dunnettreader + theology   176

Robert A. Markus - Gregory the Great and his World (1997) | Cambridge University Press
The book is a study of Gregory the Great, the pope who sent Augustine (of Canterbury) and his fellow missionaries to convert the heathen English to Christianity (597). Markus gives a full account of Gregory's life and work, his thought and spirituality, within the setting of the world at the end of the sixth century. At a time of catastrophic change in Europe, Gregory's work as pope stands on the threshold of medieval Western Europe. The book deals with every aspect of his pontificate, providing a major contribution to the study of late antique society. -- No modern equivalent in any language -- Takes into account advance in historical scholarship over the 90 years since Dudden, and modern perspectives in the study of Late Antiquity -- Downloaded frontmatter (incl maps), excerpt, index via Air to DBOX -- added to Evernote
books  biography  6thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  medieval_history  Gregory_the_Great  theology  Papacy  Christianity  Christendom  Byzantine_Empire  Roman_Empire  Lombards  Italy  Church_history  missionaries  religious_culture  religious_lit  barbarians  Visigoths  North_Africa  heresy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus - Saeculum: History & Society in the Theology of St Augustine (1970, rev 2007) | Cambridge University Press
Significant intro to rev'd edition, included in downloaded frontmatter along with TOC and original Preface. -- In this book Professor Markus's main concern is with those aspects of Augustine's thought which help to answer questions about the purpose of human society, and particularly with his reflections on history, society and the Church. He relates Augustine's ideas to their contemporary context and to older traditions, and shows which aspects of his thought he absorbed from his intellectual environment. Augustine appears from this study as a thinker who rejected the 'sacralization' of the established order of society, and the implications of this for a theology of history are explored in the last chapter. -- Downloaded frontmatter, excerpt & index via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_history  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  Augustine  human_nature  eschatology  social_order  Providence  teleology  religion-established  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  Roman_Empire  paganism  pluralism  secularism  Roman_religion  secularization  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Margins and Metropolis: Authority across the Byzantine Empire. (eBook, Paperback and Hardcover 2016) - Princeton University Press
1st volume of 2 covering her 40 year career - This volume explores the political, cultural, and ecclesiastical forces that linked the metropolis of Byzantium to the margins of its far-flung empire. Focusing on the provincial region of Hellas and Peloponnesos in central and southern Greece, Judith Herrin shows how the prestige of Constantinople was reflected in the military, civilian, and ecclesiastical officials sent out to govern the provinces. She evokes the ideology and culture of the center by examining different aspects of the imperial court, including diplomacy, ceremony, intellectual life, and relations with the church. Particular topics treat the transmission of mathematical manuscripts, the burning of offensive material, and the church's role in distributing philanthropy.

Herrin contrasts life in the capital with provincial life, tracing the adaptation of a largely rural population to rule by Constantinople from the early medieval period onward. The letters of Michael Choniates, archbishop of Athens from 1182 to 1205, offer a detailed account of how this highly educated cleric coped with life in an imperial backwater, and demonstrate a synthesis of ancient Greek culture and medieval Christianity that was characteristic of the Byzantine elite.

This collection of essays spans the entirety of Herrin's influential career and draws together a significant body of scholarship on problems of empire. It features a general introduction, two previously unpublished essays, and a concise introduction to each essay that describes how it came to be written and how it fits into her broader analysis of the unusual brilliance and longevity of Byzantium.

Judith Herrin is the Constantine Leventis Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London. She is the author of Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire, Women in Purple: Rulers of Medieval Byzantium, and The Formation of Christendom (all Princeton). -- downloaded Introduction to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Byzantium  medieval_history  empires  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_culture  empires-governance  Islam  Islamic_civilization  ancient_Greece  Christianity  Christendom  elite_culture  urban_elites  rural  center-periphery  Orthodox_Christianity  Roman_Catholicism  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  manuscripts  iconoclasm  philanthropy  intelligentsia  church_history  theology  Islam-expansion  Christianity-Islam_conflict 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Oxford DNB article: Ruskin, John
The second volume of Modern Painters adopted a different style from that of the first. Ruskin wished to show that truthful perception of nature led to an experience of beauty that was also an apprehension of God. It was necessary to prove that beauty rested on an absolute, divine basis, not custom or subjective association. To this end he devised the concept of the ‘theoretic faculty’—derived from the Greek theoria, or contemplation—a faculty which mediated between eye and mind, and which allowed an instinctual, emotional (in Ruskin's terminology, moral) as opposed to conscious and rational, apprehension of beauty: ‘this, and this only, is the full comprehension and contemplation of the Beautiful as a gift of God’ (Works, 4.47).

Ruskin divided beauty into two categories, ‘vital’ and ‘typical’. Vital beauty, in accordance with natural theology, expresses God's purpose in the harmonious creation of the world and its creatures, including man. Typical beauty, in accordance with evangelical typology, expresses the immanence of God in the natural world through the presence of ‘types’ to which man responds as beautiful. These types are qualities rather than things: infinity, unity, repose, purity, and symmetry. They are associated with divine qualities and can be found in nature and in art, but though abstract themselves, they have a real presence that it is the artist's duty truthfully to represent. Through his mother's training and the sermons he heard every Sunday, Ruskin had absorbed the evangelical practice of treating objects as both real and symbolic at the same time, a key critical practice that remained a feature of his writings throughout his life.

Ruskin completed the ground plan of his critical and aesthetic theories in volume 2 of Modern Painters with a discussion of the imagination. Where the theoretic faculty perceived, the imagination created. He posited three orders of truth: of fact, of thought, and of symbol, with their corresponding imaginative faculties. The penetrative imagination saw the object or idea, both its external form and its internal essence. The associative imagination enabled the artist or writer to convey the truth perceived and so his thought. The contemplative imagination turned these truths into symbolic form. Thus it is perfectly legitimate for an artist to change or rearrange what he has truthfully observed and penetratively imagined, as Ruskin demonstrated in Modern Painters, volume 4 (1856), in his discussion of Turner's drawing of the pass of Faido (Works, 6.34–41). There was a higher truth than natural fact, but it took Ruskin until the completion of Modern Painters volume 5 (1860), via a discussion of the ‘Symbolical Grotesque’ in The Stones of Venice, volume 3 (1853), fully to develop a theory of the imagination that successfully synthesized the dialectic of the real and the symbolic....

The third volume of Modern Painters appeared in January 1856, the fourth in April, but the final volume was not published until June 1860. The natural world was still Ruskin's touchstone, and Turner still his artist-hero, but both were seen in an altered context as Ruskin tried to come to terms with the waning of his dogmatic evangelical belief and the correlative loss of a spontaneous joy in landscape. His critical yardstick was still an artist or writer's fidelity to truth, ‘but truth so presented that it will need the help of the imagination to make it real’ (Works, 5.185). Taken as a whole, these volumes constituted an attempt to establish a satisfactory theory of the imagination that rested on the material facts of the natural world, but which showed not only that these facts also carried a profound symbolic truth, but that that truth could equally be conveyed in symbolic form. The crowded symbolism in Holman Hunt's minutely realistic The Awakening Conscience and the entirely imaginary, though equally realistically depicted, image of Christ in Hunt's The Light of the World must serve here as shorthand examples.
