dunnettreader + virtue   32

Anoush Fraser Terjanian, Associate Professor - Department of History - East Carolina University
Anoush F. Terjanian, Commerce and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought (Cambridge UP, © 2013) -- Co-editor. Book 17 of Raynal et. al., Histoire philosophique et politique du commerce et des établissements des européens dans les deux Indes, (1770, 1774, 1780), Ferney: Centre international d'étude du XVIIIe siècle, forthcoming 2016.
academia  18thC  French_history  French_Enlightenment  political_economy  colonialism  anticolonialism  philosophes  commerce-doux  luxury  virtue  politics-and-literature  political_discourse  economics-and-morality  economic_discourse  Histoire_des_Deux_Indes  intellectual_history  historiography-18thC  Montesquieu  Raynal  books 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
HERMAN PAUL - DISTANCE AND SELF-DISTANCIATION: INTELLECTUAL VIRTUE AND HISTORICAL METHOD AROUND 1900 | JSTOR History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 104-116 -- What did "historical distance" mean to historians in the Rankean tradition? Although historical distance is often equated with temporal distance, an analysis of Ernst Bernheim's Lehrbuch der historischen Methode reveals that for German historians around 1900 distance did not primarily refer to a passage of time that would enable scholars to study remote pasts from retrospective points of view. -- the metaphor rather conveys a need for self-distanciation. Self-distanciation is not a Romantic desire to "extinguish" oneself, but a virtuous attempt to put one's own ideas and intuitions about the working of the world between brackets in the study of people who might have understood the world in different terms. Although Bernheim did not explicitly talk about virtue, the article shows that his Lehrbuch nonetheless considers self-distanciation a matter of virtuous behavior, targeted at an aim that may not be fully realizable, but ought to be pursued with all possible vigor. For Bernheim, then, distance requires epistemological virtue, which in turn calls for intellectual character, or what Bernheim's generation considered scholarly selfhood {wissenschaftliche Persönlichkeit). Not a mapping of time onto space, but a strenuous effort to mold "scholarly characters," truly able to recognize the otherness of the past, appears to be characteristic of Bernheim's view of historical distance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  historicism  philosophy_of_history  German_scholarship  historians  epistemology-history  virtue  epistemic_virtue  character  character-formation  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Alison V. Scott, review - Joan Coutu, Then and Now: Collecting and Classicism in Eighteenth-Century England. | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. January, 2016
Focusing on four significant collections of classical sculpture begun in the middle of the 18thC, Then and Now: Collecting and Classicism in Eighteenth-Century England offers a detailed examination of the socio-politics of classical sculpture collecting in eighteenth-century Britain, in the context of shifting ideas about the nature of the English gentleman and his relation to connoisseurship and politics. Joan Coutu argues convincingly for the multilayered and important distinctiveness of the mid-century collections she takes as case studies in this book. On the one hand, they were clearly not “identity-driven and philologically based” in the manner of early 18thC collections, nor did they collapse the temporal distance with the classical world as earlier collections did (p. 7). On the other hand, however, they differed markedly from the famous collections assembled by the likes of Charles Townley, Henry Blundell, and William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne, in the later 18thC. Those tended to emphasize the authentic original and gathered “objects to be admired as samples of another time and another place” in contrast to the mid-century collections that Coutu shows to have functioned as exemplum, “a visible anchor of the classical erudition of the English patriciate” which was actively intended to encourage public virtue in other men -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  cultural_history  18thC  British_history  gentleman  virtue  classicism  collections  antiquity  antiquaries  elite_culture  history_as_examples  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - The Stoics (on Evil) | Academia.edu
Chapter for The History of Evil in Antiquity (Acumen) - in press -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  physics  Stoicism  evil  virtue  Providence  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - Serious, Non-Sarcastic Questions About the Benedict Option | The American Conservative - May 2015
I have great respect and affection for my colleague, Rod Dreher. But I have to admit, I am very frustrated by his latest obsession, because I don’t understand… Quite superb elaboration of what's required for a religious community to withdraw from the main culture while being in the world -- examples from Orthodox Judaism, Mormons etc as well as medieval monasticism -- since if the primary inspiration for the so-called Benedict Option is Alisdair MacIntyre, his diagnosis of what's wrong with modernity, and accordingly how one might counter modernity's fatal flaws, is based on a vision of integral moral community that shares and lives together an active understanding of virtue -- so it must be social, embodying social identity and the reality and perpetuation of community through institutions, rules, external marks of identity, etc.
