jerryking + netflix   70

With the iPhone Sputtering, Apple Bets Its Future on TV and News
March 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Tripp Mickle.

The iPhone is running out of juice. To go beyond the device that made Apple Inc. a global colossus, Tim Cook is betting on a suite of services—marking the company’s biggest shift in more than a decade......Apple will take a giant leap forward announcing video- and news-subscription services that it hopes will generate billions of dollars in new annual revenue and deepen ties between iPhone users and the company.....apps and services, from Spotify to Netflix to China’s WeChat , have often become more important to users than the devices that run them. .....The company’s ambition in video is to become an alternative to cable, combining original series with shows from other networks to create a new entertainment service that can reach more than 100 markets world-wide. ....Apple hasn’t said what it will charge for the programming. .....The original series will be delivered in a new TV app that staff have been calling a Netflix killer.....Apple has been negotiating to bring its new TV app to multiple platforms, including Roku and smart TVs.........Apple plans to showcase a revamped News app that includes a premium tier with access to more than 200 magazines—including Bon Appétit, People and Glamour—as well as newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal.....The Washington Post and New York Times aren’t participating in the new app...... in the early 2000s, co-founder Steve Jobs reinvented the company by pushing it into mobile devices. The iPod and its accompanying iTunes service revived a company that was largely dependent on Mac computer sales....Mr. Cook is attempting a similar feat in the approaching twilight of the smartphone era....Cook wanted to know which apps were selling well, how many Apple Music subscribers stuck with the service, and how many people were signing up for iCloud storage.....Apple’s biggest source of services revenue comes from distributing other companies’ software through its App Store.....Apple’s music-streaming service has about 50 million global subscribers—far behind Spotify’s 96 million.

Apple’s base of 1.4 billion iPhones, iPads and Macs in use globally gives it a distribution platform..................The push into news subscriptions could help Apple battle Facebook, whose News Feed has helped it become the No. 1 app world-wide in monthly active smartphone users.....Facebook is attempting to become a super-app like China’s WeChat, which allows users to shop, order food, buy movie tickets and make reservations on any mobile operating system......Steve Jobs foreshadowed Apple’s services future when he started iTunes in 2001, offering categories from competing major labels to make the first successful digital-music store, with songs available for 99 cents.

For Mr. Cook’s monthly services meetings, the company monitors of apps that benefit and threaten Apple. There is a "release radar" for Cook to track apps that are expected to sell well and other metrics for the apps that have challenged Apple’s business, including iTunes sales decreases compared with Apple Music subscription growth.
App_Store  Apple  Apple_IDs  Apple_Music  big_bets  CEOs  cloud_computing  Disney  iCloud  iPhone  iTunes  magazines  mobile_applications  multiplatforms  Netflix  news  NYT  original_content  pivots  platforms  services  smartphones  Spotify  storage  streaming  subscriptions  television  Tim_Cook  WaPo  WeChat 
march 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Netflix Is Shrinking the World - The New York Times
Netflix, which has become the internet’s most invaluable and intoxicating portal to the parts of planet Earth that aren’t America......A win by “Roma” would be a fitting testament to Netflix’s ambitions. Virtually alone among tech and media companies, Netflix intends to ride a new kind of open-border digital cosmopolitanism to the bank.......Netflix, which has 139 million paying members around the world, has lately become something more than a licenser of other countries’ escapist television.

In 2016, the company expanded to 190 countries, and last year, for the first time, a majority of its subscribers and most of its revenue came from outside the United States. To serve this audience, Netflix now commissions and licenses hundreds of shows meant to echo life in every one of its markets and, in some cases, to blend languages and sensibilities across its markets......Netflix has discovered something startling: Despite a supposed surge in nationalism across the globe, many people like to watch movies and TV shows from other countries. ....Hollywood and Silicon Valley have long pursued expansion internationally. But Netflix's strategy is fundamentally different. Instead of trying to sell American ideas to a foreign audience, it’s aiming to sell international ideas to a global audience.....a crucial difference between Netflix and other tech giants: Netflix makes money from subscriptions, not advertising.....This simple difference flips all of its incentives. It means that Netflix has a reason to satisfy every new customer, not just the ones in the most prosperous markets. Each new title carries subtitles in 26 languages, and the company is creating high-quality, properly lip-synced audio dubbing in 10 languages. For years, Netflix has roiled the film and TV business in Hollywood with its billions. Now it’s taking its money — the company spent $12 billion on content in 2018 and is projected to spend $15 billion this year — to film and TV producers in France, Spain, Brazil, India, South Korea and the Middle East, among other places.

Because it is spending so much on shows from everywhere, Netflix has an incentive to get the biggest bang for its buck by pushing them widely across its user base. Its algorithms are tuned toward expanding your interests rather than narrowing them. As a result, many of Netflix’s shows are watched widely beyond their local markets......Netflix does seem to be pushing cultural boundaries and sparking new conversations all over the world....It’s legitimate to ask how long Netflix will be able to keep up this cross-border conversation — whether, as it keeps growing, it will have to make legal or moral compromises with local censors or other would-be cultural arbiters.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Matt
Michigan2h ago
Farhad, I totally enjoyed your extrospection of Netflix as a global epoch-maker and change agent. This is globalization at its best. Netflix is outsourcing (crowdsourcing), outspending, and outwitting the Hollywood (s) of this world. Its recipe is simple yet profound: telling the stories of people, everywhere in this world, to themselves in their down-to-earth languages and customs. And technology has everything to do with it. Netflix would not have been where it is today if it was not for streaming technology. The assertion is true: technology is bring the world closer together.

By Farhad Manjoo
Opinion Columnist

Feb. 22, 2019
content_creators  cosmopolitan  cross-cultural  entertainment  Farhad_Manjoo  globalization  Hollywood  international_expansion  internationalization  international_diversity  Netflix  original_programming  streaming  user_bases 
february 2019 by jerryking
Vertical media mergers are just so 19th century | Financial Times
June 21, 2018 | Financial Times | Anne-Marie Slaughter.

Media companies are falling over themselves to merge with one another right now. AT&T took the US to court over the right to buy TimeWarner, and Comcast and Disney are engaged in a bidding war for some of 21st Century Fox. Big looks set to get bigger. Yet according to our best thinkers on the future of capitalism, the corporate titans driving these decisions are heading firmly backward.

AT&T and Comcast are communications companies that are attempting to go vertical and control every layer of a media empire from underground cables to the creation of content....Andrew Carnegie was determined to own coal mines and railroads as well as steel mills. The goal was control from top to bottom, closed access and economies of scale.

But that is old-fashioned thinking, according to the current crop of books on the dramatic economic changes being wreaked in the next phase of the information age. They argue that vertical integration amounts to building silos in an era that will be dominated by platforms — owning in an era of renting — and looking for mass markets when customers want individualized products.

Hemant Taneja makes a strong case for “customised microproduction and finely targeted marketing” in his book Unscaled. An investor for the Boston-based firm General Catalyst, he does not question the value of having many customers rather than few. But he argues that fast-growing companies in sectors ranging from energy to healthcare and education are succeeding because they customise their goods and services to a “market of one”.

The rise of artificial intelligence and cloud computing allows these companies to “rent scale”, he writes. Small, nimble companies can now out-compete big ones in specific markets, adding scale as they need to.....Netflix’s market value exceeded that of Comcast back in May and it is now bigger than Disney. Its global headcount is 5,500, nearly one-fifth of Time Warner’s and one-50th of AT&T’s. Netflix does not have the size to build as large in-house AI capabilities. But a quick search for “media data analytics” reveals a score of companies. Why pay for that capability when you can rent it
Andrew_Carnegie  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  artificial_intelligence  books  cloud_computing  end_of_ownership  entertainment_industry  Netflix  platforms  scaling  size  vertical_integration  AT&T  Comcast  customization  Disney  gazelles  nimbleness  mass_media  personalization  mergers_&_acquisitions  21st_Century_Fox  Time_Warner  19th_century  microproducers  target_marketing  unscalability  silo_mentality 
june 2018 by jerryking
Acronyms Gone Wild: How FANG Has Mutated This Year - MoneyBeat - WSJ
By Steven Russolillo and Ben Eisen
Sep 27, 2017

five giants — Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook and Alphabet, Google’s parent company plus Netflix FAANG
Facebook  Netflix  Amazon  Apple  Google  Microsoft 
february 2018 by jerryking
What the Tax Bill Fails to Address: Technology’s Tsunami -
DEC. 20, 2017 | The New York Times | Farhad Manjoo.

Manjoo posits that the Republican tax bill is the wrong fix for the wrong problem, given how tech is altering society and the economy....The bill (the parachute) does little to address the tech-abetted wave of economic displacement (the tsunami) that may be looming just off the horizon. And it also seems to intensify some of the structural problems in the tech business, including its increasing domination by five giants — Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook and Alphabet, Google’s parent company — which own some of the world’s most important economic platforms.....some in Silicon Valley think the giants misplayed their hand in the legislation. In pursuing short-term tax advantages, they missed a chance to advocate policies that might have more broadly benefited many of their customers — and improved their images, too......This gets back to that looming tsunami. Though many of the economy’s structural problems predate the last decade’s rise of the tech behemoths, the innovations that Silicon Valley has been working on — things like e-commerce, cloud storage, artificial intelligence and the general digitization of everything and everyone around you — are some of the central protagonists in the economic story of our age.

Among other economic concerns, these innovations are implicated in the rise of inequality; the expanding premium on education and skills; the decimation and dislocation of retail jobs; the rising urban-rural divide, and spiking housing costs in cities; and the rise of the “gig” economy of contract workers who drive Ubers and rent out their spare bedrooms on Airbnb....technology is changing work in a few ways. First, it’s altering the type of work that people do — for instance, creating a boom in e-commerce warehouse jobs in large metro areas while reducing opportunities for retail workers in rural areas. Technology has also created more uncertainty around when people work and how much they’ll get paid.
Farhad_Manjoo  preparation  job_loss  job_displacement  Silicon_Valley  tax_codes  corporate_concentration  platforms  income_inequality  short-sightedness  e-commerce  cloud_computing  artificial_intelligence  gig_economy  precarious  automation  uncertainty  universal_basic_income  digitalization  Apple  Amazon  Netflix  Microsoft  Facebook  Alphabet  Google  inconsistent_incomes  Big_Tech  FAANG 
december 2017 by jerryking
Beyond Netflix: Fall’s Must-See Streaming TV - WSJ
By Joshua Fruhlinger
Sept. 14, 2017

+ Acorn TV

If you want more adventurous (and brag-worthy) fall viewing, look beyond the usual suspects to the myriad specialized, niche streaming services offering everything from Korean soap operas to B-horror.

To tune in, you’ll need a smart TV or a streaming device like Apple TV or Google Chromecast. (A game console, like an Xbox or PlayStation, will work, too.) Of course, you can also watch on a computer, tablet, or smartphone.
niches  streaming  television  Netflix  HBO_Go  Amazon_Prime 
september 2017 by jerryking
Netflix Canada hikes prices as streaming competition heats up - The Globe and Mail
DAVID FRIEND
TORONTO — The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017

The popular video streaming service is hiking prices for new members effective immediately. It will do the same for existing users after notifying them by e-mail in the coming weeks.

Netflix’s standard plan will now cost a dollar more – or $10.99 a month – to watch content on two screens at a time.

The basic plan, which does not offer high definition video and only permits one streaming screen at a time, also goes up a dollar to $8.99 a month.

Premium plan subscribers will pay $2 more for up to four simultaneous streams and ultra high-definition 4K content. It will now cost $13.99 monthly.

It’s the first price increase in nearly two years that affects subscribers in Canada.
price_hikes  Netflix  streaming  subscriptions 
august 2017 by jerryking
It’s Time for Apple to Go Hollywood - WSJ
By Steve Vassallo
June 20, 2017

Apple’s hires, however, appear to be another in a series of plodding steps. It’s been a wildly successful slough, but there’s a palpable sense that the company is losing momentum with its testudine gait—that it’s been taken over by bean counters and no longer has the nerve or verve to “think different.”

Apple could change that impression and supercharge its video play by doing something that would make the Whole Foods deal look like small potatoes: buy Netflix .

It would cost several times the Whole Foods deal to buy Netflix, but with almost $260 billion in cash reserves, Apple can afford it. (Full disclosure: my firm was an early investor in Netflix but no longer holds any shares in the company.)

Purchasing Netflix would give Apple three critical things it needs to succeed.

• Content creation. As Apple learned from “Planet of the Apps,” its failed reality TV series about iPhone app developers (really), producing original programming is difficult. With all due respect to Messrs. Erlicht and Van Amburg, simply adding a couple of studio execs probably won’t be enough. In acquiring Netflix—which has produced an endless string of award-winning hits, from “House of Cards” to “Stranger Things”—the iPhone company would gain instant credibility and proven expertise in creating premium content at scale.

• Vertical integration. Apple is the most successful walled garden in history. Taking video creation and distribution in-house would satisfy that longstanding business model.

• International expansion. Content providers now have to think and act globally.... Netflix is available in more than 190 countries. Buy it, and Apple owns the world’s first truly global TV network.

One more thing, to quote the man in the black turtleneck. In addition to content, another enormous asset Apple would get from buying Netflix is its CEO, Reed Hastings. Without a clear successor to Tim Cook on the horizon, it would be malpractice if Apple’s board didn’t have some names in mind.
Apple  Netflix  economies_of_scale  M&A  Hollywood  content_creators  vertical_integration  in-house  Reed_Hastings  international_expansion  think_differently  original_programming 
june 2017 by jerryking
In House of Murdoch, Sons Set About an Elaborate Overhaul
APRIL 22, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES and SYDNEY EMBER.

With James and his elder brother, Lachlan, 45, who is the executive chairman of 21st Century Fox, firmly entrenched as their father’s successors, they are now forcibly exerting themselves. Their father remains very involved, but his sons seem determined to rid the company of its roguish, old-guard internal culture and tilt operations toward the digital future. They are working to make the family empire their own, not the one the elder Murdoch created to suit his sensibilities.....The conglomerate, like its competitors, is facing an extremely uncertain future. Consumers are canceling or forgoing cable hookups and instead subscribing to streaming services like Netflix and Hulu, which 21st Century Fox co-owns. The movie business continues to grapple with piracy, rising costs and flat domestic attendance. Fox also has special problems: With competitors getting bigger — AT&T’s $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner being Exhibit A — where does that leave the Murdochs?

“That’s a question I think they asked themselves and moved them to try to buy the rest of Sky,” said Michael Nathanson, an analyst at MoffettNathanson, referring to a pending $14.3 billion deal for 21st Century Fox to take full control of the British satellite TV giant.

At the moment, 21st Century Fox’s portfolio is relatively healthy. Fox News has continued to dominate in the ratings. The FX cable channel has found a steady stream of hits, including “Atlanta” and “The People v. O. J. Simpson.” The Fox broadcast network has struggled to find new must-see shows, but the company’s overseas channels and sports networks are thriving. In its most recent quarter, 21st Century Fox reported income of $856 million, a 27 percent increase from the same period a year earlier.
succession  Rupert_Murdoch  CATV  conglomerates  uncertainty  Netflix  Hulu  James_Murdoch  Lachlan_Murdoch  family-owned_businesses  Bill_O'Reilly  organizational_culture  sexual_harassment  Roger_Ailes  generational_change  digital_media  National_Geographic  CEOs  21st_Century_Fox  mass_media 
april 2017 by jerryking
Building an Empire on Event Data – The Event Log
Michelle WetzlerFollow
Chief Data Scientist @keen_io
Mar 31

Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Netflix have built their businesses on event data. They’ve invested hundreds of millions behind data scientists and engineers, all to help them get to a deep understanding and analysis of the actions their users or customers take, to inform decisions all across their businesses.
Other companies hoping to compete in a space where event data is crucial to their success must find a way to mirror the capabilities of the market leaders with far fewer resources. They’re starting to do that with event data platforms like Keen IO.
What does “Event Data” mean?
Event data isn’t like its older counterpart, entity data, which describes objects and is stored in tables. Event data describes actions, and its structure allows many rich attributes to be recorded about the state of something at a particular point in time.
Every time someone loads a webpage, clicks an ad, pauses a song, updates a profile, or even takes a step into a retail location, their actions can be tracked and analyzed. These events span so many channels and so many types of interactions that they paint an extremely detailed picture of what captivates customers.
data  data_driven  massive_data_sets  data_scientists  event-driven  events  strategy  engineering  Facebook  Google  Amazon  Netflix 
april 2017 by jerryking
Advertisers Try New Tactics to Break Through to Consumers - WSJ
By SUZANNE VRANICA
June 19, 2016

companies are rewriting their marketing playbooks. Some are blurring the line between advertising and content, in the hopes of passing through the filter of what consumers actually see and read. Others are diving deeper into data and location targeting on the theory that consumers will embrace ads that they find relevant.......Marketers have been drawn to digital advertising because of the promise of targeting consumers with more precision. But the backlash over the quantity and intrusiveness of digital marketing, and the adoption of ad blockers, is forcing them to figure out other ways to capture users’ attention......Advertisers like Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC are embracing so-called native ads, which seamlessly blend into a user’s feed and are harder to distinguish from editorial content.