aesthetics  theology  19thC  via:ayjay 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Tertullian : Ante-Nicene Fathers Translations - The Tertullian Project
Re-keyed html with footnotes and further comments (Elucidations) of widely reproduced 19thC translations - mostly T & F Clark, Edinburgh, or American editions of the same
The website has lots of articles, book chaptersk etc of out-of-copyrjght materials with comments from the site editor of more recent information and his personal verifying of bibliographic info on specific editions
website  etexts  translation  Early_Christian  Tertullian  Roman_Empire  heresy  theology  Trinity  martyrs  manners  apologetics  cultural_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  persecution 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
David Brakke - Gnosticism: From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas | The Great Courses
Gnosticism: From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas
Professor of religious studies and history at Ohio State
24 lectures
Uniformly rave reviews from people with good academic background in Early Christianity and comparative religion
Neoplatonism  theology  eschatology  ecclesiology  manichaean  gnostic  heterodoxy  creation  late_antiquity  hermeneutics  Early_Christian  archaeology  esotericism  manuscripts  audio  proto-orthodox  evil  soteriology  church_history  video  religious_history  courses  Trinity  God-attributes  heresy 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Romanticism, reflexivity, design: An interview with Colin Jager by Nathan Schneider « The Immanent Frame
Colin Jager’s reading of the British romantics places them at the center of debates about religion, secularism, and pluralism today. In The Book of God, he traces the ways in which design arguments for God’s existence — predecessors to the current Intelligent Design movement—were developed and discussed in British literature from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth. His interpretation challenges those in the habit of trying to disentangle the religious and the secular, in both the past and the present. Jager is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University and is currently at work on a second book, After Secularism: Romanticism, Literature, Religion - downloaded pdf to Note
interview  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  literary_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Romanticism  God-existence  secularization  English_lit  religious_culture  religious_belief  design-nature  creation  theology  theodicy  natural_religion  Deism  creationism  intelligent_design  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
l'abbé J.-E.-A. Gosselin - Histoire littéraire de Fénelon (1867) - Notice bibliographique | BnF Catalogue général
Type : texte imprime, monographie
Auteur(s) : Gosselin, Jean-Edme-Auguste (1787-1858)  Voir les notices liées en tant qu'auteur
Titre(s) : Histoire littéraire de Fénelon, ou Revue historique et analytique de ses oeuvres, pour servir de complément à son histoire et aux différentes éditions de ses oeuvres [Texte imprimé] / par M... [l'abbé J.-E.-A. Gosselin. avec des Recherches bibliographiques sur le "Télémaque" / par l'abbé A.-P.-P. Caron]
Publication : Paris : Lecoffre, 1867
Description matérielle : XIII-480 p. ; gr. in-8
Autre(s) forme(s) du titre : 
Titre alternatif : Revue historique et analytique de ses oeuvres, pour servir de complément à son histoire et aux différentes éditions de ses oeuvres
Notice n° :  FRBNF30524555
Humongous- double columns and fine print / the detailed TOC alone must run close to 20 pgs
Download possible - see on Gallica app
Louis_XIV  education  Catholics-France  religious_history  17thC  heterodoxy  19thC  education-women  religious_lit  French_lit  Papacy  Fenelon  Huguenots  literary_history  Gallica  education-elites  court_culture  spiritual_practices  Edict_of_Nantes  Quietism  theology  intellectual_history  Ancients-and-Moderns  books  mirror_for_princes  moral_philosophy  classicism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Hervé Serry - Saint Thomas sociologue ? 2094)- Cairn.info
Face à l’émergence de la sociologie comme discipline scientifique, l’Église catholique des années 1880-1920 et ses partisans dans les milieux intellectuels se mobilisent rapidement. L’école durkheimienne est ainsi controversée aussi bien par les instances cléricales que par des intellectuels laïques catholiques prolongeant leur action. Cette opposition s’arrime sur la volonté de forger une « sociologie catholique », dont la philosophie thomiste qui guide alors la doctrine officielle de l’Église serait le socle, afin de ne pas laisser le terrain du savoir sur le social aux opposants de l’Église. Méconnue, l’argumentation théorique et politique que développent les entrepreneurs de cette sociologie catholique, dont certains sont les héritiers de Frédéric Le Play, permet d’explorer l’élaboration, à l’époque où l’école française de sociologie s’impose, des fondements de certains schèmes de pensée qui, dans les sciences sociales, privilégient la « liberté » des individus contre les déterminismes sociaux. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
anti-individualism  Counter-Enlightenment  intellectual_history  theology  social_theory  article  Catholics-and-politics  France  3rd_Republic  pre-WWI  Thomism  downloaded  laïcité  epistemology  scientific_method  human_nature  Aquinas  19thC  political_culture  Thomism-19thC  cultural_history  Papacy  Durkheim  anti-modernity  religious_history  intelligentsia  Fin-de-Siècle 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Thibault Gess, review - Jean-Luc Marion : Sur la théologie blanche de Descartes (2009) - actu philosophia
Les éditions PUF viennent de republier peut-être le plus grand ouvrage de Jean-Luc Marion, à savoir Sur la théologie blanche de Descartes [1] qui, à partir d’un problème dont Ferdinand Alquié avait relevé toute la densité, celui de la création des vérités éternelles, trouve matière à mener une investigation en tout point remarquable sur les questions de l’analogie et de l’univocité de l’être, navigant brillamment entre Suarez, Mersenne, Galilée, Kepler, et bien d’autres. Il s’agit là d’un ouvrage à la fois d’histoire de la philosophie et de philosophie, tant la profondeur des analyses, et l’érudition déployée, éclairent d’un jour nouveau un moment historique de la pensée occidentale, mais aussi pensent philosophiquement certaines questions qui eussent pu sans cela demeurer soit théologiques, soit scientifiques : à cet égard, la discussion du procès de Galilée constitue un très grand moment de lecture philosophique d’un problème trop souvent réduit à une marque d’intolérance religieuse.
17thC  intellectual_history  French_language  Aquinas  16thC  foundationalism  books  Descartes  analogy  scholastics  imago_dei  Scotus_Dun  theology  reviews  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Desmond M. Clarke - French Philosophy, 1572-1675 (June 2016) | Oxford University Press - History of Philosophy Series
Desmond M. Clarke presents a thematic history of French philosophy from the middle of the 16thC to the beginning of Louis XIV's reign. While the traditional philosophy of the schools was taught throughout this period by authors who have faded into permanent obscurity, a whole generation of writers who were not professional philosophers--some of whom never even attended a school or college--addressed issues that were prominent in French public life. Clarke explores such topics as the novel political theory espoused by monarchomachs, such as Beze and Hotman, against Bodin's account of absolute sovereignty; the scepticism of Montaigne, Charron, and Sanches; the ethical discussions of Du Vair, Gassendi, and Pascal; innovations in natural philosophy that were inspired by Mersenne and Descartes and implemened by members of the Academie royale des sciences; theories of the human mind from Jean de Silhon to Cureau de la Chambre and Descartes; and the novel arguments in support of women's education and equality that were launched by De Gournay, Du Bosc, Van Schurman and Poulain de la Barre. The writers involved were lawyers, political leaders, theologians, and independent scholars and they acknowledged, almost unanimously, the authority of the Bible as a source of knowledge that was claimed to be more reliable than the fragile powers of human understanding. Since they could not agree, however, on which books of the Bible were canonical or how that should be understood, their discussions raised questions about faith and reason that mirrored those involved in the infamous Galileo affair.
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  France  political_philosophy  sovereignty  Bodin  Montaigne  scepticism  academies  Gassendi  Pascal  Descartes  mind  mind-body  theology  natural_philosophy  Biblical_authority  women-education  women-intellectuals 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn review of Larry Siedentop's Invention of the Individual" - Did Christianity Create Liberalism? | Boston Review
Very interesting re the (19thC) "French" approach to liberalism -- historicist stressing process, contingency. Contrast with Anglo-Saxon social contract that takes the individual as its (unexamined) premiss, as does economic theory based on satisfying individual preferences etc. LS wrote an important article on the French approach. So Moyn sees LS as working to update and revise Guizot. Problem is LS (and all those claiming Christianity the basis of individual "natural rights") can't explain how the next world focus of Jesus and Paul became a this-world focus with the role of the individual as foundational. Moyn critiques the steps LS takes starting with the moral revolution of Augustine and working through the Middle Ages.
theology  natural_law  France  Instapaper  liberty  medieval_history  political_philosophy  Augustine  Guizot  liberalism  social_theory  historiography-19thC  individualism  medieval_philosophy  reviews  EF-add  social_contract  Constant  books  natural_rights  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  Augustinian  kindle-available  19thC  from instapaper
december 2015 by dunnettreader
The Gnostic Society Library and the Nag Hammadi Library - Introduction to Gnosticism
An Introduction to Gnosticism and The Nag Hammadi Library -- site has huge collection of etexts from Nag Hammadi, apocryphal gospels, background materials on Gnosticism through the ages - video lectures, some free (especially by the Bishop of the Gnostic Ecclesia, sort of weekly sermons) and for $, collections of lectures e.g. the Divine Feminine, the Arthurian and Grail cycle. Big emphasis on Jungian psychology, symbols etc. New Age reaching or getting in touch with the divine spark in each person - and developing, fulfillment etc. The etexts have explanatory materials that link to legitimate scholarship
evil  Jungian  bibliography  religious_history  monotheism  theology  imago_dei  mysticism  cosmology  church_history  Biblical_criticism  website  Kabbalah  archaeology  Christology  Biblical_authority  Early_Christian  manuscripts  Biblical_exegesis  late_antiquity  intellectual_history  heterodoxy  Biblical_allusion  Christianity  theodicy  gnostic  etexts 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Wireless Philosophy | Classical Theism 7 (Atheistic Arguments from Evil) | Wi Phi
Classical Theism 7 (Atheistic Arguments from Evil), Emeritus Professor, Philosophy, University of Toronto -- Last in series - Often it can seem like the existence of evil is incompatible with a good and omnipotent God. This video present an argument for that claim put forward by J.L. Mackie, and it examines the different ways that Classical Theism and Theistic Personalism respond to a version of it that concludes that there is no God
video  God-attributes  God-existence  philosophy_of_religion  theology  theodicy 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Is God a Mindless Vegetable? Cudworth on Stoic Theology (2011) | Academia.edu
Intellectual History Review 21/2 (2011), 121-33 -- In the late sixteenth century a number of influential writers claimed Stoicism to be compatible with Christianity but by the mid eighteenth century, Stoicism had come to be associated with atheism. What happened during the course of the reception of Stoicism in the intervening period? While it remains unclear who was the first person to call the Stoics atheists, there is no doubt that the most philosophically sustained analysis of Stoic theology during this period is to be found in Ralph Cudworth's True Intellectual System of the Universe, published in 1678. Cudworth's aim in this work is to catalogue and then attack all existing forms of atheism and one of the four principal forms of atheism he identifies he calls ‘Stoical’. However, in Cudworth's complex taxonomy of different forms of theism and atheism, Stoicism appears twice, first as a form of atheism but also as a form of imperfect theism. The aim of this study is to examine Cudworth's claims about Stoic theology, assessing their fairness, but also placing them within the wider context of the early modern reception of Stoicism. -- Keywords: Atheism, Stoicism, Cambridge Platonism, and Ralph Cudworth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Stoicism  theology  atheism  determinism  God-existence  God-attributes  Cambridge_Platonists  Cudworth  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Nitzan Lebovic - Introduction - to issue "Political Theology" (2008) | JSTOR - New German Critique
No. 105, Political Theology (Fall, 2008), pp. 1-6 -- Articles in issue -- György Geréby, Political Theology versus Theological Politics: Erik Peterson and Carl Schmitt (pp. 7-33) *--* Christiane Frey, χλη̑σις/Beruf: Luther, Weber, Agamben (pp. 35-56) *--* Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky and Catharine Diehl, The Image of Happiness We Harbor: The Messianic Power of Weakness in Cohen, Benjamin, and Paul (pp. 57-69) *-'* Samuel Moyn, Hannah Arendt on the Secular (pp. 71-96) *--* Nitzan Lebovic, The Jerusalem School: The Theopolitical Hour (pp. 97-120) *--* Arnd Wedemeyer, Herrschaftszeiten! Theopolitical Profanities in the Face of Secularization (pp. 121-141) *--* Benjamin Lazier, On the Origins of "Political Theology": Judaism and Heresy between the World Wars (pp. 143-164) -- Introduction downloaded to Note
article  journals-academic  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  political-theology  Schmitt  Arendt  secularization  secularism  Luther  Weber  Judaism  entre_deux_guerres  Holocaust  downloaded  post-WWII  Cold_War  eschatology  Benjamin 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - The First Historian of Human Rights (2011) | JSTOR - The American Historical Review
Vol. 116, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 58-79 -- Revisiting Ritter's story of the invention of human rights—as perverse as it was pioneering—affords critical distance from what has become a central historiographical fashion. It is precisely because his narrative constructs the past of human rights for so unfamiliar a project that Ritter provides a more vivid reminder of how easy it still is to devise a field with the goal of crafting a usable past for new imperatives. The deep past out of which human rights are supposed to have sprung provides rich but manipulable material for such enterprises. Ritter's first history is also a salutary reminder of the meanings that the concept of human rights accreted in the postwar era, when they transcended the nation‐state and began to be called in English by their current name. The 1940s, when Ritter wrote, are often forced to play the role of precursor in contemporary narratives—as a kind of failed early version of the post–Cold War 1990s, when human rights as a movement and a framework became visible enough to motivate historians to work on them. Given the Universal Declaration, the chronological focus on the 1940s is understandable. But Ritter provides an inadvertent warning against omitting the conservative and religious sources of human rights in that era, and therefore interpreting it anachronistically. His case powerfully buttresses emerging skepticism about the whole notion of rooting contemporary human rights in the 1940s, let alone earlier, given more recent transformations in the very meaning of the concept, and the unprecedented explosion of a movement based on them. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Cold_War  IR-realism  IR  religious_history  Christianity  Christian_Democracy  human_rights  anti-capitalism  anti-materialism  communitarian  anti-individualism  international_law  usable_past  historiography-postWWII  United_Nations  post-war_reconstruction  Germany  Europe  theology  rights-legal  conservatism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Joan-Pau Rubiés - Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 571-596 -- The article starts out, "Idolatry" ended in the pages of Voltaire's Dictionnaire Philosophique -- Voltaire explains it's an empty term for analytical purposes, just used to condemn others, by contrast with monotheism and polytheism, which is at least a meaningful distinction. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  religious_history  religious_belief  comparative_religion  ethnography  theology  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  idolatry  pagans  religious_imagery  religious_practices  religious_culture  ritual  Voltaire  monotheism  polytheism  sociology_of_religion  Enlightenment  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe - Issue Introduction (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 561-570 **--** Articles in issue on idolatry *--* Jonathan Sheehan, Introduction: Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe (pp. 561-570) *-* Joan-Pau Rubiés, Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (pp. 571-596) *--* Carina L. Johnson, Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (pp. 597-622) *--* Sabine MacCormack, Gods, Demons, and Idols in the Andes (pp. 623-648) *--* Jonathan Sheehan, The Altars of the Idols: Religion, Sacrifice, and the Early Modern Polity (pp. 649-674) *--* Peter N. Miller, History of Religion Becomes Ethnology: Some Evidence from Peiresc's Africa (pp. 675-696) *--* Martin Mulsow, Idolatry and Science: Against Nature Worship from Boyle to Rüdiger, 1680-1720 (pp. 697-712) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  journal  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_experience  ritual  idolatry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  theology  sociology_of_religion  political-theology  science-and-religion  historicism  relativism  demons  devil  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  comparative_history  sacrifice  science_of_man  social_sciences  human_nature  Africa  Latin_America  pagans  nature  natural_religion  nature_worship  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Boyle  Antiquarianism  natural_history  Peiresc  virtuosos  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Newberry - Joseph Butler on Forgiveness: A Presupposed Theory of Emotion | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2001)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Apr., 2001), pp. 233-244 -- corrects misreading of Butler's position - not overcoming emotions of resentment but restraining one's actions or forbearance of taking revenge -- and discusses why Butler has been misread -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  Butler  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  theology  forgiveness  moral_sentiments  morality-Christian  emotions  reason-passions  action-theory  agency  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
William Junker, review - Hans Boersma, Embodiment and Virtue in Gregory of Nyssa | Marginalia - October 2015
Hans Boersma, Embodiment and Virtue in Gregory of Nyssa: An Anagogical Approach, Oxford University Press, 2013, 304pp., $40 Hans Boersma’s latest book describes…Boersma didn't find what he was looking for - support for the 20thC trend of "spiritual ontology" that focuses on the earth, Nature, Creation, etc. as already sacred - the review discusses the various problems with trying to align different approaches to the sacred during this life (especially Platonism and Neoplatonism which involves both an upward motion into the light and a recovery of the original Good of the created world) with the heavily linear eschatology embraced by the early Christian theologians. So he really doesn't get much into the Embodiment issue that Boersma deals with in what Boersma sighs is just a traditional theological history.
