Twitter
RT : GCHQ has proposal to surveill encrypted messaging and phone calls. The idea is to use weaknesses in the “identity s…
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2 days ago
How Subscriptions Are Remaking Corporate America

While Apple investors fret over the latest iPhone sales, the market has rewarded Microsoft for locking in a regular stream of revenue tied to the cloud and its Office 365 franchise. Those old Windows software boxes? They’ve been replaced by shiny mobile apps tied to monthly payments.

Sure enough, Microsoft (ticker: MSFT) shares rose 3.8% in November, even as Apple (AAPL) tumbled. Despite Apple’s user base of one-billion-plus iPhones, the company’s shareholders still worry every year about the next device. It’s an exhausting cycle for consumers, investors, and, surely, Apple itself.

Subscriptions offer a way off the product hamster wheel. Recurring payments have changed the way that Americans consume software, music, movies, television, fitness, clothing, and food. Even tractor maker Deere (DE) is trying to sell subscriptions to farmers.

The market never knows how to price Apple. This time may be no different. Either way, it’s about time investors started caring about cash flow.

Investors, somewhat belatedly, have discovered the subscription payoff. The market now values Microsoft at $23 for every dollar of profit it generates, while Apple’s price/earnings ratio is mired at a hardware-like 13 times.

The jump for Adobe is really eye opening. I knew their subscription service was going well, but I didn’t know how well.

In 2012—the last full year it sold boxed software—Adobe earned $2.35 a share. This year, the company is projected to earn $6.82, going to $7.98 next year.

It’s a stunning jump for a 36-year-old outfit. The stock’s gain has outpaced earnings growth because investors are paying more for every dollar of profit. The stock has risen 793% since Adobe outlined its subscription strategy in 2011. Adobe trades at 31 times next year’s earnings projections. In 2012, the multiple was 12.

This is the quote that went viral.

“Retention is the new growth,” Narayen tells Barron’s. The subscription model, he adds, has made the company more responsive, with developers tracking customer habits and updating software in nearly real time.

“What is so obvious in retrospect with a transaction-based software model is that you’re at least two steps removed from the end customer,” Narayen adds.
business  software  saas  investing  finance 
2 days ago
The Thumb Zone

Unfortunately, phone manufacturers and software developers have all but thrown the one-hand principle out the window in recent years. The allure of larger and larger screens has decreased the thumb-reachable percentage of the screen significantly. And yet, much of our software, particularly on iOS, has failed to accommodate.[2]

When the first iPhone was released, with its puny 3.5-inch screen, I could easily reach every corner with either thumb. On an iPhone XS Max, with its gargantuan 6.5-inch screen, I’m lucky to reach even 60% of the total screen area without a second hand. And yet, Navigation bars, with their all-important Cancel and Done buttons, and many other controls are still located at the top of the screen, way out of thumb’s reach.[3]
ios  ui  design 
2 days ago
Mechanical Keyboards - Matt Gemmell
An ode to mechanical keyboards.

You can type using whatever you want, but isn’t there something minimising about the snick snick snick or the tak tak tak of modern keyboards? A certain leeching-away of colour, and feeling, and momentum? And, far worse, isn’t it almost soul-destroying to deliver the Return key’s coup de grâce of conclusion, but only being rewarded with something that sounds like… plik?

I’ll take my CHOK CHOK CHOK or my CLACK CLACK CLACK any day. Writing feels like doing something in the world, instead of just flicking slender characters into an electronic void. I wouldn’t give up the miracle of my iPad for almost anything, but please don’t also take away the artillery-barrage of the way we used to compose.

When I’m working on a fast-paced scene, I want the orchestra keeping up with me. When I hit Backspace, I want it to be punitive. And when I finish a paragraph, I want a one-gun salute for my efforts.
writing  keyboard  humor 
3 days ago
The Cost Of JavaScript In 2018 – Addy Osmani – Medium
A lot of the advice in here make the web in 2018 sound like an tiny embedded system. You get a 170 kB budget.
javascript  performance 
3 days ago
Microsoft Edge: Making the web better through more open source collaboration - Windows Experience Blog
From monopoly in the 1990’s to gone in 2018. Google is in Microsoft’s monopoly position now.

Today we’re announcing that we intend to adopt the Chromium open source project in the development of Microsoft Edge on the desktop to create better web compatibility for our customers and less fragmentation of the web for all web developers.

