dunnettreader + riots   7

Katrina Navickas, review - Ian Haywood, John Seed,eds., The Gordon Riots: Politics, Culture and Insurrection in Late Eighteenth-Century Britain (2012) | IHR Reviews in History
Reviewer: Dr Katrina Navickas, University of Hertfordshire -- Ian Haywood and John Seed’s volume of essays fills a significant gap in the historiography of popular protest in the 18th century. There has been little in-depth research into the Gordon Riots since George Rude’s influential analyses in the 1960s. This lack of new research seems even more anomalous given the recent revival of interest in the politics of riot in the 18th century. So why has it taken until now? One reason is because the Gordon riots have always been an awkward topic. They do not fit into the classic narrative of landmark events in Whig/radical/Marxist/labour history. The power of the crowd during the American Revolution is generally presumed to be for the good, for progress and democracy, and not for reaction and religious hatred. Scholars on the left have shared an assumption – and indeed sometimes a desire to believe – that violent anti-Catholicism was a feature of the turmoils of the 17th century, not the tolerant Augustan and Enlightened Britain of the late 18th century. Rudé and E. P. Thompson offered a more nuanced view of the ‘faces in the crowd’, showing how the riots ‘had a political logic rooted in popular economic and social grievances’. A couple of decades ago, Nicholas Rogers and Kathleen Wilson further unpicked the socio-economic factors contributing to the events of June 1780. Nevertheless, the riots have been generally regarded as an anomaly in the national story of progress. - still expensive and not kindle-available
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  18thC  British_history  British_politics  London  social_history  politics-and-religion  Gordon_Riots  riots  popular_politics  popular_culture  public_disorder  lower_orders  criminal_justice  crowds  anti-Catholic  popery  Test_and_Corporation_Acts  religious_culture  moral_economy  protests  tolerance  Catholic_emancipation  Catholics-England  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael J. Braddick - Popular Politics and Public Policy: The Excise Riot at Smithfield in February 1647 and Its Aftermath | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Sep., 1991), pp. 597-626
Historiographical split between those who see excise protests as political instability and economic historians who love excise taxes for all the revenue it brings in - need a better approach to linking public protest and policies -- part of Braddick program on public finance and where policies actually played out so useful historiography and bibliography-- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  social_history  economic_history  political_culture  public_finance  public_disorder  popular_politics  political_economy  17thC  British_politics  excise  taxes  riots  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  crowds  protests  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jessica Warner and Frank Ivis - "Damn You, You Informing Bitch." Vox Populi and the Unmaking of the Gin Act of 1736 | JSTOR: Journal of Social History, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Winter, 1999), pp. 299-330
This study examines the interaction between legislation and popular culture, with a particular emphasis on the extent to which popular resistance undermined enforcement of the Gin Act of 1736. It is argued that popular resistance, while significant, had no effect on policy until members of the middle classes intervened in an attempt to restore the social relations that had existed before the Act took effect. It was only at this point that the Act became a dead letter. In this role members of the middle classes functioned as mediators between two cultures, one plebeian, the other patrician. As such, our findings suggest that the dialectic of plebeian culture and patrician culture, as variously articulated by E.P. Thompson, may be excessively stark, especially when applied to a setting as dense and heterogenous as early Hanoverian London. Our findings also suggest that working men and women in the capital worked and socialized side by side, sometimes as drinking companions, and sometimes as professional informers. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  18thC  British_politics  classes  class_conflict  lower_orders  middle_class  elites  public_policy  Parliament  law_enforcement  London  public_disorder  popular_culture  popular_politics  gin_craze  1730s  riots  moral_economy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan White - The “Slow but Sure Poyson”: The Representation of Gin and Its Drinkers, 1736–1751 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 42, No. 1 (January 2003), pp. 35-64
It can often seem that William Hogarth's famous Gin Lane (1751) says all that would ever need to be said about the “gin craze” of the early eighteenth century. The engraving has come to be virtually identified with its subject, revealing and circumscribing possible histories within its familiar lines. Yet, Gin Lane appeared at a determinate moment, chronologically marking the end of the gin craze and the culmination of one phase in the history of proletarian drinking. During this phase, as I will argue, there were significant changes in both the social conditions and relations that shaped laboring-class drinking and the ideas through which the propertied classes attempted to understand and control it. That this has not been argued before suggests how many historians have approached this phenomenon as a distinct social problem with fairly simple, basic features. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  18thC  British_history  British_politics  lower_orders  popular_culture  popular_politics  gin_craze  public_disorder  crime  violence  riots  public_opinion  Parliament  taxes  Whigs-oligarchy  1730s  1740s  Hogarth  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Rollison - The Specter of the Commonalty: Class Struggle and the Commonweal in England before the Atlantic World | JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 63, No. 2 (Apr., 2006), pp. 221-252
Part of what he developed as his book on the long commonwealth tradition and popular politics in England from early medieval period onwards. This article more academic and footnoted, so excellent bibliography as well as shorter version of a key part of his argument. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  kindle  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  15thC  16thC  17thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  popular_politics  populism  riots  commonwealth  body_politic  class_conflict  social_history  historiography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Frank O'Gorman, review essay - Approaches to Hanoverian Society JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2 (Jun., 1996), pp. 521-534
(1) Philanthropy and Police: London Charity in the Eighteenth Century by Donna T. Andrew; *--* (2) The Language of Liberty: Political Discourse and Social Dynamics in the Anglo-American World by J. C. D. Clark; *--* (3) Stilling the Grumbling Hive. The Response to Social and Economic Problems in England, 1689-1750 by L. Davison; *--* (4) Riot, Risings and Revolution. Governance and Violence in Eighteenth- Century England by Ian Gilmour; *--* (5) A Patriot Press. National Politics and the London Press in the 1740s by Robert Harris; *--* (6) Judging New Wealth. Popular Publishing and Responses to Commerce in England, 1750-1850 by James Raven; *--* (7)The Local Origins of Modern Society. Gloucestershire 1500-1800 by David Rollison; *--* (8) An Imperial State at War: Britain from 1689 to 1815 by Lawrence Stone; *--* (9) Protest and Survival: The Historical Experience. Essays for E. P. Thompson by John Rule; Robert Malcolmson -- downloaded pdf to Note
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january 2014 by dunnettreader

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