dunnettreader + translation   36

Antonella Alimento - Beyond the Treaty of Utrecht: Véron de Forbonnais's French Translation of the British Merchant (1753): History of European Ideas: Vol 40, No 8
Pages 1044-1066 | Published online: 06 Nov 2014
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01916599.2014.968331
This study focuses on the cultural and political context from which stemmed the French translation of the British Merchant. The paratextual and macrostructural interventions that characterised Le négotiant anglois clearly demonstrate that the translator, Véron de Forbonnais, used his work to set out his own epistemological method and his way of looking at inter-state relations. With the book, Forbonnais had distanced himself from Gournay by rejecting the idea that in order for France to prosper in a situation of international competition the government needed to adopt a muscular strategy that included the adoption of a navigation act modelled on the one enacted by Britain in 1660. At the same time, Forbonnais warned French decision-makers that signing commercial treaties with the maritime powers might also be prejudicial to national economic interests. Forbonnais supplied qualified French readers not only with an annotated edition of the British Merchant but also with a translation of Davenant's Of the Use of Political Arithmetick. In so doing, he proposed to his audience a type of governance based on a competent use of statistics. In conclusion, I will argue that in Le négotiant anglois Forbonnais anticipated the key political and economical tenets of his project of ‘monarchie commerçante’, which he later set out in the Principes et observations æconomiques (1767) in order to counter the rise of the epistemology and plans for a ‘royaume agricole’ put forward by the physiocratic movement.
Keywords: British Merchant, Gournay, Davenant, navigation act, treaties of commerce, ‘balance du commerce’
article  paywall  18thC  intellectual_history  political_economy  international_political_economy  France  British_foreign_policy  economic_theory  economic_policy  Physiocrats  commerce  mercantilism  competition-interstate  Navigation_Acts  trade-agreements  trade-policy  Gournay  Davenant  translation  reception_history  French_government  enlightened_absolutism  balance_of_power  statistics  government-data 
december 2016 by dunnettreader
Ida Nijenhuis - For the Sake of the Republic: The Dutch Translation of Forbonnais's Elémens du commerce | History of European Ideas: Vol 40, No 8 (2014)
History of European Ideas
Volume 40, 2014 - Issue 8: Translation, reception and Enlightened Reform: The case of Forbonnais in eighteenth-century political economy
For the Sake of the Republic: The Dutch Translation of Forbonnais's Elémens du commerce
Ida Nijenhuis
Pages 1202-1216 | Published online: 03 Nov 2014
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01916599.2014.968339
The open access article from the special issue on Forbonnais - downloaded to Tab S2
article  downloaded  political_economy  intellectual_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  economic_theory  economic_policy  translation  Dutch  commerce  commerce-doux  mercantilism  Bolingbroke  maritime_powers 
december 2016 by dunnettreader
Roger Chartier's emeritus pages - Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - Collège de France
Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - links to his courses and seminars while he held the chair, and location for subsequent work especially the Débats d'histoire discussions - once a month starting in December 2015 - during the school year (i.e. through May) with announced intention to restart this school year. Joined for several by Patrick Boucheron who arrived (Dec 2015) as Chartier's regular appointment came to an end.
cultural_authority  Roman_Catholicism  Counter-Reformation  lit_crit  French_Enlightenment  religious_history  Europe-Early_Modern  podcast  intellectual_history  postmodern  cultural_capital  critical_theory  history_of_science  cultural_change  connected_history  historiography  theater  circulation-ideas  history_of_book  translation  microhistory  authority  interview  courses  classicism  Renaissance  website  literary_history  global_history  cultural_history  audio  Foucault  video  lecture 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Tertullian : Ante-Nicene Fathers Translations - The Tertullian Project
Re-keyed html with footnotes and further comments (Elucidations) of widely reproduced 19thC translations - mostly T & F Clark, Edinburgh, or American editions of the same
The website has lots of articles, book chaptersk etc of out-of-copyrjght materials with comments from the site editor of more recent information and his personal verifying of bibliographic info on specific editions
website  etexts  translation  Early_Christian  Tertullian  Roman_Empire  heresy  theology  Trinity  martyrs  manners  apologetics  cultural_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  persecution 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Classical E-Text: DIODORUS SICULUS, LIBRARY OF HISTORY @ theoi.com
DIODORUS SICULUS was a Greek historian who flourished in Sicily in the C1st BC. He wrote a history of the world in 40 books which included large sections devoted to myth, legend and the unusual customs of foreign tribes.

