dunnettreader + thesis   17

Ruairidh James Macleod - The Concept of Temporality in John Dewey's Early Works (2015 thesis) - Academic Commons
Ruairidh James Macleod, 2015, The Concept of Temporality in John Dewey's Early Works, Columbia University Academic Commons, http://dx.doi.org/10.7916/D8M044XW : -- It is well understood that a concept of temporality is central to Dewey’s later work, finding its culmination in his essay “Time and Individuality” (1938). What has not been either acknowledged or established is the fact that a detailed and sophisticated concept of temporality, one which is fully in accord with his later work, was already present in Dewey’s early work, particularly in his essay “The Reflex Arc Concept in Psychology” (1896). This thesis therefore seeks to demonstrate not only that such a concept of temporality exists in Dewey’s early work, but also the nuanced nature of that concept of temporality, particularly in its function as a central, grounding component of the preconditions required for Dewey’s concept of experience. (..) this thesis argues that it in fact constitutes a key contribution to a tradition of philosophy of temporality which starts with the work of Henri Bergson, continues with the philosophy of Martin Heidegger (most saliently with Being and Time), and finds its full contemporary statement in Gilles Deleuze’s work on time, based on his concept of ‘the virtual.’ The fact that Dewey’s concept of temporality, as with that of Deleuze, is based on a sophisticated understanding of contemporary scientific findings is also explored, with the argument made that possessing such a foundation in scientific thought allows Dewey’s concept of temporality to become fully compatible to current research in psychology, particularly as it concerns educational psychology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  downloaded  intellectual_history  18thC  20thC  philosophical_anthropology  mind  consciousness  time  time-perception  subjectivity  Dewey  pragmatism  psychology  physiology  neuroscience  Bergson  Heidegger  Deleuze  education  learning 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Marc BELISSA - REPENSER L'ORDRE EUROPÉEN (1795-1802). DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES ROIS AUX DROITS DES NATIONS | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 343 (Janvier/Mars 2006), pp. 163-166
Brief summary of thesis defended 2005, l'Université Paris I Sorbonne - surprise, surprise, Lucien Bély on his committee with the notion of the 18thC as the last stage of the société des princes and the French Revolution forcing the end of the dynastic wars -- though focus is on the period of the Directoire and Napoleon up through Amiens, he places it in the context of the European dynastic system as structured by the Peace of Utrecht -- highlights an interdisciplinary approach -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  thesis  18thC  1790s  1800s  Europe  Europe-19thC  balance_of_power  French_Revolution  IR  IR_theory  Westphalia  sovereignty  dynasties  nation-state  diplomatic_history  political_culture  counter-revolution  Jacobins  republicanism  Europe-federalism  Peace_of_Utrecht  société_des_princes  national_interest  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  France  French_politics  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire  monarchy  social_order  legal_system  international_law  international_system  natural_law  citizenship  subjects  property  elites  political_economy  economic_culture  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Richard Moores - Representations of France and the French in English satirical prints, c. 1740-1832 (2011 PhD thesis) - White Rose Etheses Online - University of York
This thesis explores representations of France and the French in English satirical prints in the period c. 1740-1832. This was an era of rivalry and conflict between the two nations. It has been suggested that hostility towards France at this time contributed to the formation of English, or British, national identity. This coincided with England’s ‘golden age of caricature’. While much of the satirical art produced focussed on France, most studies of this material have dealt with how the English portrayed themselves and each other. Those which have discussed representations of the French have promoted the view that English perceptions of the French were principally hostile. While there is a temptation to employ such prints as evidence of English Francophobia, a closer investigation reveals greater satirical complexities at work which do not simply conceptualise and employ the French ‘Other’ as target of hatred. Informed by war and rivalry, as well as by trade, travel, and cultural exchange, the prints projected some positive characteristics onto the French ‘Other’, they contain varying degrees of sympathy and affinity with the French, and are demonstrative of a relationship more distinct and intimate than that shared with any other nation. At the same time, the prints expose many of the tensions and divisions that existed within Britain itself. French characters were employed to directly attack British political figures, while in other instances domestic anxieties were projected onto images of the French. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  France  Anglo-French  satire  cultural_history  social_history  national_ID  francophile  xenophobia  prints  popular_culture  popular_politics  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  travel  fashion  political_culture  political_press  art_history  caricature  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Restoration-France  July_Monarchy  reform-political  anti-Catholic  Catholic_emancipation  émigrés  exiles  ruling_class  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Carmel P. Murphy - History, revolution and the British popular novel: historical fiction in the romantic age (2013 PhD Thesis) | University College Cork.
Intro (pp.1-42) and Chapters 2 & 3 (pp.106-231) currently unavailable at request of author. -- Examining the complex intersection of the historical fiction genre with the political and historical dialogue generated by the French Revolution crisis, the thesis contends that contemporary fascination with the historical episode of the Revolution, and the fundamental importance of history to the disputes which raged about questions of tradition and change, and the meaning of the British national past, led to the emergence of increasingly complex forms of fictional historical narrative during the “war of ideas.” Considering the varying ways in which novelists (..) engaged with the historical contexts of the Revolution debate, (..) juxtaposes the manner in which English Jacobin novelists inserted the radical critique into the wider arena of history with (.use of.) the historical by anti-Jacobin novelists to combat the revolutionary threat and internal moves for socio-political restructuring. I argue that the use of imaginative historical narrative(..) represented a significant element within the literature of the Revolution crisis (.and..) a key context (.for.) the emergence of Scott’s national historical novel in 1814, and the broader field of historical fiction in the era of Waterloo. Tracing the continued engagement with revolutionary and political concerns evident in the early Waverley novels, Burney’s The Wanderer (1814), Godwin’s Mandeville (1816), and Mary Shelley’s Valperga (1823), my discussion concludes by arguing that Godwin’s and Shelley’s extension of the mode of historical fiction initially envisioned by Godwin in the revolutionary decade, and their shared endeavour to retrieve the possibility enshrined within the republican past, appeared as a significant counter to the model of history and fiction developed by Walter Scott in the post-revolutionary epoch. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  1790s  1800s  1810s  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  conservatism  Radical_Enlightenment  Jacobins  historical_fiction  novels  English_lit  historians-and-politics  counter-revolution  Scott_Sir_Walter  Burney_Frances  Godwin_Wm  Shelley_Mary  Tories  usable_past  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  history_as_examples  historiography-Tory  historiography-Whig  tradition  change-social  reform-political  reform-social  social_order  critique  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Andrew Berman - The Architects of Eighteenth Century English Freemasonry, 1720 - 1740 (2010 thesis) | University of Exeter
Advisors: Black, Jeremy & Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas -- Date Issued: 2010-09-22 --
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/2999 -- Following the appointment of its first aristocratic Grand Masters in the 1720s and in the wake of its connections to the scientific Enlightenment, ‘Free and Accepted’ Masonry rapidly became part of Britain’s national profile and the largest and arguably the most influential of Britain’s extensive clubs and societies. (..) Freemasonry became a vehicle for the expression and transmission of the political and religious views of those at its centre, and for the scientific Enlightenment concepts that they championed. The ‘Craft’ also offered a channel through which many sought to realise personal aspirations: social, intellectual and financial. Through an examination of relevant primary and secondary documentary evidence, this thesis seeks to contribute to a broader understanding of contemporary English political and social culture, and to explore the manner in which Freemasonry became a mechanism that promoted the interests of the Hanoverian establishment and connected and bound a number of élite metropolitan and provincial figures. A range of networks centred on the aristocracy, parliament, the magistracy and the learned and professional societies are studied, and key individuals instrumental in spreading and consolidating the Masonic message identified. The thesis also explores the role of Freemasonry in the development of the scientific Enlightenment. The evidence suggests that Freemasonry should be recognised not only as the most prominent of the many 18thC fraternal organisations, but also as a significant cultural vector and a compelling component of the social, economic, scientific and political transformation then in progress. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  British_history  British_politics  Enlightenment  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-politics  Freemasonry  cultural_history  intellectual_history  networks-social  networks-political  networks-business  sociology_of_science_&_technology  elites  aristocracy  Parliament  MPs  political_nation  economic_sociology  economic_culture  commerce-doux  finance_capital  banking  capital_markets  capital_as_power  history_of_science  historical_sociology  historical_change  center-periphery  provinces  clubs  social_capital  judiciary  professions  professionalization  religious_culture  science-and-religion  latitudinarian  natural_religion  Newtonian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Wallace Hughes - Antidotes to Deism: A reception history of Thomas Paine's "The Age of Reason", 1794--1809 (2013 dissertation) | ProQuest Gradworks