modernity  virtue  religious_culture  secularization  community  sectarianism  MacIntyre  Thomism-21stC  cultural_critique  culture_wars  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Shapin - The Virtue of Scientific Thinking | Boston Review - Jan 2015
scientific reeearch may not make you more vitruous, or scientists as a group better people, but the disenchantment (severing assumed link between divine design of the cosmos and our ability to learn more and better understand how man fits in) described hy Weber in Vocation priduces a few worrisome trends. One is the hubris of "playing God" scientism, The Sam Harris and Steve Pinker types that think science can explain enough about hiw humans got to whete we are and how we function in modernity to be philosopher-kings on defining moral values and how our political and social structures should operate for what ends. The other disturbing consequence of cutting the link is the loss of discipline via internalized norms of the religious and miral worth of disinyetested inquiry. As profit and funding increasingly drive all levels of scientific research, and the rnds are increasingly narrowed to technology that can be exploited for profit or power (or both in the military-industrial-( academia) complex, what's to distinguish scientists from bankers. The foundation of trust in scientific results is at extreme risk. The only positive, which ashapin doesn't drvelop, is scepticism re the trustworthiness of the scientific enterprise may threaten the future of the planet via climate change, but few will be eager to put their trust in tge claims of the candidates nominating themselves as philosopher-kings.
Social_Darwinism  Pocket  cosmology  18thC  morality  virtue  scientism  post-WWII  moral_philosophy  17thC  21stC  19thC  history_of_science  mioitary-industrial_complex  20thC  cultural_history  Cold_War  morality-objective  curiosity  is-ought  natural_theology  norms  Reformation  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  morality-conventional 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Herbert Gintis - Gene–culture coevolution and the nature of human sociality | Royal Society - Issue Theme "Human Niche Construction" - Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 27 March 2011, vol. 366, no. 1566, 878-888
Human characteristics are the product of gene–culture coevolution, which is an evolutionary dynamic involving the interaction of genes and culture over long time periods. Gene–culture coevolution is a special case of niche construction. Gene–culture coevolution is responsible for human other-regarding preferences, a taste for fairness, the capacity to empathize and salience of morality and character virtues. -- Keywords: gene–culture coevolution, sociobiology, epistatic information transfer -- Published 14 February 2011 doi: 10.1098/rstb.2010.0310 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  gene-culture_coevolution  sociobiology  social_theory  genetics  cultural_change  social_process  niche_construction  evolution  evolution-social  evolutionary_biology  human_nature  character  preferences  altruism  fairness  empathy  moral_sentiments  moral_psychology  morality-innate  morality-conventional  virtue  tradition  cultural_transmission  evolution-group_selection  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Kevin Slack - Benjamin Franklin’s Metaphysical Essays and the Virtue of Humility | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 31-61
Historians have long rejected Max Weber and D. H. Lawrence’s portrayal of Benjamin Franklin as the stuffy architect of a new kind of prudish bourgeois virtue. Recent scholarly work has challenged this notion and has added something more: the idea that Franklin is a serious thinker, even an ironic thinker, in the Western philosophic tradition. Certainly Franklin participated in a vigorous intellectual debate with the greatest minds of his time over the meaning of religion, moral duty, and virtue. In this article I return to Franklin’s own writings to provide what I think is a new and hopefully provocative interpretation of Franklin as a philosophic thinker. After briefly recounting the traditional interpretation of Franklin’s Autobiography, I present new interpretations of Franklin’s metaphysical essays in the context of his orientation to the philosophical schools of his day and argue that Franklin, upon this foundation, constructs his own theory of the philosophical temper. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  American_colonies  American_Revolution  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Deism  metaphysics  determinism  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  Franklin_Ben  virtue  civic_virtue  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Denis Larrivee and Adriana Gini - Neuroplasticity and the Reemergence of Virtue | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2014
