dunnettreader + rhetoric-political   41

Politics and numbers | The Enlightened Economist
I’m thoroughly enjoying William Deringer’s Calculated Values: Finance, Politics and the Quantitative Age – almost finished. The book asks, why from the early…
reviews  17thC  18thC  19thC  economic_history  economic_culture  economic_models  statistics  rhetoric-political  political_press  parties  partisanship  books  review  kindle-available  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Our failures of political rhetoric are asymmetric | xpostfactoid
The study of rhetoric can yield great insights into the way power is structured and masses of people are moved. But those who study rhetoric closely are prone…
Instapaper  US_politics  rhetoric-political  media-political  GOP  right-wing  Democrats  democracy  polarization  from instapaper
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Christian Ruby - Le « public » contre le « peuple » : une structure de la modernité (2005) - Cairn.info
Plan de l'article

Philosophie et « public », de nos jours
La constitution moderne de l’opposition « public »/« peuple »
Le statut historique de « public »
La formation et l’agencement des publics
L’importance actuelle de cette référence au « public »
La déprise nécessaire
Pour citer cet article

Ruby Christian, « Le « public » contre le « peuple » : une structure de la modernité. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 89-104
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-89.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0089.
article  public_sphere  public_opinion  representative_institutions  masses-fear_of  political_participation  democracy  media  citizens  parties-transmission_belts  civic_virtue  Habermas  downloaded  interest_groups  consumerism  political_culture  general_will  political_press  solidarity  Dewey  citizenship  political_philosophy  legitimacy  rhetoric-political  modernity  republicanism  mass_culture 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Quentin Skinner - On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply to My Critics -- in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 127-146 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  genealogy-method  liberty  liberty-positive  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Bryan Garsten - Liberalism and the Rhetorical Vision of Politics | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 83-93 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Scott Sowerby, review - Brian Cowan, The State Trial of Doctor Henry Sacheverell | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. August, 2014.
Cowan’s erudite edition of primary sources charts contemporary reactions to the Sacheverell trial. Cowan sees the trial as an instance of the personalization of political ideas, as long-standing debates about church and state became “focused on one figure—Sacheverell, who could now be cast as either a hero or a scoundrel, depending upon one’s politics” (p. 15, emphasis in original). Unlike so many studies of print culture that focus on production, this volume is attuned to reception, with reproductions of commonplace books and marginalia that alternately endorsed and disputed the standard printed accounts of the trial. Cowan’s edition assembles sources from eleven libraries on two continents. Most of his selections are from unpublished manuscripts; five are from publications so rare that they are found in only one repository. The footnotes alone are worth the price of admission, providing a blow-by-blow account of the trial for the uninitiated. The volume is splendidly illustrated, with photographs of manuscripts, satirical prints, engravings of Sacheverell’s portrait, and depictions of the courtroom. The extended introduction surveys the history of printed transcripts of the trial, from Jacob Tonson’s official record to competing accounts by Tory and Whig authors. A helpful timeline and a comprehensive biographical guide round out the edition.
