dunnettreader + trading_companies   21

William A. Pettigrew - Freedom's Debt: The Royal African Company and the Politics of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1672-1752 (2013) | UNC Press
Shortlisted for the 2013 Whitfield Prize, Royal Historical Society
In the years following the Glorious Revolution, independent slave traders challenged the charter of the Royal African Company by asserting their natural rights as Britons to trade freely in enslaved Africans. In this comprehensive history of the rise and fall of the RAC, William A. Pettigrew grounds the transatlantic slave trade in politics, not economic forces, analyzing the ideological arguments of the RAC and its opponents in Parliament and in public debate. Ultimately, Pettigrew powerfully reasons that freedom became the rallying cry for those who wished to participate in the slave trade and therefore bolstered the expansion of the largest intercontinental forced migration in history. Unlike previous histories of the RAC, Pettigrew's study pursues the Company's story beyond the trade’s complete deregulation in 1712 to its demise in 1752. Opening the trade led to its escalation, which provided a reliable supply of enslaved Africans to the mainland American colonies, thus playing a critical part in entrenching African slavery as the colonies' preferred solution to the American problem of labor supply. -- William A. Pettigrew is lecturer in history at the University of Kent.
books  British_history  US_history  British_politics  17thC  18thC  slavery-Africans  African_trade  slavery-law  commerce  trading_companies  Royal_African_Co  Whigs  Whig_Junto  freedom  free_trade  maritime_history  West_Indies  North_America  American_colonies  Atlantic  colonialism  British_foreign_policy  Parliament  Harley  Bolingbroke  Peace_of_Utrecht  1690s  1700s  1710s  capitalism  plantations  colonial_governance  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_Jenkins_Ear 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Emily Erikson : Between Monopoly and Free Trade: The English East India Company, 1600–1757 | Princeton University Press
The EIF was one of the most powerful and enduring organizations in history. "Between Monopoly and Free Trade" locates the source of that success in the innovative policy by which the Court of Directors granted employees the right to pursue their own commercial interests while in the firm’s employ. Exploring trade network dynamics, decision-making processes, and ports and organizational context, Emily Erikson demonstrates why the EIC was a dominant force in the expansion of trade between Europe and Asia, and she sheds light on the related problems of why England experienced rapid economic development and how the relationship between Europe and Asia shifted in the 18thC and 19thC.(..) Building on the organizational infrastructure of the Company and the sophisticated commercial institutions of the markets of the East, employees constructed a cohesive internal network of peer communications that directed English trading ships during their voyages. This network integrated Company operations, encouraged innovation, and increased the Company’s flexibility, adaptability, and responsiveness to local circumstance. -- assistant professor in the department of sociology and the school of management (by courtesy) at Yale University, as well as a member of the Council of South Asian Studies. -- excerpt Chapter 1 downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  buy  economic_history  business_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  colonialism  imperialism  networks-business  networks-political  networks-information  networks-social  India  Indian_Ocean  Central_Asia  Chinese_history  China-international_relations  monopolies  trading_companies  trading_privileges  VOC  East_India_Company  trade  trade_finance  shipping  ports  British_Navy  business-and-politics  business_practices  business_influence  business-norms  nabobs  MPs  Board_of_Trade  Parliament  entrepreneurs  organizations  firms-structure  firms-organization  consumer_revolution  exports  Navigation_Acts  Anglo-Dutch_wars  French_foreign_policy  competition-interstate  risk-mitigation  risk_management  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Maria Fusaro - Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean: The Decline of Venice and the Rise of England 1450–1700 (to be released April 2015) | Cambridge University Press
Maria Fusaro presents a new perspective on the onset of Venetian decline. Examining the significant commercial relationship between England and Venice in the period 1450–1700, Fusaro demonstrates how Venice's social, political and economic circumstances shaped the English mercantile community in unique ways. By focusing on the commercial interaction between them, she also re-establishes the analysis of the maritime political economy as an essential constituent of the Venetian state political economy. This challenging interpretation of some classic issues of early modern history will be of profound interest to economic, social and legal historians and provides a stimulating addition to current debates in imperial history, especially on the economic relationship between different empires and the socio-economic interaction between 'rulers and ruled'. **--* "For the first time Maria Fusaro gives us the English among the creeks and islands of the Venetian empire, as seen by the Venetians themselves. Using archives hitherto little-known or wholly unknown, she paints a lively picture of Anglo-Venetian commerce, diplomacy and war." Nicholas Rodger, University of Oxford **--** Introduction: political economies of empire *-* 1. The medieval background *-* 2. The reversal of the balance *-* 3. The Ottoman Levant *-* 4. Genoa, Venice and Livorno (a tale of three cities) *-* 5. Trade, violence and diplomacy *-* 6. Diplomacy, trade and religion *-* 7. The Venetian peculiarities *-* 8. The English mercantile community in Venice *-* 9. The English and other mercantile communities *-* 10. The goods of the trade *-* 11. Empires and governance in the Mediterranean *-* 12. Coda and conclusions -- marketing materials not yet available for download