Opinion ARTICLE - Front. Hum. Neurosci., 18 September 2014 | doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00731 -- Is the philosophical construct of “habitus operativus bonus” compatible with the modern neuroscience concept of human flourishing through neuroplasticity? A consideration of prudence as a multidimensional regulator of virtue - Denis Larrivee1* and Adriana Gini2 - 1Educational Outreach Office, Catholic Diocese of Charleston, Charleston, SC, USA - 2Neuroradiology Division, Neuroscience Department, San Camillo-Forlanini Medical Center, Rome, Italy Unlike ancient Greece where personal virtue was the route to fulfillment, modern man typically seeks to improve human well-being by external means, in a process known as the medicalization of society. The apparent novelty of recent proposals in psychological theory to develop character strength, therefore, lies in their reemphasis on a personal implementation of positive values. Among the factors contributing to a new look at self-determination has been the capacity for the neural substrate to selectively alter itself via neuroplasticity. Indeed, the confluence of past and contemporary thinking may presage a consideration of neurobiological instantiation within which virtuous behavior may be enhanced in accord with principles governing neuroplastic change. But what are virtues and positive traits? And to what extent can these conceptions inform our growing understanding of the neural contribution to human behavior? -- full title is enormous, referring to Aquinas formula and written by at least one author committed to Catholic Thomism - discussion of Aristotle also -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  Aquinas  Thomism-21stC  moral_philosophy  mind  habit  neuroscience  cognition  plasticity  prudence  practical_reason  character  virtue  psychology  brain  brain-development  self-development  self-regulation  phronesis  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Iakovos Vasiliou interview with Richard Marshall - Plato aims at virtue » 3:AM Magazine
Blurb of his book, Aiming at Virtue in Plato -- This study of Plato's ethics focuses on the concept of virtue. Based on detailed readings of the most prominent Platonic dialogues on virtue, it argues that there is a central yet previously unnoticed conceptual distinction in Plato between the idea of virtue as the supreme aim of one's actions and the determination of which action-tokens or -types are virtuous. Appreciating the 'aiming/determining distinction' provides detailed and mutually consistent readings of the most well-known Platonic dialogues on virtue as well as original interpretations of central Platonic questions. Unlike most examinations of Plato's ethics, this study does not take as its centrepiece the 'eudaimonist framework', which focuses on the relationship between virtue and happiness. Instead, it argues that the dialogues themselves begin with the idea of the supremacy of virtue, examine how that claim can be defended, and address how to determine what constitutes the virtuous action. -- professor at CUNY
books  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  eudaimonia  virtue  virtue_ethics  deontology  Williams_Bernard 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Charlie Huenemann, review - Matthew J. Kisner and Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory (OUP) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 09, 2014
This volume presents a cohesive and engaging set of essays, converging on the question: was Spinoza frowning or smiling? ...as he surveyed the wide range of human moral phenomena, did he merely bemoan our superstitious beliefs and ignorant behaviors? Or did he see some of it as truly virtuous? But how can anything be virtuous, if all human actions are completely determined by an infinite substance that doesn't give a damn what happens? --...Charles Jarrett's essay forcefully presents the challenges of finding genuine morality in Spinoza's philosophy. As Jarrett reads him, Spinoza left himself no room to construct a meaningful "ideal" of human behavior. Indeed, "good" itself is misleading, as Spinoza "advocates or recommends that we take a perspective from which good and evil cannot be conceived. He thus seems... to advocate, a transcendence of ethics". -- Several essays take up Jarrett's challenge. -- Some of the essays are concerned with saving the possibility of Spinoza's morality from other doctrines he espoused. Michael LeBuffe ("Necessity and the Commands of Reason in the Ethics") -- Karolina Hübner rescues meaningful discourse about humanity as a whole in the face of Spinoza's disdain for universals. Eugene Marshall ("Man is a God to Man: How Humans can be Adequate Causes") defends the intelligibility, within Spinoza's determinism, that some actions can be autonomous and hence "free". -- Some of the essays provide broad and masterful perspective... meditations on the nature and significance of Spinoza's ethical project. -- A final trio of essays connects Spinoza's morality with the claims regarding "eternity" in Part V of the Ethics. These are especially welcome, as Spinoza's mystical claims are sometimes treated as an embarrassment or as a separate island of befuddlement. -- there is not a single clunker in the lot. The introduction is a thoughtful overview of the terrain that also provides a useful integration of the chapters that follow. If you are studying Spinoza's ethical theory, you need this book.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  determinism  free_will  causation  good  evil  infinity  virtue 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
ALEXIS D. LITVINE, review essay - THE INDUSTRIOUS REVOLUTION, THE INDUSTRIOUSNESS DISCOURSE, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN ECONOMIES (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 531-570. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
