dunnettreader + social_contract   41

David Ciepley - Beyond Public and Private: Toward a Political Theory of the Corporation (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article challenges the liberal, contractual theory of the corporation and argues for replacing it with a political theory of the corporation. Corporations are government-like in their powers, and government grants them both their external "personhood" and their internal governing authority. They are thus not simply private. Yet they are privately organized and financed and therefore not simply public. Corporations transgress all the basic dichotomies that structure liberal treatments of law, economics, and politics: public/private, government/market, privilege/equality, and status/contract. They are "franchise governments" that cannot be satisfactorily assimilated to liberalism. The liberal effort to assimilate them, treating them as contractually constituted associations of private property owners, endows them with rights they ought not have, exacerbates their irresponsibility, and compromises their principal public benefit of generating long-term growth. Instead, corporations need to be placed in a distinct category—neither public nor private, but "corporate"—to be regulated by distinct rules and norms. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
organizations  institutional_economics  corporations  corporate_citizenship  markets-dependence_on_government  article  corporate_control  institutions  management  public-private_gaps  bibliography  social_contract  liberalism  jstor  property_rights  downloaded  corporate_law  political_theory  managerialism  corporate_governance  corporate_personhood  firms-organization  property 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
William T. Lynch - Steve Fuller’s Account of Knowledge as a Divine Spark for Human Domination (pages 191-205) | Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences - April 2016
ABSTRACT: In his new book, Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History, Steve Fuller returns to core themes of his program of social epistemology that he first outlined in his 1988 book, Social Epistemology. He develops a new, unorthodox theology and philosophy building upon his testimony in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District in defense of intelligent design, leading to a call for maximal human experimentation. Beginning from the theological premise rooted in the Abrahamic religious tradition that we are created in the image of God, Fuller argues that the spark of the divine within us distinguishes us from animals. I argue that Fuller’s recent work takes us away from key insights of his original work. In contrast, I advocate for a program of social epistemology rooted in evolutionary science rather than intelligent design, emphasize a precautionary and ecological approach rather than a proactionary approach that favors risky human experimentation, and attend to our material and sociological embeddedness rather than a transhumanist repudiation of the body. - Asst Prof of History at Wayne State - 2001 Stanford book on early Riyal Society
theodicy  anthropocentrism  posthumanism  intelligent_design  gnostic  downloaded  sociology_of_knowledge  books  Innovation  Darwinism  risk_management  risk-mitigation  imago_dei  transhumanism  populism  social_costs  article  epistemology-social  norms  technology  social_contract  constructivism  sociology_of_science_ 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Duncan Kelly - Carl Schmitt's Political Theory of Representation (2004 ) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 113-134 -- As Pitkin suggested, political representation explores the way in which "the people (or a constituency) are present in governmental action, even though they do not literally act for themselves." This paper examines Carl Schmitt's "solution" to this quandary of political representation, which suggests that representation can bring about the political unity of the state, but only if the state itself is properly "represented" by the figure or person of the sovereign. I focus upon his attempted reconciliation of a starkly "personalist" and then Hobbesian account of representation that would justify support for the Reichspraisident under the Weimar Republic, with insights drawn from the constitutional republicanism of the Abbe Sieyes that placed the constituent power of the people at the basis of representative democracy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political-theology  representation  representative_institutions  sovereignty  exec_branch  17thC  Hobbes  corporate_personhood  Sieyes  French_Revolution  republicanism  people_the  collective_action  agency  20thC  Schmitt  Weimar  constitutionalism  constituent_power  social_contract  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn review of Larry Siedentop's Invention of the Individual" - Did Christianity Create Liberalism? | Boston Review
Very interesting re the (19thC) "French" approach to liberalism -- historicist stressing process, contingency. Contrast with Anglo-Saxon social contract that takes the individual as its (unexamined) premiss, as does economic theory based on satisfying individual preferences etc. LS wrote an important article on the French approach. So Moyn sees LS as working to update and revise Guizot. Problem is LS (and all those claiming Christianity the basis of individual "natural rights") can't explain how the next world focus of Jesus and Paul became a this-world focus with the role of the individual as foundational. Moyn critiques the steps LS takes starting with the moral revolution of Augustine and working through the Middle Ages.