Hughes, Patrick Wallace, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 2013, 362 pages; 3573259 - Adviser: Paula M. Kane -- In the Anglo-American world of the late 1790s, Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason was not well received, and his volumes of Deistic theology were characterized as extremely dangerous. Over 70 replies to The Age of Reason appeared in Britain and the US. It was widely criticized in the periodical literature, and it garnered Paine the reputation as a champion of irreligion. This dissertation is a study of the rhetoric of refutation, and I focus on the replies to The Age of Reason that were published during Paine's lifetime (d. 1809). To effectively refute The Age of Reason, Paine's respondents had to contend not only with his Deistic arguments, but also with his international reputation, his style of writing, and his intended audience. I argue that much of the driving force behind the controversy over The Age of Reason stems from the concern that it was geared towards the “uneducated masses” or the “lower orders.” (..) For Paine's critics, when the masses abandon their Christianity for Deism, bloody anarchy is the inevitable result, as proven by the horrors of the French Revolution. (..) Drawing on Habermas's theories of the bourgeois public sphere, I focus on how respondents to The Age of Reason reveal not only their concerns and anxieties over the book, but also what their assumptions about authorial legitimacy and expectations about qualified reading audiences say about late 18thC print culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  Paine  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  Deism  natural_religion  Christianity  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  publishing  pamphlets  journalism  lower_orders  public_opinion  public_sphere  print_culture  hierarchy  mass_culture  anarchy  readership  social_order  public_disorder  Radical_Enlightenment  masses-fear_of  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Bowser - The Golden Age of Rome: Augustus’ program to better the Roman Empire (2013 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2013 -- posted to History of the Ancient World website - Argument continues among historians to this day whether Augustus should be considered the benefactor that Vergil portrays, who restored virtue and order, or as the tyrant Tacitus describes. Using evidence from a variety of contemporary sources, I intend to show that Augustus did in fact work to bring about the Age of Gold that Vergil promises. Whether through warfare, legislation, political maneuvering, or propaganda, I believe that his actions from the start reflect a clear program to make the Roman Empire the most powerful and most secure state that it could be, and that he was not just working for personal ambition. I have narrowed down the concept of the Golden Age, as portrayed by the poets, to three primary qualities: peace and security, the flourishing of the old Republican virtues, and prosperity under a glorious, divine leader. I will address each of these aspects in turn, consulting evidence from the period to show how Augustus’ regime worked to satisfy them. This evidence will include contemporary literature, historical facts and records, art, architecture, religion, and symbolism. I will also address the major criticisms of each facet by eyewitnesses such as Ovid and Propertius, by Roman historians such as Tacitus and Suetonius, and by various modern scholars of Roman history. Studying the success of Augustus’ methods can reap numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of later dictators and their programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Augustan_Rome  political_history  political_culture  civic_virtue  civil_religion  literary_history  Latin_lit  Virgil  Tacitus  historians-and-politics  state-building  Ovid  Suetonius  historiography  historiography-antiquity  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph Dragovich - A Comparison Of Republican Roman and Han Chinese Barbarian Relations (2009 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2009 -- posted on History of the Ancient World website -- Abstract: Throughout the course of human history, the interaction and conflict between civilization and barbarism, whether real or perceived, has existed in historical memory. The conflict, which spans continents and centuries, can be found in the historical writings of many sedentary civilizations, who felt a need to differentiate between “Us” and “Them.” In fact, many early civilizations defined themselves in the presence of groups which they considered barbarous.The project looks at two civilizations which had such interactions. Late Republican Rome and Han China are well known for their conflicts with peripheral groups. This thesis compares how these two empires conquered and assimilated these barbarian groups, namely the Roman conquest of Gaul and the Chinese conquest of the Xiongnu, a nomadic people that inhabited modern day Mongolia. Despite these two empires separation by time and geography, their methods of conquest were very similar. Where they differed was in their assimilation of conquered peoples, a difference which stems from the way the two civilizations defined themselves.By comparing these events in history, we can gain an insight into the topic which can not be achieved by studying each civilization individually. The interface of disparate cultures is at the heart of many modern issues, from immigration to the war on terror. By studying these past events, it can be seen that this aspect of the human experience not only transcends East and West but also the centuries that separate us from the ancient world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Han_China  Chinese_history  barbarians  center-periphery  conquest  national_ID  military_history  militarization-society  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ford, Jane (2013) Vampiric enterprise: metaphors of economic exploitation in the literature and culture of the fin de siecle. PhD thesis, University of Portsmouth.
This thesis is about the complex network of metaphors that emerged around late 19thC conceptions of economic self-interest — predatory, conflictual and exploitative basis of relations between nations, institutions, sexes and people in an outwardly belligerent fin-de-siècle economy. This thesis is about the vampire, cannibal and related genera of economic metaphor which penetrate many of the major discourses of the period. In chapters that examine socialist fiction and newspapers; the imperial quest romance; inter-personal intimacies in the writing of Henry James and Vernon Lee; and the Catholic novels of Lucas Malet, I assess the breadth and variety of these metaphors, and consider how they filter the concept of the conflictual ‘economic man’ . The thesis builds on Maggie Kilgour’s "From communion to cannibalism: an anatomy of metaphors of incorporation" (1990), which traces the genealogy – in literature from Homer to Melville – of what she terms ‘metaphors of incorporation’. These are metaphors that originate from a inside-outside binary and involve the assimilation or incorporation of an external reality. Kilgour attempts to demonstrate that with the increasing isolation of the modern individual .. acts of ‘incorporation’ previously imagined as symbiotic, were later conceived as cannibalistic. --However, deploying a combination of historicist and, at times, Post-Structuralist approaches, this thesis demonstrates that these metaphors refuse to accommodate themselves to a simple unified vision of the kind advanced by Kilgour. I map the complexities of these metaphors, explaining how they originate from divergent teleological impulses and how they articulate both simple ideological operations, and more complex feelings of ambivalence about economic realities in the cultural moment of the Victorian fin-de-siècle.
thesis  cultural_history  literary_history  social_history  political_history  IR_theory  IR  19thC  Fin-de-Siècle  20thC  political_economy  political_press  fiction  novels  James_Henry  laisser-faire  domination  imperialism  homo_economicus  socialism  class_conflict  individualism  alienation  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
"The Modal Status of Kant's Postulate of God's Existence" by Mathew Jonathan Snow | U of Wisconsin Masters thesis (2013)
Masters thesis -- Kant is traditionally read as arguing that moral agents are rationally required to postulate the actual existence of God, but contemporary commentators' reconstructions of the argument only seem sufficient to warrant postulating the merely possible existence of God. There have been three attempts to address this seeming lacuna between what the argument is supposed to justify and what it does justify. Allen Wood defends the traditional interpretation - that Kant postulated the actual existence of God. M Jamie Ferreira proposes a revisionary interpretation - that Kant postulated the possible existence of God. Finally, Paul Guyer simply criticizes Kant for postulating the actual existence of God when his argument only justifies postulating the possible existence of God. I argue that Allen Wood's defense is insufficient to ground the appropriate propositional attitude toward the postulates while M Jamie Ferreira's proposal cannot pass as a reading of Kant. Nonetheless, I argue that Kant need not be criticized because the seeming lacuna does not arise if we are sufficiently sensitive to the modality of the judgment Kant takes to be required for rational pursuit of the highest good. --Snow, Mathew Jonathan, "The Modal Status of Kant's Postulate of God's Existence" (2013). Theses and Dissertations. Paper 308. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  intellectual_history  18thC  Kant-ethics  God-existence  moral_philosophy  reason  practical_reason  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
William J. Bulman - Publicity and Popery on the Restoration Stage: Elkanah Settle's "The Empress of Morocco" in Context | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 51, No. 2 (APRIL 2012), pp. 308-339
Over 100 references listed with lots of jstor links on the jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge journals -- claims that historians, as distinct from literary criticism, have mostly ignored the theatre political linkages for Restoration, unlike early Stuart and Augustan periods -- thinks they should be looking at something akin to emergence of public sphere (not necessarily in Habermas sense) post English Civil War -- among references see Princeton 2009 thesis on religious politics and theatre late 17thC to 1714
article  jstor  paywall  find  thesis  17thC  1670s  theatre-politics  English_lit  literary_history  politics-and-literature  theatre-Restoration  political_culture  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Darrick N. Taylor -thesis - L'Estrange His Life: Public and Persona in the Life and Career of Sir Roger L'Estrange, 1616-1704 (2011)
KU ScholarWorks: Authors: Taylor, Darrick N. Advisors: Clark, Jonathan C.D. .....Downloaded pdf to Note..... The subject of this dissertation is the life and career of Roger L'Estrange, who was a licenser of Books and Surveyor of the Press for Charles II, as well as a royalist pamphleteer. It seeks to answer the question of how conceptions of public and private changed in late seventeenth century England be examining the career of L'Estrange, which involved him in many of the major pamphlet campaigns of the Restoration period. It argues that there was no stable "public sphere" in seventeenth century England, one that clearly marked it off from a private sphere of domesticity. It argues that the classical notion of office, in which reciprocal obligation and duty were paramount, was the basic presupposition of public but also private life, and that the very ubiquity of ideals of office holding made it semantically impossible to distinguish a stable public realm from a private one. Furthermore, the dissertation also argues that the presupposition of officium not only provided the basis for understanding relationships between persons but also of individual identity in seventeenth century England. It argues that L'Estrange saw his own identity in terms of the offices he performed, and that his individual identity was shaped by the antique notion of persona--of a mask that one wears, when performing a role--than to modern notions of individual identity. Lastly, it will argue that people in seventeenth century England still understood their world in terms of offices, but that changes in the way they understood office, visible in L'Estrange's writings, helped prepare the way for the reception of more modern ideas about public and private spheres that would eventually come to fruition in the nineteenth century.
thesis  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  1680s  1690s  1700s  L'Estrange  Charles_II  James_II  Whigs  Tories  political_press  pamphlets  censorship  propaganda  politics-and-religion  public_sphere  office  persona  identity  self  obligation  moral_philosophy  domesticity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sean Elliott: Contending for liberty : principle and party in Montesquieu, Hume, and Burke (2010 thesis)
University of St Andrews -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This thesis explores the political reformation of “faction” in the political thought of Montesquieu, David Hume, and Edmund Burke, three thinkers whose works span what Pierre Manent calls “an exquisite moment of liberalism.” It examines the transformation of faction from one based largely on class to one based largely on political function and argues that as the political emphasis of “party” overtook that of class, a disconnect in constitutional theory appeared between the principles formerly associated with class, such as honor, and the principles now associated with parties. This disconnect is examined by focusing on the interrelated concepts of political principle, or that which motivates and regulates men, and faction, itself divided into two types, principled and singular. This thesis further considers the role of political principle to faction in each thinker’s thought in order to demonstrate how limited domestic political conflict could sustain itself via a party system. Each thinker recognized that limited political conflict did not weaken the state but rather strengthened it, if engendered by “principled faction” cognizant of a nominal sovereign. Accordingly, it is argued that a similar understanding of “principled faction,” though focused largely on aristocratic ideas of prejudice, self-interest, and inequality, better promoted political liberty within the state and contributed to a greater acceptance of party in political thought.
thesis  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  18thC  Britain  France  British_politics  faction  parties  Montesquieu  Hume  Burke  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Arthur Edward Jr Kolzow: Equality and Liberty in the Materialist Moral Philosophy of the French Enlightenment - thesis 2011 - Udini
Equality and liberty have come, over the past two and half centuries, to find themselves among the primary political and social values of the West. This study on both the philosophical and historical development of equality and liberty during the Enlightenment clarifies their purposes and justifications. It also elucidates the occasional conflicts between equality and liberty, that is, where it becomes necessary to choose one over the other. The works of three of the major materialist philosophers of the French Enlightenment, Julien Offray de La Mettrie (1709-1751), Paul-Henri d'Holbach (1723-1789), and Denis Diderot (1713-1784), are ideal for such analysis because each of them has a different perspective on equality and liberty and the relationship of these two ideas to the individual and society. La Mettrie, d'Holbach, and Diderot seek to justify their conceptions of equality and liberty through nature, in particular through the human attraction to pleasure and aversion to pain. From this perspective, they are also able to criticize the corruption and hypocrisy of the social institutions, especially the Catholic Church. The primary aim of their conceptions of equality and liberty is to create a balance between the needs and desires of the individual and those of society. Each believes that the individual can be expected to support society and, simultaneously, that society can be expected to support the individual. Equality spares the individual from neglect by social institutions by insisting that society avoid special treatment of some individuals over others, and liberty guarantees the individual's well-being by asserting the value of individual action over other concerns. However, this social balance, the balance between the interests of society and those of the individual, is not the same for each of the three materialists.