“Native ads have 50% higher click-through rates than any of our [display] banner inventory,” ....Alison Lewis, chief marketing officer of J&J’s consumer business, said that for decades, the company would create two 30-second TV spots, two billboard ads and five print ads every year. That is “not how the world works today,” she said.
advertising  offensive_tactics  Johnson_&_Johnson  Netflix  content  backlash  location_based_services  Coldwell_Banker  marketing  precision  target_marketing  playbooks 
february 2017 by jerryking
We’re All Cord Cutters Now - WSJ
By FRANK ROSE
Sept. 6, 2016

Streaming, Sharing, Stealing By Michael D. Smith and Rahul Telang
MIT Press, 207 pages, $29.95

The authors’ point is not that the long tail is where the money is, though that can be the case. It’s that “long-tail business models,” being inherently digital, can succeed where others do not. Mass-media businesses have always depended on the economics of scarcity: experts picking a handful of likely winners to be produced with a professional sheen, released through a tightly controlled series of channels and supported by blowout ad campaigns. This, the authors make clear, is a strategy for the previous century.
book_reviews  books  digital_media  entertainment_industry  massive_data_sets  Amazon  Netflix  data  granularity  cord-cutting  clarity  Anita_Elberse  The_Long_Tail  business_models  blockbusters  Apple  mass_media 
january 2017 by jerryking
Gearing Up for the Cloud, AT&T Tells Its Workers: Adapt, or Else - The New York Times
FEB. 13, 2016| NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

For the company to survive in this environment, Mr. Stephenson needs to retrain its 280,000 employees so they can improve their coding skills, or learn them, and make quick business decisions based on a fire hose of data coming into the company.....Learn new skills or find your career choices are very limited.

“There is a need to retool yourself, and you should not expect to stop,”....People who do not spend five to 10 hours a week in online learning, he added, “will obsolete themselves with the technology.” .......By 2020, Mr. Stephenson hopes AT&T will be well into its transformation into a computing company that manages all sorts of digital things: phones, satellite television and huge volumes of data, all sorted through software managed in the cloud.

That can’t happen unless at least some of his work force is retrained to deal with the technology. It’s not a young group: The average tenure at AT&T is 12 years, or 22 years if you don’t count the people working in call centers. And many employees don’t have experience writing open-source software or casually analyzing terabytes of customer data. .......By 2020, Mr. Stephenson hopes AT&T will be well into its transformation into a computing company that manages all sorts of digital things: phones, satellite television and huge volumes of data, all sorted through software managed in the cloud.

.......“Everybody is going to go face to face with a Google, an Amazon, a Netflix,” he said. “You compete based on data, and based on customer insights you get with their permission. If we’re wrong, it won’t play well for anyone here.
Quentin_Hardy  AT&T  cloud_computing  data  retraining  reinvention  skills  self-education  virtualization  data_scientists  new_products  online_training  e-learning  customer_insights  Google  Amazon  Netflix  data_driven 
february 2016 by jerryking
Kate Taylor: Digital content may be cheap, but who will pay to create it? - The Globe and Mail
KATE TAYLOR
The Globe and Mail (correction included)
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

Internet advocates love to preach choice, diversity and freedom – after all, a VPN can also be used by citizens in China to access content censored by their government – but the great irony of the digital age is that it is killing the economic incentive to create, even as it unlocks the content.....Critics argue that the lumbering entertainment industries should get hip to the Internet as a global, rather than territorial, platform. But if a licence to Netflix U.S. is, in effect, a licence to every citizen on the planet with a computer and the five minutes it takes to set up a VPN, it’s only fair that producers be paid accordingly.

The Netflix debate is just another example of the way the online distribution of digitized content has broken the cultural marketplace so that distributors rake in money while producers struggle to maintain workable businesses. Spotify thrives while musicians are paid pennies; Amazon grows while publishers struggle.
digital_media  Netflix  piracy  VPN  creative_economy  Amazon  Spotify  content_creators  content  entertainment_industry 
january 2015 by jerryking
How Consumers Are Using Big Data - WSJ
By LORA KOLODNY CONNECT
March 23, 2014

An app called Neighborland, created by social entrepreneurs Candy Chang and Dan Parham, aims to help community groups and government offices work well together. The app combines photos, data and APIs from sources including Twitter, Google Maps and Instagram, agencies that report on real-estate parcels, transit systems, and "311" complaints about nuisances like noise, broken lights and garbage.

In 2012, the New Orleans Food Truck Coalition used Neighborland to collect community ideas, map "food deserts," which are areas lacking easy access to groceries and healthy food, and show what the economic and health impact could be if coalition members were permitted to work in more areas.
311  massive_data_sets  APIs  data  analytics  Amazon  Pandora  Netflix  Nike  Jawbone  fitness  CDC  infertility  travel  Skyscanner  Routehappy  open_data  mobile_applications  consumers  hyperlocal  neighbourhoods 
november 2014 by jerryking
Nokia a lesson for backers of Canada’s nanny state - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 17 2014 | The Globe and Mail | BRIAN LEE CROWLEY.

How did it all go so wrong? And what might Canada learn from Finland’s downfall?

One obvious conclusion is not to put all your eggs in one basket, but it goes well beyond that. There was a time when economic change worked slowly enough that you could get a generation or two’s employment out of an industry before it was overtaken by innovation. Detroit dominated automobile manufacturing for many decades before its own complacency and the innovativeness of European and Asian producers came into play. In a similar vein, Nokia allowed itself to believe in its own infallibility, and Finland meekly followed suit. But the forces of change are now so powerful and lightning fast that sometimes a single product release from a competitor can signal the death knell of a previously healthy company or industry....Canada is rife with industries with their heads stuck in the sand, almost invariably because they believe they can shelter behind a friendly bureaucrat with a rulebook.

Examples abound in fields as diverse as telecoms, dairy, airlines, broadcasting, taxis and transport. Could there have been a bigger farce than the CRTC’s attempt to manhandle online content provider Netflix?...The real lesson of Nokia’s demise was that there is no substitute for being driven by what customers want, which is quality products and service at the lowest possible price...Every deviation from this relentless focus on what customers actually want makes your market a tasty morsel for the disrupters.
concentration_risk  Nokia  Finland  mobile_phones  disruption  Netflix  Uber  CRTC  complacency  accelerated_lifecycles  protectionism  nanny_state  customer_focus  change_agents  Finnish  demand-driven  lessons_learned  automotive_industry  downfall  change  warning_signs  signals  customer-driven  infallibility  overconfidence  hubris  staying_hungry 
october 2014 by jerryking
How a Netflix for sports could be a game-changer - The Globe and Mail
IAN McGUGAN
How a Netflix for sports could be a game-changer Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 08 2014,
sports  NBA  NHL  NFL  television  Netflix  broadcasting  streaming 
october 2014 by jerryking
It’s time to be honest: Netflix is parasitic - The Globe and Mail
SIMON HOUPT
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 03 2014,

Most industrialized countries subsidize domestic television and film production, partly because of scale: It costs a lot of money to make shows look even half as glossy as the stuff coming out of Hollywood, and if there’s a limited audience (say, because you’ve set your miniseries in the shipyards of Gdansk because you think it’s important that your fellow Poles know about their history), you’re probably not going to make your money back. American film and TV studios have global marketing machines to get their shows in front of consumers.