Instapaper  books  reviews  Early_Christian  theology  Plato-Republic  Plato-religion  Neoplatonism  eschatology  creation  from instapaper
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Adam Kotsko, review essay - The Devil – Writ Large and in the Details | Marginalia - October 2015
Philip C. Almond, The Devil: A New Biography, Cornell University Press, 2014, 296pp., $29.95 At first glance, these two studies of the place of the devil in the… Kotsko isn't enthusiastic -- the book on Ugartic tablets as evidence of a widely transmitted and shared story of the origins of the devil, demins, etc. that may or not be in the Old Testament but was picked up during the patristic era and passed on -- Kotsko thinks their method is shoddy -' As for Almond, it's too intellectualized, failing to explain the shifts in psychology -- what was going on when belief in devil or witches was viewed as rationality itself, etc
Instapaper  books  reviews  religious_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  religious_culture  Judaism  religious_belief  Old_Testament  apocrypha  witchcraft  devil  angels  sin  supernatural  ancient_Israel  ancient_Near_East  Biblical_criticism  philology  folklore  cultural_transmission  theology  Early_Christian  early_modern  17thC  Enlightenment  from instapaper
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Ralph Cudworth - The True Intellectual System of the Universe - Vol 1 of 3 ( 1845 ed with Johann Lorenz Mosheim annotations ) - Google Books
The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the Reason and Philosophy of Atheism is Confuted, and Its Impossibility Demonstrated, with a Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, Volume 1 -- T. Tegg, 1845 -- Oxford library -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  theology  17thC  Cudworth  materialism  natural_philosophy  theism  atheism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Ralph Cudworth - True Intellectual System of the Universe - Vol 3 of 3 (1845 ed with Johann Lorenz Mosheim annotations) - Google Books
The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the Reason and Philosophy of Atheism is Confuted, and Its Impossibility Demonstrated, with a Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, Volume 3 -- T. Tegg, 1845 -- NYPL -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  theology  17thC  Cudworth  materialism  natural_philosophy  theism  atheism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Raloh Cudworth - True Intellectual System of the Universe - Vol 2 of 3 (1845 ed with Johann Lorenz Mosheim annotations ) - Google Books
The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the Reason and Philosophy of Atheism is Confuted, and Its Impossibility Demonstrated, with a Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, Volume 2 -- T. Tegg, 1845 -- NYPL -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  theology  17thC  Cudworth  materialism  natural_philosophy  theism  atheism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Danton B. Sailor - Cudworth and Descartes (1962) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1962), pp. 133-140 -- followup to 1960 JHI article on Descartes and the Cambridge Platonists, which claims in focusing on John Smith, it misrepresents Cudworth on both theological and philosophical issues - Cudworth was enthusiastic re Cartesian natural philosophy, and embraced particular claims of Descartes that contradicted Hobbes’s views on corpuscularian transmission of motion that had implications for some of his theological oppositions to Hobbes
article  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  Descartes  Cudworth  Hobbes  Cambridge_Platonists  Cartesian  materialism  motion  bibliography  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Hadot, Pierre | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. Biography **--** 2. Philology and Method **--** 3. Early Work: Plotinus and the Simplicity of Vision **--** 4. What is Ancient Philosophy? -- (a) Philosophical Discourse versus Philosophy -- (b) Philosophy as a Way of Life -- (b) The Figure of Socrates -- (c) The Figure of the Sage **--** 5. Spiritual Practices -- (a) Askesis of Desire -- (b) Premeditation of Death and Evils -- (c) Concentration on the Present Moment -- (d) The View from Above -- (e) Writing as Hypomnemata, and The Inner Citadel **--** 6. The Transformation of Philosophy after the Decline of Antiquity -- (a) The Adoption of Spiritual Practices in Monasticism -- (b) Philosophical Discourse as Handmaiden to Theology and the Natural Sciences -- (c) The Permanence of the Ancient Conception of Philosophy **--** 7. References and Further Reading -- (a) Works in French. -- (b) Works in English. -- (c) Selected Articles on Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Socrates  eudaimonia  Stoicism  Epicurean  spiritual_practices  self-knowledge  self-sufficiency  self-development  self  self-control  passions  emotions  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  desire  judgment-emotions  meditation  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  transcendence  late_antiquity  monasticism  theology  philosophy_of_religion  natural_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Hadot_Pierre  French_intellectuals  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  Hellenism  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Design Arguments for the Existence of God | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. The Classical Versions of the Design Argument -- a. Scriptural Roots and Aquinas's Fifth Way -- b.The Argument from Simple Analogy -- c. Paley's Watchmaker Argument -- d. Guided Evolution **--** 2. Contemporary Versions of the Design Argument. -- a. The Argument from. -- b. Irreducible Biochemical Complexity -- c. The Argument from Biological Information. -- d. The Fine-Tuning Arguments -- (i) The Argument from Suspicious Improbability -- (ii) The Confirmatory Argument. **--** 3. The Scientifically Legitimate Uses of Design Inferences. **--** 4.References and Further Reading -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  philosophy_of_religion  theology  natural_religion  rational_religion  Newtonianism  creation  design-nature  God-existence  God-attributes  Aquinas  analogy  Paley  complexity  cosmology  cosmological-fine-tuning  intelligent_design  creationism  natural_philosophy  evolution  Bible-as-history  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Garry Wills - Augustine's "Confessions" - The “great sinner” myth « The Immanent Frame - March 21 2011
Excerpted from Augustine’s Confessions: A Biography, published by Princeton University Press © 2011. Posted by permission. Come to the launch of Princeton University Press’s “Lives of Great Religious Books” series on Thursday, March 24, in New York City, hosted by the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU and the SSRC Program on Religion and the Public Sphere.—ed. -- popular version of Augustine as a sex hound, and that he had an obsession with chastity that had pernicious effects on readers through the centuries doesn't match a review of his writings on sin, etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder "Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  Augustine  original_sin  depravity  Biblical_exegesis  theology  Catholic-doctrine  Christianity  sexuality  chastity  celibacy  sex-religious_attitudes  guilt  spirituality  prayers  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Newall interview of Stephen D. Snobelen: Newton Reconsidered - Theology and Alchemy | The Galilean Library
Stephen David Snobelen is Assistant Professor in the History of Science and Technology at University of King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is a founder member of the Newton project and author of many fascinating papers on Newton's alchemy and religious thinking. I was privileged to be able to ask him some questions about his work on Newton. -- helpful re the process by which Newton's papers were hidden, then sold at auction in 1936 and beginning in 1991 being made available for researchers as the dispersed manuscripts have been re-collected - who is working on what issues, as of 2005 -- Snobelen got his degrees in History of Philosophy of Science at Cambridge with Schaffer -- converted page and downloaded pdf to Note
interview  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  religious_history  religious_belief  17thC  18thC  Newton  Socinians  Arian  anti-Trinitarian  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Neoplatonism  immortality  soul  metaphysics  essence  substance  theology  Early_Christian  alchemy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Gordon Graham, Wittgenstein and Natural Religion // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - July 2015
In this book, Gordon Graham attempts to breathe new life into an old idea, namely, a naturalized conception of religion; with this goal, he succeeds admirably.…
Instapaper  books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_religion  Hume  Schleiermacher  Kant  Mill  theology  theism  metaphysics  Wittgenstein  natural_religion  enthusiasm  human_nature  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Forum - Samuel Moyn's "Christian human rights" - overview page | The Immanent Frame
In 2010, Samuel Moyn published The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History, which offered an alternative historical explanation for the origins of human rights. He rejected narratives that viewed human rights as a long-term historical product of the Judeo-Christian tradition, The French Revolution, or Enlightenment rationalism, arguing that human rights as it is now understood began to emerge only during the 1970s. Prior to this, according to Moyn, rights were connected to the nation-state and had nothing to do with an international standard of morality or justice. In addressing critiques of The Last Utopia, Moyn has given considerable attention to the relationship between human rights and religion, conceding that there is, undoubtedly, a relationship between Christianity—Catholicism in particular—and human rights, but arguing that the “death of Christian Europe” by the 1960s “forced a complete reinvention of the meaning of human rights embedded in European identity both formally and really since the war”. Contributors offer their thoughts on Moyn’s article “Personalism, Community, and the Origins of Human Rights,” which became a central focus (see excerpt) in his forthcoming book, Christian Human Rights (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). Contributors also respond to “Christian Human Rights,” the introductory essay written for this series. -- downloaded pdfs but their footnotes and links don't work, so collected them in Evernote them
