infovore + anthropology   8

How to Pay Attention
"This course is an advanced seminar in the anthropology of attention. What makes the
anthropology of attention different from other ways of studying attention (e.g.
psychology) is that we study it as a social and cultural phenomenon: attention is not just a matter of individual minds selecting objects from environments. Rather, attention is collectively organized and valued. We learn how to pay attention and what to pay
attention to from other people; other people make technological and media systems to
intentionally organize collective attention. We learn to value certain kinds of attention
(e.g. intense focus on work, mindfulness, or multi-tasking) and to criticize others (e.g.
absent-mindedness, distraction, intense focus on entertainment) in cultural contexts. So, while we will be experimenting with our own attentions throughout this course, we will remember that our attentions are not really our own. No one pays attention alone." This paper sounds brilliant.
anthropology  attention  thought  thinking  writing  study 
february 2018 by infovore
Ursula K. Le Guin: A Rant About "Technology"
"One way to illustrate that most technologies are, in fact, pretty "hi," is to ask yourself of any manmade object, Do I know how to make one?

Anybody who ever lighted a fire without matches has probably gained some proper respect for "low" or "primitive" or "simple" technologies; anybody who ever lighted a fire with matches should have the wits to respect that notable hi-tech invention." Ursula le Guin with strong truth about technology and science fiction.
sf  writing  ursulaleguin  science  anthropology 
august 2017 by infovore
The Lost Tribes of New York City on Vimeo
Lovely: Creature Comforts meets "Hey There Little Fella". Totally charming.
video  nyc  anthropology  newyork  animation  stopmotion  interview 
april 2009 by infovore
Antisocial networking « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"From where I stand, the only sane response is to keep our conceptions of friendship and affinity from being polluted by technical metaphors and constraints to begin with." Superb post by Adam Greenfield. Makes me question a lot of my recent design.
socialnetworking  society  networks  friendship  anthropology  community 
december 2007 by infovore
technogoggles: Things are actors too
"My old superviser once said to me ... that ANT was basically about being as granular in ethnographic work as possible and not taking anything as a given."
design  ubicomp  anthropology  ant  actornetworktheory 
june 2007 by infovore
Life With Alacrity: The Dunbar Number as a Limit to Group Sizes
A perceptive and detailed analysis of the Dunbar Number - and why some of the hype around it is misguided.
society  social  software  anthropology  dunbar  structure  groups  research  sociology  network 
december 2006 by infovore

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