dunnettreader + right-wing   38

Why Italy's Election Is Such a Mess
No one knows what will happen when Italy votes on Sunday. Polling is inconclusive, and the electoral rules are brand-new. In an attempt to make some sense of…
Italy  populism  right-wing  voting  elections  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Martin Longman - Making Political Analysis Easy - Sept 8 2017
What did I say? President Donald Trump on Friday delivered a message to congressional Republicans, essentially telling them their inaction led him to cut a deal…
US_politics  Congress  GOP  right-wing  Trump  fiscal_policy  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Martin Longman - The Debt Limit is Not the Issue - Sept 8 2017
I have to admit that I’m a little frustrated with the narrative that’s been built up around Donald Trump’s decision to side with Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi…
US_politics  Congress  GOP  right-wing  Trump  fiscal_policy  Democrats  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Kevin Drum - President Trump's tweet's are not for you
Over the past 24 hours, Donald Trump has tweeted that (a) he plans to send the feds into Chicago if they don't fix their crime problem, (b) he will be ordering…
Instapaper  Trump  political_press  GOP  Fox_News  right-wing  from instapaper
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Our failures of political rhetoric are asymmetric | xpostfactoid
The study of rhetoric can yield great insights into the way power is structured and masses of people are moved. But those who study rhetoric closely are prone…
Instapaper  US_politics  rhetoric-political  media-political  GOP  right-wing  Democrats  democracy  polarization  from instapaper
september 2016 by dunnettreader
M Funke, M Schularick, C Trebesch - The political aftermath of financial crises: Going to extremes | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 21 November 2015
Recent events in Europe provide ample evidence that the political aftershocks of financial crises can be severe. This column uses a new dataset that covers elections and crises in 20 advanced economies going back to 1870 to systematically study the political aftermath of financial crises. Far-right parties are the biggest beneficiaries of financial crises, while the fractionalisation of parliaments complicates post-crisis governance. These effects are not observed following normal recessions or severe non-financial macroeconomic shocks.
economic_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  financial_crisis  political_culture  democracy  right-wing  extremism  governance 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeet Heer - Sex, Economics, and Austerity | The American Prospect - 2013
John Maynard Keynes was the sexiest economist who ever lived. This might seem like half-hearted praise since in our mind’s eye the typical economist appears as… On the decades of right-wing attacks on Keynes and Keynesianism using sexual "immorality" as linked to purported moral failings of Keynes' policy responses from Versailles onward.
article  Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  21stC  Keynes  Keynesianism  economic_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  Great_Depression  right-wing  neoconservatism  fiscal_policy  budget_deficit  austerity  economics-and-morality  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - The last crusade - Eurozine - Nov 2011
Original in The New Humanist June 2011 -- The claim that Christianity provides the bedrock of Western culture might serve the interests of extremists, but it is a betrayal of a far more complex history. In the warped mind of Anders Breivik, his murderous rampages in Oslo and Utoya earlier this year were the first shots in a war in defence of Christian Europe. Not a religious war but a cultural one, to defend what Breivik called Europe's "cultural, social, identity and moral platform". Few but the most psychopathic can have any sympathy for Breivik's homicidal frenzy. Yet the idea that Christianity provides the foundations of Western civilisation, and of its political ideals and ethical values, and that Christian Europe is under threat, from Islam on the one side and "cultural Marxists" on the other, finds a widespread hearing. The erosion of Christianity, in this narrative, will lead inevitably to the erosion of Western civilisation and to the end of modern, liberal democracy. -- useful roundup of the pundits and publishers churning out these claims -- downloaded pdf to Note
Europe  cultural_history  identity_politics  collective_memory  cultural_authority  grand_narrative  culture_wars  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Christendom  bad_history  narrative-contested  morality-Christian  morality-divine_command  relativism  modernity  anti-secularization  post-secular  rights-legal  rights-political  human_rights  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  right-wing  Judeo-Christian  secular_humanism  anti-humanism  religious_history  religious_culture  Islamic_civilization  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Stoicism  New_Testament  Augustine  original_sin  memory-cultural  memory-group  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Luca Corchia - Europe: The debate between Habermas and Streeck about the Left and Europe’s future | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 25 March 2014
