jerryking + scott_anthony   12

Innovation, Recession-Style - Businessweek
By Scott D. Anthony,David S. Duncan andRichard N. Foster on December 19, 2008
Scott_Anthony  Innosight  crisis  innovation  recessions 
november 2012 by jerryking
Market Research: Safety Not Always in Numbers | Qualtrics
Author: Qualtrics|July 28, 2010

Albert Einstein once said, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

Although many market research experts would say that quantitative research is the safest bet when one has limited resources, it can be dangerous to assume that it is always the best option.

we put together a few guidelines for when one research method might be more useful than the other.

Quantitative:
* For trending purposes, i.e. trends in customer feedback
* Need for quick feedback
* Particularly useful when a company wants to determine how to increase market share
* Product feedback for consumer products

Qualitative:
* Help identify non-obvious ways to delight current customers
* Looking for information to grow an existing market or create a new one
* Market research follow-up questions when numeric scales can be misleading
* Messaging validation for products that are new to the market
* Market validation
* Understanding objections and barriers
* Product feedback for enterprise products

In the article, “Market Research: Quantitative or Qualitative,” the writer Diane Hagglund said, “sometimes numbers provide false confidence and obscure real opportunity.” [Definition of overquantification]

She later added in a follow-up article that her market research firm recommends web surveys as good vehicles for quantifying concepts that the researcher is familiar with and wants accurate percentages for each option.

“This is a valuable thing to do, especially for market sizing, external marketing and PR purpose,” Hagglund said. “But for finding out the answers that you don’t really know, start with qualitative research – and by all means do a web survey next to put those percentages in place once you know the statements to put the percentages with.”

In other words, it’s important to quantify your qualitative research and qualify your quantitative research
market_research  market_sizing  overquantification  storytelling  qualitative  quantitative  Scott_Anthony  dangers  research_methods  non-obvious  enterprise_clients  false_confidence  Albert_Einstein  easy-to-measure  delighting_customers  follow-up_questions 
december 2011 by jerryking
The Empire Strikes Back - Technology Review
December 1, 2011
The Empire Strikes Back

How Xerox and other big corporations are harnessing the force of disruptive innovation.

By Scott D. Anthony and Clayton M. Christensen
disruption  large_companies  Xerox  innovation  Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  Innosight 
december 2011 by jerryking
How to Kill Innovation: Keep Asking Questions - Scott Anthony - Harvard Business Review
February 25, 2010 | HBR | by Scott Anthony . Resource-rich
companies have the "luxury" of researching and researching problems.
That can be a huge benefit in known markets where precision matters. But
it can be a huge limitation in unknown markets where precision is
impossible and attempts to create it through analysis are quixotic.
Entrepreneurs don't have the luxury of asking "What about..." questions,
and in disruptive circumstances that works in their favor.
questions  Scott_Anthony  innovation  HBR  Innosight  due_diligence  information_gaps  market_sizing  uncertainty  unknowns  cost_of_inaction 
march 2010 by jerryking
Innovation in Emerging Markets | Articles | Chief Executive - The magazine for the Chief Executive Officer
January/February 2010, Posted On: 1/29/2010

Innovation in Emerging Markets

Three critical factors should not be overlooked in any strategy aimed at emerging markets.
By Scott Anthony
emerging_markets  Scott_Anthony  Innosight  C.K._Prahalad  market_segmentation  business_models  rethinking  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  think_threes 
february 2010 by jerryking
Toys 'R' History - WSJ.com
AUGUST 31, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | by CLAYTON M.
CHRISTENSEN and SCOTT D. ANTHONY. Today, Wal-Mart is going one better
than Toys "R" Us. With its mammoth stores, diverse array of products and
super-efficient supply chain, Wal-Mart can provide consumers good
quality, high levels of choice and convenience, and rock-bottom prices.
It has shifted the "basis of competition" from convenience to price.

So what can a company like Toys "R" Us do when signs emerge that the
basis of competition has shifted decisively in ways that make a
previously successful strategy ineffective? The truth is, if a company
facing this situation has not acted proactively before the signs become
conclusive, it is already too late. A company must sow the seeds of its
new growth business before the game palpably changes.
Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  Innosight  Toys_"R"_Us  Wal-Mart  growth  embryonic  emerging_markets  competitive_landscape 
january 2010 by jerryking
Why a Product’s Job Matters
April 18, 2007 | - The Informed Reader - WSJ | by Robin
Moroney. A basic principle of business–knowing what consumers want from
a particular product–is often ignored by corporations. Many businesses
focus on qualities that are largely irrelevant to the consumers’ buying
decisions, such as product prices, or data on customer age, gender and
marital status. Some business-to-business companies slice their markets
by industry; others by size of business. The problem with such
segmentation schemes is that they are static. Customers’ buying
behaviors change far more often than their demographics, psychographics
or attitudes. This leads to situations in which, in the words of the
late business guru Peter Drucker, “the customer rarely buys what the
business thinks it sells him.”
Peter_Drucker  Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  segmentation  marketing  market_segmentation  static  dynamic  purchase_decisions  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  B2B  demographics  psychographics  attitudes  demographic_information  relevance  consumer_behavior  behavioral_change  irrelevance 
january 2010 by jerryking
Four Lessons from Y-Combinator's Fresh Approach to Innovation
June 12, 2009 | HarvardBusiness.org | by Scott Anthony.
1. You can do a lot for a little.
2. Tight windows enable "good enough" design.
3. Business plans are nice, not necessary.
4. Failure is an option.
Also: Their main motto is (that startups should) "make something people
want". Another prominent theme in their approach is its
hacker-centricity.
Scott_Anthony  innovation  decision_making  lessons_learned  Paul_Graham  Y_Combinator  frugality  demand-driven  constraints  failure  design  customer-driven  insights  market_windows  good_enough 
october 2009 by jerryking
Finding the Right Job For Your Product
Spring 2007 | MIT Sloan Management Review | by Clayton M.
Christensen, Scott D. Anthony, Gerald Berstell and Denise Nitterhouse.
What is the "job" the product is being hired to do? Segment according to
this.
market_segmentation  Clayton_Christensen  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  Innosight  innovation  Scott_Anthony  ProQuest  customer_segmentation 
august 2009 by jerryking
The Long, Long Road From Idea to Success - NYTimes.com
July 4, 2009 | New York Times | By VINDU GOEL. Scott Anthony,
is the author of “The Silver Lining: An Innovation Playbook for
Uncertain Times.”

Corporations, the gold mine for software like this, have been reluctant to buy it until GreenPrint worked out a host of technical issues.

“It’s more difficult than you’d think it would be,” said Mr. Hamilton, chief executive of the start-up, which is based in Portland, Ore. “We had zero insight into what challenges would be in place for an organization of 50,000 users.”

GreenPrint’s travails are all too common for small technology companies. “The gulf between invention and innovation is often a huge one that many entrepreneurs can’t cross,” said Scott D. Anthony, president of Innosight, a consulting firm.

In other words, it’s not easy to turn a bright idea into a genuine business....“You see again and again the companies that succeed are not the ones that have the brilliant strategy,” he said, “but the ones that course-correct along the way.”
innovation  start_ups  Innosight  Scott_Anthony  messiness  book_reviews  silver_linings  uncertainty  books  course_correction  playbooks 
july 2009 by jerryking

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