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Sacheverell  1710s  1720s  parties  Tories  Whig_Junto  Whigs  Church_of_England  tolerance  comprehension-church  Protestant_International  church-in-danger  Queen_Anne  impeachment  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  Revolution_Principles  Walpole  print_culture  reception  Tonson  rhetoric-political  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church-and-State  manuscripts  primary_sources 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Peter Radford - Economics as storytelling: McCloskey again | Real-World Economics Review Blog - August 2015
from Peter Radford
This is not new to most of you of course. You are already steeped in McCloskey’s Rhetoric. Or you ought to be. After all economists are…
rhetoric-moral_basis  economic_culture  market_fundamentalism  Instapaper  rhetoric-political  economic_theory  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Pfau - Romantic Moods: Paranoia, Trauma, and Melancholy, 1790–1840 (2005 hbk only) | JHU Press
Thomas Pfau reinterprets the evolution of British and German Romanticism as a progress through three successive dominant moods, each manifested in the "voice" of an historical moment. Drawing on a multifaceted philosophical tradition ranging from Kant to Hegel to Heidegger—incorporating as well the psychosocial analyses of Freud, Benjamin, and Adorno—Pfau develops a new understanding of the Romantic writer's voice as the formal encryption of a complex cultural condition. Pfau focuses on 3 specific paradigms of emotive experience: paranoia, trauma, and melancholy. Along the trajectory of Romantic thought paranoia characterizes the disintegration of traditional models of causation and representation during the French Revolution; trauma, the radical political, cultural, and economic restructuring of Central Europe in the Napoleonic era; and melancholy, the dominant post-traumatic condition of stalled, post-Napoleonic history both in England and on the continent. (..) positions emotion as a "climate of history" to be interpretively recovered from the discursive and imaginative writing in which it is objectively embodied. (..) traces the evolution of Romantic interiority by exploring the deep-seated reverberations of historical change as they become legible in new discursive and conceptual strategies and in the evolving formal-aesthetic construction and reception of Romantic literature. In establishing this relationship between mood and voice, Pfau moves away from the conventional understanding of emotion as something "owned" or exclusively attributable to the individual and toward a theory of mood as fundamentally intersubjective and deserving of broader consideration in the study of Romanticism.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  Romanticism  social_psychology  self  subjectivity  self-examination  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  political_culture  political_discourse  aesthetics  cultural_history  Radical_Enlightenment  radicals  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  worldviews  social_history  change-social  change-intellectual  poetics  rhetoric-political  prose  facebook 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Timothy Michael - British Romanticism and the Critique of Political Reason (Dec 2015) | JHU Press
What role should reason play in the creation of a free and just society? Can we claim to know anything in a field as complex as politics? And how can the cause of political rationalism be advanced when it is seen as having blood on its hands? These are the questions that occupied a group of British poets, philosophers, and polemicists in the years following the French Revolution. (..) argues that much literature of the period is a trial, or a critique, of reason in its political capacities and a test of the kinds of knowledge available to it. For Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Burke, Wollstonecraft, and Godwin, the historical sequence of revolution, counter-revolution, and terror in France—and radicalism and repression in Britain—occasioned a dramatic reassessment of how best to advance the project of enlightenment. The political thought of these figures must be understood, Michael contends, in the context of their philosophical thought. Major poems of the period, including The Prelude, The Excursion, and Prometheus Unbound, are in this reading an adjudication of competing political and epistemological claims. This book bridges for the first time two traditional pillars of Romantic studies: the period’s politics and its theories of the mind and knowledge. Combining literary and intellectual history, it provides an account of British Romanticism in which high rhetoric, political prose, poetry, and poetics converge in a discourse of enlightenment and emancipation.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  British_history  English_lit  political_philosophy  political_culture  Enlightenment  epistemology  moral_philosophy  mind  Romanticism  poetry  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Shelley  Burke  Wollstonecraft  Godwin_Wm  reason  rationality  perception  judgment-political  judgment-independence  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  political_discourse  poetics  rhetoric-political  freedom  civil_liberties  civil_society  liberty-positive  scepticism 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Bourke and Raymond Geuss, eds. - Political Judgement: Essays for John Dunn (2009) | Cambridge University Press