Over the next few months the press and television networks will one again focus on European events, returning the interest of Italian public opinion to these matters, and this will take place on the basis of the pressing timeframe dictated by political issues. In a few weeks’ time the election campaign for a European Union’s parliament, scheduled for May 22-25, will be fully under way in all 28 member states. -- check out footnotes -- downloaded pdf to Note
EU  EU_governance  Eurozone  ECB  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  Greece-Troika  democracy  democracy_deficit  legitimacy  elections  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capitalism-varieties  capital_as_power  Eurosceptic  European_integration  elites  elites-self-destructive  parties  social_democracy  right-wing  nationalism  nation-state  national_interest  political_press  political_culture  economic_culture  Habermas 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jay Tolson, Return of the Repressed - review of Michael Walzer, The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Yale University Press, 2015 -- The paradox explored in this short book, which grew out of the Henry L. Stimson lectures at Yale University, can be summed up in a single question: Why did so many states that gained independence in the post–World War II era and were founded on secular and democratic ideals soon face the powerful challenges of religious revivalism? Walzer’s inquiry into the inability of “the leaders and militants of secular liberation…to consolidate their achievements and reproduce themselves” focuses on three cases: Israel, where the secularist ideology of Labor Zionism now meets with powerful opposition from champions of a more messianic strain of Zionism as well as ultra-Orthodox Judaism; Algeria, where the secularist (and, briefly, democratic) ideals of the National Liberation Front have been repeatedly challenged and were nearly overturned by militant Islamists; and India, where the ambitious reform program of Jawaharlal Nehru’s Congress party has come up against the fervor and electoral successes of Hindu nationalists determined to assert their primacy within the constitutional order. -- behind paywall
books  kindle-available  reviews  paywall  political_history  20thC  post-colonial  nationalism  national_ID  national_origins  national_tale  politics-and-religion  secularism  secularization  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  opposition  modernity  modernization_theory  images-political  Israel  Islamist_fundamentalists  Judaism  Algeria  India  Indian_religion  Hinduism  right-wing  civil_liberties  civil_society  civility-political  tolerance  majoritarian  constitutionalism  post-WWII  religion-fundamentalism  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  populism 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jack M. Balkin -The Last Days of Disco: Why the American Political System is Dysfunctional :: SSRN - Boston University Law Review, Vol. 94, 2014
...what looks like constitutional dysfunction is actually constitutional transition, (..)Americans last experienced this sense of dysfunction during the late 1970s and early 1980s (..) the transition to a new constitutional regime will be far more difficult than those effected in 1932 and 1980. (1) the growth of the modern state and changes in the role of the presidency mean that even the most politically adept and fortunate presidents face greater obstacles to implementing transformative change than they once did; they are less able than past reconstructive leaders to disrupt existing institutions and clear the ground for a new politics. This, by itself, does not prevent the emergence of a new constitutional regime. But (2) the current transition will be especially difficult because we are near the peak of a long cycle of increasing polarization between the nation’s two major political parties. That polarization greatly raises the stakes of a transition to a new constitutional regime. The defenders of the old order have every incentive to resist the emergence of a new regime until the bitter end. A long and frustrating transition will have important side effects. (1) a dysfunctional Congress tempts the Executive to act unilaterally, (..). Future presidents may use these new sources of power even when the period of dysfunction has passed. (2) sustained political dysfunction also tends to empower the judiciary vis-à-vis Congress. Moreover, judges appointed by the older dominant party, late in the regime, are less likely to engage in judicial restraint and more likely to push the jurisprudential envelope. This helps explain some of the Roberts Court's recent work. -- PDF File: 40 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  US_politics  US_constitution  SCOTUS  exec_branch  US_President  Congress  US_judiciary  separation-of-powers  faction  GOP  Democrats  legal_history  political_change  political_culture  legal_culture  originalism  change-social  power-asymmetric  ideology  conflict  competition-political  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  government-forms  government-roles  polarization  policymaking  political_gridlock  limited_government  judicial_review  conservatism  right-wing  political_participation  rule_of_law  instrumentalist  means-justify-ends  legitimacy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott McConnell - How the GOP Became the Israel Party | The American Conservative - April 2015
