infovore + sf + writing   15

Ursula K. Le Guin: A Rant About "Technology"
"One way to illustrate that most technologies are, in fact, pretty "hi," is to ask yourself of any manmade object, Do I know how to make one?

Anybody who ever lighted a fire without matches has probably gained some proper respect for "low" or "primitive" or "simple" technologies; anybody who ever lighted a fire with matches should have the wits to respect that notable hi-tech invention." Ursula le Guin with strong truth about technology and science fiction.
sf  writing  ursulaleguin  science  anthropology 
august 2017 by infovore
The Fantastic Ursula K. Le Guin - The New Yorker
"...she asked me, cautiously, “Wouldn’t you say that anybody who thought as much about balance as I do in my work probably felt some threat to their balance?” After a long pause, she added, “Of course all adolescents are out of balance, and very aware of it. To become adult can certainly feel like walking a high wire, can’t it? If my foot slips, I’m gone. I’m dead.”" Wonderful profile and interview with/of UKLG.
ursulaleguin  interview  writing  sf  fantasy  profile 
october 2016 by infovore
Melioration | Motherboard
Wonderful little story from Saxey about language, gender, and singular-they, although as with the best stories, it's all in the telling. Lots of good brain-tickles in here.
esaxey  writing  stories  fiction  sf  language 
june 2015 by infovore
Arcfinity - We're reading BARRICADE by Jon Wallace
"There’s a general principle of book reviewing, set out originally by, I believe, Cyril Connolly. He advised reviewers that they should write for the reader when reviewing a book they like, but if they dislike it they should address the author instead. This creates a distinction between a public recommendation, which pleases the author and possibly makes readers interested, and a more personal discourse intended for the author, but which is likely to be discouraging and disappointing... Well then, Mr Wallace, what are we to say to each other in this semi-public place?" Oh boy. Christopher Priest really hated this book (and his argument seems reasonable, to be honest.)
sf  writing  criticism  christopherpriest 
june 2014 by infovore
M John Harrison interviewed - infinity plus non-fiction
Rather good interview with MJH; covers lots of bases, carried out just before Light was published.
writing  interview  mjohnharrison  sf  fantasy  fiction 
october 2013 by infovore
The Kefahuchi Tract trilogy: A future without nostalgia
John Gray on M John Harrison - not just the Kefahuchi Tract trilogy, but also Viriconium and Climbers.
writing  sf  mjohnharrison  johngray 
october 2013 by infovore
Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 211, William Gibson
"Coming up with a word like neuromancer is something that would earn you a really fine vacation if you worked in an ad agency. It was a kind of booby-trapped portmanteau that contained considerable potential for cognitive dissonance, that pleasurable buzz of feeling slightly unsettled." There is so, so much in this interview, that quoting it feels somewhat futile. It's a really lovely thing piece, that goes far beyond cyberpunk, and delves deep into Gibson's writing and history. There are at least five meaty quotes I wanted to yank; it's worth reading and rereading.
williamgibson  writing  literature  interview  sf 
july 2013 by infovore
Ursula K. Le Guin | VICE
An unexpected place for a Le Guin interview, but it's great nontheless.
ursulaleguin  books  fiction  sf  writing 
october 2011 by infovore
Short story: Covehithe by China Miéville | Books | guardian.co.uk
Marvellous. Can't say any more - you need to read this (very) short story - but it's really, really lovely: shivers down the spine, and something heartwarming, all at once. And: set in a slightly magical part of the world.
books  chinamieville  writing  fiction  shortfiction  sf 
july 2011 by infovore
John Wyndham: The unread bestseller | Books | guardian.co.uk
"It's true that Wyndham's preference is for no-nonsense, brisk, wry narrators, and the horrors that visit the books can seem like opportunities to show off good old British pluck. But the books are surprisingly unheroic, and often (notably in the cases of Kraken and Triffids) peculiarly open-ended. And if you look closely, you begin to see that there's something very uncosy, persistently unsettling, about these books, that continues to ask profound questions about the limits of our culture and the foundations of the post-war world."
sciencefiction  writing  johnwyndham  sf 
december 2010 by infovore
The Future Is A Blank Canvas Pinned To A Brick Wall « Matthew Sheret.com
"We access that history with tools that were, almost entirely, the props of science fiction my parents might have encountered – if they read it. My phone is my sonic screwdriver, the internet my TARDIS; these are the tools with which I unlock and manipulate time."
future  sf  design  writing  mattsheret  history 
october 2010 by infovore
They're Made Out Of Meat
"You're not understanding, are you? You're refusing to deal with what I'm telling you. The brain does the thinking. The meat."
writing  shortstory  sf  meat  via:tomc 
february 2010 by infovore
Abyss & Apex : Fourth Quarter 2007: Wikihistory
"Take it easy on the kid, SilverFox316; everybody kills Hitler on their first trip. I did. It always gets fixed within a few minutes, what's the harm?"
writing  history  fiction  sf  timetravel 
january 2009 by infovore
New Statesman - Imaginary friends
"To conflate fantasy with immaturity is a rather sizeable error. Rational yet non-intellectual, moral yet inexplicit, symbolic not allegorical, fantasy is not primitive but primary." Ursula le Guin on fine form in the NS.
ursulaleguin  fantasy  sf  writing  fiction  literature  essay  criticism  children  reading 
december 2006 by infovore

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