dunnettreader + socialization   13

PROUST, Marcel – À la recherche du temps perdu (Œuvre intégrale) | Litterature audio.com
Donneurs de voix : Projet collectif | Durée : 145h 18min | Genre : Romans
À la recherche du temps perdu est un roman de Marcel Proust, écrit entre 1908-1909 et 1922 et publié entre 1913 et 1927 en sept tomes, dont les trois derniers parurent après la mort de l’auteur. Plutôt que le récit d’une séquence déterminée d’événements, cette œuvre s’intéresse non pas aux souvenirs du narrateur mais à une réflexion sur la littérature, sur la mémoire et sur le temps. (Source : Wikipédia).
À l’occasion du centenaire de ce monument littéraire, retrouvez les sept tomes disponibles dans leur intégralité sur Littérature audio.com, ainsi qu’une sélection d’extraits :
- Du côté de chez Swann (+ une autre version du chapitre Un amour de Swann),
- À l’ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs,
- Le Côté de Guermantes,
- Sodome et Gomorrhe,
- La Prisonnière,
- Albertine disparue (+ une autre version du Chapitre 1),
- Le Temps retrouvé.
> Projet collectif, Danièle Jouffroy, Monique Vincens, Orangeno, Pomme, René Depasse
audio-books  French_lit  French_language  Proust  19thC  20thC  Fin-de-Siècle  pre-WWI  cultural_history  cultural_critique  France  WWI  social_order  socialization  elite_culture  hierarchy  Catholics-France  3rd_Republic  moral_psychology  morality-conventional  stratification  sexuality  homosexuality  French_intellectuals  hypocrisy 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Claidière and Dan Sperber - Imitation explains the propagation, not the stability of animal culture (2008) - Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Biological Sciences
For acquired behaviour to count as cultural, two conditions must be met: it must propagate in a social group, and it must remain stable across generations in the process of propagation. It is commonly assumed that imitation is the mechanism that explains both the spread of animal culture and its stability. We review the literature on transmission chain studies in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and other animals, and we use a formal model to argue that imitation, which may well play a major role in the propagation of animal culture, cannot be considered faithful enough to explain its stability. We consider the contribution that other psychological and ecological factors might make to the stability of animal culture observed in the wild. -- Keywords: imitation, cultural evolution, animal culture -- See addendum commentary "The natural selection of fidelity in social learning" in Commun Integr Biol, volume 3 (2010) -- Both downloaded to Tab S2
article  downloaded  imitation  cognitive_science  cognition-social  cultural_transmission  cultural_stability  social_learning  cultural_change  evolution-as-model  evolutionary_biology  evolution-social  evolution-group_selection  cultural_evolution  natural_selection  sociobiology  socialization  epistemology-social 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - All our needs are social | Global Inequality - August 2015
Branko Milanovic dismantles Harry Frankfurt's attempt to differentiate our "real" needs - where considerations of inequality purportedly aren't relevant, or even are counterproductive to our full self/realization -- and "social " needs where some consideration of correcting for those below some certain level is appropriate. It's a common but incoherent philosophical move -- I blame Rousseau!
inequality  amour_propre  economic_culture  self-interest  self-love  capabilities  inequality-opportunity  sociability  analytical_philosophy  socialization  Rousseau  bad_economics  authenticity  moral_philosophy  self-development  from instapaper
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Raymond BOUDON - LA RATIONALITÉ DU RELIGIEUX SELON MAX WEBER | JSTOR - L'Année sociologique - Vol. 51, No. 1 (2001), pp. 9-50
LA RATIONALITÉ DU RELIGIEUX SELON MAX WEBER - L'Année sociologique (1940/1948-), Troisième série, Vol. 51, No. 1 (2001), pp. 9-50 -- One of the most striking features of Weber's writings on religion is the frequency with which he uses the word rationality. This derives from the metatheory grounding in his mind the interpretative method. This metatheory asserts that the meaning to an individual of his beliefs should be seen as the main cause explaining why he endorses them. Weber's religion sociology owes its strength to this theoretical framework. His « rational » conception of religious beliefs does not imply that these beliefs derive from deliberation. They are rather transmitted to the social subject in the course of his socialisation. But they are accepted only if they are perceived by the subject as grounded. These principles inspire Weber's pages on magical beliefs, on animism, on the great religions, on the diffusion of monotheism, on theodicy or the world disenchantment. He shows that religious thinking cares on coherence, tends to verify and falsify religious dogmas by confronting them with observable facts. He develops a complex version of evolutionism, explaining the cases of irreversibility registered by the history of religions, but avoiding any fatalism. He rejects any depth psychology and any causalist psychology in his sociology of religion, the common rational psychology being the only one that can be easily made compatible with the notion of "Verstehende Soziologie", i.e. of « interpretative sociology ». Weber analyses the evolution of religious ideas supposing that they follow the same mechanisms as the evolution of ideas in other domains, as law, economics or science. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  sociology_of_religion  Weber  Boudon  rationality  causation  causation-social  religious_history  religious_belief  religious_culture  hermeneutics  social_theory  socialization  social_process  rationality-bounded  disenchantment  causation-evolutionary  psychology  mechanisms-social_theory  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Raymond Boudon - Utilité ou Rationalité (2002) | Scribd