He sees it as a long march of the neocons through the GOP-oriented institutions, with The Weekly Standard playing a key role as ideological enforcer from the 1990s (post GHW Bush administration). He recounts how National Review and figures like Buchanan and Novak had an audience for nationalist-based scepticism of lockstep support for Israeli policies, and that Murdoch and the Kristol folks succeeded in making those positions unspeakable within Beltway-accepted polite discourse on the right -- clearly one reason why he helped found AmCon, since NR caved to the neocons and became ideological enforcers themselves. He doesn't see the Christian Zionist support as suddenly becoming more vocal, rabid or effective at enforcing single-issue discipline -- if anything, the Evangelicals are seeing fissures as the Israeli bombing campaigns, settler intransigence, and the reality of occupation has become visible to more Americans. The SCOTUS-authorized tsunami of money into US politics from ultra Likudnik billionaires is a factor, but its effect has been more the final cementing of uniform ultra-rightwing Israeli support from all corners of the GOP -- no one who wants to run for office on the national level as a Republican can even contemplate the least bit of daylight from the Israeli far right. And there aren't any important policy players on the right who have staked out "moderate" pro Israel positions who could create credible space for a GOP politician to take a position to the left of Bibi. The decades of investment in think tanks and Middle East policy shops promoted by the neocons and their affiliated deep-pocket funders made the career opportunities for GOP-leaning foreign policy types nearly exclusively on the far right, and 9/11 and the Iraq war created an enormous further expansion of energy, ideological discipline and funding. Leaving few alternatives for up and coming careerists and politicians.
US_politics  US_foreign_policy  GOP  neoconservatism  political_press  propaganda  politics-and-money  Israel  right-wing  Evangelical  Zionist  millennarian  Islamophobia  Likud  Iran  diplomacy  arms_control 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Grillot & Pauline Peretz - Interview with William Novak and James Sparrow - The American State: Power Obscured | Nov 2011 - Books & ideas
Tags : welfare state | state | war | law | France | United States of America -- Finding the American state where historians never looked before: this could be the motto of the new history of the state, of which William Novak and James Sparrow are two of the strongest advocates. To capture the specificity of state formation in the U.S., they encourage historians to look at the mutual constitution of state and society, instead of taking their separation for granted. Their approach is key to understanding the current legitimation crisis undergone by the American state. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_government  US_history  US_politics  state-building  state-roles  19thC  20thC  anti-statist  right-wing  rights-legal  rights-political  centralization  central_government  ideology  libertarianism  market_fundamentalism  historiography  political_science  political_culture  sociology-process  legitimacy  power  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Housby - Book Review: American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism by Matthew Avery Sutton | LSE Review of Books
American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism. Matthew Avery Sutton. Harvard University Press. Harvard University Press. 2014. -- With American Apocalypse, Matthew Avery Sutton aims to draw on extensive archival research to document the ways an initially obscure network of charismatic preachers and their followers reshaped American religion, at home and abroad, for over a century. Elaine Housby is impressed with this readable contribution.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_culture  religious_belief  US_politics  evangelical  apocalyptic  right-wing  New_Deal  social_gospel  nativism  GOP  eschatology  millennarian  Israel  US_foreign_policy  segregation  Black_churches  Bible-as-history  Biblical_exegesis  revelation  prophets 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob Weisberg, review essay - Bridge Too Far - Rick Perlstein, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan | Democracy Journal - Issue #34, Fall 2014
Rick Perlstein’s account of Ronald Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity, but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough. --
The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan By Rick Perlstein • Simon & Schuster • 2014 • 810 pages -- see Perlstein’s response -- both downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rick Perlstein - The Reason for Reagan, A response to Jacob Weisberg. | Democracy Journal: Issue #35, Winter 2015
In 1984, the year Reagan won 49 states and 59 percent of the popular vote, only 35 percent of Americans said they favored substantial cuts in social programs in order to reduce the deficit. Given these plain facts, historiography on the rise of conservatism and the triumph of Ronald Reagan must obviously go beyond the deadening cliché that since Ronald Reagan said government was the problem, and Americans elected Ronald Reagan twice, the electorate simply agreed with him that government was the problem. But in his recent review of my book The Invisible Bridge [“A Bridge Too Far,” Issue #34], Jacob Weisberg just repeats that cliché—and others. “Rick Perlstein’s account of Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity,” the article states, “but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough.” Weisberg is confident those reasons are obvious. Is he right? -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott Montgomery - The Shape of the New: Four Big Ideas and How They Made the Modern World:Amazon:Books
