dunnettreader + tolerance + hume-ethics   2

Andrew Sabl - The Last Artificial Virtue: Hume on Toleration and Its Lessons | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 37, No. 4 (August 2009), pp. 511-538
David Hume's position on religion is, broadly speaking, "politic": instrumental and consequentialist. Religions should be tolerated or not according to their effects on political peace and order. Such theories of toleration are often rejected as immoral or unstable. The reading provided here responds by reading Hume's position as one of radically indirect consequentialism. While religious policy should serve consequentialist ends, making direct reference to those ends merely gives free reign to religious-political bigotry and faction. Toleration, like Hume's other "artificial virtues" (justice, fidelity to promises, allegiance to government), is a universally useful response to our universal partiality—as Established uniformity, however tempting, is not. This implies that toleration can progress through political learning, becoming broader and more constitutionally established over time. A sophisticated Humean approach thus shares the stability and normative attractiveness of respect- or rights-based arguments while responding more acutely and flexibly to problems the former often slights: antinomian religious extremism; underdefined political agency; and internationalized, politicized religious movements. -- extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  religion-established  tolerance  civil_liberties  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  social_order  freedom_of_conscience  faction  bigotry  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Will R. Jordan - Religion in the Public Square: A Reconsideration of David Hume and Religious Establishment | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Autumn, 2002), pp. 687-713
While recent scholarship has attempted to clarify the Founders' opposition to religious establishment, few pause to consider public establishment as a viable alternative. This study examines one of the eighteenth century's least likely proponents of religious establishment: David Hume. Despite his reputation as an avowed enemy of religion, Hume actually defends religion for its ability to strengthen society and to improve morality. These salutary qualities are lost, however, when society is indifferent about the character of the religion professed by its citizens. Hume's masterful "History of England" reveals that a tolerant established church is best equipped to reap the advantages of religion while avoiding the dangers of fanaticism. Hume's differences in this respect from Adam Smith and Alexis de Tocqueville are explored. -- Hume not all that unique among sceptical philosophes in thinking that a moderate established religion - that didn't run around actively persecuting dissent - would be socially and politically salutary if not necessary
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  political_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  Hume-ethics  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church_of_England  Kirk  tolerance  dissenters  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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