21 page article -- Explains why "rational choice" fails as explanatory theory in lots of collective action, public opinion, game theory, etc. -- domains where decisions to act aren't based exclusively on instrumental, consequentialist, cost-benefit calculative, and egoistic (directly concerned with impact on self) forms of, and context for, reasoning. Boudon finds "rational choice" superior to hand-wavy explanations that are speculative "black boxes" -- e.g. (1) sociobiology or evo-devo that we're hardwired, (2) Kahneman and Tversky heuristics and biases -- fascinating observations but aren't explanatory, (3) social/cultural explanations such as "socialization" which are tautological or a black box that provide no mechanisms that can differentiate situations or variations in outcomes. E.g. in Roman Empire peasants were more likely to remain pagan and soldiers were more likely to be attracted to the new religion. "Socialization" doesn't explain why soldiers raised in the traditional religious milieu and belief system were more likely to change their beliefs. Great examples of how rationality includes cognitive processes dealing with (1) non-instrumental contexts - e.g. identification with communitarian concerns ranging from voting to immigration policies, (2) aligning actions with one's judgment of what's more likely "true" based on core beliefs and how one has learned to evaluate "evidence" [e.g. Swedes are even more likely to reject "lump of labor" than Americans!] (3) axiological reasoning, including norms of fairness that may be fairly universal (e.g. reaction to Antigone, ultimatum game) or specific to a culture (e.g. due process in political application of "rule of law") -- see article for his tripartite classification of rationality and types of cognition that "rational choice" rejects in its definition. He thinks Weber and Adam Smith got there before, and better than, Becker.
article  Scribd  social_theory  mechanisms-social_theory  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  rational_choice  rationality-economics  rationality-bounded  rationality  reasons  Weber  Smith  Becker_Gary  Simon_Herbert  fairness  community  identity  norms  epistemology-social  game_theory  altruism  cognitive_bias  cognition  cognition-social  democracy  citizens  voting  political_participation  collective_action  political_culture  public_choice  public_opinion  common_good  socialization  social_psychology  cost-benefit  self-interest  self-interest-cultural_basis  self-and-other  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Political Political Theory: An Oxford Inaugural Lecture (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-26 -- "Inaugural Lecture" for the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory. -- Political theorists study (1) political virtue, (2) political processes and institutions, and (3) political ideals (like justice, liberty, and equality). Since the time of Hume, Madison, and Kant, it has been thought that (2) is more important than (1), because maybe we can set up institutions that work for the general good whatever the state of virtue of the people... But in the revival of political philosophy heralded by Rawls in 1971, there has been great emphasis on (3) and not nearly enough on (2)... particularly in the UK. Chichele chair -holders G.A. Cohen and Isaiah Berlin focused almost exclusively on (3) -- with Berlin announcing that political philosophy was really just the study of "the ends of life." -- I argue for a reorientation of political theory teaching and scholarship back towards institutions -- particularly the normative evaluation of the political process and the exploration of institutional principles like democracy, representation, bicameralism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, federalism and so on. ..these issues should not be left to empirical or comparative politcial science, because they raise important and complex questions of evaluation that may be sold short by the pragmatic and consequentialist emphasis of empirical and comparative work. But political theory should respect the empirical study of institutions more than it does, and it should dovetail the normative and evaluative work that political theory involves with the understanding of institutions, processes, and practices that political science generates. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_science  human_nature  social_theory  institutions  government-forms  governmentality  constitutions  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  Arendt  Berlin_Isaiah  Hume  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  comparative_history  political_order  legitimacy  democracy  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  legislature  executive  judicial_review  justice  civic_virtue  dignity  egalitarian  rule_of_law  citizenship  education-civic  federalism  social_process  socialization  civil_liberties  Founders  Madison  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Epistemic Status of the Human Sciences: Critical Reflections on Foucault (2008) :: SSRN