Princeton U Press - release May 2015 - A testament to the enduring power of ideas, The Shape of the New offers unforgettable portraits of Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, Charles Darwin, and Karl Marx--heirs of the Enlightenment who embodied its highest ideals about progress--and shows how their thoughts, over time and in the hands of their followers and opponents, transformed the very nature of our beliefs, institutions, economies, and politics. Yet these ideas also hold contradictions. They have been used in the service of brutal systems such as slavery and colonialism, been appropriated and twisted by monsters like Stalin and Hitler, and provoked reactions against the Enlightenment's legacy by Islamic Salafists and the Christian Religious Right. The Shape of the New argues that it is impossible to understand the ideological and political conflicts of our own time without familiarizing ourselves with the history and internal tensions of these world-changing ideas. With passion and conviction, it exhorts us to recognize the central importance of these ideas as historical forces and pillars of the Western humanistic tradition. It makes the case that to read the works of the great thinkers is to gain invaluable insights into the ideas that have shaped how we think and what we believe.
19thc  books  kindle-available  modernity  political_philosophy  ideology  totalitarian  right-wing  fundamentalism  culture_wars  humanism  anti-humanism  postmodern  sociology_of_religion  science-and-religion  politics-and-religion  social_epistemology  20thc  Smith  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  counter-Enlightenment  18thc  21stc  political_economy  intellectual_history  Smoth  Jefferson  Hamilton  Marx  Darwin 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Chris Dillow - Blair the ideologue | Stumbling & Mumbling Jan 2015
In his interview with the Economist, Tony Blair seems like a sad old man living in the past. He says that "the Labour Party succeeds best when it is in the centre ground" - something which entails "not alienating large parts of business, for one thing”. What this misses is that things have changed since the 1990s. What worked for Labour then might well not work now. What I mean is that in the 1990s Labour could plausibly offer positive-sum redistribution and could therefore please both left and right. (..) Such policies were centrist, vote-winning and (within limits) reasonable economics. However, we don't live in the 90s any more. There are at least five big differences between then and now.
political_economy  20thC  21stC  UK_politics  UK_evonomy  Labour  Tories  right-wing  parties  neoliberalism  public_opinion  Blair_Tony 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Merkel attacks wave of rightwing populism - FT.com Jan 2015
In a hard-hitting new year broadcast, Europe’s most powerful leader led the charge against Europe’s far-right parties, slamming the organisers of recent anti-Islam protests in Germany as having hearts “often full of prejudice, and even hate”. - also tough words for Putin, calling for EU cohesion against Russian aggression - bragging re her government's accomplishments & upbeat re Getmany's domestic situation, she's cashing in that credibility to go after the real threat, which is tight-wing extremism, leading up to ehat will be fifficult negotiations with the Greek left
EU  Eurozone  Germany  Merkel  right-wing  immigration  refugees  Russia  Ukraine  Greece  austerity  sovereign_debt 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
David Fiderer - Guest Post: A Review of Fragile By Design | Next New Deal - Nov 2014
There’s only one reason why The Big Lie seemed so plausible to so many people. The polite word for it is social stereotyping. -- Calomiris and Haber write “At the core of this bargain was a coalition of two very unlikely partners: rapidly growing megabanks and activist groups that promoted expansion of risky mortgage lending to poor and intercity borrowers, such as the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN).” They reference ACORN 11 times. -- And the GSEs did hold about $225 billion of the most senior tranches of private mortgage securities. Court filings and settlements indicate that most of the losses were caused by fraud -- When the GSEs were taken over by the government in September 2008, Fannie’s serious delinquency rate was 1.36%, well below levels seen in the mid-1980s. And Freddie’s serious delinquency rate, 0.93%, was lower than the lowest national average ever recorded by the Mrtg Bnkrs Assoc. According to the MBA, the nationwide serious delinquency rate as of June 30, 2008 was 4.5% For subprime mortgages it was almost 18% -- The irony is rich. This private label securitization system was built over decades, and at every step of the expansion of this predatory and abusive lending system conservative economists were there lending support. Calomiris in particular was an active participant, fighting against any prohibition against single premium credit insurance, opposing prohibitions on loans based on housing collateral that disregarded a borrower’s ability to repay, and writing in 1999 that 125 percent LTV lending was no big deal.