books  intellectual_history  narrative-contested  bad_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  church_history  moral_philosophy  theology  human_rights  natural_rights  medieval_philosophy  Europe-Medieval  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  French_Revolution  IR  Europe  20thC  WWI  WWII  entre_deux_guerres  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  nation-state  genocide  Holocaust  UN  international_law  natural_law  law_of_nations  law_of_the_sea  justice  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  equality  liberty  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  links  Evernote 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - The Witness of Literature: A Genealogical Sketch | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Intro is afternoon spent at Christian writing conference with his friend the author Frederick Buechner, being constantly interrupted by readers -- almost all of them told the same story: Your writing has meant everything to my Christian faith. I don’t think I could be a Christian without your books.!Throughout that afternoon—rising to greet strangers, then sitting down and striving to remain inconspicuous as they poured out their hearts—I couldn’t help reflecting on the sheer oddity of the situation. These were people, by and large, who knew the Bible, who attended church, who had the benefits of Christian community. Yet they testified, almost to a person, that Christian belief would have been impossible for them without the mediation of the stories told by Frederick Buechner. I know literary history fairly well, especially where it intersects with Christian thought and practice, and it seemed to me that such radical dependence on literary experience would have been virtually impossible even a century earlier. But I also knew that Buechner’s role was anything but unique, that other readers would offer the same testimony to the fiction of Walker Percy or Flannery O’Connor or C.S. Lewis. How did such a state of affairs come about? How did literary writers come to be seen by many as the best custodians and advocates of Christian faith? It is a question with a curious and convoluted genealogy, one worth teasing out. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_lit  reading  fiction  spirituality  Christianity  theology  literary_history  English_lit  faith  religious_experience  identity  subjectivity  self-examination  self-development  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Karl Giberson (part 2 of 2) creating Adam, again and again - Peter Enns - June 2015
Today’s post is the second of two by Karl Giberson and is adapted from his newly published Saving the Original Sinner: How Christians Have Used the Bible’s… -- not clear whether they take up the first shock to the historical Adam centuries before Darwinism - discovery of the New World, and then moves toward scientific racism that debated whether humans were single or multiple species - and during same period, geology pushing back age of the earth far beyond an historically plausible frame for the literalist reading of Genesis
Instapaper  books  religious_history  Christianity  theology  change-intellectual  change-religious  creation  Adam  original_sin  theodicy  Bible-as-history  Early_Christian  Augustine  evolution  evolutionary_biology  cosmology  death  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_authority  science-and-religion  Darwinism  Fall  Genesis  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Enns - Jesus’s crucifixion: not exactly a selling point in the ancient world - June 2015
If you’re living in the Mediterranean world of the 1st century and you want to promote your religion, a “crucified god” is not your headline. Yet that is…
Instapaper  Early_Christian  Christianity  theology  religious_culture  religious_belief  gods-antiquity  Roman_Empire  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - Was Origen the Caitlyn Jenner of the Transabled? | The American Conservative - June 2015
I’m afraid I’m going to re-enter the fray. Rod Dreher has a piece today wondering whether the next step in our cultural development (or decline) will be the… Another superb piece by Millman illustrating how Dreher's hostility to changing cultural norms gets wrapped in a blanket condemnation of "modernity" (and liberalism, individualism, autonomy, and generally Enlightenment values) yet Dreher is committed to Enlightenment benefits of increased knowledge, and insists on liberalism's commitment to personal religious liberty. So it basically comes down to liberty for me but not for thee, with the Church authority for norm-setting both impervious to scientific and cultural change, and claiming an extension over those who don't recognize the Chyrch's authority. The example of Origen, whose spiritual commitment led to self-castration, and who wasn't condemned by the senior hierarchy (prior to the Church legislating on a range of norms dealing with the body and especially sexuality and gender, which was one reason Origen was never made a saint). Millman also has a lengthy passage from Tolstoy about a priest, sexual tension, spiritual demands and self-mutilation, with Tolstoy's final conclusion that this sort of psychological turmoil wasn’t the praiseworthy attitudes and action of a saint but self-absorbed cintra Christ's teaching. Tl; dr -- Dreher can't have it both ways (or in his case what seems like an ever-growing laundry list of contradictory ways). -- saved to Instapaper
Instapaper  sexuality  gender  gender-and-religion  norms  Early_Christian  theology  declinism  modernity  liberalism  Orthodox_Christianity  authority  individualism  autonomy  culture_wars  culture-American  cultural_change  cultural_authority  psychology  identity  biology  physiology  neuroscience  Tolstoy  religious_experience  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_liberties  bill_of_rights  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Dr. Ahmad Shafaat - What is Riba | Islamic Perspectives
Begun January 2005, slowly adding additional chapters -- This bookmark is for the Introduction -' Planned Contents -- Part I – RIBA IN THE QUR`AN *-* I - The Qur`an And The Authentic Ahadith Do Not Define Riba. *-* II - Riba In Pre-Islamic Arabia. *-* III - Riba In The Qur`an – A Detailed Examination of Relevant Verses [PDF Document] *-* IV - Riba In The Qur`an – A Closer Examination of Some Relevant Issues. *-* V- Usury/Interest In Other Societies. **--** Part II – RIBA IN THE HADITH. *-* VI -Ahadith About Husn al-Qada` *-* VII- Ahadith About Riba – An Overview. *-* VIII -Ahadith About Riba – An Examination Of Their Transmission (Naql) *-* IX- Ahadith About Riba – Making Sense Of Them. *-* Conclusion. -- We can hardly doubt that in the Qur`an riba is some kind of increase in the amount of a loan. But what is its precise nature? The commonly held traditional view is that riba is simply interest, that is, any increase in the loan required by the lender as a condition for advancing the loan. But many commonly held views, when they are scrutinized in the light of three primary sources of Islam – the Qur`an, authentic ahadith, and reason -- turn out to be either fundamentally flawed or harmful oversimplifications. Is the commonly accepted definition of riba one of the exceptions? Unfortunately, not. It turns out that this definition is a harmful oversimplification.
Islam  Islamic_law  Islamic_finance  credit  creditors  investment  investors  risk  risk_premiums  interest_rates  usury  theology  legal_reasoning  Qur'an  Hadith 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Fiona Ellis - God, Value, and Nature (October 2014) - Oxford University Press
** analysis of the familiar contrast between the 'natural' and the 'supernatural' domains ** Explores the idea of expanded nature and develops it in a direction that will accomodate theism. ** Examines the nature of expansive naturalism, drawing on ...Akeel Bilgrami, David Wiggins, and John McDowell ** extensive discussion of Levinas's claim that relating to value is both necessary and sufficient for relating to God **-** Many philosophers believe that God has been put to rest. Naturalism is the default position, and the naturalist can explain what needs to be explained without recourse to God. This book agrees that we should be naturalists, but it rejects the more prevalent scientific naturalism in favour of an 'expansive' naturalism inspired by David Wiggins and John McDowell. (..) expansive naturalism can accommodate the idea of God, (..) the expansive naturalist has unwittingly paved the way towards a form of naturalism which poses a genuine challenge to the atheist. (..) the traditional naturalism vs theism debate must be reconfigured: naturalism and theism (..) can both be true. Ellis draws on ... thinkers from theology and philosophy, ... between analytic and continental philosophy. (..) philosophical problems including the limits of nature and the status of value; theological problems surrounding the natural/supernatural relation, the Incarnation, and the concept of myth; and offers a model - inspired by the secular expansive naturalist's conception of philosophy - to comprehend the relation between philosophy and theology.
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  naturalism  natural_religion  theism  Deism  analytical_philosophy  McDowell  atheism  atheism-new  values  secularism  theology  Christology  supernatural  myth 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Fiona Ellis - on her new book "God, Value and Nature" | Oxford University Press Blog
Uses A.C. Grayling as the atheistic-naturalism foil. Suggests more re her argument than in the Oxford University Press catalog -- that her model uses Hegelian dialectic to surmount the "scientism" of the New Atheists and takes McDowell's argument that "value" belongs on the naturalist side of the divide to further extend the boundaries of naturalism.
books  kindle-available  theology  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_religion  naturalism  supernatural  values  theism  Deism  analytical_philosophy  McDowell  atheism  atheism-new  scientism  Hegel  dialectic  Pocket  Instapaper  from instapaper
february 2015 by dunnettreader
T Dougherty & J McBrayer - Skeptical theists and the problem of evil | OUPblog Oct 2014
It seems that skeptical theism might invoke a kind of moral paralysis as we move through the world unable to see which evils further God’s plans and which do not. Skeptical theists have marshalled replies to these concerns. Whether the replies are successful is up for debate. In either case, the renewed interest in the problem of evil has resurrected one of the most prevalent responses to evil in the history of theism — the response of Job when he rejects the explanations of his calamity offered by his friends and yet maintains his belief in God despite his ignorance about the evils he faces. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/10/theology-problem-of-evil/#sthash.It seems that skeptical theism might invoke a kind of moral paralysis as we move through the world unable to see which evils further God’s plans and which do not. Skeptical theists have marshalled replies to these concerns. Whether the replies are successful is up for debate. In either case, the renewed interest in the problem of evil has resurrected one of the most prevalent responses to evil in the history of theism — the response of Job when he rejects the explanations of his calamity offered by his friends and yet maintains his belief in God despite his ignorance about the evils he faces. - highlighting themes fr their recent collection "Skeptical Theism" - kindle sample to Note
books  kindle-available  theology  theodicy  scepticism  Deism  moral_philosophy  Bolingbroke  philosophy_of_religion  atheism  agnosticism 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Wallace Hughes - Antidotes to Deism: A reception history of Thomas Paine's "The Age of Reason", 1794--1809 (2013 dissertation) | ProQuest Gradworks
