jerryking + singapore   50

Dyson shifts HQ to Singapore to focus on cars
January 23, 2019 | Financial Times Michael Pooler and Peter Campbell in London and Stefania Palma in Hong Kong.

Move by billionaire’s business reflects strategy to be closer to customers and manufacturing centres....James Dyson’s decision to move his business headquarters to the other side of the world struck an odd note.

The switch to Singapore comes at a crucial juncture for his company, which is seeking to evolve from a household appliance brand to a manufacturer of electric vehicles. It is nothing short of his greatest gamble, which could secure his legacy or risk his fortune.....Dyson said it was simply for commercial reasons because most of its customers and all its manufacturing operations are in Asia, and to give management supervision over the construction of a car factory in Singapore that will be its largest investment to date......“This is to do with making sure we future-proof [the company],”......“What we’ve seen in the last few years is an acceleration of opportunities to grow from a revenue perspective in Asia.”......Dyson CEO, Jim Rowan insisted that the HQ move was not a bad omen for the UK, where Dyson ceased manufacturing in 2003, and pledged it would enlarge its 4,800-strong workforce there. “We’ll continue to invest in the UK,” said Mr Rowan, pointing out a proposed £350m expansion to one of two research and development centres in Wiltshire, south-west England, for autonomous vehicle testing.......far more likely that the move is linked to Dyson’s latest, and boldest, venture — its £2bn drive to break into the automotive arena. It has developed a UK site to test the vehicles, but also plans to expand its Singaporean research and development facilities, a sign that future vehicle work will take place closer to the manufacturing sites.....The company spreads its intellectual property around the globe, with about 1,500 of its 5,000 patents registered in the UK, according to data from patent research group Cipher. “Clearly if you have new business like cars that will generate significant IP,”.....A Dyson spokesman said the company had no intention of moving its current UK patents to Singapore.
Asia  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  Brexit  Dyson  electric_cars  engineering  future-proofing  head_offices  intellectual_property  James_Dyson  manufacturers  patents  relocation  Singapore 
january 2019 by jerryking
The belle époque of the small nation is over
September 28, 2018 | Financial Times | by JANAN GANESH.

Globalisation has been the era of small countries but that time may now be passing. Ganesh raises an interesting point, what happens to small countries that, since the end of WW2, have enjoyed the protection of the rules-based system (UN, WTO, NATO, Pax Americana).

Singapore leaders were determined in their quest to that small nation be less small.....The paradox is that smallness has been an edge, not a curse, in the liberal age. For all the grandiloquence about a Washington Consensus and a Pax Americana, the US was never the principal profiteer from globalisation.....The real beneficiaries were the rapid enrichment of Ireland, the ethnic diversification of Sweden, the technological fecundity of Israel and the rise of Dubai from the sands as a shimmering entrepôt......1990-2010 was the golden age--the belle époque--of the small nation....Rules-based globalism was a precious equaliser for these places.... it also made advantages of their liabilities....Their shortage of domestic consumers was the ultimate incentive to cast around for other markets. Their lack of capital made them welcome foreign investors. Even the nicheness of their native languages (in some cases) obliged them to master English.

There is, without leaning too much on “national character”, a small-country hardiness ....an acceptance of the outside world as a non-negotiable fact: a blend of fatalism and resourcefulness that makes for formidable migrants....If small countries have mastered the global age, it is a feat that goes beyond the economic. They also have a cultural reach that was hard to picture not long ago, when nations needed the brawn of a BBC or a Canal Plus to foist their creative wares on distant audiences....all attest to what we are now obliged to call the “soft power” of small countries....The mistake is to see this moment as eternal. For those who live in or care about these places, the dread is that the coming decades will be as harsh as the last few have been kind. Almost all the conditions that allowed small nations to bloom look precarious....growing protectionism...big states throwing their weight around....Peter Thiel, in his bid for NZ citizenship, said he found “no other country that aligns more with my view of the future than New Zealand”. It was telling that such a prolific maker of sound bets backed a small, open, adaptable nation.
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I am more optimistic and believe many small states will adjust just fine. Why? Think of Taleb's flexibility idea - small states are less fragile than bigger ones, more nimble, more homogenous, faster to change I like also to add that there are more smaller successful counties than the ones mentioned (e.g., Switzerland, Costa Rica).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The flip side is that small countries may have greater ability to act thoughtfully and coherently than larger peers. But I agree - it is likely to be tough ahead.