books  reviews  kindle-available  economic_history  financial_system  financial_regulation  financial_crisis  Great_Recession  housing  banking  securitization  GSEs  right-wing  bad_economics  bad_history  capital_markets  shadow_banking  NBFI  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - AS I WAS SAYING ABOUT UKIP… | Pandaemonium October 2014
The debate abound UKIP swirls unabated after its success in winning the Clacton by-election from the Conervatives, and in almost winning Heywood and Middleton from Labour. There remains considerable confusion about the nature of the UKIP phenomenon (the clarifying work of academics such as Matthew Goodwin and Rob Ford has been useful here). There is even greater confusion over how to challenge it. I have been writing about UKIP and immigration for a while now. So I thought I would pull together the main themes of that writing, to set out the main arguments from my previous articles about UKIP and the challenge that it poses. -- with the Lib-Dems in the coalition, they're no longer the safe protest vote -- and the UKIP phenomenon is more a matter of disaffection from all the mainstream politics than a classic "protest vote" -- links to a series of posts that also reflects on the Scottish vote, EU protest parties and the "left behind" that are politically disaffected but their "politics" is cultural and tribal rather than traditional class-based or typical left-right ideology patterns
21stC  UK_politics  EU_governance  parties  right-wing  elections  links 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ruben Andersson - TIME TO UNFENCE OUR VIEW OF MIGRATION | Pandaemonium
Ruben Andersson is an anthropologist at LSE’s Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit, and the author of Illegality, Inc: Clandestine migration and the business of bordering Europe. He recently published a post on the LSE politics blog which described how immigration border fences feed the very problem they supposedly address. I am delighted to be able to republish it on Pandaemonium.
Ruben Andersson -- Migration panic is upon Calais yet again. Amid desperate and determined attempts by refugees and migrants to clamber over fences or scramble to reach UK-bound ferries, the media have over the past month painted a picture of yet another impending invasion. Police have launched crackdowns; far-right extremists have massed on the city; and French politicians have lobbied hard for a stronger British involvement in controls. In response to the chaos, the UK first offered to send France the ‘ring of steel’ fences recently used at the NATO summit; now it has pledged £12m over three years, earmarked – among other things – for the building of robust security barriers around Calais port. Fencing, the UK immigration minister has made clear, is one key element in efforts to ‘send out a very clear message… [that] Britain is no soft touch when it comes to illegal immigration’. -- Ruben Andersson’s book Illegality, Inc will be launched at the LSE on 14 October with a public discussion, Secure the borders: The cost and consequences of Europe’s ‘fight against irregular migration’. He tweets at @Ruben_Andersson. -- lots of links including absurd US SBI
21stC  nation-state  geography  migration  Labor_markets  EU  EU_governance  right-wing  EU-foreign_policy  US_government  US_politics  links 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Three Ways of Explaining the Rise of “Law and Economics,” and Also, One Way (Guest Post by Sara Mayeux) | s-usih.org
So, how did law and economics go from an oddball preoccupation of a few Chicago professors to one of the dominant intellectual frameworks for thinking and talking about law? Here are three recent accounts, each emphasizing a different causal mechanism: the two chapters on law and economics in Steven Teles’s book The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement; the discussion of law and economics in Rodgers’s Age of Fracture; and Brad Snyder’s recent article “The Former Clerks Who Nearly Killed Judicial Restraint.”