As it happens, Canadians do watch plenty of homemade TV, and not just hockey: Last month’s season finale of The Amazing Race Canada on CTV was the most-watched show of that week, with more than three million viewers. (Necessary disclosure: CTV’s parent company BCE Inc. owns 15 per cent of The Globe and Mail. Unnecessary disclosure: I’ve never watched The Amazing Race Canada.) Scripted dramas and comedies are popular, too – though they certainly don’t pull in the numbers here that Big Bang Theory does. Millions still tune in to domestic news and current affairs shows. And just try telling Mike Holmes, Sarah Richardson, Debbie Travis and, frankly, Ben Mulroney that Canadians don’t watch Canadian-made TV.

If you’re fine with all that disappearing because hey, Netflix is awesome and a sexy disruptor, so be it: That’s your choice, and you’re free to make it. Plenty of people love their weekly pilgrimage to Walmart and Costco, too.

But please, at least be honest with yourself and recognize that Netflix, like the retail disruptor Walmart before it, is a parasitic enterprise. Netflix is currently pocketing an estimated $300-million a year from Canadian consumers. Its total investment in original Canadian programming so far? One season of Trailer Park Boys: 10 half-hour episodes of cheaply made TV.
Netflix  CRTC  Simon_Houpt  television  disruption  Wal-Mart  parasitic 
october 2014 by jerryking
The CRTC needs to start thinking outside the idiot box - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Sep. 27 2014,

...Watching CRTC commissioners questioning cable-company executives and other stakeholders about whether Canadians should be able to choose which channels they pay for made it painfully clear that the commission’s usefulness is being outstripped by technology. ..The new scarce resource is not bandwidth, but viewers. Broadcasters and cable carriers that once had captive markets now compete with Netflix, Youtube and other Internet-based services that exist outside CRTC regulations. These newcomers, including millions of people producing and posting their own content, from Vines to videos, are stealing viewers and changing Canadians’ habits.....the reason why the CRTC still talks "television" – is because it remains the only avenue for Canada’s heavily regulated broadcasters and cable companies to hold onto their current revenue streams while they buy time and figure out what their next move should be. The CRTC’s most critical role – ensuring Canada’s stories are told, as required under the Broadcasting Act – has lately transmogrified from obliging broadcasters to produce Canadian content, and making sure the cable companies prioritize it, to something a little less noble: namely, temporarily protecting Canadian companies from the stateless, unregulated, market-driven onslaught of the Internet....There are significant advances coming down the pipe that are going to get here faster than the end of your next two-year cable contract. This is where the CRTC should be focusing its energies. The future is not “pick-and-pay”; the future is fibre-optic Internet in every home that is magnitudes faster than the current co-axial standard, and which will become the backbone of the digital economy.... The future is not limiting access or enforcing nationalistic content rules; the future is more border-ignoring services with more content than ever, some of which will inevitably be Canadian. The future is asking the question, Do we need a national television broadcaster, or would we be better off subsidizing a national content producer that sells its programming to the highest bidder? Or produces it with a taxpayer subsidy – and then instead of broadcasting via a traditional TV channel, simply posts it online for anyone to watch on Youtube and other sites?

Talking about TV – about pick-and-pay and basic packages and Canadian content – is at best a distraction while the future barrels down on us.
Netflix  Canada  CRTC  streaming  data  roaming  CATV  television  scarcity  statelessness  bandwidth  Youtube  future  Vine  content  DIY  bite-sized 
september 2014 by jerryking
Tech Wealth and Ideas Are Heading Into News
October 20, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By DAVID CARR

Silicon Valley and its various power brokers — some who had roles in putting the news business in harm’s way to begin with — are suddenly investing significant sums of money in preserving news capacity and quality. ... Next-generation news companies including Vice, Vox Media, BuzzFeed and Business Insider have all recently received significant investment. (In addition, Jeff Skoll, another eBay alum, backed Participant Media and now the TV channel Pivot, to make “socially relevant” films and television.)

The list goes on, but the trend is clear: quality news has become, if not sexy, suddenly attractive to smart digital money.....It does not take an M.B.A. to understand that the ability to capture consumers’ attention and move them around a platform, all the while extracting value, might come in handy in the media business. ITunes used cheap, uniformly priced content to animate the sales of devices like the iPod; Amazon used cheap devices like the Kindle to push lucrative content sales. EBay reduced the friction and suspicion between buyers and sellers of all kinds of goods. ...The willingness to answer bedeviling old questions in new ways does not ensure success, but it creates remarkable possibilities. “Both Jeff Bezos and Pierre Omidyar have a hacker’s ethos, a willingness to engage in lateral thinking to solve problems in a nonconventional way, to reject what has been taken for granted and MacGyver their way to solutions (aka mental_dexterity),” suggested Shane Snow, a founder of Contently, a marketplace for content creators.

Consider Amazon’s ability to lead consumers through a highly personalized array of choices.

“If you have a story that is read by a million people, that’s great, but how do you get those million people to read another story?” said Henry Blodget of Business Insider. “Amazon is extraordinary at customizing its site for every visitor. They do endless testing and understand stickiness and relevance in a way few media companies do.”

