dunnettreader + tech + ef-add   5

Future shape of banking - Time for reformation of banking and banks? (report) | PwC - 2014
Given the current economic climate, in particular the focus on the European Central Banks Comprehensive Assessment and the move to the Single Supervisory Mechanism, a working group from the PwC Response to the economic crisis in Europe (REcCE) network has developed a provocative point of view paper on the future shape and nature of banking services and of “banks” themselves. Future shape of banking outlines four key areas banks need to address in order to remain relevant, as we argue that the future of banking will look very different to what we see today and that while the need for banking services remains – traditional banks need to sharpen their strategic focus and regulators and regulation will also need to adapt.... adding up to a paradigm shift in the banking landscape. -- downloaded pdf to Note
international_political_economy  international_finance  international_monetary_system  banking  financial_regulation  financial_innovation  disintermediation  payments_systems  central_banks  tech  NBFI  liquidity  leverage  investors  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Talking Manufacturing and Its Wage Premium | Jared Bernstein | On the Economy
–Manufacturing has the potential to grow beyond its current size and employ more people in decent jobs, but we’ve got to get the policy right. –As per Susan Houseman’s work (link), manufacturing productivity is significantly overstated for a number of reasons , implying that the agriculture analogy is incorrect. For one, it’s largely driven by one relatively small sub-sector: the production of computers and electronic products. –Second, Houseman points to two problems with the way we count inputs that also biases up estimates of manufacturing productivity. First, we’re undercounting the quantity of imported intermediate inputs and thus overcounting value added. Second, when manufacturers employ workers from outside the sector, say from Manpower-type staffing services, that biases down measured sectoral labor inputs and further biases up value added. –Even in the highly productive computer sector, productivity-induced job loss is not obvious. Houseman again: “Productivity growth also may reflect improvements to product design that result from research and development activities. ... The reason employment in electronic computer manufacturing has declined by 41 percent since 2000…is not because the assembly process has been automated but because most computer assembly has moved to Asia.” –Despite rumors to the contrary, manufacturing still pays better than other jobs for workers with similar characteristics.
US_economy  productivity  manufacturing  wages  off-shoring  technology  tech  R&D  unemployment  statistics  links  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Why Microsoft Word must Die - Charlie's Diary Oct 2013
Lots of possibly useful remarks re integration of work flow across different apps -- eg 225:

Fascinating rant against Word, thank you Charlie ...

I just felt impelled to jump in and comment on the few mentions of importing Word files into Adobe InDesign. There is some confusion. InDesign can easily handle and manage and often fix wonky styling in Word files *on import* via a basic familiarity with its Word Import Options dialog box. You can strip out all styling info, strip it out but keep local formatting (like bolds and itals), map Word styles to InDesign ones or even have the Word styles overwrite ID ones (for insane people). You can manage embedded art, page and section breaks, even tracked changes, all from the dialog box.

This summer I authored a whole title on lynda.com on this topic (Using Word and InDesign Together) and spent many weeks deep in the bowels of Word 2011/Mac and Word 2013/PC (whose interface is so pale it resembles the White Walkers) to work out all the final fussy bits I wasn't sure of. Along the way I discovered some useful style-related features of Word that few users are aware of, like the ability to show a color-coded number map of which styles (para and char) are used where in a doc, or being able to easily highlight all "direct formatting" (local overrides) of the same type throughout a doc at once and so easily fixed at once. -- see comment for url
Mac  editing  apps  tech  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
CMAP: "Why do you use Microsoft Word?" - Charlie's Diary Nov 2013
Lots of interesting info re word processing apps, Markdown, cloud based collaboration, version control options etc -- eg comment 61 by Charlie -- 61:

If you're on a mac, one of the hidden gems in OSX (versions since 10.4, anyway) is a terminal utility called textutil. Textutil is basically a command line (scriptable) file conversion tool for word processing documents. And the formats it supports are: txt, rtf, rtfd, html, doc, docx, odt, wordml, and webarchive.

RTFD is an Apple embrace-and-extend of Microsoft's RTF: it's RTF in a directory (folder) with added image files. HTML in this case means conformant HTML 5, and it does a vastly better job of generating HTML from Word .doc files than Word itself does. ODT is OpenDoc, i.e. the format used by LibreOffice/OpenOffice, doc and docx are the Microsoft formats, and webarchive is Apple's container for HTML plus image files in a folder in a zip archive (as used by Safari/WebKit).
Mac  apps  tips  tech  editing  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Evgeny Morozov on Why Our Privacy Problem is a Democracy Problem in Disguise | MIT Technology Review
When all citizens demand their rights but are unaware of their responsibilities, the political questions that have defined democratic life over centuries—How should we live together? What is in the public interest, and how do I balance my own interest with it?—are subsumed into legal, economic, or administrative domains. “The political” and “the public” no longer register as domains at all; laws, markets, and technologies displace debate and contestation as preferred, less messy solutions.

But a democracy without engaged citizens doesn’t sound much like a democracy—and might not survive as one. This was obvious to Thomas Jefferson, who, while wanting every citizen to be “a participator in the government of affairs,” also believed that civic participation involves a constant tension between public and private life. A society that believes, as Simitis put it, that the citizen’s access to information “ends where the bourgeois’ claim for privacy begins” won’t last as a well-functioning democracy.

Thus the balance between privacy and transparency is especially in need of adjustment in times of rapid technological change. That balance itself is a political issue par excellence, to be settled through public debate and always left open for negotiation. It can’t be settled once and for all by some combination of theories, markets, and technologies. As Simitis said: “Far from being considered a constitutive element of a democratic society, privacy appears as a tolerated contradiction, the implications of which must be continuously reconsidered.”
21stC  tech  Internet  civil_liberties  civic_virtue  democracy  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader

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