dunnettreader + sublime   19

Hans Kellner - BEYOND THE HORIZON: CHRONOSCHISMS AND HISTORICAL DISTANCE | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
Historical distance presents more complex issues than simply evaluating the meaning of the temporal span between a point in the past and some moment present to an observer. The ordinary historical difference, which is horizontal in the sense that it evokes the notion of hermeneutic horizons, fragments uncontrollably when examined closely, resulting in what might be called a "chronoschism." The experience of encountering a historical painting by Botticelli provides an example of this fragmentation. This complication of historical distance reminds us also of quite different sorts of distance, including the depths of endless regression, and the elevation of the historical sublime. These various forms of historical distance present a challenge to the horizontal character of normal historical practice. -- of interest mostly for how he appears to use Akersmith, Hayden White, Foucault etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  postmodern  historiography  sublime  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
David Dwan - Edmund Burke and the Emotions | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2011)
Vol. 72, No. 4 (October 2011), pp. 571-593 -- very extensive bibliography -- Scholarship on Burke, his aesthetics, 18thC aesthetics more generally, Enlightenment Reason, moral sentiment, sentimental lit, etc -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  18thC  Burke  reason  emotions  sublime  aesthetics  sentimentalism  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  moral_sentiments  judgment-political  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-emotions  French_Revolution  Rousseau  Wollstonecraft  civil_society  bibliography 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - Fantasy and the Buffered Self - The New Atlantis - Winter 2014
If fantasy rose to centrality as a form of nostalgia for a day when the porous self was at least surrounded by other sentient beings rather than a dark and silent cosmos, it may now have become something else altogether, a kind of ultimate disenchantment where even our own selves are vacated in favor of a world prefabricated for us by others. This raises again that key question from American Gods: Is resistance futile? Is it simply the case that “all we’re facing here is a f — ing paradigm shift”? Or might there be forces of resistance capable of waging a “mighty battle” on behalf of human freedom?(..) we might take comfort from what seems to me the authentic core of the fantastic as a genre, as we see it from the standpoint of late modernity: fantasy may best be taken as an acknowledgment that the great problem of the pagan world — how to navigate as safely as possible through an ever-shifting landscape of independent and unpredictable powers who are indifferent to human needs — is our problem once more. (..) American Gods is an especially important text for this moment, because it rightly identifies technologies as gods and simultaneously sides with the older gods as being intrinsically closer to the proper human lifeworld. Imaginatively, if not in substantive belief, we are pagans once more. (..) We may choose to believe that we can buffer ourselves, protect ourselves against unknown powers. But that’s a kind of wager: if the powers are real, our disbelief won’t deter them. And it may be that certain powers profit from being disregarded or treated as mere fancies. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  SFF  religious_belief  religious_culture  gods-antiquity  technology  self  teleology  cosmology  modernity  disenchantment  sublime  humanism  Taylor_Charles  philosophical_anthropology  cultural_change  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc Fumaroli -- Le siècle des Lumières et la naissance du "néoclassicisme" | Canal Académie 2011
Interview (mp3) and article by Canal summarizing points he makes in his introductory essay for the exhibition catalog -- Marc Fumaroli intervient ici sur l’exposition "L’Antiquité rêvée: Innovations et résistances au XVIIIe siècle" qui se tient au musée du Louvre du 2 décembre 2010 au 14 février 2011. Elle illustre à travers un choix de plus de 150 œuvres majeures, la naissance du mouvement dit « néoclassique ». Ce retour à l’Antique fut principalement inspiré par la découverte et le retentissement des fouilles des cités antiques d’Herculanum et de Pompeï. Elles révélèrent à la fois la peinture antique et son contexte, le décor et le quotidien de la vie urbaine des anciens Romains. Nous suivons ainsi les grandes périodes correspondant aux trois principales sections de l’exposition du musée du Louvre, à savoir: I – Le RENOUVEAU du goût pour l’Antique 1730-1770 **--** II – RESISTANCES 1760-1790: Néobaroque – Néomaniérisme – Le Sublime **--** III – NEOCLASSICISMES 1770-1790. Avec, dans chaque section, beaucoup de courants et contre-courants. -- web page to Pocket, includes references to the catalog and related publications
intellectual_history  art_history  aesthetics  Renaissance  17thC  18thC  Ancients_v_Moderns  classicism  neoclassical  baroque  Rococo  painting  sculpture  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  archaeology  Pompeii  sublime  Winkleman  cultural_history  historiography-18thC  lifestyle  decorative_arts  books  museums  exhibition  audio  Pocket 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Kivy - The Possessor and the Possessed: Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, and the Idea of Musical Genius (Yale Series in the Philosophy and Theory) | Amazon.com: eBook
The concept of genius intrigues us. Artistic geniuses have something other people don't have. In some cases that something seems to be a remarkable kind of inspiration that permits the artist to exceed his own abilities. It is as if the artist is suddenly possessed, as if some outside force flows through them at the moment of creation. In other cases genius seems best explained as a natural gift. The artist is the possessor of an extra talent that enables the production of masterpiece after masterpiece. This book explores the concept of artistic genius and how it came to be symbolised by three great composers of the modern era: Handel, Mozart, and Beethoven.
