dunnettreader + shipping   12

Emily Erikson : Between Monopoly and Free Trade: The English East India Company, 1600–1757 | Princeton University Press
The EIF was one of the most powerful and enduring organizations in history. "Between Monopoly and Free Trade" locates the source of that success in the innovative policy by which the Court of Directors granted employees the right to pursue their own commercial interests while in the firm’s employ. Exploring trade network dynamics, decision-making processes, and ports and organizational context, Emily Erikson demonstrates why the EIC was a dominant force in the expansion of trade between Europe and Asia, and she sheds light on the related problems of why England experienced rapid economic development and how the relationship between Europe and Asia shifted in the 18thC and 19thC.(..) Building on the organizational infrastructure of the Company and the sophisticated commercial institutions of the markets of the East, employees constructed a cohesive internal network of peer communications that directed English trading ships during their voyages. This network integrated Company operations, encouraged innovation, and increased the Company’s flexibility, adaptability, and responsiveness to local circumstance. -- assistant professor in the department of sociology and the school of management (by courtesy) at Yale University, as well as a member of the Council of South Asian Studies. -- excerpt Chapter 1 downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  buy  economic_history  business_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  colonialism  imperialism  networks-business  networks-political  networks-information  networks-social  India  Indian_Ocean  Central_Asia  Chinese_history  China-international_relations  monopolies  trading_companies  trading_privileges  VOC  East_India_Company  trade  trade_finance  shipping  ports  British_Navy  business-and-politics  business_practices  business_influence  business-norms  nabobs  MPs  Board_of_Trade  Parliament  entrepreneurs  organizations  firms-structure  firms-organization  consumer_revolution  exports  Navigation_Acts  Anglo-Dutch_wars  French_foreign_policy  competition-interstate  risk-mitigation  risk_management  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Olaf Merk - The Impact of Mega-Ships | OECD Insights Blog - June 2015
Ports and Shipping, International Transport Forum (ITF) at the OECD. -- A new publication by the ITF assesses the impacts of these giant container ships. -- Our research casts serious doubts over whether this capacity can in fact be filled. We found a disconnect between what is going on in the boardrooms of shipping lines and the real world. -- There are also several supply chain costs and risks related to mega-ships. There are adaptations needed to infrastructure and equipment: ...cranes, quays, access channels... Mega-ships stay on average 20% longer in ports – ... this requires massive efforts to accommodate these longer-stay guests. The higher risks associated with mega-ships are linked to difficulties in insuring and salvaging ... (..)more cargo is concentrated on a single ship, leading to lower service frequencies and lower supply chain resilience (..) decision-making by ports and countries should be more balanced. Many public policies stimulate mega-ship use, but public benefits are limited whereas public costs can be high. This should change, first by aligning incentives to public interests. For example, not to have port tariffs that cross-subsidise mega-ships, to clarify state aid rules for ports, increase their financial transparency and possibly link state aid for shipping companies to commitments to share in certain costs (e.g. dredging). Another way would be to increase collaboration at regional level, between countries, ports and regulators. This might include coordination of port development and investment, possibly port mergers and more national or supra-national planning and focus. -- didn't download
report  OECD  global_economy  transport  maritime_issues  shipping  ports  infrastructure  supply_chains  risk_management  insurance  trade-policy  globalization  regional_blocs  regulation-harmonization  labor_standards 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Maria Fusaro - Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean: The Decline of Venice and the Rise of England 1450–1700 (to be released April 2015) | Cambridge University Press
Maria Fusaro presents a new perspective on the onset of Venetian decline. Examining the significant commercial relationship between England and Venice in the period 1450–1700, Fusaro demonstrates how Venice's social, political and economic circumstances shaped the English mercantile community in unique ways. By focusing on the commercial interaction between them, she also re-establishes the analysis of the maritime political economy as an essential constituent of the Venetian state political economy. This challenging interpretation of some classic issues of early modern history will be of profound interest to economic, social and legal historians and provides a stimulating addition to current debates in imperial history, especially on the economic relationship between different empires and the socio-economic interaction between 'rulers and ruled'. **--* "For the first time Maria Fusaro gives us the English among the creeks and islands of the Venetian empire, as seen by the Venetians themselves. Using archives hitherto little-known or wholly unknown, she paints a lively picture of Anglo-Venetian commerce, diplomacy and war." Nicholas Rodger, University of Oxford **--** Introduction: political economies of empire *-* 1. The medieval background *-* 2. The reversal of the balance *-* 3. The Ottoman Levant *-* 4. Genoa, Venice and Livorno (a tale of three cities) *-* 5. Trade, violence and diplomacy *-* 6. Diplomacy, trade and religion *-* 7. The Venetian peculiarities *-* 8. The English mercantile community in Venice *-* 9. The English and other mercantile communities *-* 10. The goods of the trade *-* 11. Empires and governance in the Mediterranean *-* 12. Coda and conclusions -- marketing materials not yet available for download
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Mediterranean  Venice  Italy  city_states  Genoa  Livorno  British_history  mercantilism  trade  trading_companies  empires  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  maritime_history  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  commerce  privileges-corporate  trading_privileges  religion-and-economics  trade_finance  trade-cultural_transmission  governance-regional  maritime_law  commercial_law  commercial_interest  foreigners-resident  wars-causes  military_history  competition-interstate  mercantilism-violence  trade-policy_enforcement  naval_history  shipping  weaponry 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Lorena S. Walsh, review - Nuala Zahedieh, The Capital and the Colonies: London and the Atlantic Economy, 1660-1700 (2010) | EH.net Review - Feb 2011
Zahedieh finds increasing concentration of plantation commerce among large merchants specializing in particular commodities and regions in the 1680s, when falling commodity prices and increased taxes eroded profit margins and drove out small traders. Colonial merchants seldom invested in overseas property, but made a massive contribution to expansion of empire in the form of short-term credit extended to settlers. The larger operators accumulated enough capital to diversify investment into shipbuilding, slave-trading, joint-stocks, insurance, wharves, industry, landed property, loans, and public credit. This decade was a turning point, as merchant concentration and specialization led to improved productivity, economies of scale, and reduced costs. (..) attempts of the later Stuarts to corner the profits of empire by restricting free trade among Englishmen as having limited success. (..) she sees the effect of the Glorious Revolution, not as leading to an economically optimal political arrangement, but as consolidating the capacity of the transatlantic trading elite to enforce regulation in its own interests and enhance the value and scale of rent-seeking enterprises at the expense of competition and efficiency, leading to a period of slower growth in colonial trade and shipping at the end of the century. Unlike trade with Europe, colonial commerce required an unusually large fixed capital investment in the greater tonnage needed to transport large volumes of bulky goods over long distances. (..) English- and plantation-built ships were better suited to most colonial commerce than were Dutch (..) it was long-distance commerce, rather than the protection of the Navigation Acts, that revived the English shipbuilding industry. By 1700 plantation shipping accounted for 40% of London's overseas trading capacity. (..) increased education among mariners (..) managerial skills, (..) navigational instruments. (..) London's prosperity by stimulating the construction of wharfs and warehouses, (.) naval refitting, repair, and provisioning trades. Although technology and unit input costs were fairly stable across the period, increased volumes and growing experience with colonial conditions led to organizational improvements which made more efficient use of inputs. - page encoding a mess on Note - try to save page or copy to EF in Air
books  bookshelf  reviews  17thC  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  London  colonialism  North-Weingast  American_colonies  West_Indies  trade  trade-policy  shipping  Navigation_Acts  1680s  1690s  entrepôts  economic_growth  economic_culture  Charles_II  James_II  Atlantic  capital  investment  trade_finance  Dutch  education-training  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City_politics  infrastructure  ports  technology  navigation  interlopers  regulatory_capture  commodities  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE -- PARTING COMPANIES: THE GLORIOUS REVOLUTION, COMPANY POWER, AND IMPERIAL MERCANTILISM. (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 617-638. Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
WILLIAM A. PETTIGREW - University of Kent and GEORGE W. VAN CLEVE - Seattle University School of Law --This article revisits the late seventeenth-century histories of two of England's most successful overseas trading monopolies, the East India and Royal African Companies. It offers the first full account of the various enforcement powers and strategies that both companies developed and stresses their unity of purpose in the seventeenth century. It assesses the complex effects that the ‘Glorious Revolution’ had on these powers and strategies, unearthing much new material about the case law for monopoly enforcement in this critical period and revising existing accounts that continue to assert the Revolution's exclusively deregulating effects and that miss crucial subtleties in the case law and related alterations in company behaviour. It asks why the two companies parted company as legal and political entities and offers an explanation that connects the fortunes of both monopoly companies to their public profile and differing constituencies in the English empire and the varying non-European political contexts in which they operated. -- * We warmly thank Michael R. T. Macnair for his indispensable advice and assistance regarding matters of seventeenth-century English law and are grateful to Clive Holmes for encouraging us to look into these issues and to Simon Douglas and Jeffrey Hackney for initial help in doing so. Paul Halliday, Daniel Hulsebosch, and Philip J. Stern provided helpful responses to specific research queries.