theology  natural_law  France  Instapaper  liberty  medieval_history  political_philosophy  Augustine  Guizot  liberalism  social_theory  historiography-19thC  individualism  medieval_philosophy  reviews  EF-add  social_contract  Constant  books  natural_rights  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  Augustinian  kindle-available  19thC  from instapaper
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Cédric Rio, review - Pierre Crétois, Le Renversement de l’individualisme possessif: de Hobbes à l’État social Droit de propriété et intérêt collectif - La Vie des idées - 24 août 2015
Recensé : Pierre Crétois, Le Renversement de l’individualisme possessif : de Hobbes à l’État social, Paris, Classiques Garnier, 2014, 356 p.-- Mots-clés : propriété | libéralisme | solidarité | républicanisme -- En France l’idée que la propriété est un droit naturel émerge et triomphe au XVIIIe siècle, sous l’impulsion des physiocrates. C’est une telle conception que le mouvement solidariste critiquera un siècle plus tard afin de promouvoir l’État social. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  19thC  French_Enlightenment  Physiocrats  Hobbes  Locke-2_Treatises  Rousseau  property  property_rights  individualism  individualism-possessive  republicanism  common_good  solidarity  socialism  socialism-19thC  social_contract  social_movements  political_economy  political_press  economic_theory  liberalism  liberalism-19thC  welfare_state  natural_law  natural_rights  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Buckley Political Constructivism | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
(..) while our political actions are assessed against a normative principle, there is no criterion beyond the deliberative process by which the rightness of the principle is assessed; it is authoritative in virtue of being the outcome of a certain kind of deliberative process or a certain form of argument. Consequently, the challenge for constructivism is to explain the appropriateness of the process without appealing to any judgment that is supposed to derive from that process; for if the thought process relied on such a judgment to assess its appropriateness, it would assume the very thing it claims to construct. (..) a great deal of philosophical debate surrounds the appropriateness of the deliberative process, especially as it concerns the metaethical themes of justification and objectivity. (..) despite the extensive literature on the subject, there are 2 general formulations of political constructivism influenced by 2 historical accounts of practical reasons. The first is a deontological account of practical reason that is primarily associated with Kantian ethics. The second is a teleological account of practical reason that is primarily associated with social contract theory. The Kantian and social contract traditions, although offering differing accounts of practical reason, share much in common, and it would not be an exaggeration to cast constructivism as a contemporary attempt to explain the Rousseauian idea of moral freedom as acting on a law one gives oneself complemented by the Kantian idea that the law one gives oneself is out of one’s reason. Political constructivism tries to make this idea clear by identifying a compelling form of normative political analysis with easily understood criteria for thinking about political issues.
political_philosophy  20thC  21stC  metaethics  Rawls  Kant-ethics  Rousseau  social_contract  reason  practical_reason  justification 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob T. Levy - Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom - Feb 2015 - Oxford University Press
Intermediate groups-- voluntary associations, churches, ethnocultural groups, universities, and more--can both protect threaten individual liberty. The same is true for centralized state action against such groups. Levy argues that, both normatively and historically, liberal political thought rests on a deep tension between a rationalist suspicion of intermediate and local group power, and a pluralism favorable toward intermediate group life, and preserving the bulk of its suspicion for the centralizing state. He studies this tension using tools from the history of political thought, normative political philosophy, law, and social theory. (..) retells the history of liberal thought and practice (..)from the birth of intermediacy in the High Middle Ages to the British Pluralists of the 20thC. (..) restores centrality to (..) ancient constitutionalism and to Montesquieu, (..) social contract theory's contributions to the development of liberal thought have been mistaken for the whole tradition. It discusses the real threats to freedom posed both by local group life and by state centralization, the ways in which those threats aggravate each other.(..) the elements of liberal thought concerned with the threats from each cannot necessarily be combined into a single satisfactory theory of freedom. (..) it must be lived with, not overcome. -- 3 parts and an epilogue Against Synthesis -history in Part 2 -- 4. Antecedents and Foundations -- 5. The Ancient Constitution, the Social Contract, and the Modern State -- 6. Montesquieu and Voltaire, Philosophes and Parlements -- 7. The Age of Revolutions -- 8. Centralization in a Democratic Age: Tocqueville and Mill -- 9. From Liberal Constitutionalism to Pluralism -- only in hardback so far
books  buy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  liberalism  liberal_democracy  intermediate_groups  pluralism  central_government  liberty  ancient_constitution  social_contract  monarchy-proprietary  limited_monarchy  limited_government  associations  subsidiarity  feudalism  Absolutism  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Montesquieu  Voltaire  British_politics  France  Ancien_régime 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674 (2004) | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 111, No. 4 (October 2006), p. 1247
Derek Hirst, Washington University in St. Louis -- Reviewed work(s): Victoria Kahn. Wayward Contracts: The Crisis of Political Obligation in England, 1640–1674. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2004. Pp. xii, 370. $49.50. -- mixed review. -- he thinks she's on to a major way of looking how various metaphors were deployed and evolved in 17, with her readings of Hobbes and Milton 1st rate. She gets some facts and cites wrong when she strays out of her lane (cavalier not in the 17thC sense). But more damning is her lack of sufficient familiarity with Elizabethan and French discourses of romance, passions and bodies politic. Short -- didn't download
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  literary_history  17thC  Hobbes  Milton  British_history  British_politics  English_lit  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  English_constitution  republicanism  social_contract  emotions  passions  human_nature  moral_psychology  obligation  reciprocity  trust  interest-discourse 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Ian Ward - Quentin Skinner, Hobbes and Republican Liberty | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 8, No. 3 (September 2010), pp. 948-949
Overview of debates re different types of liberty, what relations between liberalism and republicanism, etc in both intellectual_history and political_philosophy in the decades after Skinner's Foundations in 1978. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  Hobbes  social_contract  liberty  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberalism  liberty-positive  liberty-negative  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  civic_virtue  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
JON GARTHOFF - LEGITIMACY IS NOT AUTHORITY | JSTOR: Law and Philosophy, Vol. 29, No. 6 (November 2010), pp. 669-694
The two leading traditions of theorizing about democratic legitimacy are liberalism and deliberative democracy. Liberals typically claim that legitimacy consists in the consent of the governed, while deliberative democrats typically claim that legitimacy consists in the soundness of political procedures. Despite this difference, both traditions see the need for legitimacy as arising from the coercive enforcement of law and regard legitimacy as necessary for law to have normative authority. While I endorse the broad aims of these two traditions, I believe they both misunderstand the nature of legitimacy. In this essay I argue that the legitimacy of a law is neither necessary nor sufficient for its normative authority, and I argue further that the need for legitimacy in law arises regardless of whether the law is coercively enforced. I thus articulate a new understanding of the legitimacy and authority of law. -- didn't download -- bibliography heavily classic modern and contemporary philosophers
article  jstor  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  institutions  authority  legitimacy  legal_culture  legal_validity  liberalism  social_contract  consent  reasons  enforcement  deliberation-public  Habermas  democracy  norms  normativity  obligation  Enlightenment  Locke  Mill  Rawls  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"LEGITIMATION" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- This article identifies 3 conceptions of legitimation - pre-modern, modern, and post-secular - -- Pre-modern conceptions of legitimation consider governments and rulers legitimate if they are ordained by God or if the political system is ordered in accordance with the normative cosmic order. Contemporary proponents of the pre-modern conception range from those in the US who maintain that the government has been legitimated by the “Judeo-Christian tradition” to those in predominantly Muslim countries like Iran that have constitutional theocracies. -- the prevailing modern conception of legitimation in constitutional democracies stems from the “consent of the governed,” which includes 2 principles of legitimation - democracy (or popular sovereignty) and constitutionalism (or the rule of law). The critical challenges to these principles include the internal challenges of identity politics and religious fundamentalism and the external challenge of globalization. The dramatic return of religion and the surprising rise of political theology are two prominent developments supporting a shift to a post-secular conception of legitimation and a new post-secular social imaginary. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "LEGITIMATION" Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Ed. Michael T. Gibbons, Diana Coole, & Kennan Ferguson. Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  legitimacy  authority  divine_right  divine_command  democracy  constitutionalism  consent  social_contract  rule_of_law  post-secular  modernity  secularization  secularism  constitutional_law  government-forms  accountability  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Locating Rousseau's Legislator in Social Contract" by Courtney C. Nussbaumer (2011)
Courtney C. Nussbaumer, Macalester College -- It is challenging to define precisely what role the legislator plays in Rousseau’s Social Contract; however, when viewed in light of the ancient guardians, the role of the legislator becomes less obscure. This paper pursues the similarities between Rousseau’s concept of the legislator and Plato’s concept of the guardian while also exploring the poignant differences between the two. One cannot help but notice their fundamental similarities such as the superior character and intelligence of the legislator and how each communicates with the people. Their ultimate purpose and legitimacy differs, however, in that the legislator plays a more esoteric role in his relation to the people to order to persuade them of his ideas. Conversely, the guardian’s purpose is one of enlightenment through reason; he never has to persuade anyone of anything. -- Nussbaumer, Courtney C. (2011) "Locating Rousseau's Legislator in the Social Contract," The Macalester Review: Vol. 1: Iss. 1, Article 4. Available at: http://digitalcommons.macalester.edu/macreview/vol1/iss1/4 -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Plato  Plato-Republic  Rousseau  social_contract  leaders  reason  legitimacy  lawmaker  downloaded 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Citizenship and Dignity (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-74 -- Theories of dignity have to navigate between two conceptions: the egalitarian idea of human dignity and the old idea of dignitas, connected with hierarchy, rank, and office. One possible way of bridging the gap between the two is to talk of the dignity of the citizen. In modern republics and democracies, the dignity of the citizen extends to a large sector of the population and connotes something about the general quality of the relation between the government and the governed. This chapter first explores Immanuel Kant’s account of the dignity of the citizen, and then it pursues the implications of the dignity of the citizen for modern society and modern theories of human dignity. Though the dignity of the citizen and human dignity are not the same concept, they are congruent in many respects and the former casts considerable light on the latter — in particular on the connection between dignity and responsibility and dignity and transparency in social and political relations. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: citizenship, contractarianism, dignity, human dignity, Kant, responsibilities, transparency -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  Enlightenment  modernity  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  citizenship  citizens  dignity  Kant  Kant-politics  Kant-ethics  egalitarian  rank  social_order  social_contract  responsibility  office  commonwealth  common_good  fiduciaries  accountability  governing_class  transparency  inequality  political_participation  political_nation  political_economy  political_culture  governmentality  power-asymmetric  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Consent in Contract Law (revised 2011) :: SSRN
Chapter in THE ETHICS OF CONSENT: THEORY AND PRACTICE, Alan Wertheimer, Franklin G. Miller, eds., Oxford University Press, 2010 -- Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-36 -- Consent, in terms of voluntary choice, is - or, at least, appears to be or purports to be - at the essence of contract law. Contract law, both in principle and in practice, is about allowing parties to enter arrangements on terms they choose - each party imposing obligations on itself in return for obligations another party has placed upon itself. This freedom of contract- an ideal by which there are obligations to the extent, but only to the extent, freely chosen by the parties - is contrasted to the duties of criminal law and tort law, which bind all parties regardless of consent. At the same time, consent, in the robust sense expressed by the ideal of freedom of contract, is arguably absent in the vast majority of the contracts we enter these days, but its absence does little to affect the enforceability of those agreements. Consent to contractual terms often looks like consent to government: present, if at all, only under a fictional (as if) or attenuated rubric. The article begins by a brief examination of the nature of consent, then turns to contract doctrines that turn on the alleged absence of consent (e.g., duress and undue influence); contract rules and principles (e.g., implied terms) that turn on hypothetical consent; the challenges to consent that arise from electronic contracting and bounded rationality, and theories of contract law that emphasize consent. -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  contracts  social_contract  consent  rational_choice  rationality-bounded  power-asymmetric  e-commerce  commercial_law  libertarianism  freedom_of_contract  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Edmund Burke, A Vindication of Natural Society (Liberty Fund ed.1982, ed. Frank N. Pagano) - Online Library of Liberty
Edmund Burke, A Vindication of Natural Society: or, a View of the Miseries and Evils arising to Mankind from every Species of Artifical Society. In a Letter to Lord ** by a Late Noble Writer, ed. Frank N. Pagano (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, Inc., 1982). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/850> -- Edmund Burke’s first work, originally issued anonymously in 1756 as a letter attributed to “a late noble writer.” The Vindication is a political and social satire ridiculing the popular enlightenment notion of a pre-civil “natural society.” -- downloaded pdf to Note for editorial apparatus
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_law  social_contract  state-of-nature  Burke  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: John Locke on Property (January, 2013) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Eric Mack discusses John Locke’s theory of property to which Jan Narveson, Peter Vallentyne, and Michael Zuckert respond in a series of essays and comments. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_economy  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  property  property_rights  social_contract  natural_law  natural_rights  state-of-nature  labor  landowners  landed_interest  lower_orders  reformation_of_manners  mass_culture  political_participation  popular_politics  popular_culture  public_disorder  public_goods  Native_Americans  colonialism  development  common_good  commons  liberalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters: Hugo Grotius on War and the State (March 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Fernando R. Tesón, a professor at Florida State University College of Law, explores what Grotius thought about the proper relationship between the laws of nature and the laws of nations, what limits (if any) can be legitimately and rightly placed on the conduct of states engaged in war, and what relevance his insights may have today. Responding to his essay are Hans W. Blom, Paul Carrese, and Eric Mack. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  human_nature  international_law  natural_law  natural_rights  natural_religion  property_rights  just_war  navigation  trade  colonialism  war  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  VOC  commercial_law  state-of-nature  consent  legitimacy  social_contract  sociability  self-interest  self-defense  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern [1947] - Online Library of Liberty
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2145> -- Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern explores the very roots of liberty by examining the development of modern constitutionalism from its ancient and medieval origins. Derived from a series of lectures delivered by Charles Howard McIlwain at Cornell University in the 1938–39 academic year, these lectures provide a useful introduction to the development of modern constitutional forms. -- Introduction states the "problem" beginning with Bolingbroke's definition of the Septennial Act and Whig abandonment of Revolution Principles, and Burke, Paine, arbitrary government and written constitutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  government-forms  constitutionalism  English_constitution  US_constitution  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  judiciary  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  Absolutism  representative_institutions  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  medieval_history  feudalism  monarchy  limited_monarchy  resistance_theory  social_contract  public_opinion  political_participation  reform-political  reform-legal  Bolingbroke  Revolution_Principles  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Burke  Paine  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue devoted to 50th Anniversary of Robert Heilbroner's "The Worldly Philosophers" | JSTOR: Social Research, Vol. 71, No. 2, SUMMER 2004
Quite a roundup of contributors -- From Solow on methodology to Haack on philosophy of science and epistemology, Warren Samuels, Jamie Galbraith, and several papers on intellectual_history, including parallels with Polanyi
journal  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  economic_history  economic_theory  economic_culture  capitalism  macroeconomics  social_sciences  epistemology  rationality-economics  institutional_economics  social_contract  markets  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Nadeau, review essay - Blaise Bachofen (dir.), Le libéralisme au miroir du droit. L’État, la personne, la propriété - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 249-253 | Érudit 
Christian Nadeau - Université de Montréal -- Ces auteurs, pour la plupart spécialistes de philosophie politique moderne, se sont penchés sur des notions fondamentales du libéralisme en les situant dans leur contexte théorique d’émergence. Sont ainsi passés au crible de l’analyse philosophique les oeuvres de Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, Bentham, Constant et Tocqueville, mais aussi, celles des auteurs associés au conservatisme, comme Burke ou Bonald. Dans son introduction, Blaise Bachofen explique les raisons pour lesquelles les textes rassemblés dans ce recueil se recoupent sur la notion de libéralisme normatif, et plus précisément de libéralisme juridique. La norme de droit propre au libéralisme permet en effet de rendre compte à la fois de sa dimension politique et de sa dimension économique. L’égal traitement de droit contient en lui-même les motivations morales des principes fondamentaux du libéralisme. -- Trois grandes notions ont été retenues pour expliciter le paradigme du libéralisme juridique : L’État, comme lieu des échanges et des protections individuelles ; la personne, comme sujet du droit et de la liberté ; la propriété, comme notion canonique du rapport de l’individu à lui-même et aux objets qu’il peut légitimement faire siens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  Locke-2_Treatises  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  Montesquieu  Bentham  Burke  Constant  Tocqueville  liberalism  property  property_rights  equality  civil_liberties  nation-state  utilitarianism  legal_system  counter-revolution  social_contract  legitimacy  public_opinion  political_culture  natural_law  natural_rights  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Mortimer, review - Charles W. A. Prior. A Confusion of Tongues: Britain's Wars of Reformation, 1625-1642 | H-Net Reviews - Sept 2012
His aim is to challenge interpretations of the civil war that prioritize one element of the English mixture and instead that religion, political thought, and law cannot be separated. ...he claims that it was the very confusion and instability that this mixture created, rather than deep ideological divisions, that led to the civil wars. ... “driven by a complex struggle to define the meaning” of the key religious and political texts. Prior argues that we have concentrated too much on the doctrinal divisions... we need to broaden our perspective to include issues of law, ecclesiology, and church history. Prior provides case studies demonstrating the interaction between these subjects. --...issue of religious conformity, which drew together questions of spiritual and temporal obedience; ...the ensuing debate fostered the creation of rival narratives of English religious history. These narratives are then examined in more detail ....the disputes over ceremonies in worship -- the role played by these different versions of history. The Scots had their own, self-conscious, history of ecclesiastical liberty which could be deployed against Charles; and the events of the late 1630s served to link in Scottish minds liberty and purity of doctrine. ....Charles’s position in Dec 1640, when the canons were condemned by the Commons, was weak. Prior’s focus, though, is resolutely on arguments rather than events, and the debate over the canons is, for him, ...an intensification of positions that had been current since at least 1604. .... the tension between the powers of the Crown and bishops, and the institutions of law and Parliament. ....further constitutional questions generated a plurality of narratives, exacerbating the problem. -- the efforts of two men to overcome this tension: Thomas Aston insisted that episcopacy was part of the English constitution, but Henry Parker refused to accept the legitimacy of custom and precedent. Instead he developed a more complicated argument, which, at root, linked authority to the consent of the governed. ?...neither of these attempted solutions worked, and the continuing instability led to war.
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  legal_history  English_Civil_War  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  historians-and-religion  historians-and-politics  historiography-17thC  historians-and-state  episcopacy  precedent  custom  legitimacy  consent  social_contract  monarchy  divine_right  apostolic_succession  authority  hierarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Rousseau (in 2 volumes, 1873) - John Morley - Google Books
This bookmark is to a reprint of Vol 1 in the late 1880s. The quality of the original edition on Google_Books is very poor. Unfortunately the reprint of Vol 2 isn't available on Google_Books. Check Hathi Trust or Internet Archive. Added to Google_Books library -- both 1873 volumes and the reprint of Vol 1
books  etexts  Google_Books  18thC  biography  intellectual_history  French_Enlightenment  Rousseau  Voltaire  d'Alembert  Diderot  Hume  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  Geneva  general_will  cultural_critique  cultural_history  music_history  social_contract  elite_culture  Paris  theater  Morley  EF-add  philosophes  libertine 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jacob T. Levy - Not So Novus an Ordo: Constitutions Without Social Contracts | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 37, No. 2 (April 2009), pp. 191-217
Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that binds individual persons together into a polity and sets fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. Yet something essential is lost in this slippage between social contract theory and the practice of constitutionalism. Contractarian blinders lead us to look for greater individualism, social unity, and coherence of principles than should be expected. Real constitutional orders appropriate, incorporate, and channel the histories and divisions of the societies they govern. Treating them as social contracts flattens and distorts them, making those engagements with the past or with social plurality appear anomalous and encouraging their minimization. Accordingly this article redirects attention to non-contractarian strands within constitutionalism's intellectual inheritance and lived practice. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  legal_history  legal_theory  constitutionalism  social_contract  political_philosophy  Bolingbroke  Hume  legitimacy  institutions  political_culture  individualism  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Frederick Neuhouser, review - Lee MacLean, The Free Animal: Rousseau on Free Will and Human Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