From Plato to Max Weber, the attempt to understand political judgement took the form of a struggle to define the relationship between politics and morals. (...) explores a series of related problems in philosophy and political thought, raising fundamental questions about democracy, trust, the nature of statesmanship, and the relations between historical and political judgement. (...) reconsiders some classic debates in political theory – about equality, authority, responsibility and ideology – Introduction **--** Part I. The Character of Political Judgement: *-* 1. What is political judgement? Raymond Geuss *-* 2. Sticky judgement and the role of rhetoric Victoria McGeer and Philip Pettit *-* 3. Theory and practice: the revolution in political judgement Richard Bourke **--** Part II. Trust, Judgement and Consent: *-* 4. On trusting the judgement of our rulers Quentin Skinner *-* 5. Adam Smith's history of law and government as political theory Istvan Hont *-* 6. Marxism in translation: critical reflections on Indian radical thought Sudipta Kaviraj **--** Part III. Rationality and Judgement: *-* 7. Pericles' unreason Geoffrey Hawthorn
8. Accounting for human actions: individual agency and political judgement in Montaigne's Essais Biancamaria Fontana *-* 9. Nehru's judgement Sunil Khilnani **--** Part IV. Democracy and Modern Political Judgement: *-* 10. Democracy, equality and redistribution Adam Przeworski *-* 11. Democracy and terrorism Richard Tuck -- excerpt from Intro downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  political_culture  ancient_Greece  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  18thC  Montaigne  Smith  agency  decision_theory  democracy  equality  redistribution  political_participation  public_opinion  rhetoric-political  Marxism  India  colonialism  post-colonial  terrorism  legitimacy  authority  moral_philosophy  responsibility  accountability  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Listening to Ta-Nehisi Coates Whilst Snuggled Deep Within My Butthole | Jezebel - July 2015
Dear Ta-Nehisi Coates—how do you pronounce that, by the way? Lately, it has become more difficult to see in here. My intellectual wings have been chafing my… She picks up every piece of passive-aggressive discomfort, weaseling self-justification, feeble attempts to reassert cultural and moral authority without appearing to (wouldn't "do" for the Yale professor of humility to be seen to pull rank), and general intellectual, moral and rhetorical disaster in David Brooks' column. He's given his readers an excuse not to take Ta-Nehisi seriously, since Brooks has publicly performed the discomfort of white privilege for them and has shared with them what he's "learned" from Black Lives Matter and Ta-Nehisi's book, which is that he still believes in fairy tales, and so his readers are encouraged to as well.
Instapaper  US_society  political_culture  racism  pundits  books  elites-political_influence  conservatism  satire  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  American_exceptionalism  racism-structural  identity_politics  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Read President Obama’s Eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinckney, and Hear Him Sing - Bloomberg Politics - June 2015
Giving all praise and honor to God. The Bible calls us to hope, to persevere and have faith in things not seen. They were still living by faith when they died,… transcript of eulogy
Instapaper  speech  rhetoric-political  religious_culture  African-Americans  Black_churches  Obama  political_culture  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Luca Grillo - Cicero's "De Provinciis Consularibus Oratio" | Oxford University Press
Perhaps no other single Roman speech exemplifies the connection between oratory, politics and imperialism better than Cicero's De Provinciis Consularibus, pronounced to the senate in 56 BC. Cicero puts his talents at the service of the powerful "triumviri" (Caesar, Crassus and Pompey), whose aims he advances by appealing to the senators' imperialistic and chauvinistic ideology. This oration, then, yields precious insights into several areas of late republican life: international relations between Rome and the provinces (Gaul, Macedonia and Judaea); the senators' view on governors, publicani (tax-farmers) and foreigners; the dirty mechanics of high politics in the 50s, driven by lust for domination and money; and Cicero's own role in that political choreography. This speech also exemplifies the exceptional range of Cicero's oratory: the invective against Piso and Gabinius calls for biting irony, the praise of Caesar displays high rhetoric, the rejection of other senators' recommendations is a tour de force of logical and sophisticated argument, and Cicero's justification for his own conduct is embedded in the self-fashioning narrative which is typical of his post reditum speeches. This new commentary includes an updated introduction, which provides the readers with a historical, rhetorical and stylistic background to appreciate the complexities of Cicero's oration, as well as indexes and maps. -- Latin text
books  kindle-available  Cicero  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  Roman_Republic  irony  corruption  Caesar  imperialism  Latin_lit  ancient_history  ancient_Rome 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL'S EULOGY IN COMMONS FOR THE LATE PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT April 17, 1945
Extraordinary piece of rhetoric, but typical Churchill -- knew how to give the intimate personalized touch -- so the audience somehow also "knows" FDR and can share the mourning -- and the grandeur and glory of the ages rolled into one. Interesting that much of his description of FDR's actions are within the frame he establishes of FDR's physical disabilities, and a favorite Churchillian theme, the extraordinary will power it took not just to rise to the presidency, but to conduct the extreme complexity of policy that required intense attention every single day, made further complicated by domestic and international politics, of which he was an intuitive master of the possible.