ALEXIS D. LITVINE - Trinity College, Cambridge -- The idea of industriousness has been an ever-recurring issue since Max Weber launched it as a putative explanation of the advent of economic modernity. The notion of ‘industrious revolution’ has provoked a renewed flourishing of publications focusing on this issue. Although most historians agree on the emergence of industriousness in seventeenth-century Europe, there is no consensus regarding the chronology, hence the real causes, of this mental and discursive shift. This article emphasizes the problematic role played by literary evidences in these social and cultural models of diffusion of new consumer values and desires. It then establishes the timing of the emergence of the ‘industriousness discourse’ using an original approach to diffusion based both on the quantitative analysis of very large corpora and a close reading of seventeenth-century economic pamphlets and educational literature. It concludes first that there was not one but several competing discourses on industriousness. It then identifies two crucial hinges which closely match the chronology proposed by Allen and Muldrew, but refutes that championed by de Vries and McCloskey. The industrious revolution as described by these authors would have happened both too late to fit its intellectual roots and too early to signal the beginning of a ‘consumer revolution’. -- * I am extremely grateful to Peter Mandler, Craig Muldrew, participants in the Early Modern Economic and Social History seminar, and two anonymous referees, for their comments on previous versions of this article. I am also indebted to Andrew Hardie, Jean-Baptiste Michel, and Paul Schaffner for allowing me to use their data and to Billy Janitsch, Andreas Vlachos, and Andrew Wilson for technical assistance.
article  paywall  find  historiography  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  economic_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  social_order  consumerism  Industrial_Revolution  industriousness  virtue  discourse  bourgeoisie  modernity-emergence  education  values  publishing  readership  Protestant_Ethic  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Shapin on E.C. Spary, Eating the Enlightenment : Food and the Sciences in Paris, 1670-1760 | The Los Angeles Review of Books - March 2013
Delightful review noting that the traditional humoural medicine, including diet, was based on a close link between body and mind, but as humours were abandoned great confusion about just what the links were and how they worked. Also covers the commercial distribution of new (to Europeans) beverages (coffee, tea, chocolate etc) and invention of others (e.g. various spirits like eaux de vie) and flavors. Got wrapped up in morality debates re taste vs gluttony, luxury, consumer fashion, and naturalism, reflected in the Encyclopédie and Rousseau. Shapin extends his discussion beyond the book's time frame to 19thC.
books  reviews  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  luxury  consumerism  fashion  naturalism  noble_savage  virtue  vice  medicine  food  taste  Encyclopédie  Voltaire  Rousseau  Bouffon  humours  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Frans Svensson - THE ROLE OF VIRTUE IN DESCARTES' ETHICAL THEORY, OR: WAS DESCARTES A VIRTUE ETHICIST? | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 3 (JULY 2010), pp. 215-236
Looks useful 1st by trying to set criteria to distinguish virtue ethics from concern with virtue in other metaethics (deontology, consequentialism, eudaimonia) - he then looks at Descartes's letters to Queen Christina , supplemented with some remarks on moral psychology in Passions of the Soul. Contra Lisa Shapiro in a recent Blackwell Companion, his verdict is No. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  metaethics  virtue_ethics  virtue  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  good  reason  reason-passions  free_will  Descartes  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael LeBuffe - SPINOZISTIC PERFECTIONISM | JSTOR: History of Philosophy Quarterly, Vol. 27, No. 4 (OCTOBER 2010), pp. 317-333
Perfectionism seems to imply simply capable of improvement -- explains Spinoza's Ethics as differing from the virtue ethics sort as not based on something like the essence of humans -- the article gives an outline of what he thinks are the attractive features of Spinoza's moral_philosophy disentangled from some of the more obscure or less plausible parts of Spinoza's system, while recognizing that since Spinoza is a super systematic philosopher, some of his metaphysical concepts are key to his moral_philosophy, which LeBuffe attempts to spell out -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  20thC  21stC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  virtue_ethics  virtue  good  hedonistic  happiness  improvement  perfectibility  Spinoza  morality-conventional  morality-objective  perspectivism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion [1779], ed. Mary Catherine Moran - Online Library of Liberty