One of the secrets of Amazon (and Netflix) is that it never offered one site, but millions of customized sites. It is not hard to envision a carefully measured invitation at the bottom of a highly trafficked news article: “People who read this story are also reading ...” .
news  Silicon_Valley  moguls  entrepreneur  David_Carr  digital_media  Amazon  Second_Acts  disruption  Pierre_Omidyar  Jeff_Bezos  websites  personalization  Netflix  customization  testing  experimentation  growth_hacking  stickiness  relevance  newspapers  content  problem_solving  unconventional_thinking  smart_people  attention  Henry_Blodget  Contently  content_creators  power_brokers 
october 2013 by jerryking
For Netflix founder Reed Hastings, the show must go online - The Globe and Mail
STEVE LADURANTAYE - MEDIA REPORTER, TORONTO

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jun. 28 2013,
Netflix  Reed_Hastings  Steve_Ladurantaye 
august 2013 by jerryking
The Business of Being Netflix
February 14, 2013 | WSJ | By LOGAN HILL.

How the DVD-by-mail service is using streaming video and original content to become big-league TV's most unlikely adversary.
Netflix  streaming 
march 2013 by jerryking
For ‘House of Cards,’ Using Big Data to Guarantee Its Popularity - NYTimes.com
February 24, 2013 | NYT | By DAVID CARR

Rick Smolan wrote “The Human Face of Big Data.” “
Netflix, which has 27 million subscribers in the nation and 33 million worldwide, ran the numbers. It already knew that a healthy share had streamed the work of Mr. Fincher, the director of “The Social Network,” from beginning to end. And films featuring Mr. Spacey had always done well, as had the British version of “House of Cards.” With those three circles of interest, Netflix was able to find a Venn diagram intersection that suggested that buying the series would be a very good bet on original programming.

Big bets are now being informed by Big Data, and no one knows more about audiences than Netflix....But there are contrarian opinions, "“Data can only tell you what people have liked before, not what they don’t know they are going to like in the future,” he said. “A good high-end programmer’s job is to find the white spaces in our collective psyche that aren’t filled by an existing television show,” adding, those choices were made “in a black box that data can never penetrate.” "...The rise of the quants has some worried about the impact on quality and diversity of programming. Writing in Salon, Andrew Leonard wonders “how a reliance on Big Data might funnel craftsmanship in particular directions. What happens when directors approach the editing room armed with the knowledge that a certain subset of subscribers are opposed to jump cuts or get off on gruesome torture scenes” or are just interested in sexual romps?

Netflix insists that actual creative decisions will remain in the hands of the creators. “We don’t get super-involved on the creative side,” Mr. Evers said. “We hire the right people and give the freedom and budget to do good work.” That means that when Seth Rogen and Kristen Wiig are announced as special guests on coming episodes of “Arrested Development,” it is not because a statistical analysis told Netflix to do so.

But there are potential conflicts. Given that Netflix is in the business of recommending shows or movies, might its algorithms tilt in favor of the work it commissions as it goes deeper into original programming? It brings to mind how Google got crossed up when it began developing more products, and those began showing up in searches.

And there are concerns that the same thing that makes Netflix so valuable — it knows everything about us — could create problems if it is not careful with our data and our privacy.
David_Carr  Netflix  data_driven  massive_data_sets  streaming  data  television  digital_humanities  Asha_Isaacs  quantitative  big_bets  white_spaces  original_programming  human_psyche  craftsmanship  Venn_diagrams  content_creators  algorithms  biases  the_right_people 
february 2013 by jerryking
CRTC paints picture of Canada’s Netflix boom - The Globe and Mail
SEAN SILCOFF

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Sep. 04 2012,
Netflix  Canada  CRTC  streaming  data  roaming 
november 2012 by jerryking
As Netflix’s plot thickens, CEO strives to hone an edge
Sep. 10 2012 |The Globe and Mail | OMAR EL AKKAD - TECHNOLOGY REPORTER.

While such expansion helps to quickly build Netflix's customer base, it tends to hammer the bottom line. The company's business model relies on paying for content licenses up front, and then slowly making its money back through customer subscription fees. However, that means Netflix is currently losing money in many of its overseas markets – about $100-million a quarter from its United Kingdom and Latin America operations. Even in Canada, where Netflix constitutes the biggest single use of consumer Internet bandwidth, Netflix is only now starting to break even.
Netflix  Reed_Hastings  licensing  licensing_rights  subscriptions  streaming  web_video  challenges  opportunities  piracy  Omar_el_Akkad  competitive_landscape  digital_media  slight_edge 
september 2012 by jerryking
Netflix vs. Naysayers - WSJ.com
March 27, 2007 | WSJ | By NICK WINGFIELD

CEO Hastings Keeps Growth Strong; Plans for Future After Death of DVDs. In the decade since Netflix Inc. NFLX +3.07% began renting DVDs online, CEO Reed Hastings has faced down a murderers' row of rivals.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc., WMT -0.59% Amazon.com Inc. AMZN +0.72% and Blockbuster Inc. have all piled into the market with services that mail DVDs to consumers who've ordered them over the Web.

...WSJ: You've started letting some of your subscribers watch movies from your Web site. How seriously are you pushing into Internet-delivery of movies?

Hastings: We're taking it pretty aggressively. We're investing about $40 million into it this year. We feel that that's the appropriate size investment, given the size of the market. If you overinvest in a market, of course, a lot of the money is wasted.

If you underinvest, then someone else can get ahead of you. We'll be up to 5,000 films by the end of the year, open to all of our subscribers....

WSJ: Blockbuster was once dismissive of Netflix, but now they're taking you very seriously. Did their initial attitude affect the way you view potential threats to Netflix?

Hastings: Absolutely. We have to recognize that now there are tens and maybe hundreds of start-ups who think that they're going to eat Netflix's lunch. The challenge for a management team is to figure out which are real threats and which aren't.... It's conventional to say, "only the paranoid survive" but that's not true. The paranoid die because the paranoid take all threats as serious and get very distracted.(jk....which threats are worthy of my attention?==> distinguish between illusory and legitimate threats and fears.)

...WSJ: What are some examples of how you were choosy in reacting to potential threats to Netflix?