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Mediterranean  Venice  Italy  city_states  Genoa  Livorno  British_history  mercantilism  trade  trading_companies  empires  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  maritime_history  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  commerce  privileges-corporate  trading_privileges  religion-and-economics  trade_finance  trade-cultural_transmission  governance-regional  maritime_law  commercial_law  commercial_interest  foreigners-resident  wars-causes  military_history  competition-interstate  mercantilism-violence  trade-policy_enforcement  naval_history  shipping  weaponry 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeff Horn - Economic Development in Early Modern France: The Privilege of Liberty, 1650–1820 (release date for hardback mid-Feb 2015) | European history after 1450 | Cambridge University Press
Privilege has long been understood as the constitutional basis of Ancien Régime France, legalising the provision of a variety of rights, powers and exemptions to some, whilst denying them to others. In this fascinating new study however, Jeff Horn reveals that Bourbon officials utilized privilege as an instrument of economic development, freeing some sectors of the economy from pre-existing privileges and regulations, while protecting others. He explores both government policies and the innovations of entrepreneurs, workers, inventors and customers to uncover the lived experience of economic development from the Fronde to the Restoration. He shows how, influenced by Enlightenment thought, the regime increasingly resorted to concepts of liberty to defend privilege as a policy tool. The book offers important new insights into debates about the impact of privilege on early industrialisation, comparative economic development and the outbreak of the French Revolution. **--** 1. Introduction: profits and economic development during the Old Régime *--* 2. Privileged enclaves and the guilds: liberty and regulation *--* 3. The privilege of liberty put to the test: industrial development in Normandy *--* 4. Companies, colonies, and contraband: commercial privileges under the Old Régime *--* 5. Privilege, liberty, and managing the market: trading with the Levant *--* 6. Outside the body politic, essential to the body economic: the privileges of Jews, Protestants and foreign residents *--* 7. Privilege, innovation, and the state: entrepreneurialism and the lessons of the Old Régime *--* 8. The reign of liberty? Privilege after 1789 -- look for pdf of Intro once released
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  privileges-corporate  economic_culture  economic_policy  development  monarchy  profit  entrepreneurs  guilds  trading_companies  trade-policy  regulation  industrialization  industrial_policy  Colbert  Colbertism  urban_development  urban_elites  commerce  commercial_interest  French_government  Huguenots  Jews  colonialism  French_Empire  colonies  corporate_finance  monopolies  Levant  MENA  Ottomans  liberties  liberty  Ancien_régime  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  haute_bourgeoisie  markets  markets-structure  foreign_trade  foreign_policy  foreigners-resident 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel Woolf, review - Ken MacMillan, Sovereignty and Possession in the English New World: The Legal Foundations of Empire, 1576-1640 (2006) | JSTOR: The International History Review, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 598-600
Cambridge University Press -- Looks well done - Woolf gives high marks for linking the interest of various players, including monarchs, with shifting ideologies and challenges of articulating a legal system that made sense with English ambitions, relations with other European colonial enterprises, and England's peculiar legal framework and its interactions with government - e.g. why the most elaborated jurisprudence, the Spanish, didn't fit with Fortescue commonwealth style thought and ticklish question of "conquest" -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  find  political_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  political_philosophy  international_law  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  colonialism  British_politics  British_history  trading_companies  balance_of_power  maritime_history  common_law  Roman_law  dominion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Joshua Clover, review essay - Autumn of the Empire [post the Great Recession] | The Los Angeles Review of Books July 2011
Books discussed - Richard Duncan, The Dollar Crisis: Causes, Consequences, Cures *--* Robert Brenner, The Economics of Global Turbulence *--* Giovanni Arrighi, The Long Twentieth Century: Money, Power and the Origins of Our Times *--* Giovanni Arrighi, Adam Smith in Beijing *--*--*--* All three authors are heterodox from view of what passes for informed discourse about economic theory or political economy - by the conclusion of the essay, Giovanni Arrighi's longue-durée of transitions of a succession of capitalist empires becomes the vantage point for discussions of how we got to the Great Recession as well as where we have to start thinking about another way of understanding the geopolitical dynamics of global capitalism (or the global capitalist dynamics of geopolitics) Other TAGGED AUTHORS - Jill Ciment, Paul Krugman, Fernand Braudel, Joseph Schumpeter, John Maynard Keynes, Karl Marx, T.S. Eliot *--* Other TAGGED BOOKS - Reinhardt and Rogoff, This Time It's Different, *--* Michael Lewis, The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine
books  reviews  global_economy  globalization  international_political_economy  financialization  financial_crisis  economic_history  geopolitics  empires  empire-and_business  world_history  world_systems  cycles  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Genoa  city_states  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  British_Empire  US-China  US-empire  imperialism  imperial_overreach  trade  trading_companies  production  productivity  capitalism  competition  profit  investment  international_monetary_system  translatio_imperii  Annales  bubbles  labor  off-shoring  investors  American_exceptionalism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea (Hakluyt trans.) with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea, trans. Richard Hakluyt, with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2004). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/859> -- Grotius’s influential argument in favor of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing in Richard Hakluyt’s translation. The book also contains William Welwod’s critque and Grotius’s reply to Welwod. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  international_political_economy  IR_theory  international_law  international_system  sovereignty  maritime_history  exploration  trade  trading_companies  colonialism  piracy  shipping  Dutch  British_history  British_Empire  fishing  free_trade  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Alfred Marshall - Industry and Trade (Vol 2) [1919] | Google Books
Vol 2 appears to be available only as a commercial ebook (price c $4) - Vol 1 is a full Google Books copy added to my Google_Books library -- Vol 2 looks interesting in his treatment of the English economy from at least the Black Death -- remarks on "mercantilism" and the economic policies of the British government in the mid 18thC (following Adam Smith characterized as"bad" and "selfish") -- Though the bulk of his work was completed before the turn of the 20th century, the global ramifications of World War I prompted him to reconsider his theories on international economics, and in 1919 he published the two-volume Industry and Trade. Here, in Volume II, he discusses. . how monopolies and competition impact prices . trusts and cartels in the American and German economies . the decline of class differences and advantages in industrial systems . unions, co-opts, and business federations . and much more.
books  etexts  Google_Books  economic_history  British_history  UK_economy  Germany  Prussia  mercantilism  merchants  international_political_economy  international_economics  trading_companies  trade-policy  trade  trade-agreements  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  German_unification  monopolies  corporations  corporate_finance  labor  Labor_markets  wages  unions  imperialism  empire-and_business  US_economy  protectionism  Hamilton  Smith  free_trade  laisser-faire  institutional_economics  institution-building  firms-theory  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Johan van der Zande - Statistik and History in the German Enlightenment | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 71, No. 3 (July 2010), pp. 411-432
Not statistics but the collection and study of information about the states of Europe - connected to cameralism and focus on political economy rather than military -though clearly how to survive and thrive as an independent state in the European system a major impetus. Van der Zande uses analogy of Venetian ambassadors. Gets launched in a big way in 1750s and has ceased to be a separate important discipline by the early 19thC, the apparent victim of Germany's historical age. Interesting view of motives, academic and bureaucratic resources German states within and without the HRE, the European system, alternative philosophies of human nature, happiness, commerce and the roles of the state. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Germany  Enlightenment  Austria  historiography-18thC  political_arithmetick  governance  enlightened_absolutism  cameralism  commerce  agriculture  trade  manufacturing  trading_companies  taxes  social_sciences  nation-state  bureaucracy  public_health  demography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard W. Unger, review - Jan de Vries and Ad van der Woude, The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500–1815 | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2000), pp. 239-241
Reviewed work(s): The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500–1815. By Jan de Vries and Ad van der Woude. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Pp. xx+767. $89.95. -- Richard W. Unger, University of British Columbia -- The final sixty pages do serve to draw together what has gone before and offer not only an overview of economic and social developments but also a tentative theory about patterns of the rise and fall of modern economies. The authors launch a sustained attack on traditional periodization of economic and, indeed, all history. They find in the Netherlands in the seventeenth century many of the features of nineteenth- and twentieth-century economic growth. They see no reason to look on the English Industrial Revolution as a cataclysmic event. -- There seems to be no doubt that the massive debt run up by the Dutch government in fending off the French threat from 1672 to 1713 burdened the economy so much that it could neither recover earlier levels of growth nor engage in restructuring like that which occurred in the years from 1660 to 1700 in the face of falling food prices, rising real incomes of laborers and craftsmen, and declining land values. Too many people in the eighteenth century—such as government officials and bondholders—lived well thanks to the need to service the debt; these people resisted necessary fiscal reform.