Here in Singapore, a senior politician summed it up very well: we are just a block of granite in the south china sea, and have no God-given right to exist as a country. The only way we can survive is by being paranoid and continuously reinventing ourselves.
city-states  globalization  Iceland  Janan_Ganesh  nimbleness  Peter_Thiel  post_globalization  rules-based  Singapore  small_states  soft_power  antifragility  Dubai  Ireland  punch-above-its-weight  paranoia  reinvention 
october 2018 by jerryking
Singapore experiments with smart government
January 22, 2018 | FT | by John Thornhill.

Singapore has a reputation as a free-trading entrepôt, beloved of buccaneering Brexiters. ....But stiff new challenges confront Singapore, just as they do all other countries, in the face of the latest technological upheavals. Is the smart nation, as it likes to style itself, smart enough to engineer another reboot?.....Singapore is becoming a prime test bed for how developed nations can best manage the potentially disruptive forces unleashed by powerful new technologies, such as advanced robotics and artificial intelligence...Naturally, Singapore’s technocratic government is well aware of those challenges and is already rethinking policy and practice. True to its heritage, it is pursuing a hybrid approach, mixing free market principles and state activism.

Rather than passively reacting to the technological challenges, the island state is actively embracing them....“The real skill of Singapore has been to reverse engineer the needs of industry and to supply them in a much more cost-effective way than simply writing a cheque,” says Rob Bier, managing partner of Trellis Asia, which advises high-growth start-ups...To take one example, the country has become an enthusiastic promoter of autonomous vehicles. The government has created one of the most permissive regulatory regimes in the world to test driverless cars.....GovTech’s aim is to help offer seamless, convenient public services for all users, creating a truly digital society, economy and government. To that end, the government is acting as a public sector platform, creating a secure and accessible open-data infrastructure for its citizens and companies. For example, with users’ permission, Singapore’s national identity database can be accessed by eight commercial banks to verify customers with minimal fuss. A public health service app now allows parents to keep check of their children’s vaccinations.

By running with the technological wolves, Singapore is clearly hoping to tame the pack.
Singapore  autonomous_vehicles  dislocations  traffic_congestion  aging  smart_government  disruption  robotics  automation  artificial_intelligence  test_beds  reboot  city_states  experimentation  forward-thinking  open-data  privacy  reverse_engineering 
january 2018 by jerryking
High-tech Singapore rides into the future
6 June 2015 | Financial Times|Louise Lucas in Singapore

Singapore has seen the future - and is busily putting it into practice.

From crowdsourced buses, designed to do for public transport what ...
Singapore  sharing_economy  massive_data_sets  disruption  from notes
july 2015 by jerryking
My country is what it is because…
JULY 13, 2014 | BY KNEWS | Adam Harris.

Ever since a friend loaned me the book ‘From Third World to First—The Singapore Story: 1965-2000’ I have been looking at my country with a range of emotions. I have felt anger, pity, sorrow, disappointment and shame….Last week, I read a news report prepared by one of my reporters. Using information supplied by the Indian Arrival Committee (IAC) – who culled statistics from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) database and some other international sources – it was concluded that Guyana is 254 years behind Singapore….The economic policies of that Asian giant boggled my mind. For one, its leader bought foreign talent when the country had none, but there was a caveat. For every two foreigners there needed to be one Singaporean. There was no attempt to get the foreigner to pay a bribe….The strange thing is that we have examples to follow; instead we have opted to do our own thing. The result is stagnation and a people who merely want to leave the country by any means possible. In this day and age we have skilled Guyanese running to other countries to peddle their ability.
Singapore  Guyana  Guyanese  Lee_Kuan_Yew  books  city-states  disappointment  economic_development  economic_stagnation 
july 2015 by jerryking
Singapore reminds us of Burnham and the PNC’s colossal failure
AUGUST 23, 2014 | : Kaieteur News| M. Maxwell.

Guyana and Singapore started at fairly similar points of economic development in the early sixties. Guyana had the advantage of far greater resources and a smaller population base. Today, Singapore is a developed nation and economic powerhouse while Guyana paddles around in the gutter economically.
Singapore  Guyana  PNC  economic_development  economic_stagnation  Lee_Kuan_Yew  LFSB 
march 2015 by jerryking
From jungle to juggernaut: How Singapore pulled off its economic miracle - The Globe and Mail
IAN McGUGAN
From jungle to juggernaut: How Singapore pulled off its economic miracle
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 23 2015
Singapore  economic_development  Lee_Kuan_Yew 
march 2015 by jerryking
Can-Do Lee Kuan Yew - NYTimes.com
MARCH 23, 2015
Continue reading the main story

Roger Cohen

The measure of that achievement is that the ingredients of disaster abounded in Singapore, a country that is “not supposed to exist and cannot exist,” as Lee said in a 2007 interview with The New York Times. “We don’t have the ingredients of a nation,” he noted, “the elementary factors: a homogeneous population, common language, common culture and common destiny.” Instead, it had a combustible ethnic and religious hodgepodge of Chinese, Malays and Indians gathered in a city-state of no natural resources....The fact that the elements for cataclysm exist does not mean that cataclysm is inevitable. Lee demonstrated this in an age where the general cacophony, and the need to manage and spin every political minute, makes statesmanship ever more elusive. The determining factor is leadership. What defines leadership above all is conviction, discipline in the pursuit of a goal, adaptability in the interest of the general good, and far-sightedness.

Lee’s only religion was pragmatism, of which religion (as generally understood) is the enemy, because, to some adherents, it offers revealed truths that are fact-resistant. Any ideology that abhors facts is problematic. (If you believe land is yours because it was deeded to you in the Bible, for example, but other people live there and have for centuries, you have an issue pregnant with violence.) Lee had one basic yardstick for policy: Does it work? It was the criterion of a forward-looking man for whom history was instructive but not imprisoning. He abhorred victimhood (an excuse for sloppy thinking and nationalist delusion) and corruption. He prized opportunity, meritocracy, the work ethic of the immigrant and education.
authoritarianism  city-states  far-sightedness  leaders  leadership  Lee_Kuan_Yew  nation_builders  obituaries  Roger_Cohen  Singapore  Southeast_Asia  statesmen  tributes  victimhood  work_ethic 
march 2015 by jerryking
In Singapore, Building Businesses for the Next Billion - NYTimes.com
By QUENTIN HARDY

Singapore’s tiny size always forced it to look outward, whether servicing foreign ships or assembling electronics for export to Europe and the United States. Now that software is delivered over the Internet and almost everyone has a phone, Singapore still needs to export its business, but the regional market, with an extraordinary mixture of rich and poor, has a lot more potential....“There are over 1 billion people within a four-hour flight of Singapore,” said Hian Goh, a partner at Pivotal Asia Ventures. While that is true of a couple other Asian capitals, he noted, “nowhere else has the range wealth: Singapore’s $60,000 per capita GDP, and $3,000 in Laos. Technology is a force enabler for all of them.”

The expatriate ties are equally diverse, with companies from Russia and the European Union looking for cross-border investment, and individuals from South Africa and Slovakia who were drawn by the warm weather, easy business regulations and high-speed connectivity.

One incubator, called The Joyful Frog Digital Incubator (the name has something to do with “just do it”), wouldn’t seem out of place in the Silicon Valley, except the house barista is more cosmopolitan.

