dunnettreader + self-examination   11

Table of contents - John Sellars, ed. - The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition (Feb 2016) | Academia.edu
Introduction | Stoicism in Rome | Stoicism in Early Christianity | Plotinus and the Platonic Response to Stoicism | Augustine’s Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions | Boethius and Stoicism | Stoic Themes in Peter Abelard and John of Salisbury | Stoic Influences in the Later Middle Ages | The Recovery of Stoicism in the Renaissance | Stoicism in the Philosophy of the Italian Renaissance | Erasmus, Calvin, and the Faces of Stoicism in Renaissance and Reformation Thought | Justus Lipsius and Neostoicism | Shakespeare and Early Modern English Literature | Medicine of the Mind in Early Modern Philosophy | Stoic Themes in Early Modern French Thought | Spinoza and Stoicism | Leibniz and the Stoics: Fate, Freedom, and Providence | The Epicurean Stoicism of the French Enlightenment | Stoicism and the Scottish Enlightenment | Kant and Stoic Ethics | Stoicism in Nineteenth Century German Philosophy | Stoicism and Romantic Literature | Stoicism in Victorian Culture | Stoicism in America | Stoic Themes in Contemporary Anglo-American Ethics | Stoicism and Twentieth Century French Philosophy | The Stoic Influence on Modern Psychotherapy
books  intellectual_history  Stoicism  ancient_philosophy  Epictetus  Seneca  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Neoplatonism  Augustine  Abelard  John_of_Salisbury  medieval_philosophy  Renaissance  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  Erasmus  Reformation  Calvin  Justus_Lipsius  Neostoicism  philosophy-as-way-of-life  psychology  self  self-examination  self-knowledge  self-development  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Spinoza  Leibniz  fate  determinism  Providence  free_will  freedom  French_Enlightenment  Epicurean  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kant-ethics  German_Idealism  German_scholars  neo-Kantian  Romanticism  literary_history  analytical_philosophy  psychoanalysis  phenomenology 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley, eds. - Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality | Classical Philosophy | Cambridge University Press (hbk 2010, obk 2015)
In honor of A. A. Long: Publications 1963–2009 -- Table of Contents 1. Plato on aporia and self-knowledge, Andrea Wilson Nightingale -- 2. Cross-examining happiness: reason and community in the Socratic dialogues of Plato Sara Ahbel-Rappe -- 3. Inspiration, recollection, and mimesis in Plato's Phaedrus, Kathryn A. Morgan -- 4. Plato's Theaetetus as an ethical dialogue, David Sedley -- 5. Divine contemplating mind, Allan Silverman -- 6. Aristotle and the history of Skepticism, Alan Code -- 7. Stoic selection: objects, actions, and agents, Stephen White -- 8. Beauty and its relation to goodness in Stoicism, Richard Bett -- 9. How dialectical was Stoic dialectic?, Luca Castagnoli -- 10. Socrates speaks in Seneca, De vita beata 24-28, James Ker -- 11. Seneca's Platonism: the soul and its divine origin, Gretchen Reydams-Schils -- 12. The status of the individual in Plotinus, Kenneth Wolfe -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Plato  Platonism  Aristotle  Stoicism  Seneca  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  epistemology-moral  God-attributes  eudaimonia  aporia  soul  imago_dei  virtue_ethics  virtue  self-knowledge  self-examination  self-development  dialectic  beauty  good  sociability  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Pfau - Romantic Moods: Paranoia, Trauma, and Melancholy, 1790–1840 (2005 hbk only) | JHU Press
Thomas Pfau reinterprets the evolution of British and German Romanticism as a progress through three successive dominant moods, each manifested in the "voice" of an historical moment. Drawing on a multifaceted philosophical tradition ranging from Kant to Hegel to Heidegger—incorporating as well the psychosocial analyses of Freud, Benjamin, and Adorno—Pfau develops a new understanding of the Romantic writer's voice as the formal encryption of a complex cultural condition. Pfau focuses on 3 specific paradigms of emotive experience: paranoia, trauma, and melancholy. Along the trajectory of Romantic thought paranoia characterizes the disintegration of traditional models of causation and representation during the French Revolution; trauma, the radical political, cultural, and economic restructuring of Central Europe in the Napoleonic era; and melancholy, the dominant post-traumatic condition of stalled, post-Napoleonic history both in England and on the continent. (..) positions emotion as a "climate of history" to be interpretively recovered from the discursive and imaginative writing in which it is objectively embodied. (..) traces the evolution of Romantic interiority by exploring the deep-seated reverberations of historical change as they become legible in new discursive and conceptual strategies and in the evolving formal-aesthetic construction and reception of Romantic literature. In establishing this relationship between mood and voice, Pfau moves away from the conventional understanding of emotion as something "owned" or exclusively attributable to the individual and toward a theory of mood as fundamentally intersubjective and deserving of broader consideration in the study of Romanticism.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  Romanticism  social_psychology  self  subjectivity  self-examination  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  political_culture  political_discourse  aesthetics  cultural_history  Radical_Enlightenment  radicals  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  worldviews  social_history  change-social  change-intellectual  poetics  rhetoric-political  prose  facebook 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - The Witness of Literature: A Genealogical Sketch | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Intro is afternoon spent at Christian writing conference with his friend the author Frederick Buechner, being constantly interrupted by readers -- almost all of them told the same story: Your writing has meant everything to my Christian faith. I don’t think I could be a Christian without your books.!Throughout that afternoon—rising to greet strangers, then sitting down and striving to remain inconspicuous as they poured out their hearts—I couldn’t help reflecting on the sheer oddity of the situation. These were people, by and large, who knew the Bible, who attended church, who had the benefits of Christian community. Yet they testified, almost to a person, that Christian belief would have been impossible for them without the mediation of the stories told by Frederick Buechner. I know literary history fairly well, especially where it intersects with Christian thought and practice, and it seemed to me that such radical dependence on literary experience would have been virtually impossible even a century earlier. But I also knew that Buechner’s role was anything but unique, that other readers would offer the same testimony to the fiction of Walker Percy or Flannery O’Connor or C.S. Lewis. How did such a state of affairs come about? How did literary writers come to be seen by many as the best custodians and advocates of Christian faith? It is a question with a curious and convoluted genealogy, one worth teasing out. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_lit  reading  fiction  spirituality  Christianity  theology  literary_history  English_lit  faith  religious_experience  identity  subjectivity  self-examination  self-development  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Della Rocca, review - Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide (2013) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 2014
Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 264pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780521111607. -- Reviewed by Michael Della Rocca, Yale University -- What explains the continuing power the Meditations has over us, its ability to shape our ways of philosophical thinking even today? As influential as Descartes' arguments have been, it is certainly not the rational compellingness of those arguments that gives the book its exalted place in philosophy. And while Descartes' departures from Aristotelian philosophy (to the extent that he broke with it) are historically and philosophically important, they do little to explain the lasting and powerful attraction of the Meditations. I will return to this mysterious power at the end of this review. But first I want to show how the many fine and well-selected essays in Karen Detlefsen's volume collectively confirm the widespread conviction that engagement with Descartes remains vital to philosophy. -- first rate group of authors, including Garber on Descartes's response to Hobbes's objections re substance
books  reviews  17thC  intellectual_history  Descartes  Hobbes  Locke  metaphysics  epistemology  substance  scepticism  cogito  perception  qualia  natural_philosophy  self  self-knowledge  self-examination  theology  scholastics  Aristotelian  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Srinivas Aravamudan - Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel (2011) 360 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
A MUST BUY -- Srinivas Aravamudan here reveals how Oriental tales, pseudo-ethnographies, sexual fantasies, and political satires took Europe by storm during the eighteenth century. Naming this body of fiction Enlightenment Orientalism, he poses a range of urgent questions that uncovers the interdependence of Oriental tales and domestic fiction, thereby challenging standard scholarly narratives about the rise of the novel. More than mere exoticism, Oriental tales fascinated ordinary readers as well as intellectuals, taking the fancy of philosophers such as Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Diderot in France, and writers such as Defoe, Swift, and Goldsmith in Britain. Aravamudan shows that Enlightenment Orientalism was a significant movement that criticized irrational European practices even while sympathetically bridging differences among civilizations. A sophisticated reinterpretation of the history of the novel, Enlightenment Orientalism is sure to be welcomed as a landmark work in eighteenth-century studies.