Diodorus Siculus. Library of History (Books III - VIII). Translated by Oldfather, C. H. Loeb Classical Library Volumes 303 and 340. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1935.

Volumes II and III of Diodorus in the Loeb series contain the bulk of his mythological material. Both books are still in print and available new from Amazon.com (click on image right for details). In addition to the translations the book contains the source Greek text, maps, and Oldfather's footnotes and index.

NOTE: Diodorus attempts to convert the stories of myth into factual histories. To this end he concocts a variety of stories to rationalise and explain away the fantastical elements of myth. Many of these are as far-fetched as the original stories themselves. Nevertheless, in spite of these reworkings, his work does preserve many old stories not found elsewhere.
Mediterranean  Greek_lit  ancient_Greece  historiography-antiquity  translation  myth  etexts 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Classical E-Text: PAUSANIAS, DESCRIPTION OF GREECE @ theois.com
PAUSANIAS was the Greek writer who flourished in the C2nd AD. His Description of Greece in ten books is a traveller's account of sights of historical and cultural interest in the Peloponnese and central Greece. He provides a comprehensive catalogue of temples and shrines in the region, as well as frequent discussions of local myth and cult practice.-- etexts from Pausanias. Description of Greece. Translated by Jones, W. H. S. and Omerod, H. A. Loeb Classical Library Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. -- The five Pausanias volumes in the Loeb series are still in print and available new from Amazon.com. In addition to the translation the books contain the source Greek text, Jones's introduction and footnotes, and an index of proper names. The last volume of the series also contains maps and a collection of photos of the archaeological remnants of the places and buildings described by the ancient author.
Pausanias  ancient_Greece  geography  etexts  Mediterranean  Roman_Empire  translation  Greek_lit 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Classical E-Text: AESCHYLUS - texts of translations @ theoi.com
AESCHYLUS was a Greek tragedian who flourished in Athens in the early C5th BC. Of the 76 plays he is known to have written only seven survive: 1. the Persians; 2. Seven Against Thebes; 3. Suppliant Women; 4 - 6. the Oresteia trilogy (Agamemnon, Libation Bearers or Choephori and The Eumenides); 7. Prometheus Bound. The last of these, however, is usually attributed by modern scholars to an unknown playwright. -- the url is for the first page of the translations (Prometheus Unbound) with navigation to the other 6 plays -- text from Aeschylus. Translated by Smyth, Herbert Weir. Loeb Classical Library Volumes 145
translation  ancient_Greece  etexts  Aeschylus  tragedy  plays  Greek_lit  theater 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Plutarch through the ages - conference videos (May 2013) | Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
This conference addressed the uses of Plutarch's historical and philosophical works by late antique, medieval and early modern scholars, writers and artists. Speakers: Ewen Bowie (Oxford), Roberto Guerrini (Siena), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Edith Hall (King's College London), Judith Mossmann (Nottingham), Frances Muecke (Sydney), John North (Institute of Classical Studies), Marianne Pade (Danish Institute Rome), Chris Pelling (Oxford), Alberto Rigolio (Oxford), Fred Schurink (Northumbria), Frances Titchener (Utah State), Rosie Wyles (King's College London), Sophia Xenophontos (Cyprus) and Alexei Zadorojnyi (Liverpool) **--** Thursday 23 May 2013 - Plutarch's revival in late Byzantium: the case of Theodore Metochites - From Francesco Barbaro to Angelo Poliziano: Plutarch's Roman Questions in the fifteenth century - John Whethamstede and Plutarch - Additional Lives: Hannibal, Scipio and Epaminondas - Plutarch, the Institutio Traiani, and the Social Dynamics of Philosophy in Renaissance England *^--** Friday 24 May 2013 - Plutarch in Scotland - Plutarco, Poussin e l’arte barocca - After Exemplarity: a Map of Plutarchan Scholarship - Plutarch à la Russe: Ancient Heroism and Russian Ideology in Tolstoy’s War and Peace - Plutarch’s Gracchi on the French, English and Irish stages, 1792-1852: From Revolution to Corn Laws and Famine - Welcomed with open arms: Plutarch and the modern Prometheus - Concluding Remarks
Plutarch  class_conflict  Europe-19thC  reception  historiography-19thC  Roman_Empire  video  ancient_Rome  biography  lecture  historiography  Roman_Republic  emulation  historiography-18thC  historiography-antiquity  historiography-17thC  political_history  historiography-Renaissance  Renaissance  translation  19thC  ancient_Greece  intellectual_history  usable_past  humanism  Greek_lit  history_as_examples  conference  Study_and_Uses  medieval_lit  medieval_philosophy  Byzantium 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Dralyuk on Ready’s Dostoyevsky | Language Hat