This isn’t to say “there is better than here,” or “Asia wins.” Those responses are increasingly incoherent. It may not be that kind of contest, and for many of these people, even in a state as closely managed as Singapore, the nation matters less than connectivity and what local populations need.

They are building a world where tech travels everywhere, demolishing existing systems and changing societies.
start_ups  Singapore  globalization  venture_capital  vc  cosmopolitan  city-states  exporting  outward_looking 
october 2013 by jerryking
A Statesman's Friendly Advice - WSJ.com
April 4, 2013 | WSJ | Peggy Noonan

Noonan: A Statesman's Friendly Advice, Singapore's Lee Kwan Yew on what makes America great—and what threatens its greatness. "Lee Kuan Yew: The Grand Master's Insights on China, the United States and the World," a gathering of Mr. Lee's interviews, speeches and writings.

Mr. Lee, of course, is the founder and inventor of modern Singapore. He made it a dynamo. He pushed it beyond its ethnic divisions and placed a bet that, though it is the smallest nation in southeast Asia has few natural resources, its people, if organized and unleashed within a system of economic incentive, would come to constitute the only resource that mattered. He was right. When he took office as prime minister, in 1959, per capita income was about $400 a year. Last year it was more than $50,000.

By PEGGY NOONAN
Peggy_Noonan  Singapore  America_in_Decline?  books  ethnic_divisions  competitiveness_of_nations  city-states  leaders  statesmen  Lee_Kuan_Yew 
april 2013 by jerryking
International: Mining the urban data
Nov 21st 2012 | The Economist | Ludwig Siegele: deputy international editor, The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition
cities  urban  data  smartphones  smart_cities  London  Singapore  sensors  mit  SENSEable  exhaust_data  optimization  real-time 
january 2013 by jerryking
Who Is Singapore Billionaire Peter Lim? - Scene Asia - WSJ
October 13, 2010 | WSJ | By Cris Prystay.
Peter Lim Isn’t Afraid to Live Large
Singapore  high_net_worth  entrepreneur  moguls 
december 2012 by jerryking
Several Suits Reveal Risks in Serving Asia's Rich
November 19, 2008 | WSJ | By TOM WRIGHT in Jakarta and LAURA SANTINI in Hong Kong.
high_net_worth  Singapore  litigation  private_banking  Indonesia  risks  Southeast_Asia 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Other Facebook Founder - WSJ.com
May 4, 2012 | WSJ | By SHIBANI MAHTANI.

The Other Facebook Founder
Atop $2 Billion Fortune, Eduardo Saverin Gave Up Silicon Valley for Singapore's Tech, Society Scene
Facebook  entrepreneur  Eduardo_Saverin  Singapore 
may 2012 by jerryking
Ian Bremmer on Pivot States - WSJ.com
April 27, 2012 | WSJ | By IAN BREMMER.

The Future Belongs to the Flexible
In the emerging global order, the key to a country's success will be courting multiple partners.

We're entering a "G-Zero" world: one in which no single nation (not even the U.S.) or alliance of governments (certainly not the G-7 or G-20) possesses the political and economic muscle to drive an international agenda. In this new decentralized global order, growth isn't enough. A country also must have resilience—the power to pivot....In the years ahead, forget about much-discussed artificial groupings like the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) and the so-called "Next 11" (N11), a roster of potential powerhouses that includes Turkey and South Korea but also political powder kegs like Pakistan, Nigeria and Iran.

In our emerging G-Zero world, with no single power able to set the agenda, the winners and losers of the next generation will be determined not by the rubrics of the moment but by how well and often they are able to pivot.
Ian_Bremmer  BRIC  Myanmar  Brazil  Turkey  Africa  G-7  Indonesia  Singapore  Kazakhstan  Canada  pivots  G-Zero 
april 2012 by jerryking
Rolls-Royce Powers Ahead in High-Wage Countries - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 20, 2011| WSJ | By DANIEL MICHAELS. While many American and European manufacturers transplanted production to low-wage countries in Asia and Latin America in recent years, British industrial giant Rolls-Royce PLC has taken a contrarian course. It gravitates to high-wage hot spots.

