jerryking + rick_spence   17

How to garner goodwill and respect | Financial Post
April 2, 2012 Financial Post | Rick Spence.

here are seven ways I believe you can woo your audience:

1. Recognize this opportunity is about understanding what the audience wants to hear. Always ask the meeting organizers about their expectations, and strive to meet them.
2. Be yourself.
3. Explain clearly and concisely what you do. ...Tell your story as simply as possible — who buys your products, and what problems do you solve for them?
4. Look for ways to tell your story visually. Use PowerPoint to show us your premises, your products and your customers. Don’t overdo it; people want to hear from you, not sit through a canned presentation.
5. Brag, but subtly.
6. Be memorable. At least, don’t be boring. Do something unexpected. Bring an unlikely prop, share a secret, describe how your company changed people’s lives, or ask the audience to take action. Leave people with one compelling idea or vision they’ll be talking about long after you sit down.
7. Practise, practise. Read your presentation repeatedly until you are so familiar with it you don’t need your notes.

If you finish early, ask for questions from the floor. Prepare an initial question or two of your own, in case your audience is shy (otherwise, this could be longest minute of your life). You might say, “What I’d be asking me right now is this — ” Follow it with a question that allows you to repeat your theme, with some new “inside” information that enhances it.

Be spontaneous, but never unprepared.
goodwill  respect  public_speaking  conferences  preparation  readiness  Communicating_&_Connecting  Rick_Spence  authenticity  know_your_audience  clarity  concision  unprepared  spontaneity  RetailLoco_2017  speeches 
january 2017 by jerryking
Identify new growth niche and how you can profit
March 19, 2013 | Financial Post | By Rick Spence.

Sparks: What other companies need unlikely solutions? How could you help them with data management, management of perishables, or guaranteeing consistent quality?
Sparks: What niche information markets could you develop and own? Or, what services could you offer to celebrity startups that have everything except business experience?
Spark: Retailers are eager to lock up new brands to differentiate themselves. How can you help more marketers achieve a competitive advantage?
Spark: What other marginal products and businesses will tech giants such as Google and Facebook drop next? How can you help users adjust? Or, what under-performers should you be trimming from your own product roster?
Sparks: Designers and builders should target early adopters eager for a colour makeover.
Spark: Where else can you find a business whose margins are so huge that Buy-One, Get-Three-Free makes sense? Or, when big names are offering value propositions like this, how can you retool your promotions and sales to compete?
Spark: How could you solve major problems like these without a supercomputer?
Spark: Gadgetry is changing so fast that even markets you thought had stabilized are wide open to new ideas. How can you use hot new technology to disrupt your industry?
Rick_Spence  growth  niches  entrepreneur  kill_rates  IBM_Watson  massive_data_sets  celebrities  ideas  entrepreneurship  new_businesses  solutions  disruption  under-performing  early_adopters  competitive_advantage  perishables  information_markets  adjustments  data_management  culling  differentiation  retailers  brands 
march 2013 by jerryking
The kids are all right |
October 27, 2003 | PROFITguide.com | Rick Spence || .
Rick_Spence  entrepreneurship  training  youth  children 
august 2012 by jerryking
Ask, and you shall succeed |
Nov. 1, 2004 |PROFIT|Rick Spence. What are the breakthrough
questions that create clarity? Asking abstract, personal questions ("What's your org.'s reason for being? Why would you be missed if you were gone?") helps focus on a clients' real issues...VCs are probably the best at questioning.Their job is to wade through heady optimism, technical jargon, obscuring fluff & self-serving #'s to get to the truth. They ask a series of questions, starting with the predictable & straightforward and moving inexorably toward more oblique,
penetrating questions.Eg. "Who're your existing customers? Target customers? What constitutes an 'ideal' customer?" & "Who actually writes the cheque?" Tom Stoyan's breakthrough question when talking with a prospect (or a supplier, or anyone else), never overwhelm them with details they don't want. Before rushing into a spiel, ask prospects if they want the 30-sec. or the 3-min. version. Their response will help
you gauge their interest and calibrate your msg.

WHAT'S ONE OF THE MOST VALUABLE BUT UNDERUSED BUSINESS TOOLS? THE QUESTION! Before rushing into your spiel, ask prospects if they want the 30-second version or the 3-minute version. Their response will help you gauge their interest, and then tailor your message to fit. The right question can also save you time and effort when dealing with people who want things from you. Rebuff oral propositions. "Can you send me a proposal on paper?" Besides detectives and priests, VCs are probably the best at asking questions. "Who are your existing customers? Who are your target customers? What constitutes an 'ideal' customer?" And, finally, "Who actually writes the cheque?" Some questions diffuse complexity and create consensus. "What is your organization's reason for being? Whywould you be missed if you were gone?"
Rick_Spence  JCK  management_consulting  vapourware  decision_making  overoptimism  entrepreneur  skills  hiring  sales_presentations  questions  UpSark  venture_capital  VC  clarity  breakthroughs  calibration  jargon  follow-up_questions 
april 2011 by jerryking
Next year, be ahead of the competition
Dec. 27, 2010 | Financial Post | Rick Spence