intellectual_history  20thC  US_legal_system  legal_theory  law-and-economics  judiciary  postmodern  neoliberalism  conservatism  right-wing  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert M. Solow, review essay - Hayek, Friedman, and the Illusions of Conservative Economics | New Republic - Dec 2012
Review essay of The Great Persuasion: Reinventing Free Markets since the Depression By Angus Burgin -- starting in late 1930s - Good Hayek vs Bad Hayek and lots on Uncle Milton - Solow doesn't think much of the influence of the Mont Pèlerin Society and sees a lot of contingency in the political rise of Thatcher and Reagan -- but agrees re Friedman's effective sales job of anti-intellectual and anti-empirical extreme dogma
books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  conservatism  laisser-faire  right-wing  Hayek  Friedman_Milton  mixed_economy  capitalism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - The Tale Of Two Middle Classes | Yale Global -July 2014
Far Right in Europe starting to agitate re middle class incomes in Asia growing vs stagnating or declining in West -- The rich have benefited immensely from globalization and they have keen interest in its continuation. But while their use of political power has enabled the continuation of globalization, it has also hollowed out national democracies and moved many countries closer to becoming plutocracies. Thus, the choice would seem either plutocracy and globalization – or populism and a halt to globalization. Another solution, one that involves neither populism nor plutocracy, would imply more substantial redistribution policies in the rich world. Some of the gains of the top 5 percent could go toward alleviating the anger of the lower- and middle-class rich world’s “losers.” These need not nor should be mere transfers of money from one group to another. Instead, money should come in the form of investments in public education, local infrastructure, housing and preventive health care. But the history of the last quarter century during which the top classes in the rich world have continually piled up larger and larger gains, all the while socially and mentally separating themselves from fellow citizens, does not bode well for that alternative.
international_political_economy  globalization  plutocracy  populism  right-wing  democracy  1-percent  public_goods  infrastructure  finance_capital  politics-and-money  OECD_economies  economic_growth  protectionism  trade-policy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Milan Zafirovski - The Merton Theorem Revisited and Restated: Conservatism and Fascism as Functional Analogues | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 2 (June 2010), pp. 142-173
The paper revisits and restates the Merton Theorem of American religious conservatism (Puritanism) and European fascism (Nazism) as functional analogues. The original formulation the Merton Theorem identifies and describes them as functional analogues in nativism or nationalism through exclusion of and aggression against non-native out-groups. The paper offers an extended restatement of the Merton Theorem in which American conservatism and European fascism function as functional analogues in that both represent the model of a closed, or the antithesis to an open, society, of which nativism is a special case. In the extended Merton Theorem they are functional analogues specifically in terms of such indicators or dimensions of a closed society as political absolutism, closure and oppression, religious absolutism and nihilism, moral absolutism and repression, and extremism. -- important bibliography of work since Walzer in 1960s on 17thC, Weber's thesis etc plus recent articles on nationalism, ethnic identity, right wing extremism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  political_culture  Puritans  Protestant_Ethic  conservatism  right-wing  fascism  nationalism  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  modernization  secularization  fundamentalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
A bygone age … The unraveling … Faith in institutions by Nicholas Lemann | The Washington Monthly
First, we had too much faith in the ability of people like us, smart and well-intentioned upper-middle-class (defined by family background, not by what the Monthly paid) Washington liberals, to determine what was and wasn’t a genuine social need. Our scorn for interest group liberalism led us to undervalue the process of people organizing themselves and pushing the political system to give them what they wanted from it. Second, we failed to anticipate the way that eliminating all those structures that struck us as outdated—the government bureaucracies, the seniority system in Congress, the old-line interest groups—would almost inevitably wind up working to the advantage of elites more than of the ordinary people on whose behalf we imagined ourselves to be advocating. The frictionless, disintermediated, networked world in which we live today is great for people with money and high-demand skills, not so great for everybody else. It’s a cruel irony of the Monthly’s history that our preferred label for ourselves, neoliberal, has come to denote political regimes maximally friendly to the financial markets. I’ve come to see the merits of the liberal structures I scorned in my younger days.
