infovore + quality   14

russell davies: little printer, big ambition
"...one point I wanted to make, to all those agencies that have decided that making products is the future. That's a laudable and intelligent aim, but it took five years for BERG to go from here to here. And they're really good. They had to be focused and ambitious, working really hard. This isn't stuff you can just chuck out the back of a creative technology department  Just a thought." Yeah, there is that.
russelldavies  berg  littleprinter  quality  effort  labour 
november 2011 by infovore
LA Noire dev responds to controversy News - - Page 1 | Eurogamer.net
'"The expectation is slightly weird here, that you can do this stuff without killing yourself," added McNamara. "Well, you can't, whether it's in London or New York or wherever; you're competing against the best people in the world at what they do, and you just have to be prepared to do what you have to do to compete against those people."'

This is what McNamara considers responding to controversy. I'm furious that men like this are allowed to manage other human beings.
management  industry  games  workingpractice  quality  brendanmcnamara  asshat 
june 2011 by infovore
Week 13: Too much is never enough | Urbanscale
"[Mayo is] making a dummy RFID-reader surface for us to mount on a subway turnstile, as well as a companion piece for the MetroCard vending machine. The challenge here is to avoid imposing our own designerly tastes on these artifacts; if we want them to be convincing at that all-important subliminal level, we have to try and imagine them as an extension of the MTA’s existing graphic vocabulary.

And that, in turn, means capturing a certain kind of municipal badness in the design of type and signage: inapposite font selection, clumsy kerning and so on. It’s an odd and demanding kind of discipline — especially for us, with our marked preference for the Vignelliesque."

Realism channeled through suitably ropey implementation.
design  simulation  badness  quality  culture 
april 2011 by infovore
Gamasutra: Mathew Stone's Blog - Children's Games - For Shame
"We live in a world where the game of the movie of Where the Wild Things are, Motherfucking Where the Wild Things are, was a fucking cash-grab. This was a game based of Maurice Sendak. This should have been teeming with imagination. This should have been infinitely creative, a wonderful adventure inspiring generations of children. What is it, instead? It's a boring platformer. That's it. Just a generic, ordinary platformer. Are we okay with that? Are we okay with living in a world where a game based on a Maurice Sendak book is anything less than breathtaking, let alone underwhelming? I'm sure as hell not." 'Where are the children's games?" is, in fact, a good question; I can think of a few answers - but nowhere near enough. And, more to the point: there's a lot packed up inside that question that applies to things that aren't children's games. This is a topic I shall be returning to, I feel sure.
games  children  wonder  quality 
march 2011 by infovore
The Online Photographer: Quote o' the Day
"The move during the past 10 years or so has been from cameras being precision mechanical devices to molded polycarbonate containers for electronic components. This has meant a lowering of overall physical quality. What one gets in terms of features, functions and image quality is higher than ever before, but the satisfaction of owning and using a high quality mechanical and optical device has for the most part evaporated. Only the top models within any brand produce a tactile satisfaction and please one's esthetic sense." The quotation is from Michael Reichmann; the discussion that follows is as thoughtful as usual from TOP's readers.
quality  manufacturing  photography  cameras  satisfaction  enjoyment 
july 2010 by infovore
MIGS: Is Good Marketing Better Than A Good Game? | Edge Online
"Using a simple correlation scale comparing marketing spend and sales against Metacritic rating and sales, Divnich found that marketing influenced game revenue “three times more than game scores”... “There is no compelling reason to focus on quality, you should literally just spend that money and time on marketing.”" I'm not sure he's suggesting this is a /good/ thing, but he is pointing out that it's what the numbers say. It's still depressing.
games  business  marketing  quality  review  metacritic  migs 
november 2009 by infovore
1UP's Retro Gaming Blog : Something Old, Something Blu: Quantum of Solace
"The problem is that what made GoldenEye so good was a fleeting, transient quality that can never be grasped again: it's not that the game was especially brilliant by modern standards, but rather that it utterly eclipsed its contemporaries. These days, the FPS is as comfortable on consoles as it is on Windows, and for a Bond shooter to have the same impact as GoldenEye it would have to outperform Call of Duty 4, Halo 3, BioShock, and Half-Life 2. In short, it would have to be revolutionary." Although: a big part of what made it so good was the social side of the jerky split-screen multiplayer, and Live just isn't the same. Yes, there was the context, but there was also some kind of magical glue holding it all together. Still, there are lots of smart, sensible points here, about emerging from the shadow of Goldeneye.
games  n64  goldeneye  fps  consoles  jamesbond  quality 
april 2009 by infovore
The Brainy Gamer: The big ignore
"...in recent years, [the stage has] moved away from those practices. Today, we better understand the importance of offering kids the very best we can do. They are no different from the rest of us. They respond positively to quality, and they quickly grow bored and restless with mediocrity... We might consider a similar approach to video games. If we want our kids - heck, if we want all of us - to enjoy quality games, we must pay attention to and promote those games that deliver quality."
children  entertainment  games  art  quality  criticism  michaelabbott 
november 2008 by infovore
Rands In Repose: The Culture Chart
"I wasn’t concerned when Netscape started losing market share to Microsoft. I didn’t sweat it when the stock price stalled. The reason I started thinking about my next gig was, months before either of these two events occurred, one of the lunchtime bridge team left. The game stopped. The small group of four no longer spent a long lunch quietly, unknowingly defining the culture of the company and everyone who was watching noticed."
work  rands  culture  software  business  strategy  quality 
october 2008 by infovore
russell davies: slow strategy
"...doing strategy happily is probably more important than doing it quickly or slowly."
strategy  planning  projectmanagement  speed  quality  projects  gtd 
september 2008 by infovore
Chris' Survival Horror Quest
"Some people believe that there's no correlation between quality and sales, and thus think that the way to make money is to make things that are easily marketable (read: licenses). Game developers themselves usually argue that sales above a certain level require a game to be sufficient quality. I decided to see which of these perspectives was correct for the Playstation 2 era." Datanalysismachinego!
data  visualization  statistics  sales  games  quality  analysis 
september 2008 by infovore
Speak Up › Dear Lulu, The New Standards
"The result of the workshop is Dear Lulu, a fantastic and imaginative resource that puts digital printing to the test through a Do-It-Yourself presentation." Testing digital printing by creating a book that's full of metrics and challenges.
typography  printing  reference  quality  printondemand  lulu  design  layout  margin  bleed 
august 2008 by infovore
The Death of High Fidelity : Rolling Stone
"Over the past decade and a half, a revolution in recording technology has changed the way albums are produced, mixed and mastered — almost always for the worse." Good Rolling Stone article on compression, enhancement, and why it sounds rubbish.
compression  loudness  music  maximizing  enhancing  recording  pop  fidelity  quality  mp3 
january 2008 by infovore

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: