dunnettreader + sociability   41

James Farr, review essay - Social Capital: A Conceptual History (2004) | Political Theory 32.1 on JSTOR
Farr, James. "Social Capital: A Conceptual History." Political Theory 32.1 (2004): 6-33. Web. -- Taking its departure from current debates over social capital, this article presents new textual findings in a backward-revealing conceptual history. In particular, it analyzes the texts and contexts of Lyda J. Hanifan who was rediscovered by Robert Putnam as having (allegedly first) used the term; it offers discoveries of earlier uses of the term and concept-most notably by John Dewey-thereby introducing critical pragmatism as another tradition of social capital; and it recovers features of the critique of political economy in the nineteenth century-from Bellamy to Marshall to Sidgwick to Marx-that assessed "capital from the social point of view," especially cooperative associations. While it ends with Marx's use of "social capital," Dewey is its central figure. The article concludes by returning to the present and offering work, sympathy, civic education, and a critical stance as emergent themes from this conceptual history that might enrich current debates. -- downloaded via Air
article  jstor  downloaded  social_theory  social_capital  human_capital  bibliography  sociability 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
D. Georgarakos
Trust, Sociability, and Stock Market Participation
Dimitris Georgarakos1 and
Giacomo Pasini2
1Goethe University Frankfurt and Center for Financial Studies
2Venice University
Review of Finance (2011) 15 (4): 693-725. doi: 10.1093/rof/rfr028 -- This article investigates the importance of both trust and sociability for stock market participation and for differences in stockholding across Europe. We estimate significant effects for the two, and find that sociability can partly balance the discouragement effect on stockholding induced by low regional prevailing trust. We test for exogeneity of trust and sociability indicators using variation in history of political institutions and in frequency of contacts with grandchildren, respectively. Moreover, the effect of trust is stronger in countries with limited participation and low average trust, offering an explanation for the remarkably low stockholding rates of the wealthy living therein. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
trust  sociability  investors  financial_system  article  capital_markets  investment  behavioral_economics  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Cornelia Wilde - Seraphic Companions: The Friendship between Elizabeth Gauden and Simon Patrick | Early Modern Literary Studies (2014
Special Issue 22: Communities and Companionship in Early Modern Literature and Culture (2014) -- This essay explores the friendship between Simon Patrick, future bishop of Ely, and Elizabeth Gauden, one of his parishioners, as an example of Neo-Platonic, chaste, yet impassioned friendship, between the sexes: Based on a combination of Neo-Platonic metaphysics of love, Aristotelian notions of philia, and legitimised by the ideal of Christian charity, the friendship’s spiritual aim is the two ‘soul mates’’ mutual intellectual and emotional refinement in order to be united with the heavenly community and the divine. The ideal of their seraphic companionship is to be achieved through the every-day practice of their friendship, that is, in their actual meetings and through their correspondence (Cambridge University Library Add. MS 19). Patrick and Gauden act as friends by discussing questions of theological and philosophical import, by advising each other on matters spiritual and mundane, and by sharing in social and devotional practices. Through Patrick, the two friends are connected to a ‘this-worldly’ intellectual and religious community the philosophical and theological origins of which can be located within the most important school of 17thC Platonic philosophy, Cambridge Platonism. Patrick, too, counts as a Cambridge Platonists, whose theological views and emphasis on matters of practical divinity characterise him as a prominent figure of post-Restoration liberal Anglicanism. Patrick and Gauden are a virtually unknown example of the 17thC trend for intellectual friendships between men and women as Ruth Perry has identified it (1985). The friendship is presented as a form of sociability that offered women a dynamic role within the learned community and furthered their active religious participation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  religious_culture  17thC  Church_of_England  Restoration  Cambridge_Platonists  Patrick_Simon  correspondence  friendship  women-intellectuals  gender-and-religion  gender_relations  sociability  devotional_practices  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - All our needs are social | Global Inequality - August 2015
Branko Milanovic dismantles Harry Frankfurt's attempt to differentiate our "real" needs - where considerations of inequality purportedly aren't relevant, or even are counterproductive to our full self/realization -- and "social " needs where some consideration of correcting for those below some certain level is appropriate. It's a common but incoherent philosophical move -- I blame Rousseau!
inequality  amour_propre  economic_culture  self-interest  self-love  capabilities  inequality-opportunity  sociability  analytical_philosophy  socialization  Rousseau  bad_economics  authenticity  moral_philosophy  self-development  from instapaper
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Jag Bhalla - Astronaut vs. Cowboy Ethics | Big Think - May 2015
by Jag Bhalla “Freedom in a commons brings ruin to all.” So says Garrett Hardin reassessing his misnamed “tragedy of the commons” parable. He’s right, and since… -- they'd all die in space if the "negative liberty" model served as source of normativity -- lots of links
moral_philosophy  norms  liberty-negative  collaboration  community  sociability  human_nature  practical_reason  praxis  libertarianism  links  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
KATE DAVISON - OCCASIONAL POLITENESS AND GENTLEMEN'S LAUGHTER IN 18thC ENGLAND (2014) - Abstract | The Historical Journal - Cambridge Journals Online
The Historical Journal / Volume 57 / Issue 04 / December 2014, pp 921-945 -- University of Sheffield -- This article considers the intersection between polite manners and company in eighteenth-century England. Through the laughter of gentlemen, it makes a case for a concept of occasional politeness, which is intended to emphasize that polite comportment was only necessary on certain occasions. In particular, it was the level of familiarity shared by a company that determined what was considered appropriate. There was unease with laughter in polite sociability, yet contemporaries understood that polite prudence could be waived when men met together in friendly homosocial encounters. In these circumstances, there existed a tacit acceptance of looser manners that might be called ‘intimate bawdiness’, which had its origins in a renaissance humanist train of thought that valorized wit as the centrepiece of male sociability. This argument tempers the importance of politeness by stressing the social contexts for which it was – and was not – a guiding principle. Ultimately, it suggests that the category of company might be one way of rethinking eighteenth-century sociability in a more pluralistic fashion, which allows for contradictory practices to co-exist. As such, it moves towards breaking down the binary oppositions of polite and impolite, elite and popular, and theory and practice that have been imposed on the period. -- Cambridge University Press paywall
article  paywall  find  cultural_history  elite_culture  18thC  British_history  politeness  sociability  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Jason M. Wirth, Seattle University, review - Dalia Nassar (ed.), The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy (OUP 2014) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 23, 2014
Dalia Nassar's assemblage of engaging and significant essays on some of the resurgent philosophers of early German romanticism emphasizes their contemporary philosophical relevance. "For it is a specifically philosophical revival, motivated by philosophical questions". Nassar demarcates this relevance into four general kinds. In the first part of the book, consisting of a fascinating debate between two of the heaviest hitters in this revival, Manfred Frank and Frederick Beiser, the question revolves around the very identity of early German philosophical romanticism. What counts as a work of this kind? What makes these works significantly different from works by practitioners of German idealism? Or can the two areas be so clearly distinguished? The next three sections are less global in their ambitions, but all of them touch on important facets of this period's enduring philosophical provocation. The second section features essays on the question of culture, language, sociability, and education, while the third turns to matters aesthetic, and the fourth and concluding section takes up the question of science.
