dunnettreader + separation-of-powers   20

Josh Chafetz - Democracy’s Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions | Yale University Press - 2011
This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain’s Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analyzing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy. -- see kindle sample
books  kindle-available  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  democracy  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  representative_institutions  political_participation  UK_Government  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  American_colonies  US_constitution  Congress  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  House_of_Representatives  constituencies  judiciary  judicial_review  exec_branch  monarchy  monarchical_republic  MPs  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_culture  legitimacy  Founders  Madison  Blackstone  Mill  prerogative  bill_of_rights  bills_of_attainder  elections-disputed  Bolingbroke 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jack M. Balkin -The Last Days of Disco: Why the American Political System is Dysfunctional :: SSRN - Boston University Law Review, Vol. 94, 2014
...what looks like constitutional dysfunction is actually constitutional transition, (..)Americans last experienced this sense of dysfunction during the late 1970s and early 1980s (..) the transition to a new constitutional regime will be far more difficult than those effected in 1932 and 1980. (1) the growth of the modern state and changes in the role of the presidency mean that even the most politically adept and fortunate presidents face greater obstacles to implementing transformative change than they once did; they are less able than past reconstructive leaders to disrupt existing institutions and clear the ground for a new politics. This, by itself, does not prevent the emergence of a new constitutional regime. But (2) the current transition will be especially difficult because we are near the peak of a long cycle of increasing polarization between the nation’s two major political parties. That polarization greatly raises the stakes of a transition to a new constitutional regime. The defenders of the old order have every incentive to resist the emergence of a new regime until the bitter end. A long and frustrating transition will have important side effects. (1) a dysfunctional Congress tempts the Executive to act unilaterally, (..). Future presidents may use these new sources of power even when the period of dysfunction has passed. (2) sustained political dysfunction also tends to empower the judiciary vis-à-vis Congress. Moreover, judges appointed by the older dominant party, late in the regime, are less likely to engage in judicial restraint and more likely to push the jurisprudential envelope. This helps explain some of the Roberts Court's recent work. -- PDF File: 40 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  US_politics  US_constitution  SCOTUS  exec_branch  US_President  Congress  US_judiciary  separation-of-powers  faction  GOP  Democrats  legal_history  political_change  political_culture  legal_culture  originalism  change-social  power-asymmetric  ideology  conflict  competition-political  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  government-forms  government-roles  polarization  policymaking  political_gridlock  limited_government  judicial_review  conservatism  right-wing  political_participation  rule_of_law  instrumentalist  means-justify-ends  legitimacy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jack Balkin - Fragile Democracies: An Interview with Sam Issacharoff | Balkinization - June 2015
A bunch of great Qs from HB -- I recently spoke with Sam Issacharoff (NYU Law School) about his new book, Fragile Democracies: Contested Power in the Era of Constitutional Courts (CUP). -- JB: You are one of the foremost experts on American election law. How did you get interested in the constitutional problems of emerging democracies? JB: A key claim of the book is that courts can play an important role in keeping emerging democracies from backsliding into authoritarianism and dictatorship. Why are courts able to do this? -- JB: Critics of judicial review have long argued that it is inconsistent with democracy, and actually undermines it in the long run. How does your argument engage with those critics? SI: We have long debated the issue of judicial review and the countermajoritarian difficulty in the U.S. The new democracies of the 20thC and 21stC uniformly created constitutional courts whose central function was to check the exercise of power by the political branches(..) entrusted to these courts not only the power of judicial review, but the power to be the central administrative body over elections. The gamble is that democracy would be stabilized by guaranteeing limitations on government and repeat elections. (..) I would prefer to see the question whether strong court constitutionalism can sustain democracy in fractured societies as an empirical one-- of "does it work?" If it does, we can indulge the theoretical question of the legitimacy of how judicial power is exercised, but down the road a ways.