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  literary_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  fiction  novels  lit_crit  literary_theory  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_lit  orientalism  Defoe  Swift  Voltaire  Diderot  Montesquieu  Behn  Manley  Montagu_Lady_Mary  realism  empiricism  moral_philosophy  self  subjectivity  self-examination  self-and-other  self-knowledge  travel  romances  satire  utopian  exploration  cultural_critique  Biblical_criticism  philology  antiquaries  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  chronology  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  xenophobia  national_ID  racialism  colonialism  imperialism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Francisco Rico - Pétrarque au partage de midi | Italique, VII, 2004, 9-26
Italique [En ligne], VII | 2004, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.124. **--** dans voi ch’ascoltate comme en bien des endroits de l’œuvre de Pétrarque – qu’il s’agisse de prose ou de vers, de latin ou de langue vulgaire –, «errore» constitue à peu de choses près un terme technique emprunté à la tradition stoïcienne pour désigner la falsa opinio qui trouble la vision du commun des mortels, alimente les « speranze », le « dolore » et les autres affectus ou perturbationes animi, provoque la désagrégation de l’esprit en « pensieri » aussi « sparsi » que les rimes venant les refléter. De toute évidence, Pétrarque apparaît ici comme un « altr’ uom » : il n’est plus ce qu’il était autrefois, il arbore désormais l’air grave du sage stoïcien et n’hésite pas à dénoncer les poèmes du canzoniere comme autant de rerum vulgarium fragmenta dans leur fond et dans leur forme, comme de vulgaires morceaux dignes du « popol » ignorant. Il ne s’agit pas ici d’une simple fiction plus ou moins placée sous le signe des précédents bien connus offerts par la littérature latine et les troubadours : à plusieurs reprises, l’illustre Italien dont nous commémorons le septième centenaire a voulu se convertir en « altr’ uom » et y est parvenu. -- J’aimerais attirer un instant votre attention sur un des moments décisifs de cette trajectoire passionnée et émouvante : ce moment du partage de midi où, à la croisée des chemins, déjà à l’âge mûr, Pétrarque résout les incertitudes qui l’avaient hanté durant ses longues années de formation et s’engage d’un pas ferme sur la voie qui le conduira à son plein épanouissement, à la fois en tant qu’écrivain et en tant qu’homme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  religious_history  14thC  Italy  Renaissance  humanism  Italian_lit  Petrarch  poetry  poetics  Stoicism  epistemology  epistemology-moral  perception  moral_philosophy  theology  self-examination  self-fashioning  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Arnaud Tripet - Pétrarque, la parole silencieuse | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 9-25.
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.112. *--* Les historiens s’accordent en général pour attribuer à Pétrarque une place inaugurale dans la culture dite humaniste, une culture qui sacrifie avant tout aux divinités de la parole. On restitue alors celle des Anciens. On valorise le verbe en lui conférant un pouvoir inédit sur les âmes, la capacité de les convertir au bien, au vrai et au beau. Son œuvre tant latine qu’italienne fournirait presque à l’infini des citations où la puissance bienfaisante du discours est proclamée au sein d’une épiphanie antique de la sagesse. Bientôt, et sous son influence, vont se créer en Italie, puis en Europe des écoles parallèles à celles déjà en place. Dans leurs programmes humanistes, le traditionnel trivium ne suffira plus, avec la logique, la rhétorique et la grammaire, pour qualifier les disciplines du langage en vue de la maîtrise ès arts. Va s’ajouter l’étude de l’histoire et de la poésie, laquelle n’existait précédemment que comme une variante de la rhétorique. Le souci d’élégance expressive ira de pair avec une certaine laïcisation des contenus. Humanisme dont on dira en simplifiant outrancièrement qu’il se construit ad maiorem hominis gloriam, de l’homme « parlant » en tout cas, et tenté souvent par une copia un peu complaisante, voire incontinente. Une question se pose alors : le silence va-t-il tempérer cette abondance ? Va-t-il nuancer la tentation de croire que le mot a valeur ontologique, et que l’on est ce qu’on dit ? Va-t-il suggérer que l’on est tout autant ce qu’on tait ? Sans autre préambule, je voudrais produire deux exemples tirés de Pétrarque. Ils parlent d’eux-mêmes et le silence y prend rang avec pleine dignité dans son discours.
article  revues.org  14thC  15thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  Italy  Italian_lit  humanism  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  self-fashioning  liberal_arts  historiography-Renaissance  exempla  vernacular  eloquence  self-government  self-examination  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Kapp - Les Exempla dans les Triumphi et la culture oratoire de Pétrarque | Italique, XII, 2009, p. 9-31.
Italique [En ligne], XII | 2009, mis en ligne le 01 novembre 2012 - DOI : 10.4000/italique.220 *--* Les réserves des lecteurs du XXIe siècle contrastent avec le succès fulminant des Triumphi au Quattrocento dans les domaines littéraire et artistique. Le nombre élevé de manuscrits, ... confirme la haute estime dont ils jouirent pendant la Renaissance...pour ne pas parler des tableaux consacrés au thème du triomphe et influencés, plus ou moins, par Pétrarque. Pour expliquer ce changement surprenant des paramè­tres de la réception, on peut invoquer les divergences qui nous séparent de la civilisation humaniste.-- Et n’est-il pas légitime de renvoyer à la rhétorique qui caractérise l’humanisme européen précisément depuis Pétrarque dont on connaît l’ambition de se détacher par-là de la littérature et de la philosophie médiévales ? ...Nous proposons d’analyser cette problématique en insistant sur la figure rhétorique de l’exemplum. Afin de saisir l’impact de ce procédé à l’intérieur de la culture oratoire de Pétrarque, il faudra identifier quelques figures dans cette poésie, situer celle-ci parmi les formes du discours et évaluer ce qu’on a qualifié de « passion archéologique » de notre auteur, passion, dont relèvent les exempla tant dans son œuvre historique que dans les Triumphi. -- montrer que les exempla servent à mettre en scène le théâtre de la mémoire dans lequel le 'je' lyrique explore les présupposées et les enjeux de son éloge lyrique de Laure. Toute réflexion sur la rhétorique de Pétrarque doit partir de l’affinité entre l’art oratoire et la philosophie morale qu’il ne cesse de postuler. Cette convic­tion qu’il tire de Cicéron marque le dialogue intitulé De eloquentia du De remediis utriusque fortune. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  Petrarch  poetics  neo-Latin  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  humanism  Renaissance  Cicero  moral_philosophy  exempla  oratory  self-examination  reception  rhetoric-moral_basis  eloquence  Quintillian  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Abelard  aesthetics  alienation  analytical_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  antiquaries  aporia  Aristotelian  Aristotle  article  Augustine  authenticity  authority  beauty  Behn  Biblical_criticism  bibliography  books  British_history  buy  Calvin  change-intellectual  change-social  Christianity  chronology  Cicero  cogito  colonialism  community  comparative_anthropology  comparative_religion  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  cultural_authority  cultural_capital  cultural_critique  cultural_history  Defoe  Descartes  determinism  dialectic  Diderot  downloaded  Early_Christian  early_modern  EF-add  eloquence  emotions  empiricism  English_lit  Enlightenment  enthusiasm  Epictetus  Epicurean  epistemology  epistemology-moral  Erasmus  eudaimonia  Europe-Early_Modern  exempla  exploration  facebook  faith  fate  fiction  France  freedom  free_will  French_Enlightenment  French_lit  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  gender  Germany  German_Idealism  German_scholars  God-attributes  good  Hellenism  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historiography-Renaissance  Hobbes  humanism  identity  imago_dei  imperialism  intellectual_history  Italian_lit  Italian_Renaissance  Italy  John_of_Salisbury  jstor  Justus_Lipsius  Kant-ethics  kindle-available  late_antiquity  Leibniz  liberal_arts  literary_history  literary_theory  lit_crit  Locke  Manley  masculinity  masses-fear_of  mechanism  medicine  medieval_philosophy  metaphysics  Montagu_Lady_Mary  Montesquieu  moral_philosophy  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  national_ID  natural_philosophy  neo-Kantian  neo-Latin  Neoplatonism  Neostoicism  novels  oratory  orientalism  perception  Petrarch  phenomenology  philology  philosophy-as-way-of-life  Plato  Platonism  Plotinus  poetics  poetry  politeness  political_culture  political_discourse  popular_culture  power-knowledge  print_culture  prose  Providence  psychoanalysis  psychology  public_disorder  public_sphere  qualia  Quintillian  racialism  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  rationality  reading  realism  reception  Reformation  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  religious_history  religious_lit  Renaissance  reviews  revues.org  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  romances  Romanticism  satire  scepticism  scholastics  science-and-religion  science-public  scientific_method  Scientific_Revolution  Scottish_Enlightenment  secularization  self  self-and-other  self-control  self-development  self-examination  self-fashioning  self-government  self-interest  self-knowledge  Seneca  sentimentalism  Shaftesbury  Shakespeare  Shakespeare-influence  sociability  social_history  social_psychology  soul  Spinoza  spirituality  status  Stoicism  subjectivity  sublime  substance  Swift  theology  travel  utopian  vernacular  virtue  virtue_ethics  Voltaire  worldviews  xenophobia 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: