dunnettreader + territory   9

Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  geography  bibliography  political_history  legal_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  ancient_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Augustine  Papacy  Holy_Roman_Empire  feudalism  Italy  medieval_history  Renaissance  city_states  citizenship  sovereignty  territory  maps  landowners  property  Roman_law  exiles  Absolutism  16thC  17thC  Wars_of_Religion  France  Germany  British_history  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR  IR_theory  colonialism  legal_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro - Special Section Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought? | JSTOR: Journal of Nietzsche Studies, No. 35/36 (SPRING-AUTUMN 2008), pp. 3-8
Guest Editors' Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought?(pp. 3-8) Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro. *--* (1) Beyond Peoples and Fatherlands: Nietzsche's Geophilosophy and the Direction of the Earth (pp. 9-27) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Nietzsche and the Neoconservatives: Fukuyama's Reply to the Last Man (pp. 28-47) Haroon Sheikh. *--* (3) (downloaded) Nietzsche and the Political: Tyranny, Tragedy, Cultural Revolution, and Democracy (pp. 48-66) Tracy B. Strong. *--* (4) The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the "Innocence of Becoming": Nietzsche, 9/11, and the "Falling Man" (pp. 67-85) Joanne Faulkner *--* (book review) Nietzsche's Political Skepticism by Tamsin Shaw (pp. 177-179) - Review by: Saul Tobias. *--* (long book review) Nietzsche and the Political. Thinking the Political series by Daniel W. Conway (pp. 207-216) - Review by: Herman Siemens [both Conway and Siemens are contributors to the special section]
journal  article  books  reviews  jstor  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  globalization  political_economy  political_culture  Strauss  mass_culture  nationalism  nation-state  territory  Europe  Eurocentrism  post-colonial  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative [eScholarship] (2007)
"National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative", Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2007), 293-317. -- Keywords: Nation, National Histories, Postnational, State, Transnationalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  nationalism  territory  globalization  history_of_England  historiography-Whig  historians-and-politics  groups-identity  memory-group  memory_studies  narrative-contested  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
The Difference that Nature Makes: Empire and Natural History in Contemporary Political Theory by Mauro Caraccioli :: SSRN
Contemporary political theory’s interest in empire seems bounded by its encounter and current fascination with liberalism. What role then, if any, does nature have in political theory’s turn to empire? In this paper, I engage the status of empire and nature in political theory, pointing to the difference that turning to the early modern Spanish encounter with nature makes in studying the history of political thought. I argue that in the early accounts of Spanish ethnographers, cartographers, and natural philosophers with the New World environment, one finds the origins of crucial debates over the boundaries of nature, society, and the formation of modern empire. Nature was not so much the setting, as it was the means through which modern imperial projects were made possible. My contention is that greater attention to the experiences emerging from Spanish naturalist writings contributes to further reconstructing many of the debates found at the origins of early modern political thought. Striking amongst these debates is the boundary between nature and society as marking the rise of modern civilization and science. The value added to political theory by turning towards these fields consists of broadening Enlightenment metanarratives on the origins of modernity, while carving out a space for first-hand accounts on early modern changes in nature-society interaction.
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  empires  Europe-Early_Modern  Spanish_Empire  ecology  nature  territory  environment  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Rollison - Exploding England: The Dialectics of Mobility and Settlement in Early Modern England | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Jan., 1999), pp. 1-16
Movement, change, uncertainty and unpredictability, the most obvious characteristics of English life between the Reformation and the execution of Charles Stuart, have been lost in the recent historiography of early modern England. From a post-colonial perspective, it is obvious that something very dramatic must have happened to turn three million English speakers into six hundred million and convert entire cultures to English ways of organising and thinking. Viewed from the colonies, England exploded during this period, and continued to explode for at least 350 years. Something very revolutionary must have been going on in England to make this happen. This paper explores the dialectics of movement and settlement in early modern England for signs of contradiction. -- impact on doing social history of postmodernism on thinking about geography, territory, "governmentality" reflected in archives that doesn't match lived experience, post-colonial insights -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  historiography  postmodern  postcolonial  social_theory  geography  territory  migration  social_mobility  political_economy  middle_class  peasants  labor  agriculture  gentry  colonialism  British_Empire  demography  emigration  population  urbanization  British_history  16thC  17thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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