plays virtually no role,” says John C. Haltiwanger, a co-author of
the study and an economist at the University of Maryland. “It’s all age
— start-ups are where the job-creation action really occurs.”
Start-ups account for much job destruction as well. Within five years,
half of these businesses have folded.
Steve_Lohr  start_ups  job_creation  SecondMarket  gazelles  job_destruction 
september 2010 by jerryking
Unboxed - Company Innovators Ask - What Works?
August 14, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.So what does
work in the innovation game? No single formula, to be sure. But some
recent interviews with executives, consultants and academics can be
distilled into three recommendations: think broadly, borrow from the
entrepreneurial Silicon Valley model, and pay close attention to
customers and to emerging user needs.
innovation  Steve_Lohr  Silicon_Valley  lean  growth_hacking 
august 2010 by jerryking
For Today’s Graduate, Just One Word - Statistics - NYTimes.com
Aug. 5, 2009 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR. “We’re entering a world
where everything can be monitored and measured,” said Erik Brynjolfsson,
an economist and director of MIT’s Center for Digital Business. “But
the big problem is the ability of man to use, analyze and make sense of
the data.”" The rich lode of Web data has its perils. Its sheer vol. can
easily overwhelm statistical models. Statisticians caution that strong
correlations of data do not necessarily prove a cause-and-effect link.
E.g., in the late 1940s, before there was a polio vaccine, public health
experts noted that polio cases increased in step with the consumption
of ice cream and soft drinks, says David A. Grier, a historian and
statistician at GWU. Eliminating such treats was recommended as part of
an anti-polio diet. It turned out that polio outbreaks were most common
in the hot mths of summer, when people ate more ice cream, showing only
an association. The data explosion magnifies longstanding issues in
statistics.
Steve_Lohr  Hal_Varian  statistics  career_paths  haystacks  analytics  Google  data  Freshbooks  information_overload  data_scientists  Erik_Brynjolfsson  measurements  sense-making  massive_data_sets  correlations  causality 
june 2010 by jerryking
The Wellness Industry as an Echo of the Internet in the 1990s - Bits Blog - NYTimes.com
May 23, 2010 | New York Times | By STEVE LOHR. "...He
estimates that more than 95 percent of the financial resources in
America are spent in the “sick-care system” in hospitals, clinics and
doctors’ offices, where patients turn up ill, often with chronic
conditions like heart disease and diabetes.

Dr. Lawrence, who attended the conference, figures that half the money
in the sick-care system is misspent, and that much of health spending
needs to move to wellness — to keep people out of costly hospitals and
clinics...."
wellness  healthcare  Steve_Lohr  health_informatics  innovation  medical_devices  sleep_apnea  internet 
may 2010 by jerryking
Unboxed - A Data Explosion Is Remaking Retailing
January 2, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR. Retailing is
emerging as a real-world incubator for testing how computer firepower
and smart software can be applied to social science — in this case, how
variables like household economics and human behavior affect shopping.
competingonanalytics  retailers  Steve_Lohr  Wal-Mart  human_behavior  Wet_Seal  user_generated  Web_2.0  data  data_driven  massive_data_sets 
january 2010 by jerryking
New Programs Aim to Lure Young Into Digital Jobs
December 20, 2009 |New York Times | STEVE LOHR.Hybrid careers
like Dr. Halamka’s that combine computing with other fields will
increasingly be the new American jobs of the future, labor experts say.
In other words, the nation’s economy is going to need more cool nerds.
But not enough young people are embracing computing — often because they
are leery of being branded nerds.
Steve_Lohr  Colleges_&_Universities  students  career_paths  STEM  new_graduates  nerds  young_people 
december 2009 by jerryking
Unboxed - Next Jump Uses Data to Turn Online Browsing Into Buying - NYTimes.com
Dec. 5, 2009 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR. Next Jump represents the
future of e-commerce and could emerge as a counterweight to Amazon. This
patiently gestated start-up shows one path to the still-elusive promise
of Internet advertising: using data to greatly improve the efficiency
of marketing. Next Jump has been gathering data, and not only from
companies and customers. It also gets credit-card transaction data from
Amex & MasterCard. This vast trove — accumulated over years — is the
company’s most precious asset. Next Jump analyzes that data to draw
inferences about what a person would be likely to buy, and at what
price. Its network also includes 28,000 retailers who can specify the
characteristics of customers — age, location, income, for example — that
they are most interested in luring with certain products. Next Jump’s
software then tailors offerings to small segments of potential
customers, down to individuals, often reaching them with e-mail alerts.
“It’s true microtargeting,”
data_driven  microtargeting  Steve_Lohr  e-commerce 
december 2009 by jerryking
Compressed Data; I.B.M.'s Deep Blue Has a Business Plan
May 24, 1999 | The New York Times | By STEVE LOHR. He cited
precision weather forecasting as a current example of what deep
computing can do. Feeding information from the National Weather Service,
local sensors and topographical data bases into supercomputers, it has
now become possible to make pinpoint forecasts.