article  paywall  find  17thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  Glorious_Revolution  mercantilism  monopolies  trading_companies  East_India_Company  Royal_African_Co  colonialism  slavery  piracy  competition  parties  London  legal_history  judiciary  commercial_law  interest_groups  Whig_Junto  Tories  James_II  William_III  Parliament  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  regulation  West_Indies  ports  shipping  trade-policy  entrepôts  exports  imports  luxury_goods  consumers  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea (Hakluyt trans.) with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage - Online Library of Liberty
Hugo Grotius, The Free Sea, trans. Richard Hakluyt, with William Welwod’s Critiuqe and Grotius’s Reply, ed. David Armitage (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2004). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/859> -- Grotius’s influential argument in favor of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing in Richard Hakluyt’s translation. The book also contains William Welwod’s critque and Grotius’s reply to Welwod. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  international_political_economy  IR_theory  international_law  international_system  sovereignty  maritime_history  exploration  trade  trading_companies  colonialism  piracy  shipping  Dutch  British_history  British_Empire  fishing  free_trade  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Claire Judde de Larivière - The 'Public' and the 'Private' in 16thC Venice: From Medieval Economy to Early Modern State | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 4 (142) (2012), pp. 76-94
This article analyses the Venetian public galleys' expeditions during the sixteenth century, as a case study for understanding the relationships between patricians and the State, and the way in which the 'public' and the 'private' roles were reorganized in the late Middle Ages. Going further the explanations usually given, the article tries to explain the decline of the public galleys, and emphasizes the symbolic, cultural, political and ideological factors that had also led to the abandonment of public navigation. It seeks to reintegrate economic considerations, practices, actions and actors into their social, political and ideological contexts, and thus avoids isolating economic phenomena and economic thinking from their political background. Doing so, it argues that the abandonment of public navigation in Venice was the corollary of the gradual differentiation between the State and the ruling class that was typical of the earliest stages of modernity. -- interesting bibliography ranging from Frederic Lane to Craig Muldrew -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  16thC  Venice  shipping  public_goods  public_enterprise  private_enterprise  elites  stratification  privatization  capitalism  imperialism  political_culture  economic_culture  elite_culture  political_economy  Renaissance  modernity-emergence  social_order  public_finance  financial_economics  financial_innovation  common_good  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercantilism  empire-and_business  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
N. Draper - The City of London and Slavery: Evidence from the First Dock Companies, 1795-1800 | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 61, No. 2 (May, 2008), pp. 432-466
Through analysing the composition of the founding shareholders in the West India and London Docks, this article explores the connections between the City of London and the slave economy on the eve of the abolition of the slave trade. It establishes that over one-third of docks investors were active in slave-trading, slave-ownership, or the shipping, trading, finance, and insurance of slave produce. It argues that the slave economy was neither dominant nor marginal, but instead was fully integrated into the City's commercial and financial structure, contributing materially alongside other key sectors to the foundations of the nineteenth-century City. -- huge bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_economy  economic_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  slavery  abolition  London  ports  trade  merchants  planters  investors  shipping  finance_capital  insurance  City  City_politics  Industrial_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard W. Unger, review - Jan de Vries and Ad van der Woude, The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500–1815 | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2000), pp. 239-241
Reviewed work(s): The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500–1815. By Jan de Vries and Ad van der Woude. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997. Pp. xx+767. $89.95. -- Richard W. Unger, University of British Columbia -- The final sixty pages do serve to draw together what has gone before and offer not only an overview of economic and social developments but also a tentative theory about patterns of the rise and fall of modern economies. The authors launch a sustained attack on traditional periodization of economic and, indeed, all history. They find in the Netherlands in the seventeenth century many of the features of nineteenth- and twentieth-century economic growth. They see no reason to look on the English Industrial Revolution as a cataclysmic event. -- There seems to be no doubt that the massive debt run up by the Dutch government in fending off the French threat from 1672 to 1713 burdened the economy so much that it could neither recover earlier levels of growth nor engage in restructuring like that which occurred in the years from 1660 to 1700 in the face of falling food prices, rising real incomes of laborers and craftsmen, and declining land values. Too many people in the eighteenth century—such as government officials and bondholders—lived well thanks to the need to service the debt; these people resisted necessary fiscal reform.
books  reviews  jstor  economic_history  political_economy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Dutch  development  modernization  urbanization  agriculture  industry  Industrial_Revolution  foreign_policy  sovereign_debt  rentiers  trading_companies  trade  colonialism  shipping  entrepôts  periodization  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Panama Canal: Out of the narrows | FT.com August 2013
Great overview of how shipping and port infrastructure changing in US and Latin America. Interesting comments on increased use of Suez Canal for bigger vessels. Growth of East coast traffic since early 2000s.
globalization  shipping  infrastructure  US_economy  Latin_America  transport 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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