Two interpretive questions guide MacLean's study: first, whether Rousseau's ascription of free will to humans, especially in the Second Discourse, is to be taken at face value (rather than as part of an esoteric strategy to hide his "true" view from the masses); and second, what implications the ascription or non-ascription of free will has for interpreting his moral and political thought. -- most of book on No. 1, to counter Straussians esoteric reading -- The textual arguments offered here are deft and attentive to nuance, and, unlike most treatments of Rousseau by philosophers, they cover not only his three central philosophical texts, but also less studied works such as Reveries of the Solitary Walker. Chapter 3 contains one of the best extended treatments of Emile's "Savoyard Vicar" that I have read. -- Especially intriguing is the suggestion that the religious views expressed by the Vicar are to be read as playing a crucial role in The Social Contract's argument that a legitimate republic requires a civil religion. -- She demonstrates a sure and confident grasp of Rousseau's texts, including unpublished material. Even more impressive, she knows a surprising amount about the views of Rousseau's contemporaries and predecessors on the topic of free will - Buffon, Montaigne, and Condillac, for example - and she very helpfully brings this knowledge to bear on her carefully constructed interpretations of Rousseau. For this reason her book is a must-read for scholars interested in the historical context within which Rousseau's views develop.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  human_nature  18thC  Rousseau  free_will  self-love  self-interest  civil_religion  social_contract  Buffon  Condillac  Montaigne  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Pascal Emmanuel Gobry - What Is Citizenship? | Cato Unbound Sept 2013
National service debate - In his essay, Mr. Kuznicki is right to take me to task for being guilty of a bit of a sleight-of-hand, which is blurring the distinction between the Ancients’ view of liberty and the Moderns’. I confess to the blurring. First, because I think they are blurred – as much as we try to get rid of them, we can’t seem to be able to; less “great-grandfathers,” the Ancients are more older brothers, or perhaps Jiminy Crickets, to the Moderns.

And second, I think the distinction should be blurred. Mr. Kuznicki writes that “when the ancients wrote of liberty, they meant something like an obligation to participate actively in government.” I certainly agree that they thought it was part of it, but it is not reducible to that. It is perhaps more accurate to say that the Ancients thought of liberty as something like participation in a just moral order.
political_philosophy  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  social_contract  liberalism  libertarianism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  citizens  political_participation  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Dana Villa - Hegel, Tocqueville, and "Individualism" | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Autumn, 2005), pp. 659-686
Critics of liberal individualism have pointed out the many failures of "atomism" as a method in social and political philosophy. Their methodological criticisms have a tendency, however, to devolve into repudiations of moral individualism as such. In part, this is due to a misreading of Hegel and Tocqueville, two critics of individualism who nevertheless upheld the importance of individual rights and what Hegel called "freedom of subjectivity." My essay brings these two very different theorists together in order to show how each deliberately dispensed with the ontology inherited from eighteenth-century social contract theory, the better to focus on associational life and public freedom. The end result is not a relapse into the rhetoric of civic republicanism, but a refurbishment of that tradition from the standpoint of modern liberty: the liberty of the individual. This common project links Hegel, the idealist philosopher, and Tocqueville, the liberal-republican, in unexpected but complementary ways. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  liberalism  individualism  communitarian  community  liberty  18thC  19thC  Hegel  Tocqueville  civil_liberties  republicanism  neo-republicanism  civic_humanism  civil_society  social_contract  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy Stanton - Authority and Freedom in the Interpretation of Locke's Political Theory | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 6-30
This essay argues that many modern discussions of Locke's political theory are unconsciously shaped by an imaginative picture of the world inherited from the past, on which authority and freedom are fundamentally antipathetic. The consequences of this picture may be seen in the distinction made customarily in Locke studies between the 'authoritarian' Locke of Two Tracts on Government, for whom authority descends from God, and the later, 'liberal,' Locke, for whom authority arises from the will and agreement of individuals, and felt in the emphases placed on consent and resistance in most interpretations of Lockean political thought. The essay examines the composition and contours of this picture and, by holding up a mirror to contemporary Locke scholarship, draws attention to some of the ways in which it unwittingly distorts Locke's thinking. -- paywall Sage -- something similar in terms of binaries and ignoring different audiences in contemporary reading of others of the period including Bolingbroke