books  reviews  find  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  German_Idealism  Romanticism  Kant  Hegel  Schelling  Schleiermacher  Fichte  Novalis  Hölderin  metaphysics  epistemology  mind  nature  aesthetics  culture  cultural_history  subjectivity  Absolute  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  hermeneutics  history_of_science  sociability  education  bildung  Evernote 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, review - Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 11, 2014
Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature, Oxford University Press, 2014, 143pp.,-- Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Johns Hopkins University -- one can easily trace the influence of "continental" figures such as Étienne Balibar and Antonio Negri on Almog's reading. But Almog is an acolyte of no one (except Nature, and to a lesser extent, Spinoza). The book is marked by the freshness of an independently thinking mind, a mind which appears at some moments to be celebrating a quasi-religious "new-birth." This book is rich in genuine insights, though it does not engage in patient, close analysis of arguments and texts. Toward the end Almog unfolds his discontent with the "dissective philosopher" who "run[s] his deductions, and feel[s] the gratification of being the master of a domain of propositions" (107). For Almog, Part I of Spinoza's Ethics is a paradigm of such "dissective philosophy," and the philosophical key is letting go of such an analytic attitude and "letting instead the key come to you by way of understanding informally 'love of God (Nature)'" (107). I do not share these views, and I will shortly explain why. More importantly, I believe this "New Age" attitude really harms the work, which could have been even more impressive than it is.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  style-philosophy  continental_philosophy  nature  anthropocentrism  human_nature  humanism  mathematics  Platonism  political_philosophy  sociability  moral_philosophy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Reviewed by Jocelyn Benoist - Vincent Descombes, The Institutions of Meaning: A Defense of Anthropological Holism // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // August 2014
Reviewed by Jocelyn Benoist, University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne This is the English translation by Stephen Adam Schwartz of Vincent Descombes’ Les Institutions du Sens (Paris, Editions de Minuit, 1996). It is the sequel to The Mind’s Provisions: A Critique of Cognitivism, also translated into English by Schwartz (Princeton University Press, 2001; French original version: La Denrée Mentale, Paris, Editions de Minuit, 1995). The two books should be considered together as a whole, to which the author himself gave the title of The Disputes of Mind. -- This impressive work is indeed a major contribution to the philosophy of mind. Perhaps the cognitivist wave is not as powerful today as it was twenty years ago, which may render the ‘dispute’ less intense nowadays, but the concept of mind provided by the author is no less topical. --. It is clear that this book is a milestone in the contemporary philosophy of mind and should absolutely be read by every philosopher or scientist interested in the nature of the mind today. It pursues an intense debate with contemporary cognitivism and with Continental theories and ‘deconstruction’ of mind, and develops a totally unique perspective at the crossroads of the Analytic and French traditions. Maybe, like every polemical work, it depends a bit too much on what it criticizes. However, beyond the polemic, it seems to me that this book does indeed promise a new philosophy of mind that defines the mind by itself and no longer by any transcendent principle — either ‘the Subject’ or ‘Society’ — that in a sense would not already be mindful. Thus, it seems to me that we should read this book as a plea for the non-metaphysical irreducibility of the mind. And what do we need more today than a non-metaphysical (I have not said: anti-metaphysical) anti-reductionism?
books  reviews  philosophy_of_language  mind  sociability  structuralist  poststructuralist  continental_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  phenomenology  hermeneutics  subjectivity  deconstruction  Peirce  logic  society  constructivism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Principle of Proximity (2011) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-08 -- How should we think about, how should we model the basis of political community. To the extent that it is a matter of choice, what should be the basis on which the people of the world divide themselves up into distinct political communities. This paper seeks to cast doubt on the proposition that it is a good idea for people to form a political community exclusively with those who share with them some affinity or trust based on culture, language, religion, or ethnicity. I want to cast doubt on that proposition by articulating an alternative approach to the formation of political communities, which I shall call the principle of proximity. People should form political communities with those who are close to them in physical space, particularly those close to them whom they are otherwise like to fight or to be at odds with. This principle is rooted in the political philosophies of Hobbes and Kant. The suggestion is that we are likely to have our most frequent and most densely variegated conflicts with those with whom we are (in Kant’s words) “unavoidably side by side”, and the management of those conflicts requires not just law (which in principle can regulate even distant conflicts) but law organized densely and with great complexity under the auspices of a state. The paper outlines and discusses the proximity principle, and the conception of law and state that it involves, and defends it against the criticism that it underestimates the importance of pre-existing trust in the formation of political communities. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 27 -- Keywords: community, conflict, ethnicity, Hobbes, identity, Kant, law, nationalism, proximity, state, state-building