I meant to post this months ago, but efficiency is not my strong suit: perennial LH favorite Boris Dralyuk has an LARB review of Oliver Ready’s translation of…
Instapaper  books  reviews  Dostoyevsky  translation  from instapaper
january 2016 by dunnettreader
THE WARBURG INSTITUTE: Translation
Translation and the Circulation of Knowledge in Early Modern Science

Friday 28 June 2013
Programme - Poster

In recent decades, scholars have offered myriad new insights into the exchange and propagation of scientific ideas in the early modern Republic of Letters. Within this vibrant field, however, the part played by translation and translators remains little studied. This colloquium will explore the role of translation in early modern science, providing a forum for discussion about translations as well as the translators, mediators, agents, and interpreters whose role in the intellectual history of the period remains ill defined and deserves greater attention.

Organized by: Sietske Fransen (Warburg Institute) and Niall Hodson (Durham University)

Keynote speaker: Sven Dupré (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science and Freie Universität Berlin)

Speakers: Felicity Henderson (Royal Society), Charles van den Heuvel (Huygens ING), Niall Hodson (Durham University), Ana Carolina Hosne (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg), Jan van de Kamp (Independent), Clare Griffin (UCL), Margaret O. Meredith (Maastricht University), José Maria Pérez Fernandez (Universidad de Granada), Iolanda Plescia (Sapienza – Università di Roma), Fabien Simon (Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7)
history_of_science  conference  sociology_of_knowledge  video  YouTube  networks-information  translation  Republic_of_Letters  17thC  intellectual_history  natural_philosophy 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
MELVYN NEW - Review essay: Five Twenty-First-Century Studies of Laurence Sterne and His Works (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 122-135 -- "Read, read, read, read, my unlearned reader!": Five Twenty-First-Century Studies of Laurence Sterne and His Works -- Reviewed Works: Laurence Sterne in France by Lana Asfour; Labyrinth of Digressions: Tristram Shandy as Perceived and Influenced by Sterne's Early Imitators by René Bosch, Piet Verhoeff; Yorick's Congregation: The Church of England in the Time of Laurence Sterne by Martha F. Bowden; Sterne's Whimsical Theatres of Language: Orality, Gesture, Literacy by Alexis Tadié; The Cultural Work of Empire: The Seven Years' War and the Imagining of the Shandean State by Carol Watts -- indirectly a useful overview of shifts in dealing with Sterne, Tristram and Church of England not only in latter part of 18thC but 19thC and 20thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  Sterne  French_lit  satire  prose  celebrity  cultural_history  intellectual_history  publishing  publishing-industry  imitation  Church_of_England  scepticism  Swift  self-knowledge  philanthropy  sentimentalism  sincerity  authenticity  politics-and-literature  materialism  sermons  translation  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Mediaeval Logic and Philosophy - Paul Vincent Spade
Translations, notes, course materials and articles downloadable as pdfs -- he wrote the William of Ockham entry for the Stanford EP, lots if materials on universals, and goes back to Boethius, including B's commentary on Porphyry questions
Neoplatonism  medieval_philosophy  universals  translation  courses  Boethius  logic  website  Ockham  article  etexts  nominalism  Aristotle 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Donald S. Lopez, Jr.- The evolution of a text: The Tibetan Book of the Dead | The Immanent Frame - March 2011
Excerpted from The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography published by Princeton University Press © 2011. -- In a footnote to his introduction, Evans-Wentz writes that he and Kazi Dawa Samdup felt, “that without such safeguarding as this Introduction is intended to afford, the Bardo Thodol translation would be peculiarly liable to misinterpretation and consequent misuse . . .” They could have had little idea of the myriad ways in which their collaboration would be read. Removing the Bardo Todol from the moorings of language and culture, of time and place, Evans-Wentz transformed it into The Tibetan Book of the Dead and set it afloat in space, touching down at various moments in various cultures over the course of the past century, providing in each case an occasion to imagine what it might mean to be dead. This biography tells the strange story of The Tibetan Book of the Dead. It argues that the persistence of its popularity derives from three factors: The first is the human obsession with death. The second is the Western romance of Tibet. The third is Evans-Wentz’s way of making the Tibetan text into something that is somehow American. Evans-Wentz’s classic is not so much Tibetan as it is American, a product of American Spiritualism. Indeed, it might be counted among its classic texts. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder " Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  20thC  21stC  translation  religious_lit  religious_culture  religious_belief  sociology_of_religion  spirituality  readership  reader_response  cultural_exchange  cultural_transmission  esotericism  hermeticism  Buddhism  Tibet  orientalism  New_Age  death  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jew and Judean: A Forum on Politics and Historiography in the Translation of Ancient Texts - Forum ebook | The Marginalia Review of Books [LA Review of Books] August 2014
Have scholars erased the Jews from Antiquity? -- Adele Reinhartz’s essay in MRB on June 24 set off a vibrant discussion in the comments section and in the MRB editors’ inboxes. The range of responses to the piece dotted the spectrum from full support to indignation, proving that a sizable readership wanted to debate these ideas further. The forum is released today only two months after the Reinhartz essay thanks to the good will and the efficiency of the participants. The essays, beginning with Reinhartz’s original piece and concluding with her response to the collection, investigate the political and historiographical considerations involved in the translation of ancient texts, in particular how modern translators and historians ought to deal with the translation of the Greek word ioudaios (Ἰουδαῖος). -- Along with the forum, MRB is excited to release an e-book version of the discussion free for our readers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
ebooks  religious_history  philology  antiquity  ancient_religions  ancient_Israel  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Judaism  Judaism-2nf_Temple  national_ID  religious_culture  translation  Greek_lit  koine  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  religious_lit  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Ilan Stavans - One Master, Many Cervantes | HUMANITIES, September/October 2008
By Ilan Stavans | HUMANITIES, September/October 2008 | Volume 29, Number 5 Don Quixote de la Mancha is a book for all seasons: esteemed, even venerated by…
lit_crit  literary_history  17thC  Cervantes  novels  canon  translation  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Lucie Campos interview with Gisèle Sapiro - Geopolitics of Translation in Social Sciences and Humanities - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French original 2014)
Translated by Lucy Garnier -- Tags : translation | publishing | Bourdieu -- As publishing markets become increasingly international, sociology looks at the translation of work in the social sciences and humanities. Gisèle Sapiro shows the effects that the crossover between the academic and publishing spheres has on translation practices. -- Gisèle Sapiro is Director of the European Centre for Sociology and Political Science. She edited the collective volumes Pierre Bourdieu, sociologue (Fayard: 2004) and Pour une histoire des sciences sociales (Fayard: 2004) and has written several books of reference on the sociology of knowledge production, the intellectual field, and the international circulation of ideas, including Translatio. Le marché de la traduction en France à l’heure de la mondialisation (CNRS: 2008), Les Contradictions de la globalisation éditoriale (Nouveau Monde: 2009), and L’Espace intellectuel en Europe, XIXe-XXIe siècles: de la formation des États-nations à la mondialisation (La Découverte: 2009). The author and her research team have published a series of reports on literary exchange in the era of globalisation. After Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines and Paris-New York the latest of these accounts, "Les Sciences humaines et sociales françaises en traduction" published online in July 2014, presents some of the directions taken by the European project she is coordinating on international cooperation in the social sciences and humanities. -' saved in Instapaper
19thC  20thC  21stC  Republic_of_Letters  intellectual_history  translation  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  networks  networks-information  intelligentsia  literary_theory  cultural_influence  cultural_exchange  language-national  humanities  publishing  academia  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  globalization  cosmopolitanism  circulation-ideas  Bourdieu  Foucault  Derrida  humanities-finance  social_sciences-finance  education-higher  education-finance  universal_language-Latin  universal_language-English  books  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Walkowitz — Translating the Untranslatable: An Interview with Barbara Cassin | Public Books July 2014