Instapaper  books  constitutional_law  constitutions  democratization  transition_economies  post-colonial  limited_government  power-concentration  power-asymmetric  accountability  government-forms  government-roles  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  judiciary  judicial_review  elections  voting  corruption  parties  legitimacy  legitimacy-international  authoritarian  one-party_state  democracy_deficit  political_participation  opposition  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Katia Weidenfeld, review - Absolutism and Its Judges - Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice. France (XIIIe-XXe siècle). Vol.1: L’idéologie de la magistrature ancienne | January 2010 Books & ideas
Reviewed: Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice. France (XIIIe-XXe siècle). Vol.1: L’idéologie de la magistrature ancienne, Gallimard, NRF, Paris, nov. 2009. 326 pp., 22 euros. -- Translated by Arthur Goldhammer with the support of the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme -- Jacques Krynen shows, in an excellent overview, that judicial power was not a recent invention: in the Old Regime, high court judges already claimed a share of royal power. This erudite yet accessible book thus revises the myth of absolutism. What about other magistrates and lawyers? -- review of Volume 2 (1789-2010) hasn't been translated -- downloaded both pdfs to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  France  political_history  legal_system  legal_history  judiciary  political_order  Ancien_régime  monarchy  Absolutism  separation-of-powers  Parlement  lawyers  lawmaker  judicial_review  government-forms  government_officials  justice  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Katia Weidenfeld, review -- Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice, France XIIIe-XXe siècle. Tome 2 : L’emprise contemporaine des juges (1789-2011) | Sept 2012 - La Vie des idées
Recensé : Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice, France XIIIe-XXe siècle. Tome 2 : L’emprise contemporaine des juges, Paris, Gallimard, 2012, 432 p., 26 €. -- -- Poursuivant la fresque entreprise dans le premier tome, Jacques Krynen nous invite, avec ce deuxième tome de l’État de justice, à parcourir l’histoire judiciaire de la France pendant la période contemporaine (1789-2011). -- She also reviewed the first volume which covers the high magistrates relation with the monarchy in the Ancien Régime (translated into English by Arthur Goldhammer) -- downloaded both pdfs to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  France  political_history  legal_system  legal_history  judiciary  political_order  Ancien_régime  monarchy  separation-of-powers  Parlement  lawyers  lawmaker  judicial_review  government-forms  government_officials  justice  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Pluralism and consensus in the modern Western world vs Brad Gregory's "The Unintended Reformation" attack on "hyperpluralism" « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2013
Gregory's "hyperpluralism" is MacIntyre-eque - there's no longer a shared notion of the summum bonnum. This anti-modernity can't tell the difference between liberal pluralism and the bogeyman of relativism. Peterson's response is one of the better since it accepts the basic frame of the need for some shared values -- "the structuring principles [for political and social life] of modern Western societies are not arbitrary assertions but rather principles that are connected with one another, interwoven with historical developments and representative of human life and ideals." He shows 8 points of "soft consensus" and ..."While it would be possible to claim that these points are not... what Gregory calls the “Life Questions,” [they] rest upon basic values that have correlations with views of the person and conceptions of the good." -- "The entire Western world has agreed (1) to live with a modern democratic political order, (2) to enforce concepts of unalienable human rights, (3) to uphold the rule of law, and (4) to secure the separation of powers. (...) the high view of the individual, and thus the high view of that individual’s opinion, is presumed [...and is also a] 5th point. (...) There are many other values which follow from the high view of the individual (...) they presume the value of freedom.. [which is both...] a presupposition of 3 and 4 and a 6th point. (...) The law is a concrete representation of the norms and regulations that are held to be not only equitable, just, and good, but also reasonable. The importance of reason and rational justification therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the rule of law, but also as [a] 7th point. (...) [The] idea of the separation of powers (...) [presumes] cooperation in the formal execution of power, administration, and management. A high regard for cooperation therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the separation of powers, but also as an 8th point. The most effective cooperation [depends] upon general agreements regarding shared goals and a basic goodwill between the cooperating parties."