books  reviews  jstor  economic_history  political_economy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Dutch  development  modernization  urbanization  agriculture  industry  Industrial_Revolution  foreign_policy  sovereign_debt  rentiers  trading_companies  trade  colonialism  shipping  entrepôts  periodization  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
AARON GRAHAM, review essay -- MERCANTILE NETWORKS IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 56, No. 1 (MARCH 2013), pp. 279-295
Reviewed work(s): ** (1) The capital and the colonies: London and the Atlantic economy, 1660—1700 by Nuala Zahedieh; ** (2) Defying empire: trading with the enemy in colonial New York by Thomas M. Truxes; ** (3) East India patronage and the British state: the Scottish elite and politics in the eighteenth century by George K. McGilvary; ** (4) The familiarity of strangers: the Sephardic diaspora, Livorno and cross-cultural trade in the early modern period by Francesca Trivellato; ** (5) Global trade and commercial networks: eighteenth-century diamond merchants by Tijl Vanneste; ** (6) From the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean: the global trade networks of Armenian merchants from New Julfa by Sebouh David Aslanian; ** (7) Oceans of wine: Madeira and the emergence of American trade and taste by David Hancock -- lengthy 17 pages -- paywall Cambridge journals
books  reviews  paywall  economic_history  globalization  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  American_colonies  West_Indies  Atlantic  India  trading_companies  networks  trust  commerce  trade  East_India_Company  Portugal  Italy  Mediterranean  London  patronage  Scotland  Anglo-Scot  1707_Union  clientelism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
NUALA ZAHEDIEH - Regulation, rent-seeking, and the Glorious Revolution in the English Atlantic economy | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 63, No. 4 (NOVEMBER 2010), pp. 865-890
The rapid rise of England's colonial commerce in the late seventeenth century expanded the nation's resource base, stimulated efficiency improvements across the economy, and was important for long-term growth. However, close examination of the interests at play in England's Atlantic world does not support the Whiggish view that the Glorious Revolution played a benign role in this story. In the decades after the Restoration, the cases of the Royal African Company and the Spanish slave trade in Jamaica are used to show that the competition between Crown and Parliament for control of regulation constrained interest groups on either side in their efforts to capture the profits of empire. Stuart 'tyranny' was not able to damage growth and relatively competitive (and peaceful) conditions underpinned very rapid increases in colonial output and trade. The resolution of the rules of the Atlantic game in 1689 allowed a consolidated state better to manipulate and manage the imperial economy in its own interests. More secure rent-seeking enterprises and expensive wars damaged growth and European rivals began a process of catch-up. The Glorious Revolution was not sufficient to permanently halt economic development but it was sufficient to slow progress towards industrial revolution. -- very interesting attack on North-Weingast, Pincus et al -- paywall Wiley -- enormous bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  Wiley  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  American_colonies  West_Indies  Atlantic  17thC  18thC  Glorious_Revolution  fiscal-military_state  North-Weingast  rent-seeking  UK_government-colonies  economic_growth  trade  trading_companies  British_politics  Parliament  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  colonialism  mercantilism  tariffs  Whig_Junto  bibliography 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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