dunnettreader + tolerance + liberty   4

John Quiggin - John Locke Against Freedom | Jacobin - June 2015
For classical liberals (often called libertarians in the US context), the founding documents of liberalism are John Locke’s Second Treatise on Government and… (.. conclusion) Received ideas change only slowly, and the standard view of Locke as a defender of liberty is likely to persist for years to come. Still, the reassessment is underway, and the outcome is inevitable. Locke was a theoretical advocate of, and a personal participant in, expropriation and enslavement. His classical liberalism offers no guarantee of freedom to anyone except owners of capitalist private property.
Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  US_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  Locke-2_Treatises  Locke-religion  tolerance  property  property_rights  Native_Americans  slavery  American_colonies  Founders  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberty  liberty-negative  political_culture  Board_of_Trade  colonialism  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Johan Tralau - Hobbes contra Liberty of Conscience | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 58-84
It has often been argued that, notwithstanding his commitment to the authoritarian state, Thomas Hobbes is a champion of the "minimal" version of liberty of conscience: namely, the freedom of citizens to think whatever they like as long as they obey the law. Such an interpretation renders Hobbes's philosophy more palatable to contemporary society. Yet the claim is incorrect. Alongside his notion of "private" conscience, namely, Hobbes develops a conception of conscience as a public phenomenon. In the following, it is argued that this inconsistency serves the purpose of deception: it holds out the possibility of dissent while making it impossible to utilise. Arguably, moreover, this is the proper hermeneutical approach to take to Hobbes's inconsistencies in general. Indeed, said inconsistencies ought to alert contemporary normative theorists to the instability of the "minimal" version of liberty of conscience attributed to Hobbes: Hobbes himself, namely, shows that it is insufficient. - paywall Sage - see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  liberty  Absolutism  tolerance  civil_liberties  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy Stanton - Authority and Freedom in the Interpretation of Locke's Political Theory | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 6-30
This essay argues that many modern discussions of Locke's political theory are unconsciously shaped by an imaginative picture of the world inherited from the past, on which authority and freedom are fundamentally antipathetic. The consequences of this picture may be seen in the distinction made customarily in Locke studies between the 'authoritarian' Locke of Two Tracts on Government, for whom authority descends from God, and the later, 'liberal,' Locke, for whom authority arises from the will and agreement of individuals, and felt in the emphases placed on consent and resistance in most interpretations of Lockean political thought. The essay examines the composition and contours of this picture and, by holding up a mirror to contemporary Locke scholarship, draws attention to some of the ways in which it unwittingly distorts Locke's thinking. -- paywall Sage -- something similar in terms of binaries and ignoring different audiences in contemporary reading of others of the period including Bolingbroke
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  17thC  Locke  tolerance  liberty  social_contract  majoritarian  authority  Bolingbroke 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Nadon ed - Enlightenment and Secularism: Essays on the Mobilization of Reason (2013)
Enlightenment and Secularism is a collection of twenty eight essays that seek to understand the connection between the European Enlightenment and the emergence of secular societies, as well as the character or nature of those societies. The contributors are drawn from a variety of disciplines including History, Sociology, Political Science, and Literature. Most of the essays focus on a single text from the Enlightenment, borrowing or secularizing the format of a sermon on a text, and are designed to be of particular use to those teaching and studying the history of the Enlightenment within a liberal arts curriculum. --**-- Christopher Nadon is Ass Prof, Gov Dept at Claremont McKenna College. He is author ofXenophon’s Prince: Republic and Empire in the Cyropaedia. --**-- Some recent scholarship on the Enlightenment has placed so much emphasis on differences from country to country, between high and low, and between radical and moderate, that we risk not seeing the forest for the trees. This volume gives all the attention one could want to diversity by featuring careful attention on particular writings by writers from different countries, including critics of the Enlightenment as well as fervent supporters. At the same time, it shows a unity of concern within this diversity by treating a single set of political, economic, religious and social issues revolving around the question of secularism and religion. As a whole, the book gives us a rich account of thought in the Enlightenment. In addition, many of the individual essays are important and original contributions to scholarship on a single thinker or book. — Christopher Kelly, Boston College
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  Britain  Dutch  France  Germany  French_Enlightenment  German_Idealism  historiography  historical_sociology  human_nature  mind-body  theology  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  secularism  tolerance  liberty  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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