Apple and google couldn’t collaborate in the WebKit repo because of competing priorities. I have a tough time believing Microsoft and Google will play nice for long.
microsoft  business  browser  IE  InternetExplorer  google  GoogleChrome  opensource 
3 days ago
Proof That iOS Still Hasn’t Gotten Undo Right
iOS has a long way to go when it comes to the level of consistency and polish of macOS.

Personally, if I were designing an iOS drawing app I’d probably go the first route, and follow Apple Notes’s lead with “↺” and “↻” buttons. But to Procreate’s credit, they clearly know these multi-finger tap gestures are both unusual, not intuitive, and utterly non-discoverable, because the very first thing they do when you first launch the app is teach you about them. Think about that: iOS user interface conventions are so shallow, so widely and wildly inconsistent, that an app proclaimed by Apple as the very best of the year has to start, as the very first thing you see when you launch it, by teaching you how to use Undo. That’s a sad state of affairs.

Interesting point about the menu bar. The humble menu bar may be one of the most innovative and enduringly useful UI design patterns of all time.

I’m left even more impressed by the original Mac team who got so much of these things right early on. iOS is eleven years old now and it’s still struggling with UI design consistency or design leverage.

What it comes down to, I think, is that the menu bar has become a vastly underestimated foundation of desktop computing. Once heralded, the menu bar is now seen as a vestige. I’m not arguing that iOS should have a Mac-style menu bar. I’m simply pointing out that without one, iOS is an 11-year-old platform that is still floundering to establish consistent conventions for some basic features, let alone complex ones, that are simple and obvious on the Mac.

Imagine going back in time to tell a MacPaint user in 1985 that they’d have to learn how to use Undo in an Apple-award-winning paint app in 2018. That’s where we are.
ios  apple  design  patterns  ui  gui  daringfireball 
3 days ago
Electron and the Decline of Native Apps
Agree 100%. We’re currently in a state of transition when it comes to application platforms and design. Will the future be chaos or will be find a new, better point in the design space?

From a thread on Twitter by SwiftOnScurity about the demise of EdgeHTML at Microsoft.

The Mojave App Store app certainly isn’t written using Electron. But the problem with Electron apps isn’t really Electron — it’s the decline in demand for well-made native Mac apps. And that is ominous. The biggest threat to the Mac isn’t iPads, Chromebooks, or Windows 2-in-1’s — it’s apathy towards what makes great Mac apps great.
apple  design  culture  javascript  os  macos 
3 days ago
How Does setState Know What to Do?
Really nice explainer of how part of react works. Also, a good example of dependency injection.
react  javascript  dependencyinjection  programming 
3 days ago
Here’s Why Facebook Bought WhatsApp For $19 Billion
More evidence of facebook’s moral bankruptcy. Spying on users private VPN traffic to find acquisition targets. Ingenious but also diabolical.

In February 2014, Facebook purchased the messaging service WhatsApp for $19 billion. The acquisition price was staggering for an app that made little money and was largely popular outside the United States.

Now, newly published confidential Facebook emails and charts show exactly why CEO Mark Zuckerberg spent a small fortune for the messaging app. For months, the company had been tracking WhatsApp obsessively using Onavo, a VPN and data analytics app, whose data showed that the messaging app was not just a rising competitor, but a potential Facebook killer.
facebook  business  whatsapp  ethics  vpn  privacy 
4 days ago
Goodbye, EdgeHTML - The Mozilla Blog
Wow. From monopoly king of browsers to gone in 18 years.
microsoft  browser  monopoly  chrome  google 
6 days ago
How to Game the App Store
Oligarchs and monopolists can’t be bothered to regulate their own systems unless forced from the outside. Left to their own devices they’ll follow the path of least resistance that makes them rich. Perfect example is cracking down on fraud in the App Store. Apple gets a cut of all revenue, so there’s no strong pressure to crack down on fraud. In a perverse way, fraud makes them money.

I’ve been pestering Apple for years publicly and privately about the manipulation and outright scams going on in the App Store. Apple has made some progress here and there, but overall Apple’s strictness in some areas and hands off approach in others has disproportionately rewarded bad actors while stifling conscientious developers.

