dunnettreader + women-rights   12

John Conley - Madeleine de Scudéry (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Long framed by her critics as a pedantic précieuse, Scudéry has only recently attracted the interest of professional philosophers. Critics have dismissed her lengthy novels as unreadable, her famous Saturday salon as amateurish, and her philosophical ideas as derivative and confused. In the recent feminist expansion of the canon of humanities, however, another Scudéry has appeared. In this reevaluation, the philosophical significance of her writings has emerged. Her literary corpus presents a novel version of the ancient philosophical method of dialogue; it also expresses original, sophisticated theories concerning the ethical, aesthetic, and theological disputes of early modernity.
17thC  French_intellectuals  French_lit  Scudéry  intellectual_history  cultural_history  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  Montaigne  scepticism  libertine_erudite  salons  Louis_XIV  court_culture  virtue_ethics  women-intellectuals  women-rights  aesthetics  genre  novels  dialogue  précieuses 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicola Lacey - Jurisprudence, History, and the Institutional Quality of Law (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 919 (2015)
A cri de coeur for putting legal theory and history back together with social theory and empirical social sciences,. -- In the early part of my career, legal history and the history of legal ideas were closed books to me, as I made my way in a field of criminal law scholarship dominated by doctrinal scholarship and by concept-focused philosophical analysis of the foundations of criminal law. These 2 very different paradigms have 1 big thing in common: They tend to proceed as if the main intellectual task is to unearth the deep logic of existing legal doctrines, not infrequently going so far as to read them back onto history, as if things could never have been other than they are. (..)I have increasingly found myself turning to historical resources (1) [to examine] the contingency of particular legal arrangements, and (2) ...to develop causal and other theses about the dynamics which shape them and hence about the role and quality of criminal law as a form of power in modern societies. So, in a sense, I have been using history in support of an analysis driven primarily by the social sciences. (..) it is no accident that all of the great social theorists, from Marx to Foucault via Weber, Durkheim, and Elias, ..have incorporated significant historical elements into their interpretations .... Indeed, without the diachronic perspective provided by history (or the perspective offered by comparative study) we could have no critical purchase on social theory’s characterizations of or causal hypotheses about the dynamics of social systems. Hence, (...) my boundless gratitude to the historians whose meticulous research makes this sort of interpretive social theory possible). -- Lacey is not over-dramatizing -- see the "commentary" from a "legal philosopher" who believes the normative basis of criminal responsibility can be investigated as timeless "moral truths". -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  historical_sociology  historical_change  institutions  institutional_change  philosophy_of_law  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  morality-conventional  morality-objective  criminal_justice  responsibility  mind  human_nature  norms  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  power  Neoplatonism  neo-Kantian  a_priori  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  evidence  mental_health  social_order  epistemology  epistemology-moral  change-social  change-intellectual  comparative_law  comparative_anthropology  civil_liberties  women-rights  women-property  rights-legal  rights-political  access_to_services  discrimination  legal_culture  legal_system  legal_reasoning  Foucault  Marx  Weber  Durkheim  metaethics  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Conscience Wars: Complicity-Based Conscience Claims in Religion and Politics by Douglas NeJaime, Reva Siegel :: SSRN - Yale Law Journal, Vol. 124, pp. 2516-2591, 2015
Douglas NeJaime, University of California, Irvine School of Law -- Reva Siegel, Yale University - Law School -- (...) Complicity claims focus on the conduct of others outside the faith community. Their accommodation therefore has potential to harm those the claimants view as sinning. (..) Some, tacitly acknowledging the democratic contests in which complicity claims are entangled, urge religious accommodation in the hopes of peaceful settlement. Yet, as we show, complicity-based conscience claims can provide an avenue to extend, rather than settle, conflict about social norms. We highlight the distinctive form and social logic of complicity-based conscience claims so that those debating accommodation do so with the impact on third parties fully in view. The Article considers a range of legal and institutional contexts in which complicity claims are arising, paying particular attention to RFRA. We show how concern about the third-party impact of accommodation structured the Court’s decision in Hobby Lobby. And looking beyond Hobby Lobby, we show how this concern with third-party harm is an integral part of the compelling interest and narrow tailoring inquiries that courts undertake in applying the statute. At issue is not only whether but how complicity claims are accommodated. -- Pages in PDF File: 76 -- Keywords: religion, accommodation, complicity, Hobby Lobby, Holt, contraception, abortion, marriage, exemptions, religious liberty, religious freedom, equality, liberty, healthcare, burwell -- saved to briefcase
paper  SSRN  constitutional_law  politics-and-religion  culture_wars  US_politics  US_constitution  religious_belief  religious_culture  health_care  women-rights  liberty  equality  employee_benefits  work-life_balance  labor_law  freedom_of_conscience  norms  discrimination 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Urbinati, Nadia - The context of religious pluralism « The Immanent Frame - 26 Jan. 2012
