jeffhammond + fiction   219

I Love David Lynch’s Dune in Spite of Its Faults | Tor.com
I turned seven the year Star Wars celebrated its 20th anniversary. The space opera film trilogy’s re-release on VHS turned into a three-night movie event in my house, which in turn spawned my lifelong love affair with the franchise.
dune  science  fiction 
18 hours ago by jeffhammond
American War by Omar El Akkad review – terrorism in a future US | Books | The Guardian
Set in a late-21st century US ravaged by global warming, this ambitious debut encourages western readers to put themselves in the shoes of the world’s displaced peoples A novel, like a person, doesn’t have to have a purpose.
books  science  fiction 
5 days ago by jeffhammond
302 Found
The girls were all lined up, kneeling, like little Russian dolls. Their elders, clad in formal robes, too, smiled down at them, beaming. They gestured, as if to urge them on. “Thank you, Father Protector, for blessing us. For teaching us.
fiction  society  stories  by  umair  haque  on 
12 days ago by jeffhammond
The Peripheral by William Gibson – a glorious ride into the future | Books | The Guardian
If you were to plot your reading of a William Gibson book on a graph – reading speed on one axis, progress through the book on another – it would produce a strange, choppy waveform.
science  fiction  writing 
19 days ago by jeffhammond
When AI rules the world: what SF novels tell us about our future overlords | Books | The Guardian
It’s only March and already we’ve seen a computer beat a Go grandmaster and a self-driving car crash into a bus. The world is waking up to the ways in which a combination of “deep learning” artificial intelligence and robotics will take over most jobs.
ai  science  fiction 
19 days ago by jeffhammond
N.K. Jemisin: ‘I am still going to write what I am going to write.’
In Raffi Khatchadourian‘s New Yorker profile of author magnifique N.K. Jemisin, Jemisin recounts the racism she witnessed as a child in Alabama in the ’80s, as well as the racism — editorial and otherwise — that she has lived through in her career.
books  science  fiction 
24 days ago by jeffhammond
Agency by William Gibson review – a world in an instant | Books | The Guardian
William Gibson has never believed that science fiction predicts the future: it only ever talks about the present.
gibson  science  fiction 
25 days ago by jeffhammond
302 Found
hen you imagine the future, what’s the first date that comes into your mind? 2050? 2070? The year that pops into your head is almost certainly related to how old you are — some point within our lifetimes yet distant enough to be mysterious, still just outside our grasp.
science  fiction  from pocket
29 days ago by jeffhammond
William Gibson: ‘I was losing a sense of how weird the real world was' | Books | The Guardian
In 2016, William Gibson was a third of the way through his new novel when Donald Trump was elected president of the United States.
science  fiction 
5 weeks ago by jeffhammond
Opinion: Science fiction and the unforeseeable future: In the 2020s, let’s imagine better things - The Globe and Mail
Cory Doctorow is is the co-editor of Boing Boing and a writer whose books include Little Brother, Makers, Walkaway and Radicalized.
climate  change  future  science  fiction 
7 weeks ago by jeffhammond
Unwrapping the Yuletide Dystopia of Brazil | Tor.com
Terry Gilliam’s 1985 comedy Brazil may take place in a dystopian country “[s]omewhere in the 20th century,” but it fully develops that setting in its first five minutes.
christmas  movies  science  fiction 
7 weeks ago by jeffhammond
How William Gibson Keeps His Science Fiction Real | The New Yorker
Suppose you’ve been asked to write a science-fiction story. You might start by contemplating the future. You could research anticipated developments in science, technology, and society and ask how they will play out.
books  science  fiction  writing 
9 weeks ago by jeffhammond
The Sex Chart That Changed My Life: Spectrums of Sexuality in John Varley’s Wizard | Tor.com
I was fifteen when a good friend loaned me his battered copy of John Varley’s novel Wizard. At that point in my life, I was the only girl running with an all-male group of nerds who were obsessed with computers and science fiction.
science  fiction 
11 weeks ago by jeffhammond
‘I’m Too Old to Be Scared by Much’: Margaret Atwood on Her ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Sequel - The New York Times
TORONTO — Margaret Atwood wasn’t sure she had a “Handmaid’s Tale” sequel in her, even as fans clamored for one. “What they were begging for was a continuation in the voice of Offred, which I would not have been able to do,” she said over tea and juice at a cafe near her home.