As I’ve said many times before, the App Store is not a free market. Apple can and does dramatically shape the App Store economy. Similar to how governments shape economies through tax law and other policies, Apple shapes the App Store economy through App Review policies, App Store implementation details, editorial decisions, the App Store search algorithm, and in so many other subtle (and not so subtle) ways. I’d love to see Apple wield that power to shape the App Store in ways that will sustain and encourage meaningful development instead of continuing to allow the deck to be stacked against it.
apple  fraud  business  monopoly  AppStore  software 
8 days ago
Twitter
This thread taught me a bit about the different mindsets. Might be useful in the UK as well.
from twitter
8 days ago
Twitter
Electron is a cancer murdering both macOS and Windows as it proliferates. Microsoft must offer a drop-in version wi…
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9 days ago
2nd Ave Deli
My favorite pastrami in NYC.
nyc  restaurants  food 
9 days ago
The Fun Is Back in Social Media…Again!
This rhymes with the point about small communities from the post, Complexity and Strategy.

TikTok probably feels a lot like Flickr or Twitter in the early days, where everyone is exploring and the users are all kind of doing the same things with it. As networks get bigger, they reach a point where there isn’t just one big group exploring the same space together. Instead, you have many big groups who have different goals and desires that all need to fit under one roof (essentially, politics becomes necessary)…and that can get messy, particularly when the companies running these apps want to appeal to the widest possible audience for capitalization purposes.
social  media  software  evolution  complexity  technology  culture  politics 
9 days ago
Twitter
One of my students has used the word "fucktangular" in an informal essay to describe a situation that was complicat…
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9 days ago
De-facto Closed Source: The Case For Understandable Software
On the npm event-stream fiasco.

You want to download thousands of lines of useful, but random, code from the internet, for free, run it in a production web server, or worse, your user’s machine, trust it with your paying users’ data and reap that sweet dough. We all do. But then you can’t be bothered to check the license, understand the software you are running and still want to blame the people who make your business a possibility when mistakes happen, while giving them nothing for it? This is both incompetence and entitlement.
opensource  software  culture  programming 
10 days ago
Twitter
RT : Interesting thread worth reading.
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12 days ago
Twitter
RT : Ever wondered what an Ethernet frame looks like on the wire? No? Well here it is anyway.

10mbit, probably ARP.
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12 days ago
Twitter
And I think that’s something that liberalism, leftism, anyone on the left needs to grasp over the next few years. I…
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12 days ago
Twitter
There’s a myth that a lot of liberals like to tell themselves, that bigotry is caused by fear and ignorance and tha…
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12 days ago
Twitter
Today's news about the Marriott breach should finally drive home a lesson that has been missed for years now: "we'v…
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12 days ago
Twitter
“I’m running 5 minutes late” = I’m running 10 minutes late

“I’m running 10 minutes late” = I’m running 20 minutes…
from twitter_favs
13 days ago
Blazingly fast querying on huge tables by avoiding joins
Computing id’s to select from is faster than joining.
database  sql  performance 
13 days ago
Lessons from 4 Years of GraphQL - YouTube
Really good stuff about how to evolve a project over time, and how to do incremental adoption.
graphql  video  software  evolution 
13 days ago
rant-dom: SubEthaEdit 5 – Now free and open source!
SubEthaEdit was one of my first editors on early OS X. Fond memories. This post is a history of its making.
osx  history  editor 
14 days ago
How Surveillance Inhibits Freedom of Expression - Schneier on Security
An article to give people who say, “I have nothing to hide”.

Ultimately, this fear stagnates society in two ways. The first is that the presence of surveillance means society cannot experiment with new things without fear of reprisal, and that means those experiments­ -- if found to be inoffensive or even essential to society -- ­cannot slowly become commonplace, moral, and then legal. If surveillance nips that process in the bud, change never happens. All social progress­ -- from ending slavery to fighting for women's rights­ -- began as ideas that were, quite literally, dangerous to assert. Yet without the ability to safely develop, discuss, and eventually act on those assertions, our society would not have been able to further its democratic values in the way that it has.

The second way surveillance hurts our democratic values is that it encourages society to make more things illegal. Consider the things you do­ -- the different things each of us does­ -- that portions of society find immoral. Not just recreational drugs and gay sex, but gambling, dancing, public displays of affection. All of us do things that are deemed immoral by some groups, but are not illegal because they don't harm anyone. But it's important that these things can be done out of the disapproving gaze of those who would otherwise rally against such practices.
privacy  surveillance  government  policy  censorship  business 
16 days ago
Jeff Bezos, Jack Ma, and The Quest to Kill eBay – Steve Yegge – Medium
This seems pretty important for all the Twitter clones out there. How to compete with an existing business with strong network effects.

