11454
Twitter
This is beautifully put — and also explains why some of the best design goes unacknowledged.
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yesterday
Twitter
Ever wonder what the problem is with the school voucher program? Here it is right here:
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12 days ago
Twitter
$ZGNX Chart looks incredibly strong. Broke above Pivotal Resistance with a lot of room to run. Some resistance ahea…
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13 days ago
Twitter
The Bluth Company is prepared to assemble the Wåll, . Fax me.
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20 days ago
White House nixed Holocaust statement naming Jews - POLITICO
So weird that this would happen when Stephen Bannon is not at all an anti-Semite.
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20 days ago
Twitter
Gregg Popovich is the best, and this quote is extraordinary.
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20 days ago
Twitter
Arkansas just passed a law that will let a rapist sue his victim for having an abortion. welcome to hell.…
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20 days ago
Twitter
The man who literally has the nuclear codes for the U.S. fires off a snarky tweet glibly referring to "World War II…
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25 days ago
The Avery Review | Unwalling Citizenship
"Xenophobia is wrong. Inequality is wrong. Building border walls is wrong." Teddy Cruz & Fonna Forman on rejection
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25 days ago
Twitter
Former GWB chief of staff Josh Bolten explains why the president did not allow Karl Rove to attend NSC mtgs, ever…
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25 days ago
Twitter
An unorthodox online newspaper in Norway holds lessons for the future of media companies. explains:…
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27 days ago
Twitter
Melania Trump is pretending to eat a diamond necklace like it's spaghetti on the cover of Vanity Fair Mexico.
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27 days ago
Twitter
Trump's real war isn't with the media. It's with facts.
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27 days ago
Why We Need to Listen to Racists
Preaching to the unconverted — Hadley talks about “calling out” these voters — is a disastrous strategy. The following quote is from an interview with the sociologist Kathy Cramer, who has visited 27 rural communities in Wisconsin in an effort to understand white identity politics, and written a book about it:

“People are only going to absorb facts when they’re communicated from a source that they respect, from a source who they perceive has respect for people like them. And so whenever a liberal calls out Trump supporters as ignorant or fooled or misinformed, that does absolutely nothing to convey the facts that the liberal is trying to convey.”

In a broader sense, it’s now possible to see that the Clinton campaign’s strong emphasis on identity politics — on feminism, LGBQ rights, and racism — was preaching to the unconverted. It’s not that these causes are not just or important, but they weren’t meaningful to voters who weren’t already in the pews. In 2008 and 2012, Obama made a great play for white working class votes, and won a significant proportion of them. So did Clinton in the 2008 primary. In 2016 she barely bothered.

To state the obvious, if the left wants to displace Trump and the right more generally, it needs to work out how to bring some Republican (or in the UK, Tory or UKIP) voters over to its side, and that includes at least some of this group. One lesson of Clinton’s defeat, and of Brexit, is that while the left may never again win a majority of the white working class vote, it can’t afford to ignore it. Not if it hopes to win power again.
politics  race  2016  trump  election  racism  communication  *** 
27 days ago
Philosopher Richard Rorty Chillingly Predicts the Results of the 2016 Election ... Back in 1998 | Open Culture
As democratic institutions fail, he writes in the quote above:

[M]embers of labor unions, and unorganized unskilled workers, will sooner or later realize that their government is not even trying to prevent wages from sinking or to prevent jobs from being exported. Around the same time, they will realize that suburban white-collar workers—themselves desperately afraid of being downsized—are not going to let themselves be taxed to provide social benefits for anyone else.

At that point, something will crack. The nonsuburban electorate will decide that the system has failed and start looking around for a strongman to vote for—someone willing to assure them that, once he is elected, the smug bureaucrats, tricky lawyers, overpaid bond salesmen, and postmodernist professors will no longer be calling the shots. A scenario like that of Sinclair Lewis’ novel It Can’t Happen Here may then be played out. For once a strongman takes office, nobody can predict what will happen. In 1932, most of the predictions made about what would happen if Hindenburg named Hitler chancellor were wildly overoptimistic.

One thing that is very likely to happen is that the gains made in the past forty years by black and brown Americans, and by homosexuals, will be wiped out. Jocular contempt for women will come back into fashion. The words [slur for an African-American that begins with “n”] and [slur for a Jewish person that begins with “k”] will once again be heard in the workplace. All the sadism which the academic Left has tried to make unacceptable to its students will come flooding back. All the resentment which badly educated Americans feel about having their manners dictated to them by college graduates will find an outlet.
rorty  philosophy  politics  labor  *****  prediction  2016 
27 days ago
Twitter
Shouldn't accounts like & be linked to a .gov e-mail ... If I recall, there was some fuzz about pr…
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28 days ago
Mallory Ortberg, Author at The Toast - The Toast
My favorite writer at my favorite recently-defunct site.
6 weeks ago
Watching Words Move - Fonts In Use
“Watching Words Move was originally produced in 1959 as a handmade typographic notebook of pasted-up words and done in one day in the Composing Room in New York. Three years later BJ agreed to let Herbert Spencer reproduce it as a booklet insert in the December 1962 issue of Typographica. Spencer had a strong interest in concrete poetry and the booklet served as a playful prelude to a feature published a year later. His guiding mission was to liberate letters from the mere delivery of information and allow them to become a means of expression in their own right.” — robertbrownjohn.com
typography  words  ***  poetry 
6 weeks ago
Management theory is becoming a compendium of dead ideas
The similarities between medieval Christianity and the world of management theory may not be obvious, but seek and ye shall find. Management theorists sanctify capitalism in much the same way that clergymen of yore sanctified feudalism. Business schools are the cathedrals of capitalism. Consultants are its travelling friars. Just as the clergy in the Middle Ages spoke in Latin to give their words an air of authority, management theorists speak in mumbo-jumbo. The medieval clergy’s sale of indulgences, by which believers could effectively buy forgiveness of their sins, is echoed by management theorists selling fads that will solve all your business problems. Lately, another similarity has emerged. The gurus have lost touch with the world they seek to rule. Management theory is ripe for a Reformation of its own.

Management theories are organised around four basic ideas, repeated ad nauseam in every business book you read or business conference you attend, that bear almost no relation to reality. The first idea is that business is more competitive than ever.
management  counterintuitive  critique  capitalism  politics  2016  economist  religion 
6 weeks ago
Typerepublic: the republic of type
Taüll is inspired from old black lettering devices, this typeface main goal is to link the medieval world with our brand new digital metropolis.
blackletter  sans  typography  tobuy  *** 
6 weeks ago
R-Typography
Pathos is a robust slab serif typeface that follows a simple design idea - to make serifs as large as possible. Because there are obvious limits to how much serifs can grow, for instance the space available between and inside letters, Pathos’ huge serifs test the physical limits to their size.
typography  tobuy  ****  serif  fun 
6 weeks ago
Why academics consulting with industry on health care may be an idea whose time has come
Perhaps ironically, the advent of the Trump presidency could signal an even greater role for academics in shaping public policy. The president-elect has set out an ambitious agenda, but with many details left to fill in, and congressional Democrats are preparing their opposition.

The likely repeal of the Affordable Care Act and continued angst over drug prices mean health economists like us will be asked to provide answers to inform policy debates. For example, a majority of American voters believe pharmaceutical prices are too high. Less clear is what to do about it. It is here academics play an important role, helping to evaluate the impact of policies ranging from federal negotiation of drug prices to finding alternatives to the Affordable Care Act.

So it is a good time to ask: How do we know what we say we know, and can we be trusted to steer through hyper-partisanship and corporate self-interest? Research in many areas, including health economics, features partnership and collaboration between industry and academics like us. Private firms face a range of difficult questions that need answers. Does a drug work? For whom is it most valuable? Academics are trained to answer important policy questions like these.
politics  academic  academia  consulting  ***  2016  industry 
6 weeks ago
Hatch — PSTL
We are pleased to introduce you to Hatch—a horizontally inclined slab serif built out west. Hatch is a contemporary take on the “reverse” stress genre with a subtle contrast & a casual vibe. Unique letterforms and rounded contours make this coastal slab well suited for your identity, branding or editorial designs. Hatch is engaging and highly capable of handling any project you can image.
typography  tobuy  ***  serif 
6 weeks ago
Social Media Is Killing Discourse Because It’s Too Much Like TV
Neil Postman provided some clues about this in his illuminating 1985 book, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business. The media scholar at New York University saw then how television transformed public discourse into an exchange of volatile emotions that are usually mistaken by pollsters as opinion. One of the scariest outcomes of this transition, Postman wrote, is that television essentially turns all news into disinformation. "Disinformation does not mean false information. It means misleading information—misplaced, irrelevant, fragmented or superficial information—information that creates the illusion of knowing something but which in fact leads one away from knowing ... The problem is not that television presents us with entertaining subject matter but that all subject matter is presented as entertaining.” (Emphasis added.) And, Postman argued, when news is constructed as a form of entertainment, it inevitably loses its function for a healthy democracy. "I am saying something far more serious than that we are being deprived of authentic information. I am saying we are losing our sense of what it means to be well informed. Ignorance is always correctable. But what shall we do if we take ignorance to be knowledge?"

The problem with today’s Internet, driven less by text and hypertext (hyperlink-enriched text), is that it not only shares many of TV’s ills but also creates new ones. The difference between traditional television and the form of TV that has reincarnated as social media is that the latter is a personalized medium. Traditional television still entails some degree of surprise. What you see on television news is still picked by human curators, and even though it must be entertaining to qualify as worthy of expensive production, it is still likely to challenge some of our opinions (emotions, that is).

Social media, in contrast, uses algorithms to encourage comfort and complaisance, since its entire business model is built upon maximizing the time users spend inside of it. Who would like to hang around in a place where everyone seems to be negative, mean, and disapproving? The outcome is a proliferation of emotions, a radicalization of those emotions, and a fragmented society. This is way more dangerous for the idea of democracy founded on the notion of informed participation.

Now what can be done? Certainly the explanation for Trump’s rise cannot be reduced to a technology- or media-centered argument. The phenomenon is rooted in more than that; media or technology cannot create; they can merely twist, divert, or disrupt. Without the growing inequality, shrinking middle class, jobs threatened by globalization, etc. there would be no Trump or Berlusconi or Brexit. But we need to stop thinking that any evolution of technology is natural and inevitable and therefore good. For one thing, we need more text than videos in order to remain rational animals. Typography, as Postman describes, is in essence much more capable of communicating complex messages that provoke thinking. This means we should write and read more, link more often, and watch less television and fewer videos—and spend less time on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.
internet  media  2016  trump  politics  consumption  entertainment  *****  television  algorithm 
6 weeks ago
Four Ways to Reinvent Service Delivery
Unlike innovations in product manufacturing, those that radically redefine the delivery of a service are relatively rare. Service redefinition requires deep insight into how to meet clients’ needs. And because it is not generally driven by disruptive technologies, which often force people to confront basic assumptions, organizations struggle to overcome the mentality of “that’s not how we do it” and “our clients don’t expect that.” But as Club Red and other service providers are finding—as manufacturers did with lean production methods—these innovations can create tremendous value for them and for their customers. The challenge is to give managers a systematic way to question basic assumptions about how a service is defined and delivered and to see the opportunity to achieve dramatically better results.
hbr  healthcare  service  ***  innovation  counterintuitive 
7 weeks ago
Twitter
Not sure which of the two people pictured is the subject of this headline
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7 weeks ago
Twitter
William Lloyd Garrison in 1831, spelling out what every progressive's ethic should be in 2017 and beyond
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7 weeks ago
Twitter
John Berger, writing in the daytime night in 2003 & seeing all to come
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7 weeks ago
John Berger, Written in the night: The pain of living in the present world
John Berger, writing in the daytime night in 2003 & seeing all to come
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7 weeks ago
Twitter
Imagine a world where multiple US institutions were attacked by a foreign power and our leader said "It's time for…
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8 weeks ago
Twenty-First Century Victorians | Jacobin
The nineteenth-century bourgeoisie used morality to assert class dominance — something elites still do today.
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8 weeks ago
Thin Skins and Missing Parents | Gary Greenberg
“We didn’t want to fuck up our children in the well-documented manner of our own mums and dads.”
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8 weeks ago
Twitter
I am going to miss downloading these every Monday, congratulations for such a great project.
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8 weeks ago
Twitter
Sam Lessin, former VP Product @ Facebook, says the Internet is killing diversity of ideas. Says so in a paywalled c…
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8 weeks ago
Twitter
Identification card for the Port Authority of Baltimore's "Expert Mouser," 1943.
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8 weeks ago
Twitter
One of the most clever images I've seen of Trump. The scythe has to be intentional right? Credit AP Photo, not sur…
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9 weeks ago
Anarko | Fountain
Homemade signs and posters by the protest movement of the 60's was the inspiration for Anarko. Especially the work of Ben Shahn has been a big influence.