The turbine producer has factories in England, the U.S. and Germany, where it recently bought into an engine maker for more than $2 billion.

...Preserving even a limited amount of high-end manufacturing in advanced economies can help stem a vicious cycle of industrial exodus that plagues parts of the U.S. and U.K. Each specialized marine or aerospace manufacturing job creates around three more jobs nearby at suppliers, maintenance operations and in services such as design or finance, according to studies.

Until the recent economic crisis, many advanced economies had looked to service industries, such as finance and information technology, as substitutes for vanishing manufacturing employment. But the spillover job creation from such services is "effectively trivial,"
exodus  manufacturers  United_Kingdom  China  intellectual_property  Singapore  shipbuilding  value_creation  engineering  high-wage  hotspots  spillover  Rolls-Royce  downward_spirals  developed_countries  contrarians 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Whole Truth and Nothing But - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
September 6, 2011

In America, says Kishore Mahbubani, dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of
Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, “No U.S. leaders
dare to tell the truth to the people. All their pronouncements rest on a
mythical assumption that ‘recovery’ is around the corner. Implicitly,
they say this is a normal recession. But this is no normal recession.
There will be no painless solution. ‘Sacrifice’ will be needed, and the
American people know this. But no American politician dares utter the
word ‘sacrifice.’ Painful truths cannot be told.”
truth-telling  Kishore_Mahbubani  Singapore  Tom_Friedman  sacrifice 
september 2011 by jerryking
China, Twitter and 20-Year-Olds vs. the Pyramids - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
February 5, 2011
The forces that were upholding the status quo in the Arab world for so
long — oil, autocracy, the distraction of Israel, and a fear of the
chaos that could come with change — have finally met an engine of change
that is even more powerful: China, Twitter and 20-year-olds. ...Egypt’s
government has wasted the last 30 years — i.e., their whole lives —
plying them with the soft bigotry of low expectations: “Be patient.
Egypt moves at its own pace, like the Nile.” Well, great. Singapore also
moves at its own pace, like the Internet. ....The Arab world has 100
million young people today between the ages of 15 and 29, many of them
males who do not have the education to get a good job, buy an apartment
and get married. That is trouble. Add in rising food prices, and the
diffusion of Twitter, Facebook and texting, which finally gives them a
voice to talk back to their leaders and directly to each other, and you
have a very powerful change engine.
Singapore  China  Middle_East  Arab-Muslim_world  Egypt  Tom_Friedman  competitiveness_of_nations  Arab_Spring  sclerotic  young_people 
february 2011 by jerryking
Luxury tea purveyor hopes to brew business in Canada
Nov. 25, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Alexandra Seno. Idea
for Mark Orlach? Despite becoming a phenomenon at home in Singapore,
luxury tea purveyor TWG Tea is planning to enter Canada as part of
establishing a presence in North America. Taha Bouqdib, the company's
co-founder and president, says it’s “in search of the right partner to
boost expansion into the Canadian market.”

Seeing an opportunity for growth in upscale tea, Mr. Bouqdib, a former
top executive at Paris tea specialist Mariage Freres, and
Singapore-based entrepreneur Manoj Murjani, started TWG in 1997. The
company blends its teas in Asia, not far from the world-renowned
plantations that provide them the leaves. Personal relationships with
the suppliers ensure the first-pick with each harvest.
beverages  teas  luxury  Singapore  retailers  market_entry  personal_relationships 
december 2010 by jerryking
Leading His Troops by Example - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 7, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By DUNCAN MAVIN.
NYSE-listed China Security & Surveillance Technology Inc., based in
Shenzhen, China, manufactures and installs surveillance and security
equipment—cameras, alarm systems, thermal-imaging equipment, for
example—for corporate clients in China and Chinese government
organizations. It also offers a range of security support services, such
as monitoring and training services.