books  kindle-available  music_history  art_history  art_criticism  literary_history  aesthetics  18thC  19thC  creativity  genius  Handel  Mozart  Plato  Longinus  ancient_philosophy  poetry  rhetoric  sublime  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert E. Wood, review - Vittorio Hösle (ed.), The Many Faces of Beauty // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
This work contains the conference papers from the first of three conferences at the Notre Dame Institute for Advance Study under the direction of Vittorio Hösle. The conferences were focused on what were previously known as three transcendental properties of Being: Beauty, Truth, and Goodness, respectively. The current volume contains the papers from the 2010 conference. -- The work is divided into five parts: 1. Beauty in Mathematics and Nature (four essays), 2. Beauty in the Human Mind and in Society (four essays), 3. Historicity, Interculturality, and the Ugly as Challenges of Aesthetics (three essays), 4. Beauty in the Arts (four essays: on painting, music, literature, and film), and 5. Beauty and God (one essay). Hösle devotes 18 pages to an ample introductory summary of the argument of each of the 16 papers. -- The Many Faces of Beauty provides stimulating approaches to the topic. We have a look at many different art forms and a look at beauty through history from many different perspectives. As we move into and through the twentieth century, there is a defocusing on beauty and a focus upon the sublime. Also, it is unusual to find reaction to Hegel, pro or con, appearing in several of the articles. But there is a new interest in Hegel today, especially in the circles that pronounced him dead. This work should pique that interest.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  aesthetics  beauty  sublime  Kant-aesthetics  Hegel  Neoplatonism  culture  taste  elite_culture  music  music_history  art_history  articles  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Sandra Shapshay, review - Emily Brady, The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature // Reviews // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // University of Notre Dame
Review good on cognitive dimension in Kant compared with Burke about which Shapshay has written zz In this book Emily Brady seeks to 'reassess' and 'reclaim' the concept of the sublime in order to show the continuing relevance of this aesthetic category for debates in contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought. This aim is important, and it is one with which I have great sympathy. In recent years the concept has been used, on the one hand, too liberally by postmodern philosophers who have stretched 'the sublime' beyond conceptual coherence, and, on the other hand, too little by Anglo-American philosophers who have largely forgotten this aesthetic category. ..sublime responses, especially to natural environments, are still with us today, and may be even more frequent than in former times given that "Places that were once distant and inaccessible have become much closer through adventure tourism and the like." In addition, Brady supports the claim that contemporary tastes in landscapes have not changed radically since the 18th century .... -- The book is divided into two roughly equal parts. In Part I, Brady aims to characterize the core meaning of the sublime by tracing its development from the rhetorical sublime of Longinus into a category largely of nature appreciation in the 18th century with the aesthetic theories of Addison, Gerard, Burke, and Alison (in Britain) and Mendelssohn and Kant (in Germany). In Chapter 4 she continues the narrative with subsequent developments of the category of the sublime affected by Schiller, Schopenhauer and British Romanticism. In Part II, Brady considers the relevance of this core meaning of the sublime she derives from the history of aesthetic theory for contemporary aesthetics and environmental thought, taking up the following questions. Can artworks be sublime in a non-derivative sense? What distinguishes the sublime from neighboring categories such as 'grandeur,' 'terrible beauty,' and 'wonder'? How does sublime response compare with an engagement with tragedy? And what is the relevance of the sublime for valuing the environment both aesthetically and ethically?