Hastings: There are markets that aren't going to get very big, and then there are markets that are going to get big, but they're not directly in our path. In the first camp we have small companies like Movielink -- a well-run company but not an attractive model for consumers, sort of a $4-download to watch a movie. We correctly guessed when it launched four years ago that this was not a threat and didn't react to it.

The other case I brought up is markets that are going to be very large markets, but we're just not the natural leader. Advertising supported online video, whether that's at CBS.com or YouTube -- great market, kind of next door to us. But we don't do advertising-supported video, we do subscription, so it would be a huge competence expansion for us. And it's not a threat to movies.
Netflix  Reed_Hastings  CEOs  DVDs  downloads  streaming  subscriptions  threats  large_markets  discernment  paranoia  distractions  overextended 
june 2012 by jerryking
How I Did It: Reed Hastings, Netflix, Internet Business Models Article - Inc. Article | Inc.com
Dec 1, 2005 | Inc. Magazine | As told to Patrick J. Sauer.
The founder of Netflix on developing a passion brand, and sustaining it as passions change.
Netflix  branding  Reed_Hastings  profile  business_models 
may 2012 by jerryking
Prizes for Solutions to Problems Play Valuable Role in Innovation
January 25. 2007 | WSJ | By DAVID WESSEL.

Prizes aren't a panacea. They won't replace corporate R&D labs or universities. Some problems -- a cure for cancer -- are just too big. Some require too much upfront investment. Some scientists are reluctant to admit defeat and surrender a problem.

Moreover, the secrecy on which businesses insist to protect intellectual-property rights has its downsides: "People are in a black hole," says Harvard's Mr. Lakhani. "They don't know anything beside whether they won or lost." Losers' knowledge isn't widely shared.

But prizes work in ways that conventional R&D doesn't, and finding ways to spur innovation is crucial to improving how well we -- and our children and grandchildren -- live.
David_Wessel  innovation  InnoCentive  Netflix  incentives  contests  problem_solving  prizes  bounties 
may 2012 by jerryking
As DVD stores fade into the sunset, fringe providers grab centre stage - The Globe and Mail
STEVE LADURANTAYE — MEDIA REPORTER
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 23, 2012
Netflix  dvds  Zip.ca  movies  Steve_Ladurantaye 
april 2012 by jerryking
Plans for 'TV Everywhere' Bog Down in Tangled Pacts - WSJ.com
March 5, 2012 | WSJ |by SAM SCHECHNER and SHALINI RAMACHANDRAN
television  Hulu  Netflix  Google 
march 2012 by jerryking
Shuttered: Digital cameras killed Kodak, but smartphones will kill digital cameras | Features | FP Tech Desk | Financial Post
Jan 19, 2012 – Jan 20, 2012 2:25 PM ET

Eastman Kodak, which invented the hand-held camera and helped bring the world the first pictures from the moon, has filed for bankruptcy protection, capping a prolonged plunge for one of the United States' best-known companies.

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creative_destruction  Apple  iPhone  Blockbuster  cameras  Canon  Kodak  HTC  Netflix  Nikon  Nokia  photography  smartphones  digital_cameras 
january 2012 by jerryking
Netflix, Amazon.com Sign Content-Streaming Deals - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 | WSJ | by STU WOO And MICHELLE KUNG.

Netflix, Amazon Add to Movies
Deals Signed With DreamWorks and Fox, Respectively, Indicate Hollywood Is Embracing Streaming
Netflix  Amazon  streaming  DreamWorks  Hollywood 
september 2011 by jerryking
H.Bloom Wants to Be the 'Netflix of Flowers' - NYTimes.com
September 22, 2011, 7:00 am
Starting the ‘Netflix of Flowers’
By JESSICA BRUDER
e-commerce  Netflix  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  florists 
september 2011 by jerryking
The Math of Hit TV Shows - WSJ.com
MAY 12, 2011 | WSJ | By AMY CHOZICK. The Math of a Hit TV Show. For New Shows, Networks Try Familiar, With a Little Twist
television  Netflix  NBC  broadcasting  CATV  pitches  sitcoms  dramas 
may 2011 by jerryking
Charlie Rose - Reed Hastings
May 4, 2011 | Charlie Rose Show | Charlie Rose interviews Reed Hastings.
Charlie_Rose  Reed_Hastings  Netflix  web_video  interviews  streaming  movies  television 
may 2011 by jerryking
Canadian broadcasters face threat of web-based TV services - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY — Media reporter
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 15, 2011 6:53PM EDT
Last updated Friday, Apr. 15, 201
Netflix  broadcasting  disruption  television  digital_media 
april 2011 by jerryking
Document Page: The Evolving Mission Of Google
Carr, David
The New York Times
03-21-2011
"There is no doubt in my mind they are becoming a media company," said
Mike Vorhaus, the president of the media consulting firm Magid Advisors.
"They are providing content to consumers and selling ads against it --
sounds like a media company to me."

So what, you might ask. What difference does it make what occupation
Google writes down on its driver's license?

For starters, being in the media business means looking at media a
little differently. Google has been spending a lot of time and some
significant money trying to help traditional media businesses stay in
business, in part because Google does not want its search engines to
crawl across a wasteland of machine-generated info-spam and amateur
content with limited allure.
Google  Hal_Varian  Netflix  competitive_landscape  mass_media  media  YouTube  strategy  sports  content  David_Carr  digital_media  layer_mastery 
march 2011 by jerryking
Cinderella Dreams, Shoestring Budget? No Problem - WSJ.com
* FEBRUARY 16, 2011, By COLLEEN DEBAISE.