The US version was published earlier this year ... Edited by Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra, and Michael Wood, the 1,300-page Dictionary retains the original introduction, most of the entries, and an orientation toward Europe, but it has also been adjusted and supplemented for US audiences. Apter’s robust preface documents the enormous complexity and scale involved in translating intraduisibles. One of the most provocative and important contributions of the Vocabulaire is its insistence that philosophical concepts, often assumed to be transhistorical and universal, in fact have a history in languages. The editions, adaptations, and translations of the project are important too, however, because they show that philosophical concepts have a history in books as well. The Vocabulaire may be a multilingual project, whose entries collate and compare terms in more than a dozen languages, but the editions are not all multilingual in the same way and for the same reasons. Whereas the Ukrainian editors sought to expand the vocabulary and prestige of their language, their US counterparts were more concerned to acknowledge and mitigate Anglophone dominance. The books are different structurally and economically as well as linguistically. The Ukrainian and Arabic editions have appeared only in parts, while the US edition appears as a whole. In tongues with fewer readers and fewer resources, publishing one part helps to fund a subsequent part. That kind of funding is not necessary for most books published in English. -- Pocket
interview  books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  language-history  language  translation  philosophy  antiquity  publishing  language-national  concepts-change  Pocket 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Howard D. Weinbrot - Alexander Pope and Madame Dacier's Homer: Conjectures concerning Cardinal Dubois, Sir Luke Schaub, and Samuel Buckley | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 1/2 (1999), pp. 1-23
Intrigue involving local press censorship (Tonson printing Buckingham works edited by Pope and supressed by the ministry), diplomatic relations with Catholic Europe and Pope's reputation in England under attack -- early 1720s. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  British_history  British_politics  Whigs-oligarchy  diplomatic_history  cultural_history  18thC  1720s  Pope  DuBois  France  Anglo-French  Homer  translation  lit_crit  Ancients_v_Moderns  Dacier_Mme  poetics  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
David Hoover - The End of the Irrelevant Text: Electronic Texts, Linguistics, and Literary Theory | DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly, Vol 1.2 (2007)
David Hoover <david_dot_hoover_at_nyu_dot_edu>, New York University -- The close study of literary texts has a long and illustrious history. But the popularity of textual analysis has waned in recent decades, just at the time that widely available electronic texts were making traditional analytic tools easier to apply and encouraging the development of innovative computer-assisted tools. Without claiming any simple causal relationship, I argue that the marginalization of textual analysis and other text-centered approaches owes something to the dominance of Chomskyan linguistics and the popularity of high theory. Certainly both an introspective, sentence-oriented, formalist linguistic approach and literary theories deeply influenced by ideas about the sign's instability and the tendency of texts to disintegrate under critical pressure minimize the importance of the text. Using examples from Noam Chomsky, Jerome McGann, and Stanley Fish, I argue for a return to the text, specifically the electronic, computable text, to see what corpora, text-analysis, statistical stylistics, and authorship attribution can reveal about meanings and style. The recent resurgence of interest in scholarly editions, corpora, text- analysis, stylistics, and authorship suggest that the electronic text may finally reach its full potential. -- see bibliography re Chomsky Language Instinct debates
article  English_lit  lit_crit  linguistics  innate_ideas  digital_humanities  reader_response  postmodern  poststructuralist  translation  bibliography 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
The Tudor Translations: Machiavelli, 2 vols. - Online Library of Liberty
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Tudor Translations: Machiavelli, with an Introduction by Henry Cust, M.P.. 2 Vols. (London: David Nutt, 1905). 09/01/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1741> -- A two volume collection of inlfuential English translations of the writings of Machiavelli during the Tudor period.-- pdf is of scan -- didn't download
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  Tudor  historiography-Renaissance  translation  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
JONATHAN ALLEN GREEN -- FRIEDRICH GENTZ'S TRANSLATION OF BURKE'S "REFLECTIONS" (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 639-659. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