books  reviews  intellectual_history  21stC  aesthetics  environment  nature  sublime  art_history  art_criticism  18thC  19thC  British_history  German_Idealism  Germany  Addison  Burke  Kant-aesthetics  Schiller  Schopenhauer  Romanticism  Grand_Tour  analytical_philosophy  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel I. O'Neill - Burke on Democracy as the Death of Western Civilization | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jan., 2004), pp. 201-225
This essay concerns Edmund Burke's view of the civilizing process. It begins by developing Burke's revision of Scottish Enlightenment historiography from the perspective of his own earlier treatise on aesthetics. Here, the argument is that Burke saw Western civilization as guaranteed by two institutions, the "sublime" church and the "beautiful" nobility, that jointly produced the requisite level of "habitual social discipline" in the masses necessary for the "natural aristocracy" to govern. The article's central argument is that Burke saw the Revolutionaries' destruction of these two institutions, and especially their subsequent attempt to replace them with political democracy undergirded by policies of social and cultural democratization, as marking the literal end of Western civilization itself. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_politics  French_Revolution  counter-revolution  Burke  Western_civ  aesthetics  sublime  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  nobility  aristocracy  aristocracy-natural  domination  hierarchy  social_order  deference  political_culture  governing_class  elites  democracy  political_participation  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  Scottish_Enlightenment  civilizing_process  manners  politeness  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ronald Paulson - Versions of a Human Sublime - Discussion article for issue: The Sublime and the Beautiful: Reconsiderations | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Winter, 1985), pp. 427-437
(1) From the Sublime to the Political: Some Historical Notes (pp. 213-235) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Sociology and the Sublime (pp. 237-249) Judith Huggins Balfe. *--* (3) Plato's Performative Sublime and the Ends of Reading (pp. 251-273) Charles Altieri. *--* (4) Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime (pp. 275-289) Suzanne Guerlac. *--* (5) A Commentary on Suzanne Guerlac's "Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime"(pp. 291-297) Frances Ferguson. *--* (6) Gothic Sublimity (pp. 299-319) David B. Morris. *--* (7) A Grammar of the Sublime, or Intertextuality Triumphant in Church, Turner, and Cole (pp. 321-341) Bryan J. Wolf. *--* (8) Sublime or Ridiculous? Turner and the Problem of the Historical Figure (pp. 343-376) Andrew Wilton. *--* (9) Seascapes of the Sublime: Vernet, Monet, and the Oceanic Feeling (pp. 377-400) Steven Z. Levine. *--* (10) Declensions: D'Annunzio after the Sublime (pp. 401-415) Paolo Valesio and Marilyn Migiel. *--* (11) Fresh Frozen Fenix Random Notes on the Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Ugly in the Postmodern Era (pp. 417-425) Nathaniel Tarn -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  article  jstor  literary_history  lit_crit  intellectual_history  aesthetics  sublime  antiquity  Longinus  Plato  Plato-poetry  18thC  Gothic-fiction  painting  art_history  art_criticism  20thC  Modernism  avant_guard  postmodern  political_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Transcendental Aesthetics: The Language of Sense (Chapter 2) - Paul L. Sawyer - Ruskin's Poetic Argument: The Design of the Major Works (1985) | Victorian Web
Focus on Ruskin's first major work, defending Turner. Discusses Ruskin's mode of seeing landscape (Ruskinian sublime), starting with gestalt, then intense attention to detail and connections among them, with third stage the whole again but now informed by the energy in which the details create a whole that is a moment, extended by viewing, of divine nature. Distinguishes a Lockean empiricism that's limited to subject v object and extension by association with a more Aristotelian perception that grasps essences from surface particulars. The sort of hermeneutic circle from whole to parts to transformed whole breaks down a bunch of dualisms. Ruskin rejected the sublime as a useful aesthetic concept - confusion re whether experience of observer or character or feature of the object. Similarly imagination and artistic creativity weren't separately theorized by Ruskin.
books  etexts  19thC  Ruskin  aesthetics  art_history  art_criticism  English_lit  perception  painting  Turner  neoclassical  empiricism  imagination  sublime  Coleridge  Wordsworth 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Noah Heringman: The Style of Natural Catastrophes (2003)
JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 66, No. 1/2 (2003), pp. 97-133 -- discusses David Mallett 1728 poem as well as 1750s eartquakes
article  jstor  literary_history  history_of_science  18thC  Britain  nature  catastrophe  geology  style  aesthetics  sublime  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Michel Delon: Nicholas Cronk, The Classical Sublime. French Neoclassicism and the Language of Literature (2008)
JSTOR: Zeitschrift für französische Sprache und Literatur, Bd. 118, H. 1 (2008), p. 70

Enormous praise from Delon - what Boileau was really trying to do, and how the reactions played out in the 17thC, especially with the Ancients v Moderns, and echoed in emergence of aesthetic. Contrast with the je ne sais pas
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  France  French_lit  cultural_history  Ancients_v_Moderns  aesthetics  neoclassical  sublime  poetry  Boileau  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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