So Life Lesson #2, and this one is pretty goddamn important, is: Don’t try to beat a network by making a clone with improvements. It ain’t gonna work. There is too much gravitational inertia in the original network; nobody is incentivized to leave it.

There are some approaches that will work, and we’re going to explore two of them: Jeff’s and Jack’s. Both approaches require you to get into an entirely different market and build a network there. You can’t beat a strong network head-on, but you can flank it.

let’s stop and get Life Lesson #3 out of the way: Don’t give up on a good idea. Despite the swift and embarrassing failure of Amazon Auctions, Jeff Bezos never gave up. This is probably the most important thing I ever learned from him, and I learned a lot from him.

Contrast this approach with Google’s, which went something like this: Try something quickly, see if it succeeds, and if not, abandon it forever and MOVE ON. This strategy started with Eric Schmidt and “let 1000 flowers bloom”, a philosophy that Google ran with through Eric’s tenure as CEO. The core idea was that you need to “generate luck” by doing a whole bunch of stuff, and eventually some of it will get lucky.

A key problem with Eric’s approach is that it needed more scale than even Google could generate. In order to generate luck, you don’t need a thousand ideas, you need a million of them.
business  technology  software  innovation 
17 days ago
Why Good Developers Write Bad Unit Tests
File under: DRY as Cement

Good advice all around. Includes how to write good helper functions.

On the difference between test code and production code.

Before blindly applying DRY to your tests, think about what will make the problem obvious when a test fails. Refactoring may reduce duplication, but it also increases complexity and potentially obscures information when things break.

On good test names:

A function called ReturnsNullptrWhenStreamIsEmpty would feel overly verbose in other contexts, but it’s a good test name. If you saw it break, you’d immediately know the class was mishandling empty data streams. You could likely fix the bug without ever reading the test’s implementation. That’s the mark of a good test name.

In summary:

Most importantly, tests should maximize simplicity while minimizing abstraction. A good test allows the reader to understand intended behavior and diagnose issues without ever leaving the test function.
testing  dry  programming  design  patterns  tdd 
17 days ago
Twitter
2/ It is true, in my experience, that women & URMs & URM-women and anyone not inherently advantaged will hesitate s…
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18 days ago
Errata Security: Some notes about HTTP/3
Background on QUIC and TCP. How QUIC modernizes TCP to address modern networking issues in 2018. e.g. mobile
network  tcp  history  quic  http 
18 days ago
Twitter
RT : If you've been to the PyLadies Auction , you know what a great event it is. We're looking for sponsors:…
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19 days ago
Twitter
Corporate responsibility doesnt seem to happen unless corps R compelled 2 pay fair wages, health ins & motherfuckin…
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19 days ago
I hate manager READMEs – Camille Fournier – Medium

One of the worst parts of these docs is the airing of your own perceived personality faults. I suck at niceties. I get heated sometimes in discussions. I don’t give praise very much. If you know you have foibles/quirks that you in fact want to change about yourself, do the work. Don’t put them out there for your team to praise you for the intention to do the work, just do it. And while you get to decide which of your foibles/quirks/challenges you will or will not change about yourself, as the manager, it is on you to make your team effective and that may in fact mean changing some things about yourself that you don’t want to change. Writing them down feels good, like you’ve been honest and vulnerable and no one can be surprised when you behave badly, after all you warned them! But it does not excuse these bad behaviors, and it certainly does not take the sting away when someone feels shut down by your rudeness or unhappy from a lack of positive feedback. If you must write a README, please skip this section. Keep your bad behaviors to yourself, and hold yourself accountable for their impact.
management  culture  leadership 
21 days ago
UK minister says airlines used "exploitative algorithms" to split up families unless they paid extra
This isn’t a theoretical issue. It would hinder orderly evacuation of an aircraft during an emergency.
software  ethics  programming 
21 days ago
Twitter
How to get the most benefit from AWS ES. Thread.
from twitter
21 days ago
Twitter
This thread holds good advice for any conference. I’ve used it successfully at many ’s. I’m grateful for th…
from twitter
22 days ago
Twitter
This is a great example of how the big cloud providers can add customer value over time by learning from real custo…
from twitter
22 days ago
APFS Reverse Engineered Presentation
Presentation given at Objective By the Sea conference.
Via Michael Tsai.
apple  apfs  filesystem  presentation  macos  ios 
22 days ago
Twitter
"You have a secret room?"
"Yes, in here. For the most valuable thing I have, when I need to keep it safe."
"I am ho…
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22 days ago
Twitter
With BTC down almost 80% from peak (from 20K to ~4K) & all other cryptocurrencies down 80% to 99% I rest my case th…
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22 days ago
Twitter
Crystal ice covers the trees and thick snow falls from the sky. Under the ever-shining star of the north, I was bor…
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22 days ago
Jason Snell on the New iPad Pros: ‘A Computer, Not a PC’
I definitely agree with this. The iPad isn’t new. It’s being hamstrung by having to run an OS optimized for a phone.