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  17thC  Locke  tolerance  liberty  social_contract  majoritarian  authority  Bolingbroke 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rory J. Conces - Consensual Foundations and Resistance in Locke's 'Second Treatise' | JSTOR: Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory, No. 91 (June 1998), pp. 19-33
Lots of references and useful discussion of tension between consent and individual rights - one of reasons for 18thC rejection of social contract theory that couldn't bridge contact and consent with ongoing legitimacy within political conflict and minorities
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  political_philosophy  social_contract  Locke  individualism  resistance_theory  legitimacy  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jimmy Casas Klausen: Room Enough: America, Natural Liberty, and Consent in Locke's Second Treatise (2007)
JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 69, No. 3 (Aug., 2007), pp. 760-769 -- This essay scrutinizes political obligation in the Second Treatise by analyzing the "natural liberty" Locke attributes to children, savages, some foreigners, and other tacit consenters. Both natural liberty and the voluntarism of consent require certain conditions to be actualized, one of the most important of which is "room enough": unoccupied space like that found in America in which it is possible to "exit" from the potentially coercive dilemmas of tacit consent and perhaps to originate a founding (express) consent. Insofar as consent and natural liberty rely on the availability of open space, though, Lockean liberalism justifies, maybe requires, settler colonialism.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Locke  17thC  Britain  British_Empire  colonialism  American_colonies  liberty  exit-voice-loyalty  social_contract  consent  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
David C. Snyder: Locke on Natural Law and Property Rights (1986)
JSTOR: Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 16, No. 4 (Dec., 1986), pp. 723-750 -- extends Tully's natural law analysis -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_law  property  property_rights  civil_liberties  social_contract  Locke  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Family Feud: Mark Weiner, The Rule of the Clan by Jeanne L. Schroeder :: SSRN
Downloaded pdf to Note

Weiner examination of traditional societies throughout the world and across history show that they share a single broad organizational structure that belies their facial diversity: the clan. Within the clan, man, and even more strikingly, woman, is neither free nor an individual. She is subordinate to her function within the group – in the case of woman, reproduction. In the clan, there are no individual rights protected by law, only the honor of the extended family to be avenged by feud. Adopting the terminology of “founding father of legal history and legal anthropology, Henry Sumner Maine”, Weiner argues that individual rights only come into being with the development of the state when Status relations are superceded by Contract.

Surprisingly, in his defense of the classical liberal ideal of individual rights and equality, Weiner implicitly rejects one of liberalism’s founding propositions: a vision of the free individual in the state of nature. Weiner’s thesis is more consistent with the speculative tradition of Continental theory than with American liberalism.
books  reviews  social_theory  liberalism  nation-state  individualism  legal_system  legal_history  social_contract  political_philosophy  political_culture  anthropology  civil_liberties  civil_society  human_rights  Hegel  Kant-ethics  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
Liberating Judgment: Fanatics, Skeptics, and John Locke's Politics of Probability by Douglas John Casson. | Questia, Your Online Research Library
Conclusion explains Locke's position on Great Recoinage as consistent with his approach to public judgment even though contradicted his theory of conventional signs

Tracks shifts in Locke's thought - early years framed by Montaigne style scepticism and enthusiasm of Cartesian rationalists
books  Questia  17thC  metaphysics  natural_philosophy  scepticism  political_philosophy  epistemology  probability  Locke  enthusiasm  intellectual_history  EF-add  semiotics  social_contract  natural_law 
july 2013 by dunnettreader
Hegel's Idea of Freedom by Alan Patten (1999). | Questia
Social contractarianism vs civic humanism
A central aim of Hegel's political philosophy is tochallenge this contractarian picture of therelationship between freedom and the state and topropose an alternative way of understanding thatrelationship in its place. Hegel denies that the stateshould be considered a limitation on freedom andinstead claims that a kind of freedom is realized inthe state that, by its very nature, could not beenjoyed outside the state. 
books  Questia  18thC  19thC  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  social_contract  civic_humanism  nation-state  property  liberty  Hegel 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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