JONATHAN ALLEN GREEN - Trinity Hall, Cambridge -- In his influential work on German Romanticism, Isaiah Berlin suggested that Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) catalysed the growth of the nineteenth-century counter-Enlightenment. This causal thesis, however, ignored the extent to which the Reflections' German translator, Friedrich Gentz (1764–1832), altered the meaning of the text to suit his own philosophical agenda. Although Burke saw rationalism and revolution as natural allies, Gentz – a student of Immanuel Kant – used the Reflections to articulate a conservative form of rationalism that, he believed, could stand up to the philosophes' radicalism. Through his selective translation, numerous in-text annotations, and six long interpretive essays, Gentz pressed Burke's Reflections into a Kantian epistemological paradigm – carving out a space for a priori right in the logic of the text, and demoting traditional knowledge from a normative to a prudential role. In Gentz's translation, Burke thus appeared as a champion, not a critic, of Enlightenment. -- * Many thanks to John Robertson, Joachim Whaley, and William O'Reilly for their helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  18thC  Burke  French_Revolution  translation  Germany  German_Idealism  Kant  rationalist  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-conservative  philosophes  French_Enlightenment  Berlin_Isaiah  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne, texts translated from the Latin by Michael Silverthorne, introduction by James Moore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1723> Until the publication of this Liberty Fund edition, all but one of the works contained in Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind were available only in Latin. This milestone English translation will provide a general audience with insight into Hutcheson’s thought. In the words of the editors: “Hutcheson’s Latin texts in logic and metaphysics form an important part of his collected works. Published respectively in 1756 and, in its second edition, 1744, these works represent Hutcheson’s only systematic treatments of logic, ontology, and pneumatology, or the science of the soul. They were considered indispensable texts for the instruction of students in the eighteenth century.” -- the introduction is very useful -- pdf of LibFund typesetting
etexts  translation  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  education-higher  Hutcheson  logic  metaphysics  natural_law  human_nature  social_order  EF-add  books  Aristotelian  ontology  free_will  Stoicism  state-of-nature  sociability  moral_sentiments  ideas-theories  categories  soul  mind-body  Malebranche  More_Henry  downloaded 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Pierre Bayle - A Philosophical Commentary on These Words of the Gospel, Luke 14.23, ‘Compel Them to Come In, That My House May Be Full’ - Online Library of Liberty
Pierre Bayle, A Philosophical Commentary on These Words of the Gospel, Luke 14.23, ‘Compel Them to Come In, That My House May Be Full’, edited, with an Introduction by John Kilcullen and Chandran Kukathas (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/163> This edition of the Philosophical Commentary is an amended version of the first English translation, which appeared in London in 1708. The author of the translation, which remains the only complete rendering of the Commentary into English, is unknown. A more recent translation by Amie Godman Tannenbaum was published in 1987, but it omits Part III and the Supplement. We have checked the text of the 1708 translation against the French text and made silent changes to correct omissions, misprints, and mistranslations and to clarify places where change in the meaning of English words would make the translation unintelligible or misleading to the modern reader.2 We have also implemented the corrigenda of the 1708 edition. We have not tried to make the translation more literal; in our judgment it is rather free (in the manner of the time), but substantially very faithful, and lively. We have identified and supplied details for Bayle’s various references and translated passages quoted in foreign languages, unless Bayle himself supplies a translation or paraphrase -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  translation  17thC  Bayle  tolerance  Augustine  Biblical_exegesis  Huguenots  Edict_of_Nantes  1700s  London  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Interlinear Translations of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Harvard Chaucer site
These translations of the Canterbury Tales are for those beginning their study of Chaucer's language. They supply merely a pony and by no means can they serve as a substitute for the original, nor even for a good translation. Often the syntax of the interlinear translation will be awkward in Modern English, since the aim is to supply a somewhat literal translation to make clear the meaning of the Middle English words. For the same reason there is no attempt to reproduce in Modern English the spirit and tone of the original (even if that were possible). The translation is more often "word for word" than "sense for sense."