The private security industry is growing fast in China and is already
worth tens of billions of dollars by most estimates. CSST's revenue has
risen from $32.7 million in 2005 to $580.9 million last year. The
company estimates that 2010 will see the top line increase by as much as
30%. Founded in 2001, CSST has also gone through 16 acquisitions in the
past five years.
Asian  security_&_intelligence  security  Singapore  China  Lee_Kuan_Yew  surveillance  CFOs 
november 2010 by jerryking
Got Five Million Singapore Dollars? Citibank Wants You - Scene Asia - Scene Asia - WSJ
October 21, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by Amy Ma.Citibank
in Singapore has a new premium credit card. But don’t call them, they’ll
call you — assuming you qualify.

The piece of plastic, a new Ultima credit card launched Oct. 12, is only
available for people with at least five million Singapore dollars
(US$3.83 million) in assets under management at Citibank. And even then,
you will need a personal invitation to get one.

Invitations have already been extended to, and accepted by, many of the
region’s wealthiest people. Singapore is ripe for the picking: The
city-state had the highest concentration of millionaire households in
the world, accounting for 11.4% of all households, according to the
Boston Consulting Group’s 2010 Global Wealth Report.
high_net_worth  credit_cards  exclusivity  Singapore  Citigroup 
october 2010 by jerryking
When Being First Doesn't Make You No. 1 - WSJ.com
AUG.12, 2004|WSJ|CRIS PRYSTAY.In Jan. 2000--almost 2 yrs.
before Apple.'s iPod hit the mkt.--Singapore-based Creative Tech.
unveiled a similar prod.: an MP3 player w. a tiny hard drive that stored
hundreds of hrs. of music. In biz., though, being 1st doesn't always
make you No. 1. Creative is best-known for its Sound Blaster audio cards
for PCs, a product category it pioneered & dominates. But it's
still a niche player; annual sales are a tenth of Apple's. Apple ran
mktg. rings around Creative even in its own backyard. For iPod's
Singapore launch in late 2001, Apple plastered the CBD with funky
posters & ran a hip ad blitz in movie theaters.Creative's response
finally came last month, when it began sponsoring a children's TV show
& running its 1st-ever TV ad campaign--but only in Singapore.
"There's been a big shift in our biz, & right now, our biggest
challenge is mktg.," concedes founder/CEO, Sim Wong Hoo. "But I'm
stingy. I don't want to waste $ unless I know it's going to work."
branding  Xerox  Ricoh  image_advertising  Apple  iPODs  competitive_landscape  product_launches  Singapore  first_movers  fast_followers  consumer_electronics  marketing  new_products  new_categories  category_killers 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Saturday Profile - Days of Reflection for the Man Who Defined Singapore - Biography - NYTimes.com
September 10, 2010 | New York Times | By SETH MYDANS. The
stress of his wife’s illness is constant, he said, harder on him than
stresses he faced for years in the political arena. But repeatedly, in
looking back over his life, he returns to his moment of greatest
anguish, the expulsion of Singapore from Malaysia in 1965, when he wept
in public.

That trauma presented him with the challenge that has defined his life,
the creation and development of a stable and prosperous nation, always
on guard against conflict within its mixed population of Chinese, Malays
and Indians.

“We don’t have the ingredients of a nation, the elementary factors,” he
said three years ago in an interview with the International Herald
Tribune, “a homogeneous population, common language, common culture and
common destiny.”
Singapore  Lee_Kuan_Yew  leaders  aging  Southeast_Asia  city-states  statesmen 
september 2010 by jerryking
GM's Woe Has Tills Ringing in Singapore
19-Apr-2006 Financial Times article by Anonymous sources on the
windfall opportunities GM's decline has presented for a Global Crossing unit in Montreal to which handle logistics for its conference calls.
opportunistic  GM  Global_Crossing  Singapore  windfalls  decline 
february 2009 by jerryking

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