US_history  20thC  intellectual_history  US_politics  liberalism  neoliberalism  democracy  governing_class  Congress  elections  trust  right-wing  interest_groups  bureaucracy  campaign_finance  elites  plutocracy 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Adam Timmins, review - Kerwin Lee Klein, From History to Theory (2011) | Reviews in History
Recommended -- Timmins gives high marks for 1st chapters from professionalization thru logical positivism and obsession with covering laws. Next 2 (linguistic and cultural turns) weaker mostly because they had little impact on actual practice of historians. Tyen picks up with Memory Studies. "However, the Holocaust argument is not the only one that can made to account for the rise of Memory. Pierre Nora has argued that ‘we are obsessed with memory because we have destroyed it with historical consciousness’. Another argument posits that memory ‘is a new category of experience that grew out of the modernist crisis of the self in the nineteenth century and then gradually evolved into our current usage’. A third states that ‘memory is a mode of discourse natural to people without a history, and so its emergence is a salutary feature of decolonization’. However, none of these explanations on their own can fully account for the memory boom. The roots of the rise in memory lead into Klein’s’ final chapter, which ‘takes off the academic gown’ and examines how memory is used by the right-wing Christian movement in the US to reduce history to eschatology."
books  reviews  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  Logical_Positivism  analytical_philosophy  philosophy_of_history  linguistic_turn  postmodern  memory_studies  right-wing  eschatology 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Hattem - The “War on Christmas” in Early America « The Junto Dec 2013
And so the first English dissenters who settled New England in the early seventeenth century were, like their brethren back home, decidedly anti-Christmas. Puritans were keenly aware of the holiday’s pagan origins, as Increase Mather wrote in A Testimony against Several Prophane and Superstitious Customs, Now Practiced by Some in New England: [3] (fascinating quote from Increase Mather). .... Even after the Revolution, the Congress was known to meet on Christmas Day, if they were in session. Throughout the nineteenth century, as well, there are numerous reports from all over the United States attesting to the lack Christmas observance, particularly by various Protestant and German Pietist sects.
religious_history  religious_culture  legal_history  British_history  British_politics  American_colonies  US_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  21stC  Puritans  Pietist  Interregnum  Reformation  Christianity  right-wing  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research | Who Rules America
C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research
by G. William Domhoff
Keynote address to the Michigan Sociological Association, 2006

NOTE: This document is an extended version of "C. Wright Mills, Power Structure Research, And The Failures of Mainstream Political Science," but without the critique of mainstream political science. Instead, it includes more historical background on power structure research, a more detailed critique of pluralism, and a critique of structural Marxists. It is actually a lightly edited and extended reprint of a journal article with the following citation:

Domhoff, G. William. 2007. "C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research." Michigan Sociological Review 21:1-54.
social_theory  US_history  US_economy  US_politics  power  elites  parties  US_politics-race  post-WWII  labor  Labor_markets  public_policy  right-wing  New_Left  New_Deal  neoliberalism  social_sciences-post-WWII  sociology  politics-and-money  elections  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
JONATHAN KAY, review: Jesse Walker, "The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory" - A Nation of Birthers | The American Conservative August 2013
Jesse Walker, books editor for Reason, supplies a needed counterpoint in The United States of Paranoia. The author does not try to defend the unhinged theories spouted by the likes of Jones and Glenn Beck. Instead, he argues that U.S. political culture, on all sides, has been infused with a spirit of wild-eyed fear-mongering since the nation’s founding. Paranoia isn’t a hallmark of conservatism. It’s a hallmark of America.

The Founding Fathers themselves were big-time conspiracy-mongers, Walker reports. George Washington, for instance, accused the Brits of hatching “a regular Systematick Plan” to turn colonists into “tame & abject Slaves.” Much of this over-the-top language found its way into the Declaration of Independence, which presented George III as a sort of 18th-century Stalin.
books  reviews  US_history  US_politics  American_colonies  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  paranoid_politics  Puritans  slavery  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Native_Americans  libertarianism  Obama  conservatism  right-wing  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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