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Timothy Stanton - Authority and Freedom in the Interpretation of Locke's Political Theory | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 6-30
This essay argues that many modern discussions of Locke's political theory are unconsciously shaped by an imaginative picture of the world inherited from the past, on which authority and freedom are fundamentally antipathetic. The consequences of this picture may be seen in the distinction made customarily in Locke studies between the 'authoritarian' Locke of Two Tracts on Government, for whom authority descends from God, and the later, 'liberal,' Locke, for whom authority arises from the will and agreement of individuals, and felt in the emphases placed on consent and resistance in most interpretations of Lockean political thought. The essay examines the composition and contours of this picture and, by holding up a mirror to contemporary Locke scholarship, draws attention to some of the ways in which it unwittingly distorts Locke's thinking. -- paywall Sage -- something similar in terms of binaries and ignoring different audiences in contemporary reading of others of the period including Bolingbroke
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  17thC  Locke  tolerance  liberty  social_contract  majoritarian  authority  Bolingbroke 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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