dunnettreader + sermons   5

MELVYN NEW - Review essay: Five Twenty-First-Century Studies of Laurence Sterne and His Works (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 122-135 -- "Read, read, read, read, my unlearned reader!": Five Twenty-First-Century Studies of Laurence Sterne and His Works -- Reviewed Works: Laurence Sterne in France by Lana Asfour; Labyrinth of Digressions: Tristram Shandy as Perceived and Influenced by Sterne's Early Imitators by René Bosch, Piet Verhoeff; Yorick's Congregation: The Church of England in the Time of Laurence Sterne by Martha F. Bowden; Sterne's Whimsical Theatres of Language: Orality, Gesture, Literacy by Alexis Tadié; The Cultural Work of Empire: The Seven Years' War and the Imagining of the Shandean State by Carol Watts -- indirectly a useful overview of shifts in dealing with Sterne, Tristram and Church of England not only in latter part of 18thC but 19thC and 20thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  Sterne  French_lit  satire  prose  celebrity  cultural_history  intellectual_history  publishing  publishing-industry  imitation  Church_of_England  scepticism  Swift  self-knowledge  philanthropy  sentimentalism  sincerity  authenticity  politics-and-literature  materialism  sermons  translation  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
BRENT S. SIROTA -- THE OCCASIONAL CONFORMITY CONTROVERSY, MODERATION, AND THE ANGLICAN CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY, 1700–1714 (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 81-105 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
BRENT S. SIROTA - North Carolina State University -- The occasional conformity controversy during the reign of Queen Anne has traditionally been understood as a straightforward symptom of the early eighteenth-century ‘rage of party’. For all the pious rhetoric concerning toleration and the church in danger, the controversy is considered a partisan squabble for short-term political gain. This traditional interpretation has, however, never been able to account for two features of the controversy: first, the focus on ‘moderation’ as a unique characteristic of post-Revolutionary English society; and second, the prominence of the Anglican nonjurors in the debate. This article revisits the occasional conformity controversy with an eye toward explaining these two related features. In doing so, it will argue that the occasional conformity controversy comprised a referendum on the Revolution settlement in church and state. Nonjurors lit upon the practice of occasional conformity as emblematic of the broader malady of moderation afflicting post-Revolutionary England. From their opposition to occasional conformity, the nonjurors, and soon the broader Anglican high-church movement, developed a comprehensive critique of religious modernity that would inform the entire framework of debate in the early English Enlightenment. -* I thank James Vaughn, Steve Pincus, Bill Bulman, Robert Ingram, and the participants in the ‘God and the Enlightenment’ conference at Ohio University in October 2012 for their generous engagement with earlier drafts of this article. Thanks also to Phil Withington and the anonymous reviewers for their assistance in shaping this article into its final form.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1700s  1710s  occasional_conformity  nonjurors  High_Church  Church_of_England  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political_press  pamphlets  political_participation  tolerance  latitudinarian  secularization  atheism_panic  partisanship  Tories  Whigs  dissenters  Whig_Junto  moderation  modernity  Enlightenment  Queen_Anne  Harley  Bolingbroke  comprehension-church  Convocation  church-in-danger  sermons  religious_lit  cultural_critique  Atterbury  popular_politics  popular_culture  Revolution_Principles  Glorious_Revolution  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
JORDAN S. DOWNS - "THE CURSE OF MEROZ" AND THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 343-368. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
JORDAN S. DOWNS -- University of California, Riverside -- This article attempts to uncover the political significance of the Old Testament verse Judges 5:23, ‘the curse of Meroz’, during the English Civil War. Historians who have commented on the printed text of Meroz have done so primarily in reference to a single edition of the parliamentarian fast-day preacher Stephen Marshall's 1642 Meroz cursed sermon. Usage of the curse, however, as shown in more than seventy unique sermons, tracts, histories, libels, and songs considered here, demonstrates that the verse was far more widespread and politically significant than has been previously assumed. Analysing Meroz in its political and polemical roles, from the outbreak of the Irish Rebellion in 1641 and through the Restoration of Charles II in the 1660s, sheds new light on the ways in which providentialism functioned during the Civil Wars, and serves, more specifically, to illustrate some of the important means by which ministers and polemicists sought to mobilize citizens and construct party identities. --* I am grateful to Richard Cust, Barbara Donagan, Peter Lake, Isaac Stephens, Stefania Tutino, and the two anonymous reviewers who read and commented on earlier versions of this article. Special thanks are due to Tom Cogswell for his guidance and extensive feedback
article  paywall  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Restoration  religious_history  religious_culture  Providence  sermons  religious_lit  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Old_Testament  political_press  pamphlets  popular_culture  popular_politics  partisanship  parties  identity  identity_politics  Parliamentarians  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Lincoln - The Culture of War and Civil Society in the Reigns of William III and Anne | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (SUMMER 2011), pp. 455-474
The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it. -- huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- paywall
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january 2014 by dunnettreader

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