dunnettreader + theodicy   34

Matthew Sharpe - 1750, Casualty of 1914: Lest We Forget the preKantian Enlightenment | Academia.edu
Draft of chapter for upcoming Crisis and Reconfigurations: 100 years since World War 1 collection. Argues that philosophical understanding (or increasingly, study and reading) of the French, British and preKantian German enlightenments, their intellectual origins and ends, has been a retrospective victim of the European horrors set in chain by 1914, despite a growing volume of excellent, countervailing studies (by Rasmussen, Lloyd, Israel, Wade, and others) in the history of ideas.
Research Interests: Critical Theory, Enlightenment, and Philosophy of the Enlightenment
Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  neo-Kantian  critical_theory  historiography  historiography-postWWII  historicism  historians-and-politics  Early_Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Enlightenment-sceptical  theodicy  progress  Löwith  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  Blumenberg  historiography-19thC  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
William T. Lynch - Darwinian Social Epistemology: Science and Religion as Evolutionary Byproducts Subject to Cultural Evolution (Feb 2016) | Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective
Key to Steve Fuller’s recent defense of intelligent design is the claim that it alone can explain why science is even possible. By contrast, Fuller argues that Darwinian evolutionary theory posits a purposeless universe which leaves humans with no motivation to study science and no basis for modifying an underlying reality. I argue that this view represents a retreat from insights about knowledge within Fuller’s own program of social epistemology. I show that a Darwinian picture of science, as also of religion, can be constructed that explains how these complex social institutions emerged out of a process of biological and cultural evolution. Science and religion repurpose aspects of our evolutionary inheritance to the new circumstances of more complex societies that have emerged since the Neolithic revolution.  - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
sociology_of_religion  animals  theodicy  cosmology  gene-culture_coevolution  constructivism  intelligent_design  human_nature  transhumanism  imago_dei  intellectual_history  Darwinism  epistemology-social  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_ 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
William T. Lynch - Steve Fuller’s Account of Knowledge as a Divine Spark for Human Domination (pages 191-205) | Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences - April 2016
ABSTRACT: In his new book, Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History, Steve Fuller returns to core themes of his program of social epistemology that he first outlined in his 1988 book, Social Epistemology. He develops a new, unorthodox theology and philosophy building upon his testimony in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District in defense of intelligent design, leading to a call for maximal human experimentation. Beginning from the theological premise rooted in the Abrahamic religious tradition that we are created in the image of God, Fuller argues that the spark of the divine within us distinguishes us from animals. I argue that Fuller’s recent work takes us away from key insights of his original work. In contrast, I advocate for a program of social epistemology rooted in evolutionary science rather than intelligent design, emphasize a precautionary and ecological approach rather than a proactionary approach that favors risky human experimentation, and attend to our material and sociological embeddedness rather than a transhumanist repudiation of the body. - Asst Prof of History at Wayne State - 2001 Stanford book on early Riyal Society
theodicy  anthropocentrism  posthumanism  intelligent_design  gnostic  downloaded  sociology_of_knowledge  books  Innovation  Darwinism  risk_management  risk-mitigation  imago_dei  transhumanism  populism  social_costs  article  epistemology-social  norms  technology  social_contract  constructivism  sociology_of_science_ 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Romanticism, reflexivity, design: An interview with Colin Jager by Nathan Schneider « The Immanent Frame
Colin Jager’s reading of the British romantics places them at the center of debates about religion, secularism, and pluralism today. In The Book of God, he traces the ways in which design arguments for God’s existence — predecessors to the current Intelligent Design movement—were developed and discussed in British literature from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth. His interpretation challenges those in the habit of trying to disentangle the religious and the secular, in both the past and the present. Jager is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University and is currently at work on a second book, After Secularism: Romanticism, Literature, Religion - downloaded pdf to Note
interview  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  literary_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Romanticism  God-existence  secularization  English_lit  religious_culture  religious_belief  design-nature  creation  theology  theodicy  natural_religion  Deism  creationism  intelligent_design  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
The Gnostic Society Library and the Nag Hammadi Library - Introduction to Gnosticism
An Introduction to Gnosticism and The Nag Hammadi Library -- site has huge collection of etexts from Nag Hammadi, apocryphal gospels, background materials on Gnosticism through the ages - video lectures, some free (especially by the Bishop of the Gnostic Ecclesia, sort of weekly sermons) and for $, collections of lectures e.g. the Divine Feminine, the Arthurian and Grail cycle. Big emphasis on Jungian psychology, symbols etc. New Age reaching or getting in touch with the divine spark in each person - and developing, fulfillment etc. The etexts have explanatory materials that link to legitimate scholarship
evil  Jungian  bibliography  religious_history  monotheism  theology  imago_dei  mysticism  cosmology  church_history  Biblical_criticism  website  Kabbalah  archaeology  Christology  Biblical_authority  Early_Christian  manuscripts  Biblical_exegesis  late_antiquity  intellectual_history  heterodoxy  Biblical_allusion  Christianity  theodicy  gnostic  etexts 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Wireless Philosophy | Classical Theism 7 (Atheistic Arguments from Evil) | Wi Phi
Classical Theism 7 (Atheistic Arguments from Evil), Emeritus Professor, Philosophy, University of Toronto -- Last in series - Often it can seem like the existence of evil is incompatible with a good and omnipotent God. This video present an argument for that claim put forward by J.L. Mackie, and it examines the different ways that Classical Theism and Theistic Personalism respond to a version of it that concludes that there is no God
video  God-attributes  God-existence  philosophy_of_religion  theology  theodicy 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Job's Complaint in "Paradise Regained" (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 625-660 - reading Milton’s commitment to separation of church and state, against a renewal of an integrated political theology, as also a message for the individual's relation with approaching the reading of scripture -- looks like a link between her work on Milton in Wayward Contracts and her vocal program against reading imperatives of a political theology back into secularization history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  English_lit  17thC  Milton  Restoration  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Bible-as-literature  Job  New_Testament  theodicy  justice  justification  Satan  political-theology  secularism  freedom_of_conscience  temptation  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - The Poetics and Politics of Theodicy (2007) | JSTOR - Prooftexts
Prooftexts, Vol. 27, No. 2, Special Issue: Before and After The Art of Biblical Narrative (Spring 2007), pp. 211-232 -- If Exodus was the paradigm of revolutionary politics in the seventeenth century, Job was the book that most resonated in the Enlightenment, a period when political, aesthetic, and religious ambitions far exceeded their real powers. Poetry emerged as a central concern at precisely the moment when these limitations were realized, both as a vehicle for recuperating the Biblical text and for imagining a certain divine and political order. Job's theodicy provided a meeting ground for an entwined poetics and politics during the Enlightenment and, this essay suggests, today as well. The Enlightenment, I suggest, illuminates that version of Biblical poetry articulated by Robert Alter, backlighting it to show some of the political implications of a poetic Bible. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  literary_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  theodicy  Bible-as-literature  poetry  poetics  Exodus  Job  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Ronald Osborn - The Great Subversion: The Scandalous Origins of Human Rights | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Hopgood’s bracing critique of rights talk and his call for a less lofty, more pragmatic dispensation forces us to face the implications of the loss of theological anthropology for concepts of human equality and dignity. Can we have a rationally coherent, morally compelling, and historically sustainable discourse as well as a practice of humanistic values and human rights absent a “thick” metaphysical or religious framework, such as the one provided in the Western tradition for some two millennia by Judeo-Christian sources? Put another way, the question “Can we be good without God?” does not strike nearly deep enough. The urgent question is: Will we still be good to the stranger in our midst, or good in the same ways, once we have fully grasped the contestable character of humanism and once we have utterly abandoned the essentially religious idea that every person is made, in the enigmatic language of Scripture, in the image of God? It is a question that even committed atheists, for the sake of good atheism, should find worthy of consideration. -- balance behind paywall
books  reviews  human_rights  theodicy  teleology  cosmology  modernity  disenchantment  morality-divine_command  philosophical_anthropology  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  imago_dei  recognition  dignity  equality  foundationalism 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Karl Giberson (part 2 of 2) creating Adam, again and again - Peter Enns - June 2015
Today’s post is the second of two by Karl Giberson and is adapted from his newly published Saving the Original Sinner: How Christians Have Used the Bible’s… -- not clear whether they take up the first shock to the historical Adam centuries before Darwinism - discovery of the New World, and then moves toward scientific racism that debated whether humans were single or multiple species - and during same period, geology pushing back age of the earth far beyond an historically plausible frame for the literalist reading of Genesis
Instapaper  books  religious_history  Christianity  theology  change-intellectual  change-religious  creation  Adam  original_sin  theodicy  Bible-as-history  Early_Christian  Augustine  evolution  evolutionary_biology  cosmology  death  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_authority  science-and-religion  Darwinism  Fall  Genesis  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
T Dougherty & J McBrayer - Skeptical theists and the problem of evil | OUPblog Oct 2014
It seems that skeptical theism might invoke a kind of moral paralysis as we move through the world unable to see which evils further God’s plans and which do not. Skeptical theists have marshalled replies to these concerns. Whether the replies are successful is up for debate. In either case, the renewed interest in the problem of evil has resurrected one of the most prevalent responses to evil in the history of theism — the response of Job when he rejects the explanations of his calamity offered by his friends and yet maintains his belief in God despite his ignorance about the evils he faces. - See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2014/10/theology-problem-of-evil/#sthash.It seems that skeptical theism might invoke a kind of moral paralysis as we move through the world unable to see which evils further God’s plans and which do not. Skeptical theists have marshalled replies to these concerns. Whether the replies are successful is up for debate. In either case, the renewed interest in the problem of evil has resurrected one of the most prevalent responses to evil in the history of theism — the response of Job when he rejects the explanations of his calamity offered by his friends and yet maintains his belief in God despite his ignorance about the evils he faces. - highlighting themes fr their recent collection "Skeptical Theism" - kindle sample to Note
books  kindle-available  theology  theodicy  scepticism  Deism  moral_philosophy  Bolingbroke  philosophy_of_religion  atheism  agnosticism 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey K. McDonough, review - Justin E. H. Smith, Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // April 17, 2012
Justin E. H. Smith, Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life, Princeton University Press, 2011, 392pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691141787.
Reviewed by Jeffrey K. McDonough, Harvard University -- It is widely recognized that Leibniz's philosophical thought is deeply influenced by the mathematics, physics and philosophical theology of his era. Justin E. H. Smith's Divine Machines argues that many of Leibniz's most central philosophical doctrines are similarly bound up with the life sciences of his time, where the "life sciences" are understood very broadly to include fields as diverse as alchemy, medicine, taxonomy, and paleontology. Smith's groundbreaking exploration represents an important contribution to our understanding of both Leibniz's philosophy and the study of life in the early modern era. It is to be recommended to historians, philosophers, and historians of philosophy alike. Below I highlight four central topics in Smith's book, raising some reservations along the way.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  Leibniz  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  monads  causation  species  teleology  anatomy  biology  medicine  microscope  fossils  reproduction  theodicy  creation  mechanism  organism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeff McDonough's CV - Harvard University - Philosophy Department
Areas of Specialization: Early Modern Philosophy, History and Philosophy of Science. -- Areas of Competence:Medieval Philosophy, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion -- papers, conference presentations focus on Leibniz with some Berkeley, Hume
academia  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  philosophy_of_religion  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  causation  teleology  theodicy  Descartes  Spinoza  Hume  Malebranche  bibliography 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview - Jeffrey K. McDonough -Leibniz, Berkeley, Kant, Frege; bees, toasters and Julius Caesar » 3:AM Magazine - September 2014
Good overview of different approaches to Leibniz. Causation and relation of divine and creaturely activity - Scholastics, Berkeley, Malebranche, Leibniz. Difference between Malebranche and Berkeley’s idealism. Kant on refutation of idealism re Cartesian scepticism of external world.
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  Malebranche  Kant  substance  metaphysics  causation  teleology  theodicy  creation  mind-body  volition  mechanism  physics  philosophy_of_science  history_of_science  optics  idealism  scepticism  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Unknowable Truths and Omniscience: A Reply to Kvanvig | JSTOR: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 61, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 553-566
The various attribute debates in analytical_philosophy tend to be piecemeal. They also often smuggle in positions on heavily debated issues such as free_will. Helpful pulling apart various threads of theism debates on attributes, determinism and theodicy -- didn't download
article  jstor  theology  Christianity  God-attributes  free_will  theodicy  cosmology  determinism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Charles Taliaferro - Richard Swinburne, Providence and the Problem of Evil | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 197 (Oct., 1999), pp. 562-564
Swinburne, unlike Plantinga etc, admits there's enough of what we would term evil to require a theodicy from any Christian theologian or philosophers of religion more generally -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  find  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  theodicy  God-existence  God-attributes  creative_destruction  creation  agnosticism  theism  Christianity  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Carter - On Pascal's Wager, or Why All Bets Are Off | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 50, No. 198 (Jan., 2000), pp. 22-27
Short demonstration that if Pascal succeeds in showing it's rational to bet on a good god and lead a morally upstanding life, it's similarly rational to believe in an evil god and attempt to earn divine rewards by conducting our lives in the most morally repugnant way we can. - starts with a discussion of prior, less dramatic, objections to Pascal's Wager from e.g. Diderot onwards -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Pascal  religious_belief  God-existence  God-attributes  theodicy  universalism  comparative_religion  immortality  immorality  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  Diderot  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Alfred Caldecott - The Philosophy of Religion in England and America (1901) - Google Books
Downloaded pdf to Note -- interesting from standpoint of how he classifies the philosophical elements - e.g. lumps Bolingbroke with Berkeley and Butler, not with Deists or Hume - clearly doesn't see how similar Bolingbroke and Hume really were, unlike Warburton who grasped it; also doesn't sneer like Leslie Stephen -- a specimen of fin de siècle academic professionalization after the divinity training raison d'être and "vocation" of Anglo-American universities had evaporated
books  etexts  Google_Books  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_religion  British_history  US_history  reason  revelation  cosmology  God-attributes  God-existence  creation_ex_nilho  creation  scepticism  theism  Cambridge_Platonists  Locke-religion  Deism  rational_religion  natural_religion  materialism  mind-body  mind-theory_of  idealism-transcendental  subjectivism  Butler  Berkeley  Bolingbroke  theodicy  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  ecclesiology  Hegelian  British_Idealism  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  obligation  intuitionism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Schmidt - Adorno on Kant and Enlightenment (in 1959) | Persistent Enlightenment - June 2014
Re Adorno lectures on Kant 1st Critique - difference between Adorno’s treatment of Kant and ..German histories of philosophy .. which be traced back at least to Hegel, always saw Kant as a thinker who represented a *break* with the Enlightenment. .. By treating Voltaire and Kant united in an attack on “dogmatic” approaches to metaphysics, Adorno advances an interpretation of ..Kant and the Enlightenment that — like Cassirer — stressed the extent to which the Enlightenment was a European movement and that German thinkers were a part of it. ?.German universities were still home to scholars who, between 1933-1945 labored very hard to distinguishn the profound and German Kant from the superficialities of the French Enlightenment, the political stakes ..should not be minimized. ..Adorno concludes that 1st Critique and Candide ..were united in a common endeavor. --"...a catastrophe for the history of German thought ..the cliche that labels enlightenment ‘superficial’ or ‘facile’. ?..the effect of the Romantic, and ultimately theological, belittling of enlightenment was to ensure that much of the enlightened thought that flourished in Germany actually assumed the shape imagined by the obscurantists." -- "..I am ..using the term ‘enlightenment’ in the comprehensive meaning given to it in DofE... to describe the general trend of Western demythologization that may be said to have begun ..with..Xenophanes... ..to demonstrate the presence of anthropomorphism. ?.. objectivity, existence and absolute dignity have been ascribed to a whole series of assertions, doctrines, concepts and ideas of whatever kind, which in reality can be reduced to the products of human beings. ?..what the language of psychology would call mere projections, and since it is merely man that has produced these concepts from within himself they are not entitled to any absolute dignity." This “comprehensive” sense of enlightenment .. provides the project that the 1st Critique allegedly carries forward.
books  Adorno  intellectual_history  Germany  18thC  19thC  20thC  Kant  Voltaire  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  German_Idealism  Romanticism  Hegel  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  anthropomorphism  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  comparative_religion  metaphysics  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  theodicy  critical_theory  cultural_critique  Marxist  Nazis  bildung  irrational  rationalist  myth  reason  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
A. M. C. Waterman - Economics as Theology: Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations | JSTOR: Southern Economic Journal, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Apr., 2002), pp. 907-921
Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations may be read as a work of natural theology similar in general style to Newton's Principia. Smith's ambiguous use of the word "nature" and its cognates implies an intended distinction between a positive sense in which "natural" means "necessary" and a normative sense in which "natural" means "right." The "interest" by which humans are motivated is "natural" in the first sense, but it may not bring about social outcomes that are "natural" in the second sense. It will do so only if the social institutions within which agents seek their own "interest" are well formed. Smith provides a large-scale, quasi-historical account of the way in which well-formed institutions gradually develop as unintended consequences of private "interest." In so doing, he provides a theodicy of economic life that is cognate with St. Augustine's theodicy of the state as remedium peccatorum. -- interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  political_economy  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  Smith  theodicy  institutions  political_culture  economic_culture  economic_history  stadial_theories  self-interest  Augustine  natural_religion  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  commerce-doux  common_good  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Question of Certainty by John Dewey (1929)
Source: The Quest for Certainty (1933), publ. Capricorn Books, 1960. -- Chapter II - Philosophy's Search for the Immutable -- The failure and frustration of actual life is then attributed to the fact that this world is finite and phenomenal, sensible rather than real, or to the weakness of our finite apprehension, which cannot see that the discrepancy between existence and value is merely seeming, and that a fuller vision would behold partial evil an element in complete good. Thus the office of philosophy is to project by dialectic, resting supposedly upon self-evident premises, a realm in which the object of completest cognitive certitude is also one with the object of the heart's best aspiration. The fusion of the good and the true with unity and plenitude of Being thus becomes the goal of classic philosophy. -- Practical activity is dismissed to a world of low grade reality. Desire is found only where something is lacking and hence its existence is a sign of imperfection of Being. Hence one must go to passionless reason to find perfect reality and complete certitude. But nevertheless the chief philosophic interest is to prove that the essential properties of the reality that is the object of pure knowledge are precisely those characteristics which have meaning in connection with affection, desire and choice. After degrading practical affairs in order to exalt knowledge, the chief task of knowledge turns out to be to demonstrate the absolutely assured and permanent reality of the values with which practical activity is concerned! Can we fall to see the irony in a situation wherein desire and emotion are relegated to a position inferior in every way to that of knowledge, while at the same time the chief problem of that which is termed the highest and most perfect knowledge is taken to be the existence of evil-that is, of desires errant and frustrated?
etexts  Dewey  pragmatism  epistemology  ontology  Great_Chain_of_Being  Platonism  idealism-transcendental  Hegelian  evil  theodicy  certainty  desire  moral_philosophy  values  morality-objective  morality-conventional  moral_psychology  epistemology-social  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Hans Blumenberg: Former Reflections Enduring Doubt - Waggish (2009)
Very interesting discussion of Augustine, the medieval attempt to overcome Gnosticism which fails (nominalism and Luther put burden of evil on God) - modernity avoids theodicy dilemma by placing emphasis on man striving to overcome in this world rather than withdraw and place hope in salvation. In effect, "presume not God to scan, the proper study of mankind is man" -- The Legitimacy of the Modern Age covers a lot of ground, but one of the central theses, and the one that bears little resemblance to most prior theories of history, is this one: "The modern age is the second overcoming of Gnosticism. A presupposition of this thesis is that the first overcoming of Gnosticism, at the beginning of the Middle Ages, was unsuccessful. A further implication is that the medieval period, as a meaningful structure spanning centuries, had its beginning in the conflict with late-antique and early-Christian Gnosticism and that the unity of its systematic intention can be understood as deriving from the task of subduing its Gnostic opponent."
Christianity  Early_Christian  gnostic  Augustine  medieval_philosophy  Aquinas  nominalism  theology  theodicy  Pope  Essay_on_Man  modernity  progress  conservatism  Blumenberg  Schmitt  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Middle Knowledge [Molinism] - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
** Assumptions
** Scientia Media
** Objections to Middle Knowledge
** Rejection of Libertarian Freedom
** Libertarian Responses
** The Truth of Counterfactuals of Creaturely Freedom
** Objections to the Principle of Conditional Excluded Middle
** Molinist Responses
** Molinism and Determinism
** The Grounding Objection
** Molinist Responses
** The Usefulness of Middle Knowledge
** Viciously Circular
** Not True Soon Enough
** Molinist Responses
theology  theodicy  philosophy_of_religion  logic  modal_logic  God-attributes  free_will  Providence  Calvinist  Jesuits  Counter-Reformation  Genesis  creation_ex_nilho  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
William Lane Craig - Molinism vs. Calvinism | Reasonable Faith
Detailed explanation of where he differs with Reformed theologians, though both see themselves as generally following Westminster Confession
theology  theodicy  God-attributes  Providence  salvation  free_will  evil  Calvinist  Kirk  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
the theological mistake of divine omnipotence | Carol P. Christ
The “zero fallacy” is a term philosopher Charles Hartshorne used to explain the “theological mistake” known as divine omnipotence.  Hartshorne pointed out that if God is omnipotent, then God has “all” or “100%” of the power. If this is so, then human beings and all other beings have “zero” power.  But if we have zero power, then do we even exist?  It is hard to imagine what “existence” means if it is a quality attributed to beings with zero power to affect the world. In fact, if God has 100% of the power, then no being other than the divine being can be said to exist. This is what Hindus may mean when they say that the world is “maya” or illusion.
philosophy_of_religion  theodicy  God-attributes  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Tyron Inbody - RELIGIOUS EMPIRICISM AND THE PROBLEM OF EVIL | JSTOR: American Journal of Theology & Philosophy, Vol. 12, No. 1 (January, 1991), pp. 35-48
Focus on various process theologies with different definitions of God's attributes and standards for evaluating types of evils - one stream he sees from James and Dewey radical empiricism and their redefinition of experience -- looks like could be used for lit survey -- didn't download
article  jstor  philosophy_of_religion  theology  process_theology  empiricism  James  Dewey  Whitehead  theodicy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
books forged in hell etc: Steven Nadler interviewed by Richard Marshall » 3:AM Magazine
But that’s the fun of it: trying to figure out not only what Descartes or Leibniz or Malebranche or Spinoza meant to say, but also how they would or could respond to our reconstructions and critiques. I’m a big fan of the “what would/could/should dead philosopher x say about this?” style of doing history of philosophy, although there’s always the danger that it veers into anachronism.Incidentally, this is what I think distinguishes doing history of philosophy from doing intellectual history. We who do history of philosophy are philosophers, and have the philosopher’s interest in understanding and evaluating theses (for their truth) and arguments (for their validity or soundness). We want to know, for example, not only what Descartes believed accounts for the intentionality of mental acts, but also whether his explanation of this makes decent philosophical sense. Similarly, it is fascinating to examine the various aspects of Leibniz’s solution to the problem of evil, not so much as a species of Christian apologetics, but as a particularly good entry-point for understanding a rich and intriguing metaphysics.
EF-add  17thC  philosophy  intellectual_history  Spinoza  Leibniz  Malebranche  Descartes  metaphysics  metaethics  mind  theodicy 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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