thesis  18thC  Enlightenment  France  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  social_theory  human_nature  individualism  civil_society  equality  liberty  virtue  happiness  pleasure  d'Holbach  Diderot  materialism  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Catherine Tinsley Tuell: "By His Majestie's Special Command": William III and Uncommon Prayer - thesis 2011 - Udini
William III ascended to the throne of England in 1689 following his military intervention in support of the erstwhile claim to the throne by his wife (Mary II) as a replacement for the sitting Roman Catholic king, who was also her father James II. During the ideological and theological conflict that followed William's invited invasion, public worship and public prayer in the Church of England was used by Williamite propagandists to promote and legitimize a monarchy that re-fashioned the concept of a sovereign who ruled by divine right in spite of Parliament into one where the sovereign's divine right was determined by Parliament. Using what I term "uncommon prayer" as supplements to the liturgy of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer , church divines promoted the political agenda and ideology of the Williamite regime. Most often crafted for use on royally designated days of national fasting or thanksgiving, these occasional Forms of Prayer required the active participation of all of their Majesties' subjects during public worship. Satirical balladry during the Irish conflict with James II lampooning the royal proclamation for public fasting and uncommon prayer confirms their Majesties' adversaries recognized the effectiveness of the royal polemical campaign conducted by and through the church. The examination of uncommon prayers reveals that the revolutionary government used language familiar to the people in radically new ways to justify the invasion by a foreign prince, the forced "abdication" of a sitting monarch, and a re-shaping of not only the monarchy, but the Church of England and Parliament. It defined the role of William as the instrument of God's divine providence and emphasized the responsibility of the people for the nation's misfortunes because of their individual and collective sin. The sustained use of uncommon or occasional prayer throughout the years of the Williamite monarchy (1689-1702) to bring before the people the royal agenda attests to the vitality of public worship, the perceived efficacy of public prayer, and the importance of the Church of England on the social and political landscape of late-seventeenth century England.
thesis  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  Glorious_Revolution  propaganda  William_III  Providence  Church_of_England  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  Jacobites  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Nancy Rochelle Bradley: The weapons of the "true warfaring Christian": Right reason and free will in seventeenth-century literature - 2009 thesis - Udini
Abstract: Milton writes in Areopagitica of the "true warfaring Christian" who can "apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better." Though many reformers saw both human nature and the faculty of reason as depraved after the fall, Milton and other radical writers in the period emphasized the role that reason can and should play in the experience of spiritual warfare. The dissertation therefore begins by considering the theological contexts within which writers of the English Reformation understood evil and human encounters with evil, especially in the form of temptations, but also in the form of disturbing dreams and satanic presences. It then considers some epistemological problems as related to the experience of such conflicts: reason, especially right reason; knowledge, conscience and memory; and free will. Focusing on the texts of John Milton, Aemilia Lanyer, Richard Norwood, and John Bunyan, this study shows that these radical religious writers refuse to conform to the general tendency in Reformation theology to discount the use of reason. Eve's dream in Milton's Paradise Lost reveals the proper use of right reason in spiritual warfare, while the actual temptation scenes in Paradise Lost and Lanyer's Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum point to a fundamental failure of reason in the fall. Norwood's Confessions , Milton's Comus , and Milton's Samson Agonistes portray the triumphs of human reason over evil and temptation, though there remains an awareness of the constraints placed upon reason by their fallen nature such that reason needs the aid of divine grace to function as right reason. Milton's Paradise Regained and Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress point to the extraordinary victories gained by Christ and Christian through the use of right reason and memory to direct the will toward the highest goods. These texts offer a counter-voice to those who would dismiss the possibilities of the powers of right reason. Despite the awareness of the inherent limits of fallen reason, these radical reformists generally find reason an indispensable tool in spiritual battles that helps direct their wills to the highest good.
thesis  17thC  British_history  English_lit  theology  Milton  reason  original_sin  evil  grace  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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