etexts  translation  English_lit  14thC  Chaucer 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Rush, review essay - Michael Forster, After Herder: Philosophy of Language in the German Tradition, AND German Philosophy of Language: From Schlegel to Hegel and Beyond // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // 2011
Michael Forster, After Herder: Philosophy of Language in the German Tradition, Oxford University Press, 2010, 482pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199228119. -**- Michael Forster, German Philosophy of Language: From Schlegel to Hegel and Beyond, Oxford University Press, 2011, 350pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199604814. -**- Reviewed by Fred Rush, University of Notre Dame
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Germany  philosophy_of_language  German_Idealism  idealism-transcendental  hermeneutics  anthropology  cognition  translation  Herder  Hamann  Kant  Schleiermacher  Dilthey  Schlegel  Hegel  rationalist  empiricism  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Mitrović: Intentionalism, Intentionality, and Reporting Beliefs | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Oct., 2009), pp. 180-198
Downloaded pdf to Note -- The dominant view of twentieth-century analytic philosophy has been that all thinking is always in a language, that languages are vehicles of thought. The same view has been widespread in continental philosophy as well. In recent decades, however, the opposite view—that languages serve merely to express language-independent thought-contents or propositions—has been more widely accepted. The debate has a direct equivalent in the philosophy of history: when historians report the beliefs of historical figures, do they report the sentences or propositions that these historical figures believed to be true or false? In this paper I argue in favor of the latter, intentionalist, view. My arguments center mostly on the problems with translation that are likely to arise when a historian reports the beliefs of historical figures who expressed them in a language other than the one in which the historian is writing. In discussing these problems the paper presents an application of John Searle's theory of intentionality to the philosophy of history.
paper  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  translation  concepts  intentionality  philosophy_of_language  mind  bibliography  Cambridge_School  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Bernhard Fabian - THE RECEPTION OF BRITISH WRITERS ON THE CONTINENT: PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS (2007)
JSTOR: Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies (HJEAS), Vol. 13, No. 1/2 (Spring-Fall, 2007), pp. 7-21 - nice essay on issues of theory and method studying what used to be "comparative literature" - now reception theory (suggests what got picked up in different countries at various times had much to do with which particular English work or author or genre filled a gap that may not have even been noticed until someone came in contact with a bit of English culture or an English work), history and sociology of the book, history of translation, channels of cultural influence, "representations" of England or part of English culture (eg Voltaire's Lettres)
article  jstor  English_lit  literary_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  Germany  Eastern_Europe  publishing  translation  history_of_book  reading  readership  reception  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Nancy S. Struever: TRANSLATION AS TASTE (1981)
JSTOR: The Eighteenth Century, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Winter 1981), pp. 32-46 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Joseph Spence Essay on Pope's Odyssey -- mid 18thC conflation of moral with aesthetic improvement, ambiguities re relation to Nature, innovation, arts and industry, and of course gardens
article  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  18thC  Ancients_v_Moderns  lit_crit  translation  aesthetics  taste  improvement  gardens  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
David Hopkins: Dryden and the Garth-Tonson Metamorphoses (1988)
JSTOR: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 39, No. 153 (Feb., 1988), pp. 64-74 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  literary_history  17thC  18thC  1690s  1710s  Dryden  Pope  Addison  publishing  imitation  translation  poetry  Ovid  networks-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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