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  community  community-virtual  conflict  political_culture  state-building  rule_of_law  trust  ethnic_ID  national_ID  nation-state  nationalism  Kant  Kant-politics  Kant-ethics  Hobbes  sociability  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, Two Books of the Elements of Universal Jurisprudence [1660] trans. William Abbott Oldfather, 1931. Revised and ed. Thomas Behme (2009) - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, Two Books of the Elements of Universal Jurisprudence, translated by William Abbott Oldfather, 1931. Revised by Thomas Behme. Edited and with an Introduction by Thomas Behme (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2009). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2220> -- This was Pufendorf’s first work, published in 1660. Its appearance effectively inaugurated the modern natural-law movement in the German-speaking world. The work also established Pufendorf as a key figure and laid the foundations for his major works, which were to sweep across Europe and North America. Pufendorf rejected the concept of natural rights as liberties and the suggestion that political government is justified by its protection of such rights, arguing instead for a principled limit to the state’s role in human life. - downloaded ebook to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Germany  intellectual_history  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_law  natural_rights  Pufendorf  state-roles  Grotius  sociability  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters: Hugo Grotius on War and the State (March 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Fernando R. Tesón, a professor at Florida State University College of Law, explores what Grotius thought about the proper relationship between the laws of nature and the laws of nations, what limits (if any) can be legitimately and rightly placed on the conduct of states engaged in war, and what relevance his insights may have today. Responding to his essay are Hans W. Blom, Paul Carrese, and Eric Mack. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  human_nature  international_law  natural_law  natural_rights  natural_religion  property_rights  just_war  navigation  trade  colonialism  war  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  VOC  commercial_law  state-of-nature  consent  legitimacy  social_contract  sociability  self-interest  self-defense  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne (2002)- Online Library of Liberty
Gershom Carmichael, Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1707> -- Carmichael was a Scottish jurist and philosopher who became the first Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow in 1727. His writings on natural rights theory, theology, and logic were very influential. [The volume has selections in each of the foregoing categories] -- since he wrote mainly in Latin, this edition is one of few ways to get access today to his thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Carmichael_Gershom  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  logic  natural_law  natural_rights  natural_religion  civil_society  moral_sentiments  human_nature  sociability  Pufendorf  Hutcheson  Kirk  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne, texts translated from the Latin by Michael Silverthorne, introduction by James Moore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1723> Until the publication of this Liberty Fund edition, all but one of the works contained in Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind were available only in Latin. This milestone English translation will provide a general audience with insight into Hutcheson’s thought. In the words of the editors: “Hutcheson’s Latin texts in logic and metaphysics form an important part of his collected works. Published respectively in 1756 and, in its second edition, 1744, these works represent Hutcheson’s only systematic treatments of logic, ontology, and pneumatology, or the science of the soul. They were considered indispensable texts for the instruction of students in the eighteenth century.” -- the introduction is very useful -- pdf of LibFund typesetting
etexts  translation  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  education-higher  Hutcheson  logic  metaphysics  natural_law  human_nature  social_order  EF-add  books  Aristotelian  ontology  free_will  Stoicism  state-of-nature  sociability  moral_sentiments  ideas-theories  categories  soul  mind-body  Malebranche  More_Henry  downloaded 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Amazon.com: Herbert Gintis' review of Michael Tomasello, Natural History of Human Thinking
Herb is very enthusiastic re the key theoretical innovations, a lot less re the attempts to use game theory to describe the innovation
books  reviews  kindle-available  human_nature  evo_psych  evolution-social  sociability  cooperation  mind  philosophy_of_language  metaethics  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - The Dialogic Experience of Conscience: Adam Smith and the Voices of Stoicism | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Winter, 1992-1993), pp. 233-260
Lots of Shaftesbury and the Stoics as well as Hutcheson before she gets into TMS. Published right before her book, so undoubtedly covers some of the topics in the book -- though don't know how much Bakhtin was in the book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  18thC  social_theory  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  morality-innate  sociability  Stoicism  recognition  self-love  self-and-other  sympathy  conscience  Bakhtin  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - Dialogism, the Gaze, and the Emergence of Economic Discourse | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 28, No. 4 (Autumn, 1997), pp. 697-710