Look for ways to add more value. In tough times, most marketers look for
ways to claw back some of the value they offer their customers, as a
way to preserve margins; you can stand out by offering more. Henry Ford
said it best: "The man who will use his skill and constructive
imagination to see how much he can give for a dollar, instead of how
little he can give for a dollar, is bound to succeed."
Rick_Spence  advice  self-improvement  opportunities  opportunistic  value_creation  perks  hard_times 
december 2010 by jerryking
Better communication crucial -- but tough
Nov 5, 2004 |The Globe & Mail pg. C.3 | Rick Spence.
Peter Drucker, the ageless management guru, once declared that 60 % of
all management problems result from faulty communication...Mr. Drucker's
message is clear: Effective communication is crucial to business -- and
it's harder than it looks. Spence has developed some rules of thumb to
help people become better communicators. (1) Identify your target
audience; (2) Introduce yourself, and your message, properly; (3) Be
yourself (4) Use the word 'you'; (5) Tell stories; (6) Be creative;
(7) Encourage feedback.
ProQuest  Rick_Spence  Communicating_&_Connecting  feedback  Peter_Drucker  rules_of_the_game  storytelling  authenticity 
october 2010 by jerryking
How to tell your story
Nov 2004 | Profit. Vol. 23, Iss. 5; pg. 6, 1 pgs | by Ian Portsmouth.
ProQuest  storytelling  howto  Rick_Spence  entrepreneur  media_coverage  magazines  public_relations 
march 2010 by jerryking
Nine hard truths
September 2005 | PROFIT magazine | By Rick Spence. The
immutable laws of being your own boss, and five ways to transcend them
all. 1. the 40-hr. workweek is not your friend. 2. Everyone is looking
for something new. But no one has any money for anything new. 3. All
the people you meet at a networking function are trying to sell you
something; 4. The phone doesn't ring by itself--make your own calls if
you want the phone to ring. 5. At any given time, everyone you want to
contact is in a meeting. 6. Basic courtesy is deader than Sir John A.
Macdonald. No one returns phone calls anymore. 7. Allies are like
employees: hard to find, hard to live without. 8. Opportunities are all
around you, but differentiating between an "opportunity" and a genuine
source of revenue-that's hard. 9. Most of the people you meet at large
corps. dream of working for themselves. KSFs: 1. Know what your market
wants. 2. Get yourself a peer group. 3. Trust in karma. 4. Be brave. 5.
Give it away.
motivations  inspiration  Rick_Spence  rules_of_the_game  ksfs  pay_it_forward  self-employment  owners  entrepreneurship  opportunities  karma  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  revenue_generation  interpretation  second-order  hard_to_find  courtesies  hard_truths  it's_up_to_me 
february 2010 by jerryking
Too many pots
Sept. 2003 | Profit. | by Rick Spence. Abel and Cain fell
into a common trap: targeting the broadest market possible. By trying to
please too many people at once, they were unable to make deep
connections with customers and event sponsors. Sure, their potential
market was huge, but as Abel admits, "We weren't providing enough
value." Niche markets pay better than mass markets; it's a classic
entrepreneurial lesson, but one that many people learn the hard way. If
one were starting a beverage company today, find the niches Pepsi and
Coke don't own - as Cott Corp. did with bargain-priced house brands.
Unlike the markets Cain and Abel had previously wooed, the people who
attended these events had pressing information and self-development
needs, and were willing to pay for events that fulfilled those needs.
"Specializing opened up markets that we could never reach before," says
Abel. "There turns out to be no shortage of niche markets. The closer
you look, the more you see."
ProQuest  Rick_Spence  entrepreneur  market_segmentation  specialization  targeting  lessons_learned  partnerships  value_propositions  niches  Pepsi  Cott  Coca-Cola  customer_segmentation  mass_markets  emotional_connections  market_intelligence  private_information 
february 2010 by jerryking
Rage against the routine
September 2007 | From PROFIT magazine | By Rick Spence

We could all use some creative renewal and time management makeover.
Take a different route to work each day. Take a night course in
marketing, design, art history, German, creative writing or the
Renaissance. Read Seth Godin’s blog (sethgodin.typepad.com) for a crash
course in the changing worlds of strategy and marketing, complete with
purple cows, big red fezzes and ideaviruses. Buy an iPod and ask friends
to share their music with you. Embrace quiet. Learn to see and listen
with heightened senses. Say “Tell me more” more often. And take time to
ask two questions: “Why?” and “Why not?”.
5_W’s  boredom  creative_renewal  conversations  creativity  ideaviruses  innovation  inspiration  questions  quizzes  Rick_Spence  routines  Seth_Godin  time-management  timeouts 
april 2009 by jerryking

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