20thC  WWII  British_history  British_Empire  US_history  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_military  diplomatic_history  Churchill  FDR  rhetoric-political  rhetoric 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Stob, Review: John McGowan, Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy (2012) | KB Journal - 2013
McGowan, John. Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012. -- Paul Stob, Department of Communication Studies, Vanderbilt University -- John McGowan’s Pragmatist Politics draws upon the pragmatist tradition—primarily the work of William James, John Dewey, and Kenneth Burke—to formulate a liberal democratic politics for the twenty-first century. At least that’s the overt aim of the book. But what may stand out most to readers of KB Journal is how McGowan seems intent on crafting an attitude. In formulating a pragmatist politics, McGowan fails to explicate political programs and initiatives, he disregards the nuts and bolts of democratic negotiation, and he provides no real strategies for building grassroots coalitions. What he does—and what he does admirably—is present readers with a pragmatist attitude that will, he hopes, come to permeate public culture. -- Stob describes how McGowan links rhetoric and political philosophy, especially using Burke's "comic" frame as fitting a pragmatist approach to goals and public participation of liberal democracy -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  rhetoric-political  conversation  persuasion  Burke_Kenneth  Dewey  James_William  secularism  symbolic_interaction  symbols-political  symbols-religious  communication  community  individualism  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Works by Kenneth Burke | KB Journal - Bibliographies
Lengthy -- divided into categories, e.g. books (non-fiction), essays, poetry, fiction -- notes the main changes and additions to each edition of his major works, including tracking hardback and paperback versions, which is almost impossible to sort out on Amazon -- they note the bibliographies are updated (probably mostly the secondary works page) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
Burke_Kenneth  bibliography  US_history  20thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  cultural_critique  social_theory  economic_theory  lit_crit  literary_theory  literary_language  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  political_culture  political_sociology  action-theory  philosophy_of_language  epistemology  epistemology-social  dialectic  dialogue  historiography  English_lit  Shakespeare  poetry  poetics  theater  psychology  meaning  perspectivism  pragmatism  progressivism  socialism  communism  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Gavin Alexander - Fulke Greville and the Afterlife | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 203-231
Fascinating re both Grevill's history writing - his discussion of Sir Philip Sidney in publishing his work (Arcadia) not only influenced Sidney reception but framed Queen Elizabeth as a wise ruler in contrast with the Stuarts. Discussion of how, given "nothing new under the sun" and constancy of human nature, poetry, drama and prose could all be read as speaking to current events -- e, g. Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex rebellion. Greville treatment of Sidney as in retrospect prophetic re foreign relations especially with Dutch, forms of government -- Greville using Aristotle and Polybius re patterns of historical change. Greville in both his history and prose writing and his poetry and plays was always looking to readers after his death. Suggestive re development of an increasingly sophisticated historiography in 17thC that wrestled with tensions in using history as exemplary vs informing practical reason for contingencies of statecraft as well as hermeneutics for readers in the present and future. Provides a publication history of Greville's works during Commonwealth and Restoration, how it was used politically at different moments, including Exclusion_Crisis. Worden has published articles or chapters in collections that look at the generation of Sidney and Greville as some proto classical republican writings. Also may be useful for Bolingbroke's treatment of Elizabeth as model in Remarks and Study and Uses -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Anglo-Dutch  English_lit  poetry  poetics  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  historians-and-politics  historical_change  politics-and-literature  hermeneutics  reader_response  readership  publishing  scribal_circulation  manuscripts  Remarks_on_History_of_England  Study_and_Uses  political_philosophy  republicanism  Polybius  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
James Thompson - After the Fall: Class and Political Language in Britain, 1780-1900 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 785-806