Akeel Bilgrami’s article, “Secularism: Its Content and Context,” is an important and welcome contribution .... Bilgrami clarifies in a penetrating and lucid way, three fundamental ideas on secularism: first, that it is “a stance to be taken about religion”; second, that it is not an indication of the form of government or the liberal nature of a regime; and third, that the context is a crucial factor in issues concerning the relationship between politics and religion. The first two arguments are intertwined and pertain to the identity and function of secularism, while the latter brings us directly to the role of religion in the public sphere (...) in what follows [I] is propose some specifications and exemplifications that may enrich or complete [Bigrami's analysis]. -- In matters that have a direct impact on the individual freedom of religion and social peace such as the presence of religion in the public sphere, political theorists should pay close attention to the ethical context and the historical tradition of a given society without deducing practical conclusions from an ideal conception of democracy and liberalism. This pragmatic suggestion of going back and forth from the ideal norm to the context is an admission of the fact that a political practice that is liberal in a pluralistic religious environment may turn to be anti-liberal in a mono-religious society. Pluralism is the essential condition within which we should situate the discourse of the role of religions in the public sphere and the issue of secularism. Without pluralism (as a social fact or as an actual plurality of religions, not only a formal declaration of rights) a constitutional democracy has a weaker liberal nature and may generate decisions that are not more liberal or tolerant than those made in a non-constitutional democracy (or in a decent illiberal society, to paraphrase Rawls). -- example of "liberal public square" in a mono-religious society Catholic Thomist positions advocated in Italian artificial insemination debates producing very restrictive legislation of majority religion restricting rights of minority
21stC  political_philosophy  democracy  liberalism  secularism  public_sphere  Rawls  Habermas  sovereignty  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  civil_liberties  minorities  majoritarian  Italy  Catholics  Catholics-and-politics  Thomism-21stC  reproductive_rights  women-rights  democratic_theory  democratization  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - More Social Movements or Fewer? Beyond Political Opportunity Structures to Relational Fields | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 3/4, (Jun. - Aug., 2004), pp. 333-365
Theory and Society - Special Issue: Current Routes to the Study of Contentious Politics and Social Change -- If social movements are an attempt by "outsiders" to gain leverage within politics, then one might expect the global spread of democracy to reduce social movement activity. This article argues the reverse. Granted, many past social movements, such as women's rights and civil rights, were efforts to empower the disenfranchised. However, this is not typical. Rather, social movements and protest tactics are more often part of a portfolio of efforts by politically active leaders and groups to influence politics. Indeed, as representative governance spreads, with the conviction by all parties that governments should respond to popular choice, then social movements and protest will also spread, as a normal element of democratic politics. Social movements should therefore not be seen as simply a matter of repressed forces fighting states; instead they need to be situated in a dynamic relational field in which the ongoing actions and interests of state actors, allied and counter-movement groups, and the public at large all influence social movement emergence, activity, and outcomes. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  power  power-asymmetric  democracy  political_participation  government-forms  governing_class  elites  grassroots  representative_institutions  reform-political  reform-social  reform-economic  franchise  accountability  interest_groups  voice  civil_liberties  women-rights  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Dave Johnson - The Cost To Our Economy From Republican Obstruction And Sabotage | Campaign for America's Future - September 2014
After listing key filibusters -- What would it have meant for the economy and jobs to launch a post-stimulus effort to maintain and modernize our infrastructure? How about reversing the tax structure that pays companies to move jobs out of the country? How about equal pay for women? How about a minimum wage increase? How about hundreds of thousands of teachers and first responders going back to work? How about being able to organize into unions to fight for wages, benefits and safer working conditions? How about relief from crushing student loan debt? -- In the House GOP leadership has been following the “Hastert Rule” to obstruct bills that would win with a majority vote. -- So instead of looking at what has been blocked in the House, we should look at what has passed. What has passed is a record of economic sabotage. Noteworthy is the GOP “Path to Prosperity Budget” (“Ryan budget”), described as “Cuts spending & implements pro-growth reforms that boost job creation.” It dramatically cuts taxes on the rich. It privatizes Medicare. It cuts spending on infrastructure, health care for the poor, education, research, public-safety, and low-income programs. It turns Medicaid, food stamps, and other poverty programs into state block grants. And lo and behold, this GOP budget that passed the House cuts taxes and cuts funding for even maintaining – never mind modernizing – our vital infrastructure needs. This is a budget of economic sabotage. Other GOP House “jobs” bills, listed at Boehner’s “jobs” page include: -- horrifyingly awful policies with Orwellian titles or red meat specials -- special attention to keeping oil & gas subsidies flowing and eviserating regulation, especially EPA -- Johnson stresses, the voters are unaware of all this thanks in part to the MSM which is ballanced re political parties, pro business & anti labor, and guilty of mindlessly peddling what Wren-Lewis calls mediamacro. Good links
US_economy  US_politics  Congress  Great_Recession  GOP  unemployment  public_finance  public_goods  state_government  welfare  social_insurance  poverty  infrastructure  Obama_administration  health_care  women-rights  women-work  wages  fiscal_policy  fiscal_drag  taxes  1-percent  energy  climate  regulation-environment  R&D  Senate  House_of_Representatives  polarization  student_debt  education-finance  education-privatization  corporate_tax  labor_law  unions  trickle-down 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Graber, review - Danielle Citron, Hate Crimes in Cyberspace -- Balkinization - September 2014
Citron‘s HCiC redefines as criminal behavior the repeated threats, insults, and gross violations of basic privacy norms on the internet that too many people, police in particular, regard as juvenile behavior. ...a pathbreaking study of how cultural tolerance of bullying and harassment on the internet is threatening to turn the most important contemporary forum for ideas into masculine Wild West where respect and common decency are signs of weakness rather than basic norms of conduct. HciC offers a remarkably thorough survey of the depressing state of the internet for women. The first chapters detail how women are repeatedly attacked on the internet, ... Harassment and bullying have the same impact on the internet as elsewhere. Women participate less in cyberspace, they become more generally fearful, and they lose employment and other opportunities when persons attempt to research their background in cyberspace. The second set of chapters detail problems with present efforts to stop hate crimes on the internet. The first problem is .. anonymity makes attackers difficult to identify. The second are police attitudes. Finally, laws regulating bullying, harassment and stalking were not drafted with the internet in mind. -- The last set of chapters focus on legal and social solutions to the problem of hate crimes on the internet. -- HCiC has the same ambitions as Sexual Harassment of Working Women, but its different is for more successful. McKinnon has always believed Americans need theory to understand what is wrong with sexual harassment. Citron’s assumption is that all Americans need is common sense - people should not urge that women be murdered and raped, post nude photographs of ex-girl friends on revenge porn sites, or spread malicious gossip. -- The debate over HCiC will focus on the First Amendment rights of cyberbullies, but ...the book defines constitutional rights too broadly rather than too narrowly. HciC endorses a populist understanding of the internet in which “All information should be free.” ... why Citron struggles drawing boundaries between posting nude pictures of ex-girlfriends on revenge porn websites and posting other information about ex-girlfriends on various websites that may be constitutionally protected.
books  reviews  Internet  legal_system  legal_theory  privacy  women-rights  free_speech  reform-legal  reform-social  feminism  violence 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
James Fitzjames Stephen, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, ed. Stuart D. Warner (LF ed. 1993) - Online Library of Liberty
James Fitzjames Stephen, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, ed. Stuart D. Warner (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1993). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/572> -- The Liberty Fund edition of this work, published 1873. Impugning John Stuart Mill’s famous treatise, On Liberty, Stephen criticized Mill for turning abstract doctrines of the French Revolution into “the creed of a religion.” Only the constraints of morality and law make liberty possible, warned Stephen, and attempts to impose unlimited freedom, material equality, and an indiscriminate love of humanity will lead inevitably to coercion and tyranny. -- he also attacks Mill on subordination of women (he's of course for it as being a natural hierarchy, Virginia must have been proud of her uncle) and Utilitarianism, though Stephen himself was a utilitarian. -- see also short bibliography re Victorian intelligentsia
books  etexts  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  human_nature  Stephen_Leslie  Victorian  Mill  utilitarianism  women-rights  hierarchy  social_order  liberalism  democracy  mass_culture  political_participation  liberty  equality  communitarian  individualism  laisser-faire 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Clark - The Stupidest Thing I Have Ever Read | Slacktavist June 2014
-- This is from Religion Dispatches, by Patricia Miller titled, “The Story Behind the Catholic Church’s Stunning Reversal on Contraception” -- Here’s Miller: "The [papal] commission voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the ban against artificial means of birth control be lifted. -- Unhappy with the direction of the commission, the Vatican packed the last commission meetings with 15. But even the bishops voted 9 to 3 (3 abstained) to change the teaching, -- Despite the commission’s years of work and theologically unassailable conclusion that the church’s teaching on birth control was neither infallible nor irreversible, Pope Paul VI stunned the world on July 29, 1968, when he reaffirmed the church’s ban on modern contraceptives in Humanae Vitae. -- The pope had deferred to a minority report prepared by 4 conservative theologian priests that said the church could not change its teaching on birth control because admitting the church had been wrong about the issue for centuries would raise questions about the moral authority of the pope, especially on matters of sexuality, and the belief that the Holy Spirit guided his pronouncements. “The Church cannot change her answer because this answer is true. … It is true because the Catholic Church, instituted by Christ … could not have so wrongly erred during all those centuries of its history,” they wrote. As one of the conservative theologians famously asked one of the female members of the commission, what would happen to “the millions we have sent to hell” for using contraception if the teaching were suddenly changed.