Henry Home, Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion, Corrected and Improved, in a Third Edition. Several Essays Added Concerning the Proof of a Deity, Edited and with an Introduction by Mary Catherine Moran (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1352> -- The Essays is commonly considered Kames’s most important philosophical work. In the first part, he sets forth the principles and foundations of morality and justice, attacking Hume’s moral skepticism and addressing the controversial issue of the freedom of human will. In the second part, Kames focuses on questions of metaphysics and epistemology to offer a natural theology in which the authority of the external senses is an important basis for belief in the Deity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  free_will  metaphysics  epistemology  epistemology-moral  scepticism  justice  virtue  Hume-ethics  natural_religion  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - An Inquiry into the Original of Our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, An Inquiry into the Original of Our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue in Two Treatises, ed. Wolfgang Leidhold (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2004). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2462>
etexts  18thC  moral_philosophy  Hutcheson  morality-innate  moral_sentiments  Shaftesbury  Mandeville  aesthetics  beauty  virtue  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Diderot: Rameau's Nephew - Waggish 2005
Remarks include Trilling re authenticity and sincerity, similarities to Nietzsche's attack on morality, Hegel's delight in "He", and Diderot’s critique linking to MacIntyre After Virtue analysis of the weakness of Enlightenment ethics
18thC  Enlightenment  Diderot  self  moral_philosophy  hypocrisy  politeness  virtue  Hegel  Nietzsche 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Gary Saul Morson - Misanthropology | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Winter, 1996), pp. 57-72
Swift in Gulliver vs Dostoyevsky -- they share that sociability isn't simply the source of human goodness - also when man is at his most vicious -- Swift fits the Dostoyevsky model more closely than Morson suggests -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  human_nature  virtue  vice  sociability  misanthropy  Swift  Dostoyevsky  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Dana Chabot - Thomas Hobbes: Skeptical Moralist | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 89, No. 2 (Jun., 1995), pp. 401-410
Thomas Hobbes is usually held to have been a skeptic in matters of religion and morality. I accept the claim that there is a distinctive skeptical strain in Hobbes' thought but argue that his skepticism informs his moral vision, rather than depriving him of a conception of morality. As evidence for this reading, I situate Hobbes in a tradition of "skeptical moralism," along with Montaigne and certain other Renaissance figures. As opposed to moral skeptics, skeptical moralists think of moral agents as divided selves, pulled in one direction by law and another by conscience. Skeptical moralists use skepticism to make people aware of this tension, and I argue that (especially in his remarks on religion) Hobbes was doing just that. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  religious_belief  scepticism  moral_psychology  emotions  virtue  Montaigne  French_moralists  libertine_erudite  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John Gillingham - From Civilitas to Civility: Codes of Manners in Medieval and Early Modern England | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12 (2002), pp. 267-289
Argues that to see the contrasts between late medieval 'courtesy books' and early modern manuals of manners as markers of changing ideals of social conduct in England is an interpretation too narrowly based on works written in English. Examination of Latin and Anglo-Norman literature shows that the ideal of the urbane gentleman can be traced back at least as far as the most comprehensive of all courtesy books, the twelfth-century Liber Urbani of Daniel of Beccles, and was itself underpinned by the commonplace secular morality of the much older Distichs of Cato. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  British_history  Medieval  16thC  17thC  Anglo-Norman  virtue  gentleman  manners  elites  Latin_lit  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Philip Carter - Polite 'Persons': Character, Biography and the Gentleman | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12 (2002), pp. 333-354
Attempts to distinguish modern theories of refinement led eighteenth-century writers to highlight the moral integrity of a new code - politeness - in which outward civilities could be read as the manifestation of inner social virtues. To sponsors of polite culture this assurance was indicative of the superiority of modern manners manifest in the Lockean polite 'person'. Yet the possibility and validity of synthesis remained a subject for debate; partly because of the difficulty of communicating character, partly because of the potential exploitation of a supposed congruity between outer expression and inner motive. In response, late century theorists sought to reinvigorate aspects of Locke's ideal through a culture of sensibility which both developed and criticised the existing polite code. But prone to similar weaknesses, sensibility was itself abandoned in the nineteenth century as writing on morals and manners diverged, and the distinctive, enlightened concept of politeness gave way to etiquette and a modern regimen of social dos and don'ts.
