dunnettreader + technology_transfer   23

Nile Green - The Love of Strangers: What Six Muslim Students Learned in Jane Austen’s London | Princeton University Press
In July 1815, six Iranian students arrived in London under the escort of their chaperone, Captain Joseph D’Arcy. Their mission was to master the modern sciences behind the rapid rise of Europe. Over the next four years, they lived both the low life and high life of Regency London, from being down and out after their abandonment by D’Arcy to charming their way into society and landing on the gossip pages. Drawing on the Persian diary of the student Mirza Salih and the letters of his companions, Nile Green vividly describes how these adaptable Muslim migrants learned to enjoy the opera and take the waters at Bath. But there was more than frivolity to their student years in London. Burdened with acquiring the technology to defend Iran against Russia, they talked their way into the observatories, hospitals, and steam-powered factories that placed England at the forefront of the scientific revolution.The Love of Strangers chronicles the frustration and fellowship of six young men abroad to open a unique window onto the transformative encounter between an Evangelical England and an Islamic Iran at the dawn of the modern age. This is that rarest of books about the Middle East and the West: a story of friendships. Nile Green is professor of history at UCLA. His many books include Sufism: A Global History. -- Intro downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  Industrial_Revolution  technology_transfer  Iran  Islam  London  Austen  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  networks-social  networks-information  British_foreign_policy  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Jan Lorenz, Fabrizio Zilibotti, Michael König - Distance to frontier, productivity distribution and travelling waves | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal - 19 November 2015
Received wisdom would make you think that you need lots of small firms that are innovating in order to push productivity in an economy. This column provides data suggesting that large firms with high productivity growth can act as technological leaders and supply the economy with a continuous stream of innovations. Overly strong patent protection can significantly reduce growth and increase inequality. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_growth  Innovation  technology-adoption  R&D  productivity  IP  technology_transfer  technology  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Ben Leo and Todd Moss - Bringing US Development Finance into the 21st Century | Center For Global Development 7/20/15
Part of the White House and the World 2016 Briefing Book -- Well-established European development finance institutions (DFIs) are providing integrated services for businesses...-- debt and equity financing, risk mitigation, and technical assistance. .. emerging-market actors — including China, India, Brazil, and Malaysia — have dramatically increased financing activities in developing regions such as Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa. As the needs of developing countries have changed, so has the political and economic environment in the US. First, traditional development dynamics are shifting rapidly from a donor-recipient aid relationship to win-win partnerships involving public and private actors. Second, most US aid agencies typically are not positioned to address many pressing development priorities, such as expanding economic opportunities in frontier markets. Third, the US development assistance budget has become increasingly constrained, with growing pressure to cut programs. Within this context, we assess the need for a modern, full-service US Development Finance Corporation and provide a series of options for how the next US president could structure such an institution consistent with bipartisan congressional support and budgetary realities. For such a USDFC, we propose below potential products, services, and tools; size, scale, and staffing requirements; governance structures and oversight functions; performance metrics; and capital structure models. We conclude with a notional implementation road map that includes the required US executive and legislative actions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  development  IFIs  aid  US_politics  public-private_partnerships  development-impact  development-finance  emerging_markets  FDI  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  US_government  US_politics-foreign_policy  fiscal_policy  cross-border  LDCs  World_Bank  IFC  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Kenny - Aiming High - setting the new Sustainable Development Goals -- Finance & Development, June 2015, Vol. 52, No. 2
2015 marks the deadline for the MDGs... And while it might come as a surprise to those in Japan, Europe, or North America, the past 15 years may have been the period of greatest progress in humanity’s quality of life. Not least, the available data suggest that we have seen the fastest declines in global child mortality and absolute poverty in recorded history. As a result, we have far surpassed the first MDG—to halve the number of people worldwide living on less than $1.25 a day. 2015 is also the starting date for the SDGs to be agreed at the UN this fall. These goals outline a vision of progress to 2030 covering poverty, health, education, security, the environment, governance, gender equality, and much more. ..at Addis Ababa in July this year will try to finance that new agenda. ... at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in December, countries will pledge to cut greenhouse gas emissions, with the hope of setting us on a path away from catastrophic global warming. A strong agreement in Addis Ababa and progress toward the SDGs depend on advanced economies’ understanding that the issue is not altruism but naked self-interest. In 2002, when rich countries ... discussed global cooperation to meet the MDGs, these countries may have asked, “What can we do for them?” This time around the process can only be seen as “What can we do for each other?” Even though developing countries need global ties to make progress, at issue now is not persuading cash-strapped OECD finance ministers to be a little less skinflint but tackling a set of global problems that can be resolved only with the support of the developing world. -- in F&D issue downloaded as pdf to Note
article  sustainability  development  globalization  global_governance  global_system  climate  environment  trade  trade-policy  trade-agreements  global_value_chains  SDGs  poverty  aid  health  OECD_economies  public_finance  public_goods  cross-border  tax_collection  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Love - OECD Report: Fostering Investing in infrastructure | OECD Insights Blog - 24 June 2015
According to the OECD’s Fostering Investment in Infrastructure, it’s going to cost a lot to keep the thrifty housewives across the globe happy over the next 15 years: $71 trillion, or about 3.5% of annual world GDP from 2007 to 2030 for transport, electricity, water, and telecommunications. The Newport railway was privately financed, as was practically all railway construction in Britain at the time, but in the 20th century, governments gradually took the leading role in infrastructure projects. In the 21st century, given the massive sums involved and the state of public finances after the crisis, the only way to get the trillions needed is to call on private funds. -- downloaded pdf to Note
report  OECD  infrastructure  infrastructure-markets  public-private_partnerships  project_finance  public_goods  public_finance  green_finance  green_economy  LDCs  emerging_markets  OECD_economies  energy  energy-markets  telecommunications  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  FDI  water  urban_development  public_health  economic_growth  economic_reform  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Dietz Vollrath - Mathiness versus Science in Growth Economics | Growth Economics - May 2015
Paul Romer created a bit of a firestorm over the last week or so with his paper and posts regarding “Mathiness in the Theory of Economic Growth”. I finally was… -- he talked with Moll re the Lucas and Moll paper that Romer has been going ballistic about -- Vollrath seems to think that theoretical models addressing growth-enducing technologies may need to consider monopolistic style competition in some markets, but in, e.g. peasants adopting higher yield techniques, a "price-taker" model might be appropriate -- but the crucial point is not the key assumption underpinning a model, but that it be framed and specified in a fashion that empirical research can be done to rule out some factors and gradually adjust and refine both theoretical explanation and empirical evidence -- very Popperian approach to interplay between theory and "falsification"
economic_theory  economic_growth  macroeconomics  scientific_method  technology  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  competition  monopolies  increasing_returns  Chicago_School  Romer  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan D. Ostry , Atish R. Ghosh , and Mahvash S. Qureshi - Managing Capital Flows in Frontier Economies | IMF Direct - April 2015
By Jonathan D. Ostry , Atish R. Ghosh , and Mahvash S. Qureshi  There has been a remarkable increase in financial flows to frontier economies from private… Enfin! Just 20+ years late. Nice roundup of various people (like Rodrik) thinking about all the variables, including what sorts of local institutional capacity (government and financial markets and institutions) are required for (1) absorbing different types of capital flows or (2) if a country wants to restrict flows in some fashion, to manage different types of restrictions. Additionally, there are challenges to the basic premise of encouraging capital flows to frontier markets -- these countries are more likely to be investment constrained than the unproven assumption that they're savings constrained. Macroeconomic impacts are also getting a closer look, not only the dilemmas of managing monetary policy and exchange rates -- e. g., FDI can be defeated if inflows raise the rate to reduce trade advantages. Since the biggest issuers from frontier markets tend to be the state, there's a big potential impact on sustainability of fiscal policy (to say nothing of corruption), and again the exchange rate impacts can be severe in both directions. The post is mainly an outline of an ambitious, multidimensional research program that's emerging among development economists, financial economists, macroeconomics in both the OECD countries and think tanks in emerging markets and the IFIs. -- finally the discussion has moved off the obsession with flight capital that took root in the 1980s and was the trump played anytime anyone questioned the happy-happy conventional wisdom of capital liberalization promoters.
economic_theory  macroeconomics  capital_flows  FDI  IFIs  IMF  capital_controls  fiscal_policy  monetary_policy  FX  FX-misalignment  neoliberalism  globalization  emerging_markets  frontier_markets  competitiveness  technology_transfer  infrastructure  development  financial_system  financial_regulation  financial_sector_development  financial_stability  banking  interest_rates  institutional_investors  institutional_capacity  institution-building  central_banks  governance  bibliography  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard N. Langlois - Knowledge, Consumption, and Endogenous Growth - January 2000 :: SSRN
University of Connecticut - Department of Economics -- working paper for Knowledge, Consumption, and Endogenous Growth. Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Vol. 11, No. 1. http://ssrn.com/abstract=257785 -- Abstract of article: In neoclassical theory, knowledge generates increasing returns-and therefore growth-because it is a public good that can be costlessly reused once created. In fact, however, much knowledge in the economy is actually tacit and not easily transmitted-and thus not an obvious source of increasing returns. Several writers have responded to this alarming circumstances by affirming hopefully that knowledge today is increasingly codified, general, and abstract-and increasingly less tacit. This paper disputes such a trend. But all is not lost: for knowledge does not have to be codified to be reused and therefore to generate economic growth. -- Abstract of paper adds -- This essay takes a skeptical view of the proposition that we are experiencing greater codification hand in hand with modern technology and economic growth. ... [and] an equally skeptical view ...that only codified knowledge, and never tacit knowledge, can generate economic growth. Knowledge can be externalized and made less idiosyncratic in ways that do not necessarily involve codification. Knowledge is structure. And knowledge can be externalized beyond an individual creator by being imbedded either in machines and other physical technology or in various kinds of social or behavioral structures that I will broadly call institutions. Using a wonderful 1912 essay by Wesley Clair Mitchell as a starting point, I examine, as a kind of case study, the way in which knowledge is embedded and shared in consumption -- an important and neglected aspect of the process of economic growth. -- Pages in PDF 38 -- Keywords: Tacit knowledge, Increasing returns, Growth theory, Knowledge reuse, Codification -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  institutions  institutional_economics  firms-theory  firms-structure  knowledge  knowledge_economy  know-how  public_goods  epistemology-social  technology  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  economic_growth  economic_sociology  Innovation  increasing_returns  bibliography  consumption  consumers  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones - Entrepreneurs, Firms and Global Wealth Since 1850 - March 2013 | SSRN
Modern economic growth diffused from its origins in the North Sea region to elsewhere in western and northern Europe, across the Atlantic, and later to Japan, but struggled to get traction elsewhere. The societal and cultural embeddedness of the new technologies posed significant entrepreneurial challenges. The best equipped to overcome these challenges were often entrepreneurs based in minorities who held significant advantages in capital-raising and trust levels. By the interwar years productive modern business enterprise was emerging across the non-Western world. Often local and Western managerial practices were combined to produce hybrid forms of business enterprise. After 1945 many governmental policies designed to facilitate catch-up ended up crippling these emergent business enterprises without putting effective alternatives in place. The second global economy has provided more opportunities for catch up from the Rest, and has seen the rapid growth of globally competitive businesses in Asia, Latin America and Africa. This is explained not only by institutional reforms, but by new ways for business in the Rest to access knowledge and capital, including returning diaspora, business schools and management consultancies. Smarter state capitalism was also a greater source of international competitive advantage than the state intervention often seen in the past. -- downloaded pdf to Note
economic_history  development  industrialization  institutional_economics  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  competition-interstate  globalization  industrial_policy  emtrepreneurs  diaspora  SMEs  technology_transfer  trust  access_to_finance  modernization_theory  business_history  firms-organization  downloaded  SSRN  Industrial_Revolution 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Rasmus Karlsson and Jonathan Symons - Making Climate Leadership Meaningful: Energy Research as a Key to Global Decarbonisation - Feb 2015 | Global Policy Journal- Wiley Online Library
This article revisits a number of familiar debates about climate change mitigation yet draws some unorthodox conclusions. First, that progress towards a renewable small-scale energy future in environmentally conscious countries such as Germany and Sweden may take the world as a whole further away from climate stability by reducing the political pressure to finance breakthrough innovation. Second, that without such game-changing innovations, developing countries will continue to deploy whatever technologies are domestically available, scalable and affordable, including thermal coal power in most instances. Third and finally, that as any realistic hope of achieving climate stability hinges on the innovation of breakthrough technologies, the urgency of climate change calls not so much for the domestic deployment of existing energy technologies but rather a concentrated effort to develop technologies that will be adopted globally. These arguments imply that national innovation policy, and an international treaty establishing a ‘Low-Emissions Technology Commitment’ should be the central focus of climate policy. -- added to Wiley profile
article  paywall  Wiley  global_governance  energy  climate  technology  Innovation  technology-adoption  technology_transfer  green_finance  development  IR  IR-domestic_politics  economic_growth  IP-global_governance  innovation-government_policy  industrial_policy  industrialization 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Rajiv Sethi: Innovation, Scaling, and the Industrial Commons - July 2010
When Yves Smith makes a strong reading recommendation, I usually take notice. Today she directed her readers to an article by Andy Grove calling for drastic changes in American policy towards innovation, scaling, and job creation in manufacturing. The piece is long, detailed and worth reading in full, but the central point is this: an economy that innovates prolifically but consistently exports its jobs to lower cost overseas locations will eventually lose not only its capacity for mass production, but eventually also its capacity for innovation: - interesting discussion in updates and comments
US_economy  US_politics  Labor_markets  unemployment  trade-policy  trade-theory  off-shoring  manufacturing  Innovation  technology  technology_transfer  industrial_policy 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Liam Brunt - Mechanical Innovation in the Industrial Revolution: The Case of Plough Design | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), pp. 444-477
Variations in levels of embodied technology generated variations in English plough prices in 1770. Using plough prices as a quality index, this article explains size and daily output of plough teams. It shows that variations in plough technology were due to technological change-not static optimization-and village plough technology was influenced by neighbouring villages. But technological advance was not constrained on the demand size: farmers purchased the best ploughs available. Rather, local supply of technology was the limiting factor. Technological change, urbanization, and information networks are rejected as explanations of local supply of technology. The key factor was market density. -- excellent bibliography on agrarian "revolution" in England and comparative -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  18thC  19thC  British_history  agriculture  agrarian_capitalism  technology  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Home - UNEP Division of Global Environment Facility Coordination (DGEF)
UNEP is an Implementing Agency of the GEF with the World Bank and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and is the only GEF Agency whose core business is the environment. UNEP plays a key role in supporting countries to develop and execute GEF projects that fit within its comparative advantage. UNEP’s comparative advantage within the GEF has been defined as: ** Scientific assessments, monitoring, early warning; ** Linking science to policy (Capacity Building, Enabling Activities) at national, regional and global levels; ** Innovation, technology transfer and lifting barriers; ** Regional and global cooperation; ** Awareness raising, advocacy, and Knowledge Management
website  UN  UNEP  World_Bank  UNDP  green_economy  green_finance  climate  environment  technology_transfer  technical_assistance  institution-building  global_governance 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lant Pritchett -The Politics of Penurious Poverty Lines (Part II) Strange Bedfellows | Center For Global Development September 2014
Re unholy alliance in US, Europe and Japan between advocates for the destitute, fiscal realists and post-materialists -- I argue the success of the "advocates for the destitute" is the result of a coalition of strange bedfellows that actually bring the political heft in rich countries and use the rhetoric of the "advocates" as cover. The fiscal realists and post-materialists like penurious poverty lines not because they put more attention on the poor [the advocates' rationalization of using the poorest of the poor as a PR target], but because they take income gains to everyone else off the table by making a small deal of big differences in incomes between the “middle class” in Ethiopia or India and those of the rich countries. Reframing the “center” of the development agenda around an arbitrary poverty measure that eliminates 5 billion people from “development” is a political master-stroke for the fiscal realists. The advocates of penurious poverty lines create political space for fiscal realists to posture as “pro-development” (and not just hard-hearted or fiscally strapped) while arguing that “development assistance” hasn’t gone to “the poor” (by this new arbitrary measure) and hence with “focus,” agencies need less resources. “Extreme poverty” is a boon for post-materialists in promoting their goals as it manages to take the concerns of large majorities in developing countries in favor of rapid material progress (prioritized at their existing material conditions over other legitimate goals) off the table as their income gains don’t “count” as development progress as they are not “poor.”
post-2015_agenda  development  poverty  global_governance  emerging_markets  OECD_economies  aid  conservatism  values  environment  sustainability  welfare  technical_assistance  technology_transfer  middle_class  international_organizations  UN 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rostam J. Neuwirth - The Creative Industries as a New Paradigm for Business and Law: Of 'Smart Phones' and 'Smarter Regulation' :: SSRN June 13, 2014
University of Macau - Faculty of Law, E32 -- Fourth Biennial Global conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/05. **--** From a macroeconomic perspective, the historical evolution of trade and commerce has been closely entangled in a two-way or paradoxical relationship with the evolution of laws, where one is inextricably linked to the other and both mutually influence each other. At the microeconomic level, the same can be said about the relationship between businesses or industries and their underlying technologies. Recent changes, and notably the accelerated pace by which we recognize change, has led to a widespread trend of “convergence”. Convergence has been recognised in different contexts, namely in languages, technologies, and industries as well as regulatory matters. The objective of this article is thus to first trace and describe convergence from a linguistic, technological and industrial perspective. Subsequently, in order to ponder the future regulatory challenges in the regulation of global trade under the aegis of the World Trade Organization (WTO), it will focus on the question of whether technological and industrial convergence should be met by a similar trend towards regulatory convergence through regulatory harmonisation. Put differently, it will critically evaluate the present situation of regulatory divergence in the form of regulatory diversity and regulatory competition with a view of contributing to the debate of improving global trade regulation in the 21st century. - Number of Pages: 21 -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  WTO  regulation  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  technocracy  accountability  public_policy  legal_culture  regulation-harmonization  technology  technology_transfer  economic_culture  creative_economy  political_participation  globalization  global_system  manufacturing  production  change-social  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Locknie Hsu - Convergence, Divergence, and Regulatory Tension - An Asian Perspective :: SSRN September 5, 2014
Singapore Management University - School of Law -- Singapore Management University School of Law Research Paper No. 30/201 -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL), pp 2-14, June 2014, Working Paper No. 2014/13. *--* Regulatory issues relating to public health, including regulation of access to medicines and tobacco control have increasingly been the source of tension in recent trade and investment negotiations, treaties and disputes. The ongoing Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations, which include a number of developing Asian states, are an example that brings some of these issues to the fore and show a divergence of negotiating views. The intersection between public health regulation and trade and investment treaties has given some Asian states significant pause for thought; -- This intersection and resulting tension have led the WTO, WHO and WIPO to work together in an unprecedented manner to address some of the issues at the global level. The law evolving around these issues is demonstrating a deep divergence, in the manner that related disputes are being handled, and in terms of regulatory as well as negotiating stances. As an example, the debate on access to medicines demonstrates a divergence of approaches and proposed global solutions, as numerous proposals for reform of the existing construct (comprising patents and their “progeny” in the form of related commercial rights) are canvassed. Meanwhile, some countries such as India have begun to move ahead to embrace solutions such as compulsory licensing. -- It is suggested that a convergence of purpose(s) is needed, for a convergence of solutions to be found. Until then, the current divergences will continue to feed regulatory tension. -- Keywords: Convergence, divergence, trade, investment, public health, tobacco, pharmceuticals, FTAs, Asia, ASEAN -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  Trans-Pacific-Partnership  Asia_Pacific  Asia  India  IP  convergence-business  technology  technology_transfer  Innovation  health_care  commercial_law  neoliberalism  FDI  trade-agreements  property_rights  public_health  public_goods  US_foreign_policy  US_legal_system  business-and-politics  investment  WTO  international_organizations  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
About MEP
The National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) works with small and medium-sized manufacturers to help them create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money. The nationwide network provides a variety of services, from innovation strategies to process improvements to green manufacturing. MEP also works with partners at the state and federal levels on programs that put manufacturers in position to develop new customers, expand into new markets and create new products. As a program of the Dept of Commerce, MEP is a nationwide network of more than 1,200 technical experts, - located in every state - serving as trusted business advisors, focused on transforming U.S. manufacturers to compete globally, support supply chain integration, and provide access to technology for improved productivity. MEP is built around manufacturing extension centers locally positioned throughout 50 states and Puerto Rico. MEP Centers are a diverse network of state, university-based, and non-profit organizations, offering products and services that address the critical needs of their local manufacturers. Each center works directly with area manufacturers to provide expertise and services tailored to their most critical needs, ranging from process improvement and workforce development to business practices and technology transfer. Additionally centers connect manufacturers with government and trade associations, universities and research laboratories, and a host of other public and private resources to help them realize individual goals.
US_government  business  SMEs  Innovation  exports  technical_assistance  productivity  manufacturing  technology_transfer  public-private_partnerships  nonprofit  supply_chains  education-training 
august 2014 by dunnettreader

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