21stC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  declinism  Thomism-21stC  modernity  intellectual_history  Reformation  common_good  Christendom  Christianity  theocracy  politics-and-religion  liberalism  rule_of_law  separation-of-powers  civil_liberties  human_rights  liberty  liberty-negative  liberalism-public_reason  liberty-positive  welfare_state  MacIntyre  Counter-Reformation  pluralism  relativism  good  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Griffin - Balkinization: War Powers "As If" - September 2014
...too much commentary has focused on treating Obama's use of war powers "as if" it was occurring in a judicial forum, rather than politically as a matter of interbranch deliberation. Doing the latter inevitably means taking into consideration that we are right before the congressional elections. Deliberating before an election is rarely a good idea -- that's how we got the 2002 Iraq war resolution! Yet the NYT scores the Congress for failing in its constitutional responsibilities, "shamelessly ducking a vote." Yes, they should duck it. They haven't got the time to do a proper review before the election, particularly if what we should be interested in is a new AUMF. -- As far as the legal commentary, too many legal scholars are too worried about what Obama is claiming re the previous AUMFs. They seem to think that these claims might come back to haunt us as "precedents." But we are not in a judicial forum (nor are we ever likely to be) when it comes to the use of military force. -- We surely need to think as constitutionalists, but mindful of the constitutional order that applies to foreign affairs and in light of the fact that we are, after all, dealing with the "political" branches. So talk of bad precedents and Congress acting irresponsibly is not helpful. It won't help the country get anywhere it wants to go. I do agree with much current commentary that we badly need a legal review of Obama's war authority with a view to drafting a new AUMF. That would be all to the good. So far I see no sign that Congress is truly interested in drafting one. But as I say in my Tulane talk, there is no doubt that Obama could render a service to his country in his final two years in office by putting an AUMF on the national agenda when the new Congress is seated in 2015.
US_politics  US_constitution  US_foreign_policy  separation-of-powers  Obama_administration  Congress  Iraq  Syria  US_military  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Political Political Theory: An Oxford Inaugural Lecture (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-26 -- "Inaugural Lecture" for the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory. -- Political theorists study (1) political virtue, (2) political processes and institutions, and (3) political ideals (like justice, liberty, and equality). Since the time of Hume, Madison, and Kant, it has been thought that (2) is more important than (1), because maybe we can set up institutions that work for the general good whatever the state of virtue of the people... But in the revival of political philosophy heralded by Rawls in 1971, there has been great emphasis on (3) and not nearly enough on (2)... particularly in the UK. Chichele chair -holders G.A. Cohen and Isaiah Berlin focused almost exclusively on (3) -- with Berlin announcing that political philosophy was really just the study of "the ends of life." -- I argue for a reorientation of political theory teaching and scholarship back towards institutions -- particularly the normative evaluation of the political process and the exploration of institutional principles like democracy, representation, bicameralism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, federalism and so on. ..these issues should not be left to empirical or comparative politcial science, because they raise important and complex questions of evaluation that may be sold short by the pragmatic and consequentialist emphasis of empirical and comparative work. But political theory should respect the empirical study of institutions more than it does, and it should dovetail the normative and evaluative work that political theory involves with the understanding of institutions, processes, and practices that political science generates. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_science  human_nature  social_theory  institutions  government-forms  governmentality  constitutions  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  Arendt  Berlin_Isaiah  Hume  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  comparative_history  political_order  legitimacy  democracy  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  legislature  executive  judicial_review  justice  civic_virtue  dignity  egalitarian  rule_of_law  citizenship  education-civic  federalism  social_process  socialization  civil_liberties  Founders  Madison  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Isaiah Berlin's Neglect of Enlightenment Constitutionalism (2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-12 -- One of the most important achievements of the Enlightenment is what I shall call Enlightenment constitutionalism. It transformed our political thinking out of all recognition; it left, as its legacy, not just the repudiation of monarchy and nobility in France in the 1790s but the unprecedented achievement of the framing, ratification, and establishment of the Constitution of the United States. It comprised the work of Diderot, Kant, Locke, Madison, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Sieyes, and Voltaire. It established the idea of a constitution as an intricate mechanism designed to house the untidiness and pluralism of human politics. Yet Isaiah Berlin, supposedly one of our greatest interpreters of the Enlightenment, said almost nothing about it. The paper develops this claim and it speculates as to why this might be so. Certainly one result of Berlin's sidelining of Enlightenment constitutionalism is to lend spurious credibility to his well-known claim that Enlightenment social design was perfectionist, monastic, and potentially totalitarian. By ignoring Enlightenment constitutionalism, Berlin implicitly directed us away from precisely the body of work that might have refuted this view of Enlightenment social design. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  French_Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  Enlightenment_Project  Berlin_Isaiah  rationalist  perfectibility  progress  Montesquieu  Founders  Madison  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  Glorious_Revolution  constitutionalism  government-forms  Sieyes  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  Absolutism  institutions  institutional_change  representative_institutions  tyranny  limited_monarchy  limited_government  rule_of_law  Diderot  Voltaire  Locke-2_Treatises  Kant  historical_sociology  social_sciences  social_process  pluralism  conflict  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Separation of Powers or Division of Power? (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-20 - April 24, 2012 -- The rationale of the separation of powers is often elided with the rationale of checks and balances and with the rationale of the dispersal of power generally in a constitutional system. This paper however focuses resolutely on the functional sepaartion of powers in what MJC Vile called its "pure form". Rexeamining the theories of Locke, Montesquieu, and Madison, the paper seeks to recover (amidst all their tautologies and evasions) a genuine case in favor of this principle. The paper argues that the rationale of the separation of powers is closely related to that of the rule of law: it is partly a matter of the distinct integrity of each of the separated institutions (courts, legislature, and administration). But above all, it is a matter of articulated governance (as contrasted with compressed undifferentiated exercises of power). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 34 -- Keywords: constitutionalism, constitutions, courts, legislature, Madison, Montesquieu, rule of law, separation of powers -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_system  legal_history  English_constitution  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  judiciary  judicial_review  legislature  executive  sovereignty  Locke-2_Treatises  Montesquieu  Madison  constitutionalism  limited_monarchy  limited_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  rule_of_law  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Womersley, ed. - Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century (2006) - Online Library of Liberty
David Womersely, Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century, edited and with an Introduction by David Womersley (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1727> -- This volume is a collection of essays which examines some of the central themes and ideologies central to the formation of the United States including Edmund Burke’s theories on property rights and government, the influence of Jamaica on the American colonies, the relations between religious and legal understandings of the concept of liberty, the economic understanding of the Founders, the conflicting viewpoints between moral sense theory and the idea of natural rights in the founding period, the divisions in thought among the revolutionaries regarding the nature of liberty and the manner in which liberty was to be preserved, and the disparity in Madison’s political thought from the 1780s to the 1790s. -- authors include Jack Greene, David Wootton, Gordon Wood. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) - Online Library of Liberty
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) (Indianapolis, Liberty Fund 1998). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/677> -- Arguably no political principle has been more central than the separation of powers to the evolution of constitutional governance in Western democracies. In the definitive work on the subject, M. J. C. Vile traces the history of the doctrine from its rise during the English Civil War, through its development in the eighteenth century – when it was indispensable to the founders of the American republic – through subsequent political thought and constitution-making in Britain, France, and the United States. The author concludes with an examination of criticisms of the doctrine by both behavioralists and centralizers – and with “A Model of a Theory of Constitutionalism.” The new Liberty Fund second edition includes the entirety of the original 1967 text published by Oxford, a major epilogue entitled “The Separation of Powers and the Administrative State,” and a bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_philosophy  political_history  constitutionalism  government-forms  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  American_colonies  American_Revolution  US_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  judiciary  rule_of_law  French_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Third_Republic  Napoleonic_Empire  Directoire  Fifth_Republic  administrative_agencies  executive  legislation  liberalism-republicanism_debates  federalism  Founders  Federalist  Bolingbroke  Montesquieu  patronage  corruption  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern [1947] - Online Library of Liberty
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2145> -- Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern explores the very roots of liberty by examining the development of modern constitutionalism from its ancient and medieval origins. Derived from a series of lectures delivered by Charles Howard McIlwain at Cornell University in the 1938–39 academic year, these lectures provide a useful introduction to the development of modern constitutional forms. -- Introduction states the "problem" beginning with Bolingbroke's definition of the Septennial Act and Whig abandonment of Revolution Principles, and Burke, Paine, arbitrary government and written constitutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  government-forms  constitutionalism  English_constitution  US_constitution  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  judiciary  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  Absolutism  representative_institutions  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  medieval_history  feudalism  monarchy  limited_monarchy  resistance_theory  social_contract  public_opinion  political_participation  reform-political  reform-legal  Bolingbroke  Revolution_Principles  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Burke  Paine  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 6 (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 6. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2104> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 6 contains (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution. The last continued part of the Defence of the Constitutions deals with Marchmont Nedham and writings on the commonwealth. Davila is the history of the 16thC French Wars_of_Religion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  political_history  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  English_constitution  US_constitution  state_government  federalism  commonwealth  historiography  France  Wars_of_Religion  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Terror  Directoire  Napoleon  Napoleonic_Wars  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  centralization  central_government  local_government  parties  partisanship  faction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, ed. Ellis Sandoz, - Online Library of Liberty
Ellis Sandoz, The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law, edited and with an Introduction by Ellis Sandoz (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2180> -- This is a critical collection of essays on the origin and nature of the idea of liberty. The authors explore the development of English ideas of liberty and the relationship those ideas hold to modern conceptions of rule of law. The essays address early medieval developments, encompassing such seminal issues as the common-law mind of the sixteenth century under the Tudor monarchs, the struggle for power and authority between the Stuart kings and Parliament in the seventeenth century, and the role of the ancient constitution in the momentous legal and constitutional debate that occurred between the Glorious Revolution and the American Declaration of Independence. Authors -- Corinne Comstock Weston - John Phillip Reid - Paul Christianson - Christopher W. Brooks - James Clarke Holt - Editor: Ellis Sandoz -- a lot of historiography discussion of legal history, politics and political philosophy - interesting to see their take on Pocock - original publication date 1993, so bibliography will be a bit dated and the articles won't reflect all the waves of revisionism but important place to start -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  Anglo-American  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Hanoverian_Succession  common_law  lawyers  judiciary  rule_of_law  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  government-forms  mixed_government  Absolutism  republicanism  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  citizens  legitimacy  authority  resistance_theory  Patriot_King  civil_liberties  civic_humanism  liberty  taxes  property  petitions  Petition_of_Right  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  franchise  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Separation of Parties, Not Powers by Daryl J. Levinson, Richard H. Pildes :: SSRN (Harvard Law Review 2006)
Few aspects of the Founding generation's political theory are now more clearly anachronistic than their vision of legislative-executive separation of powers. Nevertheless, few of the Framers' ideas continue to be taken as literally or sanctified as deeply by courts and constitutional scholars as the passages about interbranch relations in Madison's Federalist 51. This Article reenvisions the law and theory of separation of powers by viewing it through the lens of party competition. In particular, it points out that during periods - like the present - of cohesive and polarized political parties, the degree and kind of competition between the legislative and executive branches will vary significantly, and may all but disappear, depending on whether party control of the House, Senate, and Presidency is divided or unified. The practical distinction between party-divided and party-unified government thus rivals, and often dominates, the constitutional distinction between the branches in predicting and explaining interbranch political dynamics. Recognizing that these dynamics will shift from competitive when government is divided to cooperative when it is unified calls into question basic assumptions of separation of powers law and theory. More constructively, re-focusing the separation of powers on parties casts numerous aspects of constitutional structure, doctrine, and institutional design in a new and more realistic light. Numbers of Pages in PDF File: 74 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  US_government  US_politics  parties  partisanship  separation-of-powers  US_constitution  Founders  Madison  Congress  executive  downloaded  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Hanley - U.S. Presidency 1: The Presidential Debate of 1787 | Ordinary Times Jan 28 2014
Abstract -- The lack of a national executive power under the Articles of Confederation was a major factor in the weakness and fragmenting of the American union in the post-Revolutionary era, a point recognized by James Madison and corrected in the Constitution. Opponents of the Constitution, the Anti-Federalists, saw the presidency as an incipient source of tyranny. Rebutting them, Hamilton argued that energy in the executive was critical to competent governance, and that the presidency was sufficiently constrained so that while a president could act as necessary for the good of the union he could not become tyrannical. How do these arguments hold for the contemporary presidency?