If consumers can rent a movie by mail, or wheels on a whim, why not a
couture gown should the occasion strike? That's the concept behind Rent
the Runway, a website launched in November 2009 that promises to give
"every woman the opportunity to be Cinderella for the night," says
co-founder Jennifer Hyman. Customers can choose from an array of
designer duds for one-time wear at a fraction of the frocks' retail
price tag. (A little black dress worth $1,250, for instance, rents for
$150, plus shipping and $5 insurance.) Returns are as simple as dropping
the Dolce & Gabbana or Diane von Furstenberg into a pre-paid
mailing envelope. To date, Rent the Runway appears to be leading a
charmed life of its own, signing up 800,000 members, growing February
sales at 10 times last year's rate, securing $17 million in venture
capital and becoming cash-flow positive in under a year.
10x  rentals  fashion  start_ups  women  entrepreneur  business_models  Netflix  second_hand  whims  haute_couture 
march 2011 by jerryking
Is Netflix Becoming a Television Station? - Megan McArdle - Business - The Atlantic
Mar 16 2011 Megan McArdle - Business - The Atlantic Megan McArdle - Business - The Atlantic
Netflix  core_competencies 
march 2011 by jerryking
DVD's farewell
Oct 23, 2010 \ Financial Times. pg. 16 \ Anonymous. Indeed,
Netflix faces a challenging future. The company dominates the US
DVD-by-post market, its early lead giving it a cost advantage as
subscriber numbers rose rapidly. But online it faces competition for
rentals from aggressive competitors, such as Amazon and Apple's iTunes.

More crucially, Netflix must buy films and programming from media
companies enjoying a profitable status quo, with little reason to
encourage disruption of the existing system of cable and satellite TV
distribution by supplying Netflix cheaply. Analysts still forecast sales
roaring upwards in the years ahead but profitability is expected to
plateau soon. With the stock valued at more than 50 times prospective
earnings, investors may be dancing prematurely on DVD's grave.
ProQuest  Netflix  dvds  streaming  Amazon  Apple 
october 2010 by jerryking
At Netflix, the picture is darkening
Oct. 06, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | DAVID MILSTEAD
Netflix  streaming 
october 2010 by jerryking
3 Big Challenges Facing Netflix
Sep 27 2010 | The Atlantic | Daniel Indiviglio
Netflix  challenges 
september 2010 by jerryking
Netflix Faces New Competition in Streaming - NYTimes.com
Sept. 26, 2010 | NYT | VERNE G. KOPYTOFF. Netflix faces a no.
of well-financed & innovative companies e.g. Apple, Amazon, Google
as well as the CATV providers. This war will not be won by perfecting
the logistics of moving DVDs, but by whoever can best negotiate with
Hollywood studios..The weakness of the streaming service is movie
selection. Netflix’s catalog of 20K streaming movies does not include
many recent Hollywood hits because Netflix has been unable to negotiate
rights from all the studios....The industry is still very young &
many companies are experimenting with business models & expanding
their video libraries. Streaming requires less infrastructure &
therefore has lower barriers to entry than a system built on sorting
machines & distn. or even brick- &-mortar stores. Netflix earns
less $rev./cust. as streaming catches on because customers are
subscribing to less expensive plans, with fewer discs and unlimited
streaming. But the company is gaining subs. @ nearly 50 %/yr.
Netflix  Reed_Hastings  Hollywood  studios  competitive_landscape  streaming  licensing  business_models  YouTube  licensing_rights 
september 2010 by jerryking
Reed Hastings The Netflix CEO brings video streaming to Canada, shaking up the cable industry
Sep 25, 2010 | The Globe and Mail. pg. F.2 | John Lorinc.
Having upended the video-rental industry (Blockbuster, following years
of decline, filed for bankruptcy in the U.S. this week), Netflix moved
into streaming in 2007. This shift puts the $1.7-billion-a-year (U.S.)
firm in direct competition with the cable and satellite sector, with its
video-on-demand offerings. Consumers can stream Netflix's huge library
of movies and TV shows through their game consoles or computers.
VoD  ProQuest  Netflix  Reed_Hastings  Canada  John_Lorinc  web_video  streaming  CATV  Rogers_Media  Shaw  Blockbuster  bankruptcies 
september 2010 by jerryking
Everybody’s Business - Netflix Stays One Step Ahead of Creative Destruction - NYTimes.com
August 7, 2010 | NYT | By DAMON DARLIN. "Established
companies’ historical inability to change is what makes Netflix’s
maneuvers so fascinating. It foresaw its possible demise at the moment
of its own creation. The company was formed in 1997 with the idea of
sending movie DVDs, then a new technology, through the mail. But Reed
Hastings, the founder and chief executive, and early employees,
recognized that delivery of movies over the Internet would replace the
mail carrier soon. They named the company Netflix, not Mailflix or DVDs
by Mail....Netflix says the mail train is likely to keep chugging for an
additional 20 years. But it has managed to do what few companies have
done by leaping to faster transportation. Harrowing, yes. But consumers
should enjoy the ride."
beforemath  creative_destruction  Netflix  Kodak  Clayton_Christensen  Reed_Hastings  dvds  movies  streaming  Amazon  Wal-Mart 
august 2010 by jerryking
Unboxed - Crowdsourcing Works, When It’s Focused - NYTimes.com
July 18, 2009 | new York Times | By STEVE LOHR. New research
suggests that open-innovation models succeed only when carefully
designed for a particular task and when the incentives are tailored to
attract the most effective collaborators. “There is this misconception
that you can sprinkle crowd wisdom on something and things will turn out
for the best,” said Thomas W. Malone, director of the Center for
Collective Intelligence at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
“That’s not true. It’s not magic.” Success requires that companies have
a culture open to outside ideas and a system for vetting and acting on
them.
Steve_Lohr  crowdsourcing  collective_intelligence  business_models  open-innovation  Netflix 
july 2009 by jerryking
Ping - We Rent Movies, So Why Not College Textbooks?
July 4, 2009 | - NYTimes.com | By MIGUEL HELFT. Chegg.com, a
company that rents textbooks to college students. The textbook business
is wildly inefficient. With demand for good deals on textbooks running
high, Chegg’s success comes in large part from being able to address
those inefficiencies. While Chegg primarily rents books, it is also
essentially acting as a kind of “market maker,” gathering books from
sellers at the end of a semester and renting — or sometimes selling —
them to other students at the start of a new one. That provides
liquidity to the market.
business_models  Netflix  textbooks  second_hand  Colleges_&_Universities  e-commerce  rentals  Chegg  inefficiencies  market_liquidity  market_makers 
july 2009 by jerryking

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