For the Anarko Pro version we added two alternatives to each letter, an extended weight and several ligatures.
fun  ****  typography  tobuy 
9 weeks ago
Twitter
This, for all conference organizers, and everyone else.
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9 weeks ago
Twitter
Raped unconscious woman, raped disabled classmate, killed 4 drunk driving, exposed partners to HIV. Guess which one…
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9 weeks ago
Log In - New York Times
These graphics are interesting and make Spain and Portugal attractive countries to move to
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9 weeks ago
Twitter
Christmas Tree Ornament Catalogue, 1936 (Germany).

via
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9 weeks ago
Twitter
‘The rise of the alt-centre’ : pseudo-intellectual narrative as conspiracy comfort blanket : v. good :…
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9 weeks ago
Twitter
Does this chart downplay US concern over Russian hacking? Here's a redesign for comparison.…
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9 weeks ago
Twitter
Mark Rothko’s recipe for art:
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9 weeks ago
Twitter
Nadav Kander directs a powerful new ad highlighting the danger of driving in the rain >
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10 weeks ago
Twitter
Tillerson is on Trump's shortlist to be Secretary of State.
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10 weeks ago
Twitter
This election result is illegitimate. Full stop. I don't know what we do once we've admitted that to ourselves. But…
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10 weeks ago
Twitter
me at the start of 2016 // me at the end of 2016
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10 weeks ago
Twitter
Serious question. How many of the men around Trump have been accused of abusing women on way or another?
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10 weeks ago
Twitter
Kudos to the designer who made the "M" look like devil horns. We will send you care packages after Trump throws you…
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11 weeks ago
Trumped and Abandoned | Susan Faludi
As white men continued to lose standing in the eyes of their wives, they focused their rage on female authority.
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11 weeks ago
Twitter
A prez who uses Twitter 2 spread fake news, propaganda, misinformation. How can that go wrong? Actual cost is $1.65…
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11 weeks ago
Typotheque: Detail in typography by Jost Hochuli, ISBN: 9782917855669
Your group offers a very nice discussion here. Your individual posts are almost universally well-supported and thoughtful. Nicely done!
design  typography  howto  books  ****  tobuy 
11 weeks ago
Twitter
This is classic abuser behavior: blame others for "forcing" you to act in ways that are ultimately damaging to them.
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11 weeks ago
Twitter
1000s of unregistered overfly local airport - scary!
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11 weeks ago
Twitter
We're about to test the proposition whether a Confederacy of Dipshits is capable of governing the most powerful nat…
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11 weeks ago
Twitter
Liberals: Take strength from this. Trump is governing from a weaker position than he realizes. Work from local/stat…
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11 weeks ago
Twitter
Republicans, if you wanted an "outsider" who "tells it like it is" and who'll "drain the swamp" - this guy was your…
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12 weeks ago
Teens Against Fascism – Pacific Standard
Do older adults' over-developed frontal lobes prevent them from choosing resistance? Important question for our time
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12 weeks ago
The Budget Audiophile, Rolling Stone (2001) | dysmedia - Douglas Anthony Cooper
MOST PEOPLE IMAGINE that you can buy a pretty good stereo for $50,000. Not many suspect that you can put together a system almost as good for $2,000. This can’t be done, I’m afraid, with gear you find at your local RadioShack. To join the fraternity of the Miserly Audiophile, you have to know what you’re doing — it’s easy to drop two grand and end up with something dire. Also, if you are absolutely committed to the accurate, sub-rumbling reproduction of the bottom few notes produced by the world’s monster pipe organs, you probably won’t find satisfaction for less than five figures. But if you can develop an ear for a certain kind of (often British) component, it’s more than possible to create serious music at a less than silly price.
audio  audio.equipment  topurchase  ****  list  reviews 
12 weeks ago
Twitter
Excellent analysis by on shift from combative => normative => punitive neoliberalism. Accurately bleak…
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12 weeks ago
Twitter
Pau Gasol Valls’ confident markings and bold colours in his holiday sketchbooks >
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12 weeks ago
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