dunnettreader + tolerance + britain   6

Mark Goldie: John Locke's Circle and James II (1992)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 35, No. 3 (Sep., 1992), pp. 557-586 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- James II's grant of religious toleration and his invitation to the whigs to return to office dramatically changed the English political scene and created profound dilemmas for the crown's former enemies. Although there is ambiguity in their responses, and although Locke himself remained an immovable exile, his circle of friends took advantage of these changes. This included nomination to James's proposed tolerationist parliament, an accommodation which damaged them in the actual elections to the Convention of 1689. Some took office, and in at least two cases Locke's associates published pamphlets in support of the king. By exploring the politics of the Lockean whigs a contradiction in earlier views is resolved. For whilst Richard Ashcraft has argued that Locke's circle remained unremittingly hostile to James and engaged in clandestine plotting, other sources identify the same people as among the king's `whig collaborators'. The chief actors in Locke's circle are Edward Clarke, Sir Walter Yonge, Richard Duke and Richard Burthogge.
article  jstor  political_history  Britain  British_politics  tolerance  Whigs-Radicals  Locke  James_II  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
B. W. Young, review essay - Enlightenment Political Thought and the Cambridge School (2009)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1 (Mar., 2009), pp. 235-251 -- paywall 24-hours $5.99 Cambridge Journals url http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X08007383 -- Works reviewed: --**-- John Locke, Toleration and Early Enlightenment Culture: Religious Intolerance and Arguments Religious Toleration in Early Modern and 'Early Enlightenment' Europe by John Marshall;  --**-- The Case for the Enlightenment: Scotland and Naples, 1680-1760 by John Robertson;  --**-- Jealousy of Trade: International Competition and Nation-State in Historical Perspective by Istvan Hont; --**--  The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Political Thought by Mark Goldie; Robert Wokler
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  17thC  18thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_economy  Britain  Italy  France  Germany  Dutch  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  religious_history  religious_culture  church_history  tolerance  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Christopher Nadon ed - Enlightenment and Secularism: Essays on the Mobilization of Reason (2013)
Enlightenment and Secularism is a collection of twenty eight essays that seek to understand the connection between the European Enlightenment and the emergence of secular societies, as well as the character or nature of those societies. The contributors are drawn from a variety of disciplines including History, Sociology, Political Science, and Literature. Most of the essays focus on a single text from the Enlightenment, borrowing or secularizing the format of a sermon on a text, and are designed to be of particular use to those teaching and studying the history of the Enlightenment within a liberal arts curriculum. --**-- Christopher Nadon is Ass Prof, Gov Dept at Claremont McKenna College. He is author ofXenophon’s Prince: Republic and Empire in the Cyropaedia. --**-- Some recent scholarship on the Enlightenment has placed so much emphasis on differences from country to country, between high and low, and between radical and moderate, that we risk not seeing the forest for the trees. This volume gives all the attention one could want to diversity by featuring careful attention on particular writings by writers from different countries, including critics of the Enlightenment as well as fervent supporters. At the same time, it shows a unity of concern within this diversity by treating a single set of political, economic, religious and social issues revolving around the question of secularism and religion. As a whole, the book gives us a rich account of thought in the Enlightenment. In addition, many of the individual essays are important and original contributions to scholarship on a single thinker or book. — Christopher Kelly, Boston College
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  Britain  Dutch  France  Germany  French_Enlightenment  German_Idealism  historiography  historical_sociology  human_nature  mind-body  theology  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  secularism  tolerance  liberty  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
JOHN LOCKE AND THE NOT-QUITE-GLORIOUS REVOLUTION | Pandaemonium August 2013
Kenan Malik's take on Locke's "politique" approach to toleration (freedom of conscience to choose own path to salvation, limited by governance concerns) including the anti-Catholic bigotry of the Whigs
17thC  Britain  British_politics  politics-and-religion  tolerance  Glorious_Revolution  Locke  Spinoza 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard B. Sher (excerpt):The Enlightenment and the Book: Scottish Authors and Their Publishers in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Ireland, and America | U Chicago Press
Reviews: " 'The Enlightenment and the Book' is the missing link in the history of publishing. It connects the traditions of Britain and America and explains how the people and practices of the book trade shaped the very culture of intellectual tolerance that defined the Enlightenment. This is a remarkable achievement of social and intellectual history that will become a classic." —Barbara M. Benedict, author of Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry ----- “This is a pioneering work that constitutes a really important contribution to book history and Enlightenment studies.”—Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, University of Michigan
books  18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  publishing  public_sphere  Britain  US_history  Ireland  Scotland  intellectual_history  cultural_history  tolerance  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Edward Andrew; Jean Bodin on Sovereignty | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Andrew, Edward. “Jean Bodin on Sovereignty.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 2 (June 1, 2011): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/90......Downloaded pdf to Note. ?.... I argue that Bodin, the theorist of absolute sovereignty, was not as hostile to liberal or democratic theories as is often assumed. John Locke recommended Bodin to his students at Christ Church, Oxford.[4] Bodin, as we shall see, insisted that monarchs cannot tax their subjects without their consent, a doctrine central to Locke and later to Rousseau and to the American and French revolutionaries. Bodin’s distinction between sovereignty and government, which I shall shortly analyze, anticipated liberal doctrines of the separation of powers and the subordination of the executive to the legislative branch of government, as well as Rousseau’s doctrine of the distinction between a sovereign legislative and an aristocratic executive subordinate to the sovereign people. Further, I shall show that Bodin’s subordination of church to state served the goal of religious toleration and that the subordination of church to state was espoused by champions of religious toleration, such as Hobbes, Mandeville, Voltaire, Diderot, Hume, and John Stuart Mill, and thus was a genuine liberal alternative to Locke’s and Jefferson’s doctrine of the separation of church and state. I also wish to show that although Bodin was a monarchist, he wrote positively about republics and indeed could be said to have inspired some of the neo-Roman republicanism that flourished around the time of the American and French revolutions.
16thC  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republicanism  politics-and-religion  sovereignty  liberalism  Absolutism  democracy  France  Britain  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  tolerance  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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