But, I will object to one thing: the iPad feels like a young platform, yes, but it’s not young. It’s over 8 years old. Steve Jobs was still around to introduce it. When the Mac was 8 years old in 1992, System 7 had been launched and it was a very advanced platform, suitable for work of any kind. The new iPad Pro hardware might be the best consumer computer hardware ever made — the only rivals are the iPhone XS and XR. But software-wise, the iPad platform is nowhere near as far along after 8 years as the Mac was a generation ago. The iPhone is. But the iPad is not, and I don’t see how anyone can deny that.
apple  ipad  review  ios 
23 days ago
Write Freely
Write Freely is free and open source software for starting a minimalist, federated blog. It supports ActivityPub.
blogging  opensource  writing  notebook  journal  golang  decentralized 
23 days ago
Don't work "remotely" - Blair Reeves
Money quote:

The great irony of our time is that hundreds of thousands of knowledge industry workers are forced to live near giant metropolitan areas at very high cost and with long commute times simply so that they can congregate at an office, don noise-canceling headphones, and then communicate with each other primarily through email and Slack.
remote  work  business  culture  consulting  career 
23 days ago
ongoing by Tim Bray · Post-REST
Good read. It’s remarkable how much of this prediction of the future is essentially from the Enterprise Integration Patterns book. I’ll have to give that a re-read.

It seems in­evitable to me that, par­tic­u­lar­ly in the world of high-throughput high-elasticity cloud-native app­s, we’re go­ing to see a steady in­crease in re­liance on per­sis­tent con­nec­tion­s, or­ches­tra­tion, and message/event-based log­ic. If you’re not us­ing that stuff al­ready, now would be a good time to start learn­ing.

But I bet that for the fore­see­able fu­ture, a high pro­por­tion of all re­quests to ser­vices are go­ing to have (ap­prox­i­mate­ly) HTTP se­man­tic­s, and that for most con­trol planes and quite a few da­ta planes, REST still pro­vides a good clean way to de­com­pose com­pli­cat­ed prob­lem­s, and its ex­treme sim­plic­i­ty and re­silience will mean that if you want to de­sign net­worked app­s, you’re still go­ing to have to learn that way of think­ing about things.
rest  http  design  graphql  api  timbray  patterns 
23 days ago
No Mercy / No Malice
On the Amazon HQ2 debacle.

Amazon's HQ2 search was not a contest but a con. Amazon will soon have 3 HQs. And guess what? The Bezos family owns homes in all 3 cities. And, you'll never believe it, the new HQs (if you can call them that) will be within a bike ride, or quick Uber, from Bezos's homes in DC and NYC. The middle finger on Amazon's other hand came into full view when they announced they were awarding their HQ to not one, but two cities. So, really, the search, and hyped media topic, should have been called "Two More Offices."

We are not only witnessing the 1% pull further away from the 99% in our hunger games economy, but certain metros begin to pull away from the rest. Of more than 400 metros in the US, five account for over 20% of the growth. And, you guessed it, two of those five are DC and NYC. This is not Amazon's problem, but this was an opportunity to do something extraordinary. Locating HQ2 in Detroit would have been transformative.

Despite all the whining about the inefficiencies of government, the public sector has hemorrhaged jobs as they struggle with runaway pension obligations and propositions/suicide pacts (like the need for two-thirds approval from the State Senate) that inhibit their ability to raise taxes. These 238 cities now have dramatically fewer resources to woo other firms that are genuine about investing in urban areas. Billboards in Calgary, cacti sent from Tucson ... “HQ2” was Amazon's term for "bad faith."
amazon  business  culture  monopoly  JeffBezos  ethics 
24 days ago
Mistakes You Apparently Just Have to Make Yourself – Hacker Noon
Boy do I love the term non-transferable knowledge.