''Instead of saying there's a 40 percent chance of rain tomorrow
afternoon, you can say it will rain from 2:15 to 3:30 P.M.,'' Mr.
Pulleyblank said. ''And instead of making forecasts for the standard
30-kilometer grids, we can narrow them to one kilometer. The storms will
be in Queens, but not the Bronx.''
IBM  massive_data_sets  weather  Steve_Lohr  microtargeting 
november 2009 by jerryking
Reaping Results: Data-Mining Goes Mainstream
May 20, 2007 | New York Times | By STEVE LOHR. "And Cemex, the
big cement company, uses global positioning satellite locators and
traffic and weather data to improve delivery-time performance in
Mexico."
data_mining  competingonanalytics  data_driven  Steve_Lohr  weather  Cemex 
november 2009 by jerryking
At a Software Powerhouse, the Good Life Is Under Siege
November 21, 2009 | New York Times |By STEVE LOHR. SAS’s
specialty, a lucrative niche called business intelligence software, is
becoming mainstream. Free, open-source alternatives to some of the
company’s products are increasingly popular. On the other end of the
spectrum, the heavyweights of the software industry — Oracle, SAP,
Microsoft and, especially, I.B.M. — are plunging in and investing
billions of dollars. As the stream of companies’ collected data turns
into a torrent, SAS and other software companies are trying to find new
ways to harness it.
Freshbooks  Steve_Lohr  competingonanalytics  data_driven  data_mining  SAS  haystacks 
november 2009 by jerryking
Unboxed - Who Says Innovation Belongs to the Small? - NYTimes.com
May 23, 2009 | New York Times | By STEVE LOHR. Technology
trends also contribute to the rising role of large companies. The lone
inventor will never be extinct, but W. Brian Arthur, an economist at the
Palo Alto Research Center, says that as digital technology evolves,
step-by-step innovations are less important than linking all the
sensors, software and data centers in systems.
innovation  size  Steve_Lohr  Clayton_Christensen  large_companies  W._Brian_Arthur  sensors  software  interconnections  Fortune_500  brands  back-office  data_centers  systematic_approaches  systems  systems_integration  Xerox 
october 2009 by jerryking
Unboxed - Crowdsourcing Works, When It’s Focused - NYTimes.com
July 18, 2009 | new York Times | By STEVE LOHR. New research
suggests that open-innovation models succeed only when carefully
designed for a particular task and when the incentives are tailored to
attract the most effective collaborators. “There is this misconception
that you can sprinkle crowd wisdom on something and things will turn out
for the best,” said Thomas W. Malone, director of the Center for
Collective Intelligence at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
“That’s not true. It’s not magic.” Success requires that companies have
a culture open to outside ideas and a system for vetting and acting on
them.
Steve_Lohr  crowdsourcing  collective_intelligence  business_models  open-innovation  Netflix 
july 2009 by jerryking
Unboxed - Governments Embracing a Role in Innovation - NYTimes.com
June 20, 2009 | New York Times | By STEVE LOHR. The rising
worldwide interest in innovation policy represents the search to answer
an important question: What is the appropriate government role in
creating industries and jobs in today’s high-technology, global economy?
San_Antonio  innovation  government  start_ups  Steve_Lohr  PPP  economic_development  industrial_policies  innovation_policies  global_economy  policymaking 
june 2009 by jerryking
Google Gets Ready to Rumble With Microsoft - NYTimes.com
December 16, 2007 | New York Times | by STEVE LOHR and MIGUEL HELFT
Google  SaaS  Microsoft  Steve_Lohr 
june 2009 by jerryking

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