Hughes, Patrick Wallace, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 2013, 362 pages; 3573259 - Adviser: Paula M. Kane -- In the Anglo-American world of the late 1790s, Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason was not well received, and his volumes of Deistic theology were characterized as extremely dangerous. Over 70 replies to The Age of Reason appeared in Britain and the US. It was widely criticized in the periodical literature, and it garnered Paine the reputation as a champion of irreligion. This dissertation is a study of the rhetoric of refutation, and I focus on the replies to The Age of Reason that were published during Paine's lifetime (d. 1809). To effectively refute The Age of Reason, Paine's respondents had to contend not only with his Deistic arguments, but also with his international reputation, his style of writing, and his intended audience. I argue that much of the driving force behind the controversy over The Age of Reason stems from the concern that it was geared towards the “uneducated masses” or the “lower orders.” (..) For Paine's critics, when the masses abandon their Christianity for Deism, bloody anarchy is the inevitable result, as proven by the horrors of the French Revolution. (..) Drawing on Habermas's theories of the bourgeois public sphere, I focus on how respondents to The Age of Reason reveal not only their concerns and anxieties over the book, but also what their assumptions about authorial legitimacy and expectations about qualified reading audiences say about late 18thC print culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  Paine  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  Deism  natural_religion  Christianity  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  publishing  pamphlets  journalism  lower_orders  public_opinion  public_sphere  print_culture  hierarchy  mass_culture  anarchy  readership  social_order  public_disorder  Radical_Enlightenment  masses-fear_of  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Civil Theology and Church Establishments in Revolutionary America | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1007-1026
The discourse of America's founding generation, it is now widely recognized, was rich and variegated in its composition, drawing upon the commonwealth tradition, the English common law, Montesquieu, Locke, Scottish moral philosophy, and the classics. These sources yield significant clues as to how eighteenth-century Americans viewed religious liberty and church-state relations, subjects of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Supplementing the work of legal historians on the religious provisions of the early state constitutions, the study of political ideas suggests the parameters of the eighteenth-century debate over the effects which various types of religious belief and ecclesiastical establishment had upon manners and institutions. It also reveals the ideological underpinnings of the apparently inconsistent legal provisions for religion at the state level, and, far from settling the elusive question of `original intent', highlights the nature of the divisions within the founding generation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_religion  civil_liberties  tolerance  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  Founders  bill_of_rights  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Commonwealthmen  Locke-religion  Hutcheson  Smith  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_legal_system  US_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Stacking the deck: Thomas Pfau’s strange history of the West « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Kahn continues her attack on anti-modernity readings of Renaissance, Reformation and Early Modern intellectual history to justify claims for the "necessity" of political theology, with emphasis on (Catholic Thomist) theology as the foundation and organizing thread. Pfau goes beyond the Schmitt readings of the illegitimacy of the post French Revolution secular political to deny post Ockham intellectual legitimacy to any theorist who follows Ockham's voluntarism -- while totally ignoring the social, political, cultural and religious changes. The result is a Hobbes as villain of the piece that conveniently ignores a century and a half of religious warfare. And as she notes, she neither recognizes herself in any of the roles in Pfau’s morality play, nor can she see where he even offers a place for contemporary secular women. Downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  theology  modernity  self  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Hobbes  secularism  political-theology  Reformation  Europe-Early_Modern  political_philosophy  religious_wars  religious_culture  religious_belief  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Thomas Pfau and the emergence of the modern individual « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Thomas Pfau’s presentation of modernity in Minding the Modern fails to incorporate both the sociopolitical dimensions of modernity’s emergence and its positive aspects. He sees modernity as the home of the “modern subject” of the Western world, or the “quintessentially modern, solitary individual” in his “palpable melancholy,” both “altogether adrift” and without “interpersonal relations.” (..) a challenge to those whom he sometimes calls the “modern apologists of secular, liberal, Enlightenment society.” -- Pfau draws upon a narrative which might be called the “middle age voluntarism to modern alienation theory.” This has many predecessors in the second half of the 20thC (..). The geopolitical situation in the 1980s and 1990s is one of the important features of the historical context of many of these narratives (..) a variety of intellectual assaults were waged in the Western world against what had become the dominant intellectual paradigm in the West. (..) Over the last 30 years (..) this critical diagnosis of modernity has become more precise; there has been a consolidation of the sources and arguments -- Alasdair MacIntyre, Michael J. Buckley, Charles Taylor, Colin E. Gunton, Stanley Hauerwas, John Milbank, Michael Allen Gillespie, and more recently David B. Hart, Adrian Pabst and Brad S. Gregory. Pfau’s Minding the Modern is a new contribution to this anti-modern diagnosis of contemporary Western culture and the modern individual. (..)some of the arguments can be found in the French Catholic reform theologians of the early 20thC. There were also many German-speaking intellectuals in the 1920s and 1930s who were developing sweeping narratives that cast a dark light on modernity and thus, both implicitly and explicitly, called into question the rationale and legitimacy of the liberal political order. Pfau claims that his book does not provide one of these narratives (..). It does seem to be similar, however, to the classic decline-and-fall narratives. Even the essays at the end of the book about “retrieving the human” are analogous. -- downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  reviews  modernity  modernity-emergence  reform-legal  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  theology  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Ockham  Luther  liberalism  self  alienation  18thC  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  19thC  Coleridge  transcendence  ontology  individualism  17thC  English_Civil_War  religious_wars  religious_culture  Hobbes  20thC  21stC  declinism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Pluralism and consensus in the modern Western world vs Brad Gregory's "The Unintended Reformation" attack on "hyperpluralism" « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2013
Gregory's "hyperpluralism" is MacIntyre-eque - there's no longer a shared notion of the summum bonnum. This anti-modernity can't tell the difference between liberal pluralism and the bogeyman of relativism. Peterson's response is one of the better since it accepts the basic frame of the need for some shared values -- "the structuring principles [for political and social life] of modern Western societies are not arbitrary assertions but rather principles that are connected with one another, interwoven with historical developments and representative of human life and ideals." He shows 8 points of "soft consensus" and ..."While it would be possible to claim that these points are not... what Gregory calls the “Life Questions,” [they] rest upon basic values that have correlations with views of the person and conceptions of the good." -- "The entire Western world has agreed (1) to live with a modern democratic political order, (2) to enforce concepts of unalienable human rights, (3) to uphold the rule of law, and (4) to secure the separation of powers. (...) the high view of the individual, and thus the high view of that individual’s opinion, is presumed [...and is also a] 5th point. (...) There are many other values which follow from the high view of the individual (...) they presume the value of freedom.. [which is both...] a presupposition of 3 and 4 and a 6th point. (...) The law is a concrete representation of the norms and regulations that are held to be not only equitable, just, and good, but also reasonable. The importance of reason and rational justification therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the rule of law, but also as [a] 7th point. (...) [The] idea of the separation of powers (...) [presumes] cooperation in the formal execution of power, administration, and management. A high regard for cooperation therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the separation of powers, but also as an 8th point. The most effective cooperation [depends] upon general agreements regarding shared goals and a basic goodwill between the cooperating parties."
21stC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  declinism  Thomism-21stC  modernity  intellectual_history  Reformation  common_good  Christendom  Christianity  theocracy  politics-and-religion  liberalism  rule_of_law  separation-of-powers  civil_liberties  human_rights  liberty  liberty-negative  liberalism-public_reason  liberty-positive  welfare_state  MacIntyre  Counter-Reformation  pluralism  relativism  good  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere, eds. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen (2011) — Social Science Research Council - Publications
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere (Columbia University Press, 2011) represents a rare opportunity to experience a diverse group of preeminent philosophers confronting one pervasive contemporary concern: what role does—or should—religion play in our public lives? Reflecting on her recent work concerning state violence in Israel-Palestine, Judith Butler explores the potential of religious perspectives for renewing cultural and political criticism, while Jürgen Habermas, best known for his seminal conception of the public sphere, thinks through the ambiguous legacy of the concept of “the political” in contemporary theory. Charles Taylor argues for a radical redefinition of secularism, and Cornel West defends civil disobedience and emancipatory theology. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen detail the immense contribution of these philosophers to contemporary social and political theory, and an afterword by Craig Calhoun places these attempts to reconceive the significance of both religion and the secular in the context of contemporary national and international politics. The essays comprising this volume include Habermas’s “The Political: The Rational Meaning of a Questionable Inheritance of Political Theology,” Taylor’s “Why We Need a Radical Redefinition of Secularism,” Butler’s “Is Judaism Zionism?” and West’s “Prophetic Religion and the Future of Capitalist Civilization.” Each chapter was originally presented as a talk at a recent symposium co-hosted by the SSRC, the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, and the Humanities Institute at SUNY Stony Brook. -- Excerpt from the afterword by Craig Calhoun downloaded pdf to Note -- the Taylor essay responded to at The Immanent Frame starting with Bigrami's paper
books  sociology_of_religion  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  politics-and-religion  political_participation  secularism  public_sphere  IR  IR-domestic_po  litics  Judaism  diasporas  exiles  Habermas  Taylor_Charles  Butler_Judith  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Recommended Reading Lists | A Common Word Between Us and You