Over the years I’ve been collecting examples of what I can only describe as non-transferable knowledge. These are all definitely huge mistakes, but no amount of counseling or thought leadership is sufficient to wave people away from them. You have to touch these stoves before you’ll believe that they’re hot.
programming  sysadmin  devops  culture  mentorship  humor 
24 days ago
You Can’t Have a Rollback Button – Skyliner
The rollback button is a lie. There’s more state to any system than what’s in the source code. The environment will get you every time.

The fundamental problem with rolling back to an old version is that web applications are not self-contained, and therefore they do not have versions. They have a current state. The state consists of the application code and everything that it interacts with. Databases, caches, browsers, and concurrently-running copies of itself.
deployment  devops 
24 days ago
Singing The Blues: Taking Down An Insider Threat - Threader App
This was a great story about internal pentesting. Useful lessons for Blue Team and Red Team alike.
security  hacking  humor  twitter  pentest 
24 days ago
Twitter
You want to stay relevant as a developer for the next 10 years?

There are 3 major things you should focus on....…
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24 days ago
Twitter
"In 2001, about 64% of the money generated in Silicon Valley went to workers. By 2016, that was down to 60%. The dr…
from twitter_favs
24 days ago
The Zig Programming Language
Zig aims to be a competitor to C in the systems programming language space.

This might be my favorite feature of the language.

Small, simple language. Focus on debugging your application rather than debugging your knowledge of your programming language.
programming  language  clang  zig  llvm 
24 days ago
The Grass Is Always Greener - My Struggles With Rust
Going from Python to Rust is... challenging. The grass isn’t much greener over in Rustville. I was surprised to learn that you can’t extend existing Traits on objects you don’t own. Also the amount of boilerplate involved in error handling was surprising.
programming  python  rust 
24 days ago
Twitter
The real heroes of the Bond films are the villains' product teams -- able to combine aesthetics and function in sca…
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25 days ago
When to put down the tools – Mike Monteiro – Medium
On the Google Walkout in 2018, and Facebook's shameful actions to silence critics after a series of scandals.

If you don't think ethics are part of your product or work, you're wrong. Customers are watching.
After watching 22,000 Google employees walk out in protest of their company’s unethical actions, I know someone’s watching the gate. I’m more inclined to trust them. Not necessarily because I trust the company, but because the employees have shown me that I can trust them.
programming  ethics  facebook 
25 days ago
Twitter
RT : If you use RED, GREEN, YELLOW to report project status, try starting your projects off as RED instead of GREEN. You…
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26 days ago
Jeff Tweedy | Chicago magazine | December 2018
"I like spending time with comedians. They’re the only people who are more unhappy than musicians."
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26 days ago
Electoral College confusions
On electoral college reform. By Lawrence Lessig.
elections  government  policy  legal  law  LawrenceLessig 
27 days ago
The C++ Build Process Explained
Boy do I wish this existed when I started my job as a build and release engineer.
c  c++  programming  build  tutorial  compiler  cpp 
28 days ago
Better Living Through Non-Zero Sum Games

The basic premise of the book is that history has a direction which favors co-operation and non-zero sum games, and that causes an increase in complexity. Starting from the first replicating molecule which co-operated with an outer layer to form first proto-cell, evolutionary and cultural history is full of examples where two entities come together to survive and progress a lot more than they would have done individually. This co-operative entity fares much better than two individual entities because of specialization. If two entities are in the same boat — that they win together or lose together — then trust is implicit. In a non-zero sum game, trust causes entities to focus on what they do best.
evolution  culture  economics  technology  complexity  book 
28 days ago
Researchers discover seven new Meltdown and Spectre attacks | ZDNet

Researchers say they've discovered the seven new CPU attacks while performing "a sound and extensible systematization of transient execution attacks" -- a catch-all term the research team used to describe attacks on the various internal mechanisms that a CPU uses to process data, such as the speculative execution process, the CPU's internal caches, and other internal execution stages.

cpu  security  hardware  performance  intel  arm  amd  meltdown  spectre 
28 days ago
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