The fall of class in nineteenth-century British history has become a familiar tale. Its rise in the historiography of eighteenth-century Britain has been less noted. This essay explores the reasons for this divergence and emphasizes its methodological origins. It highlights the need for a comprehensive history of class society and identity to replace the confused and contradictory picture of particular classes and communities that is currently on offer. To understand better the constitution of class society, it urges historians to talk less of consciousness and more of identity and to recognize that class is an imagined community much like any other. It proceeds to use this understanding of class identity to assess the turn to political language amongst social historians interested in class. The paper offers a sustained examination of the recent work of Joyce and Wahrman in particular and argues that insufficient attention has been paid to the variety of usable political languages and to the particular discursive contexts in which they are employed. It is argued that to acknowledge that class is so constructed is not to deny its existence or its importance and that historians need to look beyond political discourse to explain how class became so central to the self and the social in the nineteenth century. -- extensive references on British social history as well as postmodern historiography debates -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  social_history  political_history  cultural_history  British_history  British_politics  18thC  19thC  classes  class_conflict  working_class  middle_class  lower_orders  elites  elite_culture  popular_culture  bourgeoisie  identity  identity_politics  political_participation  political_press  rhetoric-political  aristocracy  gentry  gentleman  social_order  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: Tocqueville’s New Science of Politics Revisited (May 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Aurelian Craiutu argues that Tocqueville was not just an observer of democracy in America but also a theorist of democracy who wanted to create “a new science of politics” suitable to the new world which was beginning to take shape at that time. Craiutu points out four dimensions of Tocqueville’s new science of politics that might help us better understand his thinking. The first is that Tocqueville’s new science of politics is fundamentally cross-disciplinary, at the intersection of political science, sociology, anthropology, history, and philosophy. He then goes on to discuss the other dimensions such as its comparative, normative, and political dimensions. He concludes that his works must therefore be seen as belonging to a larger French tradition of political engagement and political rhetoric in which the writer enters into a subtle and complex pedagogical relationship with his audience, seeking to convince and inspire his readers to political action. This thesis is discussed by Daniel J. Mahoney of Assumption College, Filippo Sabetti of McGill University, and Jeremy R. Jennings of King’s College London. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  France  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  political_culture  liberalism  republicanism  human_nature  political_science  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  audience  comparative_history  historical_sociology  US_society  US_politics  social_order  historical_change  Tocqueville  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Arnt Aune - Modernity as a Rhetorical Problem: Phronēsis, Forms, and Forums in Norms of Rhetorical Culture | JSTOR: Philosophy & Rhetoric, Vol. 41, No. 4 (2008), pp. 402-420
Starting from Thomas Farrell (1993) revival of interest in Aristotelianism, what adjustments are needed in humanistic and social sciences to properly engage an Aristotle for our times -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  21stC  modernity  Aristotelian  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  community  communitarian  social_theory  political_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Gary Remer - Political Oratory and Conversation: Cicero versus Deliberative Democracy | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Feb., 1999), pp. 39-64
Investigates pre "bourgeois public sphere" deliberation, similarities and differences between forms of Cicero rhetoric (political and conversation) and Habermas style dialogue or discourse forms of political deluberation. Interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  rhetoric-political  conversation  deliberation-public  public_sphere  Habermas  Cicero  Europe-Early_Modern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Simone Chambers - Rhetoric and the Public Sphere: Has Deliberative Democracy Abandoned Mass Democracy? | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 37, No. 3 (June 2009), pp. 323-350
The pathologies of the democratic public sphere, first articulated by Plato in his attack on rhetoric, have pushed much of deliberative theory out of the mass public and into the study and design of small scale deliberative venues. The move away from the mass public can be seen in a growing split in deliberative theory between theories of democratic deliberation (on the ascendancy) which focus on discrete deliberative initiatives within democracies and theories of deliberative democracy (on the decline) that attempt to tackle the large questions of how the public, or civil society in general, relates to the state. Using rhetoric as the lens through which to view mass democracy, this essay argues that the key to understanding the deliberative potential of the mass public is in the distinction between deliberative and plebiscitary rhetoric. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  democracy  political_participation  deliberation-public  rhetoric-political  majoritarian  political_press  partisanship  parties  elections  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Power: A Response to Critics [eScholarship] | Rethinking History (2000)
This is Bevir's response to the roundtable of articles on his book, The Logic of the History of Ideas -- Additional Info: This is an electronic version of an article published in Rethinking History© 2000 Copyright Taylor & Francis; Rethinking History is available online at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13642529.asp -- Keywords:
hermeneutics, intentionality, philosophy, power, rationality, rhetoric
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  concepts  historical_change  historiography  narrative  White_Hayden  power  Foucault  intentionality  meaning  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rationality  agency  individualism-methodology  philosophy_of_language  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
John G. Gunnell - Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Nov., 2006), pp. 771-782
Although the estranged relationship between mainstream political science and much of the subfield of political theory has been properly attributed to developments during the last half of the twentieth century, the roots of this alienation are historically deeper. Many of the conversations of political theory are the progeny of a discursive form that attended the birth of modern social science. This genre was a legitimating rhetoric situated in the interstices of social science, philosophy, and politics. The study of the history of political thought originated as such a rhetoric, and it constitutes a paradigm case for examining the extent to which such a discourse can be transformed into a practice of knowledge. This field has succeeded to a greater extent than certain other elements of political theory which, transfixed by the tension between their practical aspirations and academic context, have become anomalous appendages to the social scientific study of politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  social_sciences  political_science  rhetoric-political  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  disciplines  discourse-political_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr - Political Science and the Enlightenment of Enthusiasm | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 82, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 51-69
I provide a narrative of the emergence of an expressly articulated @'political science@' in the Scottish Enlightenment. Political science was designed by Hume, Smith, and others to advance both a Newtonian method for the study of politics and a politics of moderation whose tasks included a critique of enthusiasm. In this way, poltiical science, moderation, and (anti)enthusiasm were conceptually connected. The emergence of political science, understood in this way, required a number of conceptual changes in a structure of argument shaped largely by Locke. These conceptual changes, in turn, fixed a rhetorical framework for persistent debates over the methodological and political identity of political science, even as ideology literally replaced enthusiasm. These persistent debates reveal the relevance of the history of political science as a forum for remembrance, reflection, and critique. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  18thC  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  science_of_man  social_sciences  Scottish_Enlightenment  Hume  Smith  enthusiasm  Newtonian  ideology  Locke  rhetoric-political  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Terence Ball - Hobbes' Linguistic Turn | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Summer, 1985), pp. 739-760
Thomas Hobbes has often been regarded as a "protopositivist" precursor of the scientific study of politics. Terence Ball argues here that it may be more appropriate to consider him as a thinker acutely aware that social and political reality is linguistically made. However, Hobbes was inclined to treat the distortion or breakdown of communication as a technical problem to be met by the sovereign's imposition of "shared" meanings.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  rhetoric-political  linguistic_turn  constructivism  social_theory  17thC  Hobbes  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Frederick G. Whelan - Language and Its Abuses in Hobbes' Political Philosophy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 75, No. 1 (Mar., 1981), pp. 59-75
As in Hobbes' view it is principally the capacity for speech that distinguishes men from even the social animals, so it is in verbal and doctrinal controversies that he usually finds the sources of conflict and sedition. Hobbes analyzes--in the hope of doing away with them--a variety of what he regards as abuses of language, such as metaphor, equivocation, eloquence, and absurdity, which are especially productive of political disorder. He also offers models and, in his own political philosophy, examples of the proper uses of language as science and counsel, which he believes are necessary to the establishment and governance of well-ordered commonwealths in the modern world, characterized as it is by widespread learning and disputatious habits. In the pursuance of his project, however, Hobbes himself is paradoxically forced to resort to the eloquence which he otherwise condemns, and his own observations on language provide grounds for doubts about the success of his enterprise. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  rhetoric-political  philosophy_of_language  17thC  Hobbes  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Torrey Shanks - Feminine Figures and the "Fatherhood": Rhetoric and Reason in Locke's "First Treatise of Government" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 31-57
Traditionally neglected, Locke's First Treatise of Government has taken on new significance with feminist interpretations that recognize the importance of its sustained engagement with patriarchal power. Yet feminist interpreters, both critics and admirers alike, read Locke as a champion of the "man of reason," a figure seemingly immune to the influences of passions, imagination, and rhetoric. These interpreters wrongly overlook Locke's extended engagement with the power of rhetoric in the First Treatise, an engagement that troubles the clear opposition of masculine reason and its feminine exclusions. Taking Locke's rhetoric seriously, I argue, makes the First Treatise newly important for what it shows us about Locke's practice of political critique. In following the varied and novel effects of Locke's feminine figures, we find a practice of political critique that depends on a mutually constitutive relation between rhetoric and reason. -- paywall Sage -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  literary_history  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  17thC  Locke-1st_Treatise  women-rights  women-property  patriarchy  authority  metaphor  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Filmer  Dryden  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Charles_II  masculinity  femininity  reason  philosophy_of_language  emotions  practical_reason  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Tracy B. Strong - How to Write Scripture: Words, Authority, and Politics in Thomas Hobbes | JSTOR: Critical Inquiry, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 128-159
See re Pettit and Skinner treatment of Hobbes, rhetoric and "constructivist" approach to social and political reality, sovereignty, authority erc -- downloaded pdf to Note -- followed up with comment be Victoria Silver and response
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  religious_belief  Biblical_authority  rhetoric-political  hermeneutics  authority  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political-theology  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel J. Kapust - The Problem of Flattery and Hobbes's Institutional Defense of Monarchy | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 3 (JULY 2011), pp. 680-691
This paper explores Hobbes's defense of monarchy in light of the problem of flattery. In doing so, it addresses two central issues in Hobbes scholarship: his relationship to republicanism, and his attitude toward rhetoric. Faced with criticisms of monarchy rooted in the monarch's susceptibility to flattery, Hobbes defends monarchy by focusing on the benefits of its unitary character. Rather than look to the virtue of monarchs as a bulwark against flattery, Hobbes argues that the singularity of the monarch diminishes the space and scope for flattery. Moreover, the unitary structure of monarchy provides an institutional context more favorable to taking counsel than forms of sovereignty incorporating many individuals. Hobbes's defense of monarchy counters contemporary republicans, incorporating his suspicion of rhetoric without relying on claims of monarchical virtue. -- Cambridge paywall
article  jstor  paywall  17thC  Hobbes  political_philosophy  sovereignty  monarchy  counsel  rhetoric-political  public_opinion  republicanism  civic_virtue  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert E. Brown – How did America’s Political Rhetoric Become so Biblical? | The Marginalia Review of Books Oct 2013
At first glance James Byrd’s Sacred Scripture, Sacred War and Eran Shalev’s American Zion bear little connection to King’s rhetorical strategy, not to mention his pacifism. And yet, they show how early forms of national discourse set the stage for the religiously-inflected political language that has characterized American life for the better part of two centuries. They also illuminate, by way of contrast, the rather dramatic shift away from such rhetoric within the public square in the last half of the twentieth century as religion has become a less plausible means of building consensus for civic causes
books  reviews  US_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  political_culture  politics-and-religion  rhetoric  politics-and-history  rhetoric-political  communitarian  individualism  chosen_people  slavery  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1710s  1720s  accountability  action-theory  aesthetics  African-Americans  agency  American_colonies  American_exceptionalism  American_Revolution  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Anglo-Dutch  aristocracy  Aristotelian  Aristotle  article  audience  authority  Biblical_authority  bibliography  Black_churches  bond_market_vigilantes  books  bourgeoisie  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_politics  Burke  Burke_Kenneth  Caesar  Cambridge_School  change-intellectual  change-social  Charles_II  chosen_people  Church-and-State  church-in-danger  Churchill  Church_of_England  Cicero  citizens  citizenship  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  civil_liberties  civil_society  classes  class_conflict  Coleridge  colonialism  communication  communism  communitarian  community  comparative_history  comprehension-church  concepts  concepts-change  conflict  conscience  conservatism  constructivism  consumerism  contextualism  contingency  conversation  corruption  counsel  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  cultural_critique  cultural_history  decision_theory  deliberation-public  demagogue  democracy  Democrats  Dewey  dialectic  dialogue  diplomatic_history  disciplines  discourse-political_theory  downloaded  Dryden  Early_Republic  economic_culture  economic_history  economic_models  economic_theory  EF-add  elections  elites  elites-political_influence  elite_culture  Elizabeth  emotions  English_Civil_War  English_lit  Enlightenment  enthusiasm  entre_deux_guerres  epistemology  epistemology-social  equality  eScholarship  etexts  EU  Europe-Early_Modern  Exclusion_Crisis  facebook  FDR  femininity  Filmer  finance_capital  find  fiscal_policy  Foucault  France  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  freedom  French_Enlightenment  French_politics  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  FX  genealogy-method  general_will  gentleman  gentry  George_II  George_III  globalization  Godwin_Wm  GOP  government-forms  Habermas  hermeneutics  historians-and-politics  historical_change  historical_sociology  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-Renaissance  history_of_science  Hobbes  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  human_nature  Hume  identity  identity_politics  ideology  impeachment  imperialism  India  individualism  individualism-methodology  Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  intentionality  interest_groups  Interregnum  irony  James_I  James_William  jstor  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-independence  judgment-political  Kant  kindle-available  language-history  language-politics  Latin_lit  leaders  left-wing  legitimacy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  liberty  liberty-positive  libraries  linguistic_turn  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  Locke  Locke-1st_Treatise  lower_orders  Madison  majoritarian  manuscripts  market_fundamentalism  Marxism  masculinity  masses-fear_of  mass_culture  meaning  media  media-political  metaphor  middle_class  mind  Mitterand  modernity  monarchy  Montaigne  moral_philosophy  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  narrative  national_ID  Newtonian  Obama  ontology  ontology-social  opposition  Parliament  parties  parties-transmission_belts  partisanship  patriarchy  Patriots  paywall  PCF  perception  perspectivism  persuasion  Pettit  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  phronesis  Pitt_the_Elder  poetics  poetry  polarization  political-theology  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  political_science  political_sociology  politics-and-history  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  Polybius  Popish_Plot  popular_culture  popular_politics  populism  post-colonial  post-WWII  power  practical_reason  pragmatism  primary_sources  print_culture  progressivism  prose  Protestant_International  psychology  public_opinion  public_policy  public_sphere  publishing  pundits  Queen_Anne  racism  racism-structural  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  rationality  readership  reader_response  reason  reception  redistribution  reform-political  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_history  Remarks_on_History_of_England  representative_institutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  responsibility  Restoration  review  reviews  Revolution_Principles  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  right-wing  Romanticism  Roman_Republic  Rousseau  Sacheverell  satire  scepticism  science_of_man  Scottish_Enlightenment  scribal_circulation  secularism  self  self-examination  Seven_Years_War  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Shakespeare  Shelley  Skinner  slavery  Smith  socialism  social_democracy  social_history  social_order  social_psychology  social_sciences  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  solidarity  sovereignty  speech  speech-act  statesmen  statistics  Study_and_Uses  subjectivity  symbolic_interaction  symbols-political  symbols-religious  terrorism  theater  Tocqueville  tolerance  Tonson  Tories  US_foreign_policy  US_government  US_history  US_military  US_politics  US_society  Walpole  War_of_Austrian_Succession  website  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Whig_Junto  White_Hayden  Wollstonecraft  women-property  women-rights  Wordsworth  working_class  worldviews  WWII 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: