dunnettreader + women-intellectuals + republic_of_letters   3

Special Issue: When Is a Public Sphere? JSTOR: Criticism, Vol. 46, No. 2, Spring 2004
--**-- Introduction: Charting Habermas's "Literary" or "Precursor" Public Sphere(pp. 201-205)  JOSEPH LOEWENSTEIN and PAUL STEVENS. --**-- Public Sphere/Contact Zone: Habermas, Early Print, and Verse Translation(pp. 207-222)  A.E.B. COLDIRON. --**-- Women, the Republic of Letters, and the Public Sphere in the Mid-Seventeenth Century(pp. 223-240)  DAVID NORBROOK. --**-- The Bourgeois Public Sphere and the Concept of Literature(pp. 241-256)  KEVIN PASK. --**-- How Music Created a Public(pp. 257-271)  HAROLD LOVE. --**-- Parsing Habermas's "Bourgeois Public Sphere"(pp. 273-277)  MICHAEL MCKEON
article  jstor  literary_history  music_history  lit_crit  17thC  18thC  Habermas  public_sphere  Republic_of_Letters  women-intellectuals  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Antoine Lilti - The Kingdom of Politesse: Salons and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century Paris | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Lilti, Antoine. “The Kingdom of Politesse: Salons and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century Paris.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/38. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note; a copy already in Ef -- The bibliography on the Republic of Letters is long, but most scholars would agree the notion has a double meaning: on the one hand, the Republic of Letters is a historiographical tool to refer to networks of scholars organized around academic institutions, learned journals, informal gatherings and epistolary exchanges; on the otherhand, it is the normative ideal of a community of scholars and writers who have egalitarian and personal relationships, autonomous from political power, from religious solidarities and from national identities. In Anne Goldgar’s words, the Republic of Letters is a “reflexive event.” I would like to suggest that Parisian salons did not fit any of these definitions. As a site for sociability, they were, above all, venues of entertainment for polite elites, and were deeply rooted in court society. The ideal which guided the writers who attended these salons—Morellet, Thomas, Marmontel, and many others—was not the Republic of Letters, but Parisian high society (le monde), where some men of letters, polite and successful, were welcomed because they conformed to aristocratic norms. In other words, they were dreaming about the kingdom of politesse rather than the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  salons  cultural_history  aristocracy  elites  politeness  sociability  social_capital  women-intellectuals  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paula Findlen: Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Findlen, Paula. “Founding a Scientific Academy: Gender, Patronage and Knowledge in Early Eighteenth-Century Milan.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/33. IN "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- By the eighteenth century the Cimento was as a symbolic point of departure for the idea of founding an academy that would restore Italy’s greatness through the pursuit of modern knowledge..... as the great librarian, historian, and guardian of Italy’s intellectual heritage Ludovico Antonio Muratori (1672-1750) noted with disgust in 1704, in his day virtually every Italian city had “an academy, indeed two, three or sometimes even more”—but to what end? In his famous account of the Italian republic of letters, First Sketches of the Republic of Letters of Italy, written under the pseudonym of Lamindio Pritanio, Muratori described the decline of Italy’s academies since the era of the Cimento. .... [Queen Christina] was widely regarded as a great patron of science. Yet these activities had been eclipsed by the creation of the Accademia degli Arcadi, a literary academy founded in Rome in 1690 which claimed Queen Christina as its posthumous patron and rapidly established colonies throughout the Italian peninsula...... The success of Arcadia at the expense of other kinds of scholarly initiatives at the dawn of the eighteenth century was the focal point of Muratori’s condemnation of the current state of the Italian academies and his call for the emergence of a new kind of patron. Grillo Borromeo’s decision to create an academy in Palazzo Borromeo was an attempt to redress this imbalance while also highlighting the prominent role that learned women might play in this new vision of the republic of letters.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  academies  Royal_Society  Italy  Milan  Florence  Rome  patronage  Republic_of_Letters  women-intellectuals  Scientific_Revolution  natural_philosophy  poetry  belles-lettres  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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