More often than not, one’s understanding of a religion comes from sources which are either prejudiced or which do not have an authentic understanding of the religion. To really understand a religion, one must be able to view it as its adherents do. One should be able to enter the particular world-view of the religion and see through its eyes. This will enable us to understand the particular values, attitudes and behaviors that the particular religion recommends for its followers. It is in this light that a number of prominent Muslim and Christian scholars have kindly compiled recommended reading lists. Some of the reading lists have been compiled according to levels, others according to categories, while others remain as one list. It is hoped these lists will serve as a guide, lighting the way to a better understanding of each others Tradition. **--** Muslim Scholars -- Prof. Seyyed Hossein Nasr. -- Sheikh Ali Goma’a. -- Prof. Timothy Winter -- Dr. Joseph Lumbard. **--** Christian Scholars -- Dr. Mirolslav Volf -- Reverend William Sachs -- Dr Nicholas Adams -- Roland Schatz -- downloaded pdfs to Note
comparative_religion  religious_history  religious_culture  theology  Christianity  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-Greek_philosophy  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Ann Bach - (Re)placing John Donne in the History of Sexuality | JSTOR: ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 259-289
Interesting challenge to readings that ignore Donne's religion, his culture's attitudes towards women and sex, and the blatant misogyny in his verse -as well as the question what "heterosexual identity" would have meant for him since readers interested in modern sexuality have identified him as where we can start identifying with him as a "modern" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  social_history  gender_history  lit_crit  historiography  17thC  English_lit  Donne  poetry  sexuality  heterosexuality  identity  self  self-fashioning  theology  patriarchy  misogyny  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Seidler, review essay - Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority from Luther to Pufendorf | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Apr., 1993), pp. 551-569
Review of volumes in Cambridge University Press series of history of political thought classic texts (Skinner, Tuck et al series editors) -- Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority by Martin Luther; John Calvin; Harro Hopfl; *--* The Radical Reformation by Michael G. Baylor; *--* Political Writings by Francisco de Vitoria; Anthony Pagden; Jeremy Lawrance; *--* Patriarcha and Other Writings by Robert Filmer; Johann P. Sommerville; *--* On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law by Samuel Pufendorf; James Tully; Michael Silverthorne -- lengthy essay that discusses the works themselves and the political-theology issues emerging in the aftermath of the Reformation across the 16thC and 17thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvin  Calvinist  Absolutism  divine_right  divine_command  office  ecclesiology  religion-established  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_wars  scholastics  Filmer  Pufendorf  natural_law  Holy_Roman_Empire  Germany  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  secularization  Erastianism  resistance_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Della Rocca, review - Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide (2013) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 2014
Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 264pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780521111607. -- Reviewed by Michael Della Rocca, Yale University -- What explains the continuing power the Meditations has over us, its ability to shape our ways of philosophical thinking even today? As influential as Descartes' arguments have been, it is certainly not the rational compellingness of those arguments that gives the book its exalted place in philosophy. And while Descartes' departures from Aristotelian philosophy (to the extent that he broke with it) are historically and philosophically important, they do little to explain the lasting and powerful attraction of the Meditations. I will return to this mysterious power at the end of this review. But first I want to show how the many fine and well-selected essays in Karen Detlefsen's volume collectively confirm the widespread conviction that engagement with Descartes remains vital to philosophy. -- first rate group of authors, including Garber on Descartes's response to Hobbes's objections re substance
books  reviews  17thC  intellectual_history  Descartes  Hobbes  Locke  metaphysics  epistemology  substance  scepticism  cogito  perception  qualia  natural_philosophy  self  self-knowledge  self-examination  theology  scholastics  Aristotelian  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Francisco Rico - Pétrarque au partage de midi | Italique, VII, 2004, 9-26
Italique [En ligne], VII | 2004, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.124. **--** dans voi ch’ascoltate comme en bien des endroits de l’œuvre de Pétrarque – qu’il s’agisse de prose ou de vers, de latin ou de langue vulgaire –, «errore» constitue à peu de choses près un terme technique emprunté à la tradition stoïcienne pour désigner la falsa opinio qui trouble la vision du commun des mortels, alimente les « speranze », le « dolore » et les autres affectus ou perturbationes animi, provoque la désagrégation de l’esprit en « pensieri » aussi « sparsi » que les rimes venant les refléter. De toute évidence, Pétrarque apparaît ici comme un « altr’ uom » : il n’est plus ce qu’il était autrefois, il arbore désormais l’air grave du sage stoïcien et n’hésite pas à dénoncer les poèmes du canzoniere comme autant de rerum vulgarium fragmenta dans leur fond et dans leur forme, comme de vulgaires morceaux dignes du « popol » ignorant. Il ne s’agit pas ici d’une simple fiction plus ou moins placée sous le signe des précédents bien connus offerts par la littérature latine et les troubadours : à plusieurs reprises, l’illustre Italien dont nous commémorons le septième centenaire a voulu se convertir en « altr’ uom » et y est parvenu. -- J’aimerais attirer un instant votre attention sur un des moments décisifs de cette trajectoire passionnée et émouvante : ce moment du partage de midi où, à la croisée des chemins, déjà à l’âge mûr, Pétrarque résout les incertitudes qui l’avaient hanté durant ses longues années de formation et s’engage d’un pas ferme sur la voie qui le conduira à son plein épanouissement, à la fois en tant qu’écrivain et en tant qu’homme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  religious_history  14thC  Italy  Renaissance  humanism  Italian_lit  Petrarch  poetry  poetics  Stoicism  epistemology  epistemology-moral  perception  moral_philosophy  theology  self-examination  self-fashioning  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Unknowable Truths and Omniscience: A Reply to Kvanvig | JSTOR: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 61, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 553-566
The various attribute debates in analytical_philosophy tend to be piecemeal. They also often smuggle in positions on heavily debated issues such as free_will. Helpful pulling apart various threads of theism debates on attributes, determinism and theodicy -- didn't download
article  jstor  theology  Christianity  God-attributes  free_will  theodicy  cosmology  determinism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - God's Estate [Locke's theory of God's ownership of the cosmos] | JSTOR: The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Spring, 1992), pp. 69-92
This article defends John Locke's notion that the cosmos is owned by God and explores the ethical implications of such divine ownership. Locke's theory, recently revived by Baruch Brody, is modified and defended against criticisms leveled against it by Joseph Lombardi and Robert Young. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  theology  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  creation  theism  Plato-religion  soul  immortality  property  property_rights  God-attributes  obligation  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  Locke-religion  Locke-2_Treatises  cosmology  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - The Passibility of God | JSTOR: Religious Studies, Vol. 25, No. 2 (Jun., 1989), pp. 217-224
Responding to a recent book defending the thesis of the impassibility of God (eternally unchanging etc - reflecting the Platonic prejudice against change) he argues that the God of Christian theism must suffer, for theological and moral reasons. -- didn't download
article  jstor  theology  Christianity  Christology  soteriology  God-attributes  change-metaphysics  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Charles Taliaferro - Richard Swinburne, Providence and the Problem of Evil | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 197 (Oct., 1999), pp. 562-564
Swinburne, unlike Plantinga etc, admits there's enough of what we would term evil to require a theodicy from any Christian theologian or philosophers of religion more generally -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  find  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  theodicy  God-existence  God-attributes  creative_destruction  creation  agnosticism  theism  Christianity  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven D. Smith, review essay - Discourse in the Dusk: The Twilight of Religious Freedom? | JSTOR: Harvard Law Review, Vol. 122, No. 7 (May, 2009), pp. 1869-1907
Reviewed work(s): Religion and the Constitution — Volume 2: Establishment and Fairness by Kent Greenawalt -- Smith claims a millennium of tradition re church and state is unraveling (a la MacIntyre decadent tradition) and US policy and jurisprudence tends to ignore erosion of their fundamental justifications -- starts with Pope Gregory and Henry IV and investiture controversy -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  church_history  civil_liberties  freedom_of_conscience  tolerance  pluralism  secularism  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  legal_theory  philosophy_of_law  medieval_history  Papacy  Reformation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Diarmaid MacCulloch - Putting the English Reformation on the Map: The Prothero Lecture | JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 15 (2005), pp. 75-95
The essay examines how the international Protestant identity of the English Church came to be in tension with the later assertion of sacramentalist or Catholic values within it. It chronicles how the Reformation in England came to align not with Lutheranism but with Reformed Protestantism, and compares Henry VIII's reforms with contemporary Reformations in mainland Europe seeking a 'middle way'. Edward VI's Church is contrasted with the temperature perceptible in Elizabeth I's religious settlement - which nevertheless asserted Protestant values with no concessions to Catholicism. The anomalous role of the cathedrals in England is identified as a major source of the English Church's later deviation from mainstream European Reformed Protestantism, which itself produced attempts to recreate a Reformed Church in the English north American colonies. -- tackles branch of Anglican historiography that buries the Protestant Reformation aspects of the Church of England especially the 16thC -- didn't download
article  jstor  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvinist  Tudor  Henry_VIII  Edward_VI  Elizabeth  theology  ecclesiology  via_media  Catholics-England  liturgy  sacraments  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Ulrich Lehner, review - Jeffrey Burson, "The Rise and Fall of Theological Enlightenment: Jean-Martin De Prades and Ideological Polarization in 18thC France" | Theological Studies - 2011
Ulrich Lehner, Marquette University -- Published version. Theological Studies, Vol. 72, (2011): 99–101. ©2011 Theological Studies, Inc. Used with permission. -- Ulrich Lehner. "Review of "The Rise and Fall of Theological Enlightenment: Jean-Martin De Prades and Ideological Polarization in Eighteenth-Century France" by Jeffrey Burson" Theological Studies (2011). -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  theology  Catholics  Counter-Enlightenment  Jesuits  Jansenists  Parlement  Paris  scandale  philosophes  censorship  free-thinkers  religion-established  reason  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Trinitarian Thought in the Early Modern Era" by Ulrich Lehner in The Oxford Handbook of the Trinity (2011)
Ulrich Lehner, Marquette University -- Published version. "Trinitarian Thought in the Early Modern Era" in The Oxford Handbook of the Trinity. Eds. Gilles Emery, and Matthew Levering. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2011: 240-253. DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199557813.001.0001. Copyright © 2011 Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Used with permission. -- This article explores Catholic and Protestant Trinitarian theology from 1550 to 1770. It discusses various issues, from the mystical visions of Ignatius of Loyola to the Augustinian approach of Jonathan Edwards. It considers the growing variety of eclectic views and the influence of anti-Trinitarian thinkers, beginning with Michael Servetus and Faustus Socinus. It also highlights the rise of confessionalism and anti-Trinitarianism and the explosion of mystical theology during this period. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  theology  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  16thC  17thC  18thC  Trinity  anti-Trinitarian  heterodoxy  Jesuits  Augustinian  Edwards_Jonathan  Socinians  confessionalization  mysticism  Calvinist  Christology  soteriology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"THE INTELLIGIBLE CREATOR-GOD AND THE INTELLIGENT SOUL OF THE COSMOS IN" by Jason G. Rheins | Penn Dissertations
Advisors - Charles H. Kahn and Susan Sauvé Meyer, Paul Guyer -- When Plato discusses the World-soul, cosmic intellect (nous), and the Demiurge, he approaches them theologically, i.e. as being the subjects of an account of the nature of the gods, but few works in the last half-century or more have addressed the ‘players’ in Plato’s theology as such. -- I analyze Plato’s various accounts of those divine things that are immanent in the world of change (e.g. the World-soul) and those that are said to be transcendent intelligibles (e.g. the Forms and the Demiurge) in order to determine what Plato’s gods are, and what roles they play in his system. -- The invention of the World-soul is revealed to be Plato’s way of instantiating intellect in the cosmos in order to suit the demands of his natural and moral philosophy, while his esoteric account of the Demiurge resolves any tensions between his immanent theology and his metaphysics, and suggests, semi-literally, the role that timeless, intelligible goodness plays in organizing the sensible world of change. -- Rheins, Jason G., "THE INTELLIGIBLE CREATOR-GOD AND THE INTELLIGENT SOUL OF THE COSMOS IN PLATO’S THEOLOGY AND METAPHYSICS" (2010). Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations. Paper 184. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  religious_history  theology  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  creation  gods-antiquity  God-attributes  God-existence  immanence  transcendence  forms  ideas-theories  Plato  change-metaphysics  cosmology  good  time  timeless  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Two contemporary quandaries in legal theory provide an occasion for a revival of interest in natural law theories of law. First, the debate about legal indeterminacy has made it clear that law cannot function autonomously—as a self-contained set of rules—but requires a normative justification of judges’ decisions in hard cases. In addition, Steven D. Smith has persuasively argued that there is an "ontological gap" between the practice of law, which presupposes a classical or religious ontology, and legal theory, which presupposes a scientific ontology (i.e., scientific materialism) that rejects religious ontology. This article demonstrates how the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and the radical empiricism of William James support a new process theory of natural law. Under this theory, judges resolve legal indeterminacy by determining what maximizes the telos beauty—in accordance with the circumstances of the case and the social perfection possible within that society—rather than by relying on fixed, antiquated natural laws. Process natural law also closes the ontological gap by providing an ontology that unifies the moral insights of religion with the insights of modern science. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" HANDBOOK OF WHITEHEADIAN PROCESS THOUGHT (1st ed). Ed. Michel Weber and Will Desmond. Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag, 2008. 507-536. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  legal_history  legal_theory  natural_law  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  social_theory  process_theology  laws_of_nature  divine_command  divine_right  legitimacy  authority  Whitehead  James_William  moral_philosophy  materialism  reductionism  science-and-religion  theology  ancient_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  pragmatism  legal_indeterminancy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man ( 3rd edition 2000) - Online Library of Liberty
John Passmore, The Perfectibility of Man (3rd ed.) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/670> -- A reviewer of the original edition in 1970 of The Perfectibility of Man well summarizes the scope and significance of this renowned work by one of the leading philosophers of the twentieth century: “Beginning with an analytic discussion of the various ways in which perfectibility has been interpreted, Professor Passmore traces its long history from the Greeks to the present day, by way of Christianity, orthodox and heterodox, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, anarchism, utopias, communism, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary theories of man and society. Both in its broad sweep and in countless supporting reflections, it is a journey through spiritual scenery of the most majestic and exhilarating kind.” Thoroughly and elegantly, Passmore explores the history of the idea of perfectibility – manifest in the ideology of perfectibilism – and its consequences, which have invariably been catastrophic for individual liberty and responsibility in private, social, economic, and political life. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  intellectual_history  metaphysics  theology  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Early_Christian  Renaissance  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  German_Idealism  Romanticism  political_economy  psychoanalysis  utopian  anarchical_society  communism  Enlightenment_Project  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, eds. & trans. Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert - Online Library of Liberty
Christian Thomasius, Essays on Church, State, and Politics, edited, translated, and with an Introduction by Ian Hunter, Thomas Ahnert, and Frank Grunert (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1926> -- The essays selected here for translation derive largely from Thomasius’s work on Staatskirchenrecht, or the political jurisprudence of church law. These works, originating as disputations, theses, and pamphlets, were direct interventions in the unresolved issue of the political role of religion in Brandenburg-Prussia, a state in which a Calvinist dynasty ruled over a largely Lutheran population and nobility as well as a significant Catholic minority. In mandating limited religious toleration within the German states, the provisions of the Peace of Westphalia (1648) also provided the rulers of Brandenburg-Prussia with a way of keeping the powerful Lutheran church in check by guaranteeing a degree of religious freedom to non-Lutherans and thereby detaching the state from the most powerful territorial church. Thomasius’s writings on church-state relations, many of them critical of the civil claims made by Lutheran theologians, are a direct response to this state of affairs. At the same time, owing to the depth of intellectual resources at his disposal, these works constitute a major contribution to the broader discussion of the relation between the religious and political spheres. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Germany  Prussia  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  Lutherans  Calvinist  Catholics  confessionalization  religion-established  politics-and-religion  church_courts  tolerance  religious_culture  political_culture  Westphalia  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature [1646], ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum - Online Library of Liberty
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature, ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum, foreword by Robert A. Greene (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/900> -- An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature is a concerted effort to find a middle way between the two extremes that dominated the religious dispute of the English civil war in the seventeenth century. At one extreme end of the spectrum was the antinomian assertion that the elect were redeemed by God’s free grace and thereby free from ordinary moral obligations. At the other end of the spectrum was the Arminian rejection of predestination and assertion that Christ died for all, not just for the elect. Faced with the violence of these disputes, Nathaniel Culverwell attempted a moderate defense of reason and natural law, arguing, in the words of Robert Greene, that “reason and faith are distinct lights, yet they are not opposed; they are complementary and harmonious. Reason is the image of God in man, and to deny right reason is to deny our relation to God.” -- Culverwell clearly intended to respond to Francis Bacon’s call for “a temperate and careful treatise … which as a kind of divine logic, should lay down proper precepts touching the use of human reason in theology.” -- Although, unlike the Cambridge Platonists, he quotes or refers to Bacon’s writings frequently enough to indicate considerable knowledge and approval of the Baconian gospel, the spirit of the Discourse is basically at odds with Bacon’s plan for man’s intellectual progress. In his emphasis upon scholastic psychology and his indebtedness to Aristotle, Aquinas, and Suarez, as well as in his flourishing rhetoric and richly metaphorical style, Culverwell does not forward the Great Instauration.
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  theology  natural_law  English_Civil_War  Cambridge_Platonists  Calvinist  antinomian  Presbyterians  Arminian  reason  revelation  faith  religious_belief  Aristotelian  Aquinas  Suarez  Bacon  moral_psychology  obligation  religious_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne (2002)- Online Library of Liberty
Gershom Carmichael, Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1707> -- Carmichael was a Scottish jurist and philosopher who became the first Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow in 1727. His writings on natural rights theory, theology, and logic were very influential. [The volume has selections in each of the foregoing categories] -- since he wrote mainly in Latin, this edition is one of few ways to get access today to his thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
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