Follows up on some Bakhtin suggestions in the New Literary History issue from prior year organized around articles by Todorov on self and the other, sociability etc -- she's a Smith scholar and develops the complex sociality of Smith in his moral and economic views -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  moral_philosophy  social_theory  political_economy  sociability  Smith  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Gary Saul Morson - Misanthropology | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Winter, 1996), pp. 57-72
Swift in Gulliver vs Dostoyevsky -- they share that sociability isn't simply the source of human goodness - also when man is at his most vicious -- Swift fits the Dostoyevsky model more closely than Morson suggests -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  human_nature  virtue  vice  sociability  misanthropy  Swift  Dostoyevsky  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue -Living Alone Together [Introduction and key article by Tzvetan Todorov] | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1, Winter, 1996
Issue Introduction - Living Alone Together (pp. 1-14) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* Replies to Introduction *--* (1) Community and Individuality (pp. 15-24) Patricia H. Werhane. *--* (2) A Reply to Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 25-34) Frances Ferguson. *--* (3) "Living Together Alone or Together": Commentary on Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 35-41) Stephen A. Mitchell. *--* (4) [downloaded] Todorov's Otherness (pp. 43-55) Robert Wokler. *--* (5) Misanthropology (pp. 57-72) Gary Saul Morson. *--* (6) Conflict and Sociability in Hegel, Freud, and Their Followers: Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 73-82) Daniel Burston. *--* (7) Regarding Others (pp. 83-93) Stewart Justman. *--*--* Response *--* The Gaze and the Fray (pp. 95-106) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* A. Self and Others in Culture. *--* Keeping the Self Intact during the Culture Wars: A Centennial Essay for Mikhail Bakhtin (pp. 107-126) Caryl Emerson. *--* Cultural Dreaming and Cultural Studies (pp. 127-144) Marianne DeKoven. *--* Orality, Literacy, and Their Discontents (pp. 145-159) Denis Donoghue.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  literary_theory  human_nature  social_theory  moral_philosophy  psychology  sociability  self  self-love  self-development  bildung  self-and-other  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Platonism  Socrates  Aristotle  Cicero  community  individualism  authenticity  constructivism  Rousseau  Hegel  Freud  conflict  Bakhtin  conversation  dialogue  literacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Livesey - The Dublin Society in 18thC Irish Political Thought | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 47, No. 3 (Sep., 2004), pp. 615-640
Through an analysis of the debate between Charles Davenant (1701 essay) in England, and Arthur Dobbs, Thomas Prior, and Samuel Madden in (1720s and 1730s) Ireland, it establishes that the founders saw the society as a response to Ireland's dependent status in the emerging British empire. The Dublin Society distinguished itself from other improving societies in the British Isles because it explicitly represented a new principle of sociality. The article describes the cultural origins of that principle arguing that a diverse set of groups converged on the ideal of association as a new form of order. The article concludes with a consideration of Madden's understanding, derived from his commitment to improving associations, that Irish national life was best understood as the pursuit of happiness rather than justice or virtue. -- huge bibliography -- Davenant essay important for Bolingbroke's views -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_culture  18thC  Ireland  improvement  Dublin_Society  sociability  clubs  urbanization  urban_elites  civic_virtue  justice  utilitarianism  happiness  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Lawrence E. Klein - Politeness and the Interpretation of the British Eighteenth Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 45, No. 4 (Dec., 2002), pp. 869-898
Politeness has assumed an important place in recent interpretations of eighteenth-century Britain by historians and historically minded scholars in other fields. The use of politeness as an analytic category has relied on varying assessments of the eighteenth-century semantic associations of the term, which included attentiveness to form, sociability, improvement, worldliness, and gentility. Scholars have used politeness in one or more of these senses to characterize distinctive aspects of eighteenth-century British culture: the comportment of the body in isolation and in social interaction; the material equipment of everyday life; the changing configurations and uses of domestic and public spaces; skills and aptitudes that both constituted personal accomplishment and shaped larger cultural enterprises such as religion, learning, the arts, and science; and important aspects of associational and institutional life. Thus, eighteenth-century Britain was polite in that a wide range of quite different activities have been identified as bearing the stamp of the eighteenth-century meanings of 'politeness'. Furthermore, what made eighteenth-century Britain a polite society was not its horizontal division between polite and non-polite persons but rather the wide access of a range of persons to activities and competencies that contemporaries considered 'polite'. -- big bibliography -- already in EagleFiler?
article  jstor  cultural_history  social_history  18thC  British_history  London  elites  status  politeness  manners  sociability  improvement  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Introduction by Richard Sorrenson to Issue: Did the Royal Society Matter in the 18thC? | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 32, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 130-132
Nice overview of utility how Royal Society saw itself and others saw it -- to society, to the state, sociability of clubs, interest in "wonder" of natural world, and reputation and acknowledgement local and international. Ftnts have good recent works.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  18thC  British_history  Royal_Society  clubs  sociability  Republic_of_Letters  experimental_philosophy  natural_history  virtuosos  Newtonian  technology  academies  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Helen Berry: Polite Consumption: Shopping in Eighteenth-Century England (2002)
JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 12 (2002), pp. 375-394 -- Shopping was increasingly seen as a potentially pleasurable activity for middling and upper sorts in Hanoverian England, a distinctive yet everyday part of life, especially in London. This survey considers the emergence of a polite shopping culture at this time, and presents a 'browse-bargain' model as a framework for considering contemporary references to shopping in written records and literary texts. The decline of polite shopping is charted with reference to the rise of cash-only businesses at the end of the century, and the shift towards a more hurried and impersonal form of shopping noted by early nineteenth-century shopkeepers, assistants and customers.
article  jstor  cultural_history  economic_history  18thC  Britain  London  consumers  sociability  politeness  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Luisa Calè - Gray’s Ode and Walpole’s China Tub:The Order of the Book and The Paper Lives of an Object (2011) - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Project MUSE -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay tracks the inscriptions and disseminations of Thomas Gray’s “Ode on the Death of A Favourite Cat drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes” and of Horace Walpole’s china tub. An incongruous element of chinoiserie in the Gothic fabric of Strawberry Hill, the tub marks the intersections between the orders of the collection, the house, and the book. Building on Michel Foucault’s analysis of the orders of things and the unities of discourse, this essay follows the paper-trail of the object and the poem through their inscription and extra-illustration in books that prove unstable repositories in a dynamic order of collecting. -- some interesting factoids re Sir Robert Walpole, his houses, his 1st wife
article  cultural_history  literary_history  18thC  Britain  Walpole_Horace  collections  interiors  design  poetry  sociability  Walpole 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Antoine Lilti - The Kingdom of Politesse: Salons and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century Paris | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Lilti, Antoine. “The Kingdom of Politesse: Salons and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century Paris.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/38. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" -- downloaded pdf to Note; a copy already in Ef -- The bibliography on the Republic of Letters is long, but most scholars would agree the notion has a double meaning: on the one hand, the Republic of Letters is a historiographical tool to refer to networks of scholars organized around academic institutions, learned journals, informal gatherings and epistolary exchanges; on the otherhand, it is the normative ideal of a community of scholars and writers who have egalitarian and personal relationships, autonomous from political power, from religious solidarities and from national identities. In Anne Goldgar’s words, the Republic of Letters is a “reflexive event.” I would like to suggest that Parisian salons did not fit any of these definitions. As a site for sociability, they were, above all, venues of entertainment for polite elites, and were deeply rooted in court society. The ideal which guided the writers who attended these salons—Morellet, Thomas, Marmontel, and many others—was not the Republic of Letters, but Parisian high society (le monde), where some men of letters, polite and successful, were welcomed because they conformed to aristocratic norms. In other words, they were dreaming about the kingdom of politesse rather than the Republic of Letters.
article  intellectual_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  salons  cultural_history  aristocracy  elites  politeness  sociability  social_capital  women-intellectuals  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Elena Russo: Slander and Glory in the Republic of Letters: Diderot and Seneca Confront Rousseau | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Russo, Elena. “Slander and Glory in the Republic of Letters: Diderot and Seneca Confront Rousseau.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/40. -- in " Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Diderot’s earlier optimism vis-à-vis his status in the Republic of Letters and his role as a public intellectual gave way to a profound identity crisis like the one that gripped his former friend Jean-Jacques Rousseau in his final years, documented in Rousseau juge de Jean-Jacques. By engaging both personally and by proxy in a battle against past and present enemies, Diderot forced himself to confront his own death and legacy, which he no longer imagined to be eulogies and loving praise, as he had in the letter to Falconet, but rather biased judgments of indifferent by-standers and prejudiced readers. In facing his eventual solitude as a writer, however, Diderot found comfort not among his contemporaries, but in the revived memory of the Republic of Letters’ classical past: in his newly discovered affinity for Seneca and in the embrace of his new role as Seneca’s advocate, faithful son, and alter ego.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  philosophes  intelligentsia  status  fame  reputation  authenticity  libel  audience  Republic_of_Letters  sociability  alienation  Diderot  Rousseau  Seneca  Stoicism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Dena Goodman: Public Sphere and Private Life: Toward a Synthesis of Current Historiographical Approaches to the Old Regime (1992)
JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 31, No. 1 (Feb., 1992), pp. 1-20 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This article challenges the false opposition between public and private spheres that is often imposed upon our historical understanding of the Old Regime in France. An analysis of the work of Jürgen Habermas, Reinhart Koselleck, Philippe Ariès, and Roger Chartier shows that the "authentic public sphere" articulated by Habermas was constructed in the private realm, and the "new culture" of private life identified by Ariès was constitutive of Habermas's new public sphere. Institutions of sociability were the common ground upon which public and private met in the unstable world of eighteenth-century France. Having superimposed the "maps" of public and private spheres drawn by Habermas and Ariès upon one another, the article then goes on to examine recent studies by Joan Landes and Roger Chartier to show the implications of drawing or avoiding the false opposition between public and private spheres for our understanding of the political culture of the Old Regime and Revolution.
article  jstor  historiography  17thC  18thC  France  Ancien_régime  French_Enlightenment  public_sphere  private_life  sociability  Habermas  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Kari Saastamoinen - Pufendorf on Natural Equality, Human Dignity, and Self-Esteem (2010)
Project MUSE - Kari Saastamoinen. "Pufendorf on Natural Equality, Human Dignity, and Self-Esteem."Journal of the History of Ideas 71.1 (2010): 39-62. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>. ?...Downloaded pdf to Note - also available in html. ?... It is often maintained that Samuel Pufendorf founded natural equality on human dignity. This article partly questions this interpretation, maintaining that the dignity Pufendorf attributed to human nature did not indicate the Kantian idea of absolute and incomparable worth but only superiority in relation to other animals. This comparative dignity of humanity implied that all humans are equally obliged to obey natural law, but it did not offer a foundation for the similarity of their innate duties. The latter followed from the fundamental principle of natural law, the duty to maintain sociality, and from observations concerning human self-esteem.

?.... useful links to discussion of other 17thC and 18thC authors as well as centrality of Cicero in working through modern version of rights and duties.
article  Project_MUSE  antiquity  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  natural_law  natural_rights  equality  obligation  Cicero  Pufendorf  Locke  sociability  self-love  emulation  dignity  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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