US_history  18thC  Early_Republic  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics  Madison  Hamilton  Founders  Federalist  separation-of-powers  executive  prerogative  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Bingham reviews ‘Habeas Corpus’ by Paul Halliday · LRB 7 October 2010
Habeas Corpus: From England to Empire by Paul Halliday Harvard, 502 pp, £29.95, March 2010, ISBN 978 0 674 04901 7 -- The third striking feature is a sombre one: in times of perceived emergency, when the security of the people is trumpeted as the highest political imperative, personal freedom, and with it the remedy of habeas corpus, are the first casualties. But over the 300-year period studied by Halliday the writ earned the eulogistic epithets applied to it: he calculates that more than 11,000 detainees applied for relief, of whom more than half (53 per cent) were released.
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  legal_history  legal_system  Parliament  Glorious_Revolution  civil_liberties  judiciary  separation-of-powers  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Lee Ward: Montesquieu on Federalism and Anglo-Gothic Constitutionalism (2007)
JSTOR: Publius, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Fall, 2007), pp. 551-577 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The common perception that Montesquieu is not a major theorist of federalism is due both to the peripheral nature of his account of confederate republics and his praise of the unitary British Constitution in the "Spirit of the Laws." This study challenges this view by arguing that, despite his endorsement of the separation of powers, Montesquieu had serious reservations about England's highly centralized system of parliamentary sovereignty. Moreover, his most significant reflections on federalism were not contained in his brief treatment of confederate republics, but rather in his lengthy consideration of Gothic constitutionalism. I conclude that Montesquieu's complex constitutional theory involves two distinct dimensions including both the separation of powers exemplified in England and the federal principles in the decentralized Gothic system of medieval France.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  France  French_Enlightenment  British_politics  Montesquieu  Bolingbroke  separation-of-powers  federalism  Parliament  Gothic_constitution  medieval_history  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Sharon Krause: The Spirit of Separate Powers in Montesquieu (2000)
JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Spring, 2000), pp. 231-265 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Montesquieu's theory of separate powers is elaborated in a discussion of the constitution of England in Book XI, chapter 6 of The Spirit of the Laws, which is by far the most discussed section of that work. Many commentators have interpreted the English system straightforwardly as Montesquieu's ideal regime. But while he greatly admires the legal separation of powers in the English constitution, he worries that the spirit of "extreme" liberty among the English could undercut the constitutional separation of powers that protects their liberty. Montesquieu's ambivalence thus raises questions as to what sort of "spirit" a regime must have to sustain a constitution of separate powers and so to preserve individual liberty. His reservations about England are important for understanding his philosophy of liberalism and have broad significance for any polity that seeks to protect individual liberty through a constitution of separate powers.
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september 2013 by dunnettreader

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