article  jstor  cultural_history  British_history  18thC  19thC  politeness  manners  virtue  sensibility  hypocrisy  character  gentleman  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Lamb: Locke on Ownership, Imperfect Duties and ‘the Art of Governing’ (2010) - The British Journal of Politics & International Relations | Wiley Online Library
Lamb, R. (2010), Locke on Ownership, Imperfect Duties and ‘the Art of Governing’. The British Journal of Politics & International Relations, 12: 126–141. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-856X.2009.00397.x -- In this article, I discuss how Locke's account of virtuous moral obligation fits with his theory of individual rights, with specific attention to his account of ownership. I suggest that the best way to make sense of the relationship between the competing concepts of rights and virtue in Locke's thought is through the idea of imperfect duties: moral duties that do not necessarily have a legal equivalent. These duties indicate how a teleological account of morality can exist within the framework of a commitment to individual rights while also raising questions about how a Lockean government should act in regard to them. I identify the imperfect duties involved in the ownership of property and tentatively explore Locke's scattered recommendations for ‘the art of governing’ individuals.
article  Wiley  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  moral_philosophy  virtue  obligation  property  property_rights  civil_liberties  Locke  17thC  Britain  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Arthur Edward Jr Kolzow: Equality and Liberty in the Materialist Moral Philosophy of the French Enlightenment - thesis 2011 - Udini
Equality and liberty have come, over the past two and half centuries, to find themselves among the primary political and social values of the West. This study on both the philosophical and historical development of equality and liberty during the Enlightenment clarifies their purposes and justifications. It also elucidates the occasional conflicts between equality and liberty, that is, where it becomes necessary to choose one over the other. The works of three of the major materialist philosophers of the French Enlightenment, Julien Offray de La Mettrie (1709-1751), Paul-Henri d'Holbach (1723-1789), and Denis Diderot (1713-1784), are ideal for such analysis because each of them has a different perspective on equality and liberty and the relationship of these two ideas to the individual and society. La Mettrie, d'Holbach, and Diderot seek to justify their conceptions of equality and liberty through nature, in particular through the human attraction to pleasure and aversion to pain. From this perspective, they are also able to criticize the corruption and hypocrisy of the social institutions, especially the Catholic Church. The primary aim of their conceptions of equality and liberty is to create a balance between the needs and desires of the individual and those of society. Each believes that the individual can be expected to support society and, simultaneously, that society can be expected to support the individual. Equality spares the individual from neglect by social institutions by insisting that society avoid special treatment of some individuals over others, and liberty guarantees the individual's well-being by asserting the value of individual action over other concerns. However, this social balance, the balance between the interests of society and those of the individual, is not the same for each of the three materialists.
thesis  18thC  Enlightenment  France  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  social_theory  human_nature  individualism  civil_society  equality  liberty  virtue  happiness  pleasure  d'Holbach  Diderot  materialism  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Fashioning Masculinity: National Identity and Language in the 18thC by Michèle Cohen.(1998) | Questia
The fashioning of English gentlemen in the eighteenth century was modelled on French practices of sociability and conversation. Michele Cohen shows how at the same time, the English constructed their cultural relations with the French as relations of seduction and desire. She argues that this produced anxiety on the part of the English over the effect of French practices on English masculinity and the virtue of English women.By the end of the century, representing the French as an effeminate other was integral to the forging of English, masculine national identity. Michele Cohen examines the derogation of women and the French which accompanied the emergent 'masculine' English identity. While taciturnity became emblematic of the English gentleman's depth of mind and masculinity, sprightly conversation was seen as representing the shallow and inferior intellect of English women and the French of both sexes.Michele Cohen also demonstrates how visible evidence of girls' verbal and language learning skills served only to construe the female mind as inferior. She argues that this perception still has currency today.
books  Questia  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  Britain  British-French_attitudes  masculinity  nationalism  national_ID  politeness  virtue  society  conversation  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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