infovore + immersion   5

Thoughts on Dear Esther | The Gameshelf
"So, given this [zero-button, move and look] interface, whence interactivity in Dear Esther? I say: from an understated but deadly-precise sense of attention design through spatial design.

You walk along the beach; a path goes up the bluff, another along the strand. You go one way or the other. There are no game-mechanics associated with the choice, and a plot-diagram analysis would call them "the same place" -- you can try either, back up, and go the other way. But this misses the point. Precisely because the game lacks keys, switches, stars, and 1ups, it has no implicit mandate to explore every inch of territory. Instead, you want to move forward. Backtracking is dull. Worse: given the game's sedate walking pace, it's slightly frustrating. (They left out the run button for a reason, see?) Moving into new territory is always the best-rewarded move, and therefore your choice of path is a choice. You will not (unless you thrash hard against the game's intentions) see everything in your first run-through." Cracking writing about immersive, environmental storytelling in Dear Esther, and why it's clearly a game.
jmac  games  dearesther  if  interactivefiction  exploration  immersion  design 
may 2012 by infovore
russell davies: not playful
"There seems to be some sort of consensus that the highest form of play is fully immersive, interactive live theatre. Well not for me. The rhetoric of these things is often about people making their own choices, being free to act, creating their own narrative, etc, etc. And I always end up feeling like a piece, a pawn." Totally; not for me, either, though I'm not totally into "Social Toys" either - but Russell's points are perfectly valid and sensible. (I do like theatre, though). Probably ought to write more than a few hundred characters on this.
theatre  pretending  play  socialplay  social  games  mores  immersion 
april 2010 by infovore
Fullbright: The immersion model of meaning
"Our attempts to bridle the player's freedom of movement and force our meaning onto him are fruitless. Rather, it is a distinct transportative, transformative quality-- the ability of the player to build his own personal meaning through immersion in the interactive fields of potential we provide-- that is our unique strength, begging to be fully realized." Some great Steve Gaynor; reminds me of Mitch Resnick's "microworld construction kits" all over again.
stevegaynor  games  immersion  systems  mechanics  openworld  narrative  experience  freedom  meaning 
november 2008 by infovore
Versus CluClu Land: Lasering Dudes is a Sport
"One of the reasons that sports have a such a reign over our imagination is that they feed into our love of storytelling. Sports are made to create situations with narrative significance: last-minute reversals, falls from grace, chances for redemption."
halo  games  play  narrative  storytelling  immersion 
august 2008 by infovore
Immersive Fallacy « Games Are Art
"This requires a light touch. This requires respect for the gap. The gap is part of your toolset." The importance of gaps is cropping up everywhere. It's in the gap that magic happens.
immersivefallacy  games  play  realism  representation  immersion  sandbox 
june 2008 by infovore

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