books  handmaids  tale  science  fiction 
november 2019 by jeffhammond
Science Fiction vs. Fantasy: The Choice Is Clear | Tor.com
Sooner or later, the old but apparently evergreen debate over the various merits of Science Fiction vs. Fantasy and the boundaries between the two resurfaces like some kind of grim Lovecraftian deity, accompanied by the usual chants and drum beats.
books  science  fiction 
november 2019 by jeffhammond
Thoughts on the Completion of The Last Emperox – Whatever
Now that it’s done, and because I think it’s useful and interesting for people, let’s talk a little about the process of writing The Last Emperox, and other things about the book. The following thoughts are in no particular order because, well, my brain is still a little mushy.
science  fiction  writing 
november 2019 by jeffhammond
An Interesting Fact About The Consuming Fire – Whatever
Last night on Twitter someone recounted a convention panel he’d been to, where the panelists were (jokingly) annoyed with my writing speed and publishing frequency. To which I replied, “It’s a good thing they don’t know I wrote The Consuming Fire in two weeks. That would not help things.
science  fiction  writing 
november 2019 by jeffhammond
Cory Doctorow: Jeannette Ng Was Right: John W. Campbell Was a Fascist – Locus Online
[All opinions expressed by commentators, guest bloggers, reviewers, and interviewees are solely their own and do not reflect the opinions of Locus magazine or its staff.] At the Hugo Awards ceremony at this summer’s Dublin Worldcon, Jeannette Ng was presented with the John W.
science  fiction 
november 2019 by jeffhammond
Dune at 50: Common Misconceptions About Frank Herbert's Classic - The B&N Sci-Fi and Fantasy Blog
Editor’s note: Frank Herbert’s Dune, space opera’s answer to The Lord of the Rings and possibly the most influential work of science fiction ever published, turns 50 this year.
dune  science  fiction 
october 2019 by jeffhammond
All the science fiction and fantasy novels you need to make it through winter | Ars Technica
Up here in the Northern Hemisphere, it's the time of year when curling up with a book—or a stack of books—is pretty much mandatory. If you're wondering where to start, we've got a list of new novels from 2016 to help you escape and make you think strange new thoughts.
books  science  fiction 
october 2019 by jeffhammond
The Fantastic Ursula K. Le Guin | The New Yorker
Politics has been obsessing a lot of people lately, and Ursula K. Le Guin is far from immune to bouts of political anger.
books  science  fiction  writing 
october 2019 by jeffhammond
302 Found
ou can make the argument—and I have—that we’re living in the design era of the cyberpunk. In Silicon Valley, Facebook, Google, Apple, and Microsoft are all devoted to perfecting concepts first popularized in science-fiction novels, ranging from virtual reality to virtual assistants.
design  science  fiction  from pocket
october 2019 by jeffhammond
Read: Jeannette Ng's Campbell Award acceptance speech, in which she correctly identifies Campbell as a fascist and expresses solidarity with Hong Kong protesters / Boing Boing
Last weekend, Jeanette Ng won the John W Campbell Award for Best New Writer at the 2019 Hugo Awards at the Dublin Worldcon; Ng's acceptance speech calls Campbell, one of the field's most influential editors, a "fascist" and expresses solidarity with the Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters.
science  fiction  from pocket
august 2019 by jeffhammond
Samuel Delany on Capitalism, Racism, and Science Fiction | Public Books
Samuel Delany was 20 when his first novel, The Jewels of Aptor, appeared. That was in 1962, and by 1967–69 (when “Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones” and “Aye, and Gomorrah …” nabbed Hugo and Nebula awards), he was a luminary of American science fiction and fantasy.
science  fiction  writing 
august 2019 by jeffhammond
In Praise of Samuel R. Delany - The New York Times
The author of “Dhalgren” and dozens of other books “gives readers fiction that reflects and explores the social truths of our world,” the novelist Jordy Rosenberg writes. So reflects the nameless character, known only as “the Kid,” as he wanders an apocalyptic America in Samuel R.
science  fiction 
august 2019 by jeffhammond
Something With Teeth: Finding My Identity in Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles | Tor.com
When I was a teenager, my mom gave me a book with a royal blue cover, raised silver lettering, and a spine so broken as to be almost illegible. A mass market paperback with yellowed pages that threatened to liberate themselves from the glue binding them and the distinct scent of old paper.
fiction 
july 2019 by jeffhammond
On the Road Again: Wanderers by Chuck Wendig | Tor.com
One morning, a teenage girl named Nessie leaves her house and walks. She doesn’t know where she’s going. She doesn’t know anything. Nessie is the first walker, but others soon join her.
science  fiction 
july 2019 by jeffhammond
Linguistics in Arrival: Heptapods, Whiteboards, and Nonlinear Time | Tor.com
Arrival is a 2016 movie based on Ted Chiang’s novella “Story of Your Life.” Dr. Louise Banks is a linguistics professor, and she is contacted by the army to help translate an alien language when twelve spaceships mysteriously appear above various places on Earth.
science  fiction 
july 2019 by jeffhammond
Peace: Wolfe’s Masterful Rumination on Nostalgia, Memory, and Uncertainty | Tor.com
If Gene Wolfe is oftentimes a writer hard to decipher, there is nothing unclear or equivocal about his allegiance to the genre. He is first and foremost a writer of science fiction and fantasy, and in this he was always straightforward.
books  science  fiction  wolfe 
july 2019 by jeffhammond
The Fifth Head of Cerberus: Wolfe’s Holy Trinity | Tor.com
The first novel by Gene Wolfe that received acclaim from critics and fans (you’ll recall, per the introduction, that Operation Ares isn’t going to be covered in this reread) is, as almost everything related to this author, significant—by the fact that it’s not quite a novel.
science  fiction  wolfe 
july 2019 by jeffhammond
Cory Doctorow: Fake News Is an Oracle – Locus Online
Several times over the 13 years that I’ve been writing this column, I’ve railed against the toxic myth that science fiction is a predictive litera­ture, a way to know the future.
science  fiction  society 
july 2019 by jeffhammond
Ends of the Urth | Neil Gaiman on The Book of the New Sun
An edited version of the introduction to The Folio Society edition of Gene Wolfe’s The Book of the New Sun, written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Sam Weber
science  fiction 
june 2019 by jeffhammond
‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Wants to Be More Than TV Medicine
‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Wants to Be More Than TV Medicine. Bruce Miller, the showrunner for Hulu’s adaptation of the dystopian novel by Margaret Atwood, discusses how he wanted Season 3 to be…
handmaids  tale  science  fiction  tv  from pocket
june 2019 by jeffhammond
302 Found
Imagining New Institutions for the Internet Age. A sci-fi novelist on what he learned writing a trilogy of speculative novels that extrapolate how feeds shape our lives, politics, and…
future  internet  science  fiction  from pocket
june 2019 by jeffhammond
The Hidden Layers of Every Novel (and Why They Should Stay Hidden) | Tor.com
Charlie Jane Anders has a secret notebook full of background information, histories, linguistics, and might-have-beens about her book, The City in the Middle of the Night. And you will never see it. You shouldn’t ever see it.
science  fiction  writing 
june 2019 by jeffhammond
Game of Thrones Asks What Kinds of Stories Ultimately Matter | Tor.com
It borders on cliché that writers tend to metadiscursively tout the importance of storytelling at critical moments.
game  of  thrones  science  fiction  writing 
may 2019 by jeffhammond
Neil Gaiman: ‘Good Omens feels more apt now than it did 30 years ago’ | Books | The Guardian
You’d never know from watching Good Omens, Neil Gaiman’s effervescent apocalyptic comedy of errors, that he started writing it fresh off the plane from the funeral of his friend Terry Pratchett, when “nothing seemed funny”.
books  science  fiction 
may 2019 by jeffhammond
The Luddites Were Right: SF Works That Show the Downside to New Technology | Tor.com
It’s a given: new technology is always better than old technology. And even if it were not, it’s our duty to the economy to purchase the new shiny. Only a reactionary would object to ticket scanners merely because they are much slower than the bespectacled eye.
science  fiction 
may 2019 by jeffhammond
BBC - Culture - The 1968 sci-fi that spookily predicted today
We look to fiction for eternal truths about our world and timeless insights into the human condition – either that or giddy escapism.
science  fiction 
may 2019 by jeffhammond
The Big Idea: Lewis Shiner – Whatever
For the novel Outside the Gates of Eden, acclaimed author Lewis Shiner goes back in time, just a bit, to uncover the what it is people of his generational cohort have brought into the present moment.
books  science  fiction 
may 2019 by jeffhammond
How Jane Vonnegut Made Kurt Vonnegut a Writer | The New Yorker
Kurt Vonnegut, at age twenty-two, didn’t know what to do with himself. It was autumn, 1945. He was back from Europe, having survived the firebombing of Dresden as a prisoner of war, and he had convinced the love of his life, Jane Cox, to marry him.
books  science  fiction 
may 2019 by jeffhammond
'It drives writers mad': why are authors still sniffy about sci-fi? | Books | The Guardian
Ian McEwan’s latest novel, Machines Like Me, is a fiction about science – specifically, artificial intelligence.
books  science  fiction 
may 2019 by jeffhammond
The Frightening Lessons of Philip Roth’s “The Plot Against America” | The New Yorker
Philip Roth’s novel “The Plot Against America” is a masterwork of counterfactual history, a what-if story in which Charles Lindbergh, the aviation hero and Nazi sympathizer, is elected President in 1940, leading to the widespread persecution of Jews in the United States.
books  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
Sunday Reading: Dystopian Fiction | The New Yorker
Fifty years ago this week, Kurt Vonnegut published the dystopian classic “Slaughterhouse-Five.” With everything that’s going on in the world, it’s easy to feel as though we’re living in a dystopia from which there’s no escape.
science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
Sci-Fi’s Difficult Genius | The New Yorker
Gene Wolfe’s 1986 novel “Soldier of the Mist” centers on a Roman mercenary named Latro. Having suffered an injury during the Battle of Plataea, a Greco-Persian War skirmish, Latro has no memory of his past.
science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
'Game of Thrones' Reflections on International Relations | RAND
We are both historians and international relations scholars at the RAND Corporation. We're also fans of HBO's series Game of Thrones.
game  of  thrones  politics  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
Opinion | Why We Need ‘Game of Thrones’ - The New York Times
The epic fantasy series is more than just escape. It is a way of imagining our way to the future. Ms. Newitz is a science journalist and novelist.
game  of  thrones  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
Gene Wolfe by Neil Gaiman | Books | The Guardian
I was 22 when I met Gene Wolfe. The last volume in The Book of the New Sun, The Citadel of the Autarch, had just been published, and I had been reading his fiction since my teens. I was as impressed and delighted by the Book of the New Sun as I was intimidated by it.
science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
Cory Doctorow’s ‘Radicalized’ reveals our dystopian technological future in four tales - Los Angeles Times
Cory Doctorow is literally the first author I met after I became a science fiction author — our mutual editor Patrick Nielsen Hayden paired us up at the 2003 World Science Fiction Convention, which took place in Cory’s then-hometown of Toronto.
science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
'The Matrix' Code Came From Sushi Recipes—but Which? | WIRED
Do you see it when you close your eyes? Does it show up in your dreams? Odds are, if you saw The Matrix in 1999 or any time thereafter, the image of green characters cascading down a black screen is cemented in your mind's eye.
movies  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
The Biggest 'Matrix' Question of All: Red Pill or Blue Pill? | WIRED
Sometimes existing on the internet can feel like being trapped in that dark room with Morpheus, the one where he holds out his hands to Neo and offers up either a pill of knowledge or a pill of blissful ignorance. Red pill or blue pill; know your enemy or live in peace; click or don't click.
movies  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
The Matrix Is Nothing Without Its Sequels—Nothing! | WIRED
You're talking about The Matrix at a dinner party, and that's fine. As the founding document of our present hypermodern unreality, it'll always be, 20 years after its release or 200, fair game for chat.
movies  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
How 'The Matrix' Built a Bullet-Proof Legacy | WIRED
One day in 1992, Lawrence Mattis opened up his mail to find an unsolicited screenplay from two unknown writers. It was a dark, nasty, almost defiantly uncommercial tale of cannibalism and class warfare—the type of story that few execs in Hollywood would want to tell.
movies  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
'The Matrix' at 20: A Classic That's the Last of Its Kind - The Atlantic
A recent video from Will Smith confirmed a long-standing piece of Hollywood trivia: He was the first choice to play Neo, the lead role in the Wachowskis’ The Matrix, but he turned it down.
movies  science  fiction 
april 2019 by jeffhammond
The Matrix at 20: how the sci-fi gamechanger remains influential | Film | The Guardian
When The Matrix came out 20 years ago, the internet was still in its infancy, confined by the limits of dial-up modems, Netscape browsers and the startup discs that EarthLink and AOL tucked in mailboxes across the country.
movies  science  fiction 
march 2019 by jeffhammond
Why It’s Important to Consider Whether Dune Is a White Savior Narrative | Tor.com
Now that the cast is coming together, Denis Villeneuve’s upcoming adaptation of Dune is getting more attention than ever. And with that attention an interesting question has started cropping up with more frequency, one that bears further examination: Is Dune a “white savior” narrative?
dune  science  fiction 
march 2019 by jeffhammond
'Self-reflective revenge fantasies’: Cory Doctorow’s Radicalized brings readers stories for unsettling times - The Globe and Mail
I’ve spoken to Cory Doctorow several times about his technology and rights advocacy. This is the first time we’ve spoken explicitly about his fiction, which I will describe as a form of “ripped from the headlines” science fiction and futurism.
politics  science  fiction  society  technology 
march 2019 by jeffhammond
William Gibson On Burroughs, Sterling, Dick, Libraries, The Uncanny, The Web - The Awl
In real life, William Gibson looks like you would imagine. A little older than the Gibson you imagine, but he was born in 1948, so it only stands to reason. He is gaunt and affable, clothes black, smart looking frames on his eyeglasses, more avuncular than professorial.
science  fiction 
february 2019 by jeffhammond
Orwell v Huxley: Whose Dystopia Are We Living In Today?
The modern world looks to many like a dystopia — a version of “the darkest timeline”, to borrow a term from the American sitcom Community. Whose dystopia…
science  fiction  society  from pocket
january 2019 by jeffhammond
SF Stories Featuring Abandoned Earths | Tor.com
Space colonization stories are a subgenre of SF. Space colonization stories in which the Earth has become a backwater world, cut off from thriving colony planets, are a thriving sub-subgenre. At first glance, this seems odd. Earth is rich in resources and offers humans a shirt-sleeve environment .
science  fiction 
january 2019 by jeffhammond
35 years ago, Isaac Asimov was asked by the Star to predict the world of 2019. Here is what he wrote | The Star
Originally published Dec. 31, 1983 1. Nuclear war. 2. Computerization. 3. Space utilization.
science  fiction 
december 2018 by jeffhammond
Star Wars is Really a Cautionary Tale About Devoting All Technological Advancements to Death | Tor.com
It’s called Star Wars. Not Star Trek, not Star Peace, not Star Friends, not even Star Tales. This gargantuan fictional universe is labeled with a title that guarantees the ability to travel space… and near-constant warfare.
science  fiction  star  wars 
december 2018 by jeffhammond
The Future of Work: Maximum Outflow, by Adam Rogers | WIRED
“When normalized on a per 1,000-short-ton basis, the estimates indicate that 1,000 tons of recycled material attributes 1.57 jobs, $76,030 in wages, and $14,101 in tax revenues.” —“Recycling Economic Information Report,” Environmental Protection Agency (2016) Just move them, Iggy said.
future  science  fiction 
december 2018 by jeffhammond
8 Sci-Fi Writers Imagine the Bold and New Future of Work | WIRED
Half of being human, give or take, is the work we do. Pick up a shift. Care for the sick. Fix the plumbing. Audition for a part. Sometimes it’s all we think about—and fret about, especially as technology comes for our jobs.
business  science  fiction 
december 2018 by jeffhammond
6 Mysteries to Ponder After You’ve Finished George R. R. Martin’s Fire & Blood | Tor.com
There are a number of unexpected open mysteries present within Fire & Blood, George R. R. Martin’s fictional history of the Targaryen reign of Westeros, many of them ripe for theorizing upon.
game  of  thrones  science  fiction 
december 2018 by jeffhammond
Fire & Blood is the Best Song of Ice and Fire Book in 18 Years. But Will Anyone Read It? | Tor.com
What if George R. R. Martin wrote a new Song of Ice and Fire book… and no one wanted it? Fire & Blood, the first doorstopper in a planned two-volume history of the entire Targaryen royal line of Westeros, arrives during a strained point in the relationship between author George R. R.
game  of  thrones  science  fiction 
december 2018 by jeffhammond
What Aldous Huxley Taught Us – Drew Minh – Medium
Fifty-five years ago, on this day in 1963, Aldous Huxley passed through a psychedelic portal to the other side. His death was overshadowed by the assassination of JFK on the same day, but the legacy…
science  fiction  society  from pocket
december 2018 by jeffhammond
The World is a Weird, Dark Place — Fantasy Helps Us Make Sense of It | Tor.com
I grew up on a healthy diet of the usual suspects, in terms of fantasy authors—J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, and J.K. Rowling. But my personal favorite during my adolescent years was David Eddings.
books  science  fiction  writing 
november 2018 by jeffhammond
George RR Martin: ‘When I began A Game of Thrones I thought it might be a short story’ | Books | The Guardian
Strict instructions are issued before interviewing George RR Martin: do not ask about The Winds of Winter, the sixth book in his A Song of Ice and Fire series, the one fans keep haranguing him about and Martin has been writing since 2011.
science  fiction  writing 
november 2018 by jeffhammond
Distraction at 20: An Interview with Bruce Sterling
This piece is a companion to my article in Slate on Distraction at 20, which is my very favorite book and one that everyone should be reading. Bruce was nice enough to answer several questions about the book.
science  fiction 
november 2018 by jeffhammond
The Road to Oceania - The New York Times
Walking along Henrietta Street recently, by London's Covent Garden, looking for a restaurant, I found myself thinking of George Orwell. Victor Gollancz Ltd., publisher of Orwell's early work, had its offices there in 1984, when the company published my first novel, a novel of an imagined future.
orwell  science  fiction 
november 2018 by jeffhammond
The One Book That Made Me Take the Long View of the Future: God Emperor of Dune | Tor.com
Jo Walton once wrote, fairly, that each of Frank Herbert’s Dune novels is about half as good as the one before it. By my math, that makes God Emperor of Dune (#4) about 12.5% of a classic, but it’s still worth reading.
science  fiction 
november 2018 by jeffhammond
As the World Collapses – Nautilus – Medium
Once, it was different. Once, people had homes and parents and went to schools. Cities existed within countries and those countries had leaders. Travel could be for adventure or recreation, not…
future  science  fiction  from pocket
november 2018 by jeffhammond
13 Stories About Surviving a Nuclear War — At Least Briefly | Tor.com
Most people now living are too young to remember the Cuban Missile Crisis. It was a fun time when the Americans and the Russians (who at that time were not good buddies but rivals), toyed with seeing just how close they could come to World War Three without pressing the (metaphorical) button.
books  science  fiction 
november 2018 by jeffhammond
Distraction, by Bruce Sterling, turns 20 at the perfect political moment.
It’s one thing to use science fiction to imagine the future, to extrapolate a technology or trend forward a few decades and show how it evolves in isolation.
future  science  fiction  from pocket
november 2018 by jeffhammond
Kim Stanley Robinson Writes Like the Past to Warn of the Future | WIRED
As one of the solar system's pre-eminent writers of climate change-driven, politically astute science fiction, Kim Stanley Robinson wouldn’t be anyone’s prime suspect for a crime against nature.
science  fiction 
october 2018 by jeffhammond
Margaret Atwood: ‘All dystopias are telling you is to make sure you’ve got a lot of canned goods and a gun’ | Books | The Guardian
On Thursday, just as I am saying goodbye to Margaret Atwood at the end of our interview, I get a text message. “Oh,” I say. “Bob Dylan’s won the Nobel prize.” She is about to have her photograph taken, and is arranging a rakish grey felt hat atop her steely curls.
books  science  fiction 
september 2018 by jeffhammond
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