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 279 -- Any reader of Foucault's corpus recognizes fairly quickly that it is animated by an ethical impulse, namely, to liberate individuals from a kind of oppression from which they suffer. This oppression, however, does not involve the familiar tyranny of the Leviathan or the totalitarian state; it exploits instead values that the victim of oppression herself accepts, and which then leads the oppressed agent to be complicit in her subjugation. It also depends, crucially, on a skeptical thesis about the epistemology of the social sciences. It is this conjunction of claims - that individuals oppress themselves in virtue of certain moral and epistemic norms they accept - that marks Foucault's uniquely disturbing contribution to the literature whose diagnostic aim is, with Max Weber, to understand the oppressive character of modernity, and whose moral aim is, with the Frankfurt School, human liberation and human flourishing. I offer here both a reconstruction of Foucault's project - focusing on the role that ethical and epistemic norms play in how agents subjugate themselves - and some modestly critical reflections on his project, especially the weaknesses in his critique of the epistemic standing of the human sciences. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 18 -- Keywords: Foucault, Nietzsche, human sciences, epistemology -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  social_theory  20thC  Germany  France  Foucault  Weber  Frankfurt_School  ethics  power  institutions  social_order  modernity  flourishing  social_sciences-post-WWII  epistemology-social  norms  socialization  self  morality-conventional  morality-critics  scepticism  agency  agency-structure  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Francesca Polletta, Pang Ching Bobby Chen, Beth Gharrity Gardner and Alice Motes - The Sociology of Storytelling | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 37 (2011), pp. 109-130
In contrast to the antistructuralist and antipositivist agenda that has animated the "narrative turn" in the social sciences since the 1980s, a more uniquely sociological approach has studied stories in the interactional, institutional, and political contexts of their telling. Scholars working in this vein have seen narrative as powerful, but as variably so, and they have focused on the ways in which narrative competence is socially organized and unevenly distributed. We show how this approach, or cluster of approaches, rooted variously in conversational analysis, symbolic interactionism, network analysis, and structuralist cultural sociologies, has both responded to problems associated with the narrative turn and shed light on enduring sociological questions such as the bases of institutional authority, how inequalities are maintained and reproduced, why political challengers are sometimes able to win support, and the cultural foundations of self-interest and instrumental rationality. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall
article  jstor  social_theory  narrative  narrative-contested  social_movements  political_culture  media  social_order  socialization  identity  structure  poststructuralist  symbolic_interaction  conversation  networks-social  institutions  memory-group  self-interest-cultural_basis  opposition  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark M. Blyth - "Any More Bright Ideas?" The Ideational Turn of Comparative Political Economy | JSTOR: Comparative Politics, Vol. 29, No. 2 (Jan., 1997), pp. 229-250
Review article - (1) Ideas and Foreign Policy: Beliefs, Institutions and Political Change by Judith Goldstein; Robert Keohane; (2) Ideas and Institutions: Developmentalism in Argentina and Brazil by Kathryn Sikkink -- The renewed interest in ideas as an explanatory category in political economy, particularly among rationalist and historical institutionalists, is flawed. This turn to ideas is theoretically degenerate; it treats ideas as desiderata, catch-all concepts to explain variance, rather than subjects in their own right. The two schools ask what stabilizes and what causes change, not what ideas are and what they do. The ideational turn taken by both rationalist and historical institutionalists is best understood as an ad hoc solution to the inherent weaknesses of their research programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  rational_choice  political_economy  ideas-social_theory  social_process  social_movements  socialization  sociology-process  institutions  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutionalization  IR_theory  international_organizations  development  Latin_America  political_change  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
E. K. Hunt - The Normative Foundations of Social Theory: An Essay on the Criteria Defining Social Economics | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 63, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2005), pp. 423-445
Two views of human nature underlie economic theory and any theory incorporating either view is not social economics. The first view sees human nature as metaphysically or genetically given. This view has difficulty giving differences in the structure and functioning of different societies any importance. The other view asserts that humans are entirely "created" by society. In this view, humans are merely malleable "stuff" which a society molds into "building blocs" appropriate to that society. Hunt argues that social economics lies mid-way between these extremes. Humans are "molded" by the social system of which they are a part, but that socialization is never total because humans are not "malleable stuff." There is a human nature that sometimes resists and occasionally negates socialization. Human nature is a complex set of innate needs and potentialities. Socialization creates "wants" the satisfaction of which may contribute to the satisfaction of the underlying needs, and leads to activities that develop to a certain degree the underlying potentialities. It is the task of social economics to identify those needs and potentialities and to formulate a "vision" of the fully developed human being. Hunt concludes that neoclassical economic theory is not social economics while the theories of Veblen and Marx are social economics.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  economic_theory  social_theory  neoclassical_economics  human_nature  socialization  rational_choice  Marx  Veblen  institutional_economics  capacity_fulfillment  eudaimonia  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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