religious_history  church_history  Catholics  Papacy  papal_infallibility  20thC  sexuality  feminism  patriarchy  women-work  women-rights  family  authority  tradition  links  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Torrey Shanks - Feminine Figures and the "Fatherhood": Rhetoric and Reason in Locke's "First Treatise of Government" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 31-57
Traditionally neglected, Locke's First Treatise of Government has taken on new significance with feminist interpretations that recognize the importance of its sustained engagement with patriarchal power. Yet feminist interpreters, both critics and admirers alike, read Locke as a champion of the "man of reason," a figure seemingly immune to the influences of passions, imagination, and rhetoric. These interpreters wrongly overlook Locke's extended engagement with the power of rhetoric in the First Treatise, an engagement that troubles the clear opposition of masculine reason and its feminine exclusions. Taking Locke's rhetoric seriously, I argue, makes the First Treatise newly important for what it shows us about Locke's practice of political critique. In following the varied and novel effects of Locke's feminine figures, we find a practice of political critique that depends on a mutually constitutive relation between rhetoric and reason. -- paywall Sage -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  literary_history  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  17thC  Locke-1st_Treatise  women-rights  women-property  patriarchy  authority  metaphor  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Filmer  Dryden  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Charles_II  masculinity  femininity  reason  philosophy_of_language  emotions  practical_reason  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

1-percent  2-cultures  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  abolition  access_to_services  accountability  aesthetics  analytical_philosophy  article  authority  a_priori  bibliography  books  Catholics  Catholics-and-politics  change-intellectual  change-social  Charles_II  church_history  civil_liberties  climate  communitarian  comparative_anthropology  comparative_law  concepts  Congress  constitutional_law  contention  corporate_tax  court_culture  criminal_justice  cultural_change  cultural_history  culture_wars  democracy  democratic_theory  democratization  dialogue  discrimination  domesticity  downloaded  Dryden  Durkheim  education-finance  education-privatization  EF-add  elites  Emerson  emotions  employee_benefits  energy  epistemology  epistemology-moral  equality  etexts  evidence  Exclusion_Crisis  family  femininity  feminism  Filmer  find  fiscal_drag  fiscal_policy  Foucault  franchise  freedom_of_conscience  free_speech  French_intellectuals  French_lit  gender_history  genre  GOP  governing_class  government-forms  grassroots  Great_Recession  Habermas  health_care  hierarchy  historical_change  historical_sociology  historiography  House_of_Representatives  human_nature  human_rights  idealism  identity  individualism  infrastructure  institutional_change  institutions  intellectual_history  interest_groups  Internet  Italy  jstor  jurisprudence  labor_law  laisser-faire  legal_culture  legal_history  legal_reasoning  legal_system  legal_theory  liberalism  libertine_erudite  liberty  libraries  links  literary_history  Locke-1st_Treatise  Louis_XIV  majoritarian  Marx  masculinity  mass_culture  mental_health  metaethics  metaphor  Mill  mind  minorities  Montaigne  morality-conventional  morality-objective  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  nature  neo-Kantian  Neoplatonism  norms  novels  Obama_administration  Papacy  papal_infallibility  paper  patriarchy  paywall  perspectivism  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  poetry  polarization  politeness  political_culture  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_sociology  politics-and-religion  Popish_Plot  poverty  power  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  practical_reason  privacy  précieuses  public_finance  public_goods  public_sphere  R&D  Rawls  reason  reform-economic  reform-legal  reform-political  reform-social  regulation-environment  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  representative_institutions  reproductive_rights  responsibility  reviews  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rights-legal  rights-political  salons  scepticism  Scudéry  secularism  Senate  sexuality  sexual_practices  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  sociability  social_insurance  social_movements  social_order  social_theory  sociology_of_religion  sovereignty  spirituality  SSRN  state_government  Stephen_Leslie  student_debt  taxes  Thomism-21stC  tradition  Transcendentals  trickle-down  unemployment  unions  US  US_Civil_War  US_constitution  US_economy  US_politics  utilitarianism  Victorian  violence  virtue_ethics  voice  wages  Weber  welfare  women  women-intellectuals  women-property  women-rights  women-work  work-life_balance 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: