dunnettreader + republics-ancient_v_modern   62

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Eric Nelson - "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75" (2011) | William& Mary Quarterly
Nelson E. "Patriot Royalism: The Stuart Monarchy in American Political Thought, 1769-75". The William and Mary Quarterly [Internet]. 2011;3rd ser., 68 (4) :533-596. With responses by Gordon S. Wood, Pauline Maier, and Daniel Hulsebosch, as well a reply to critics ("Taking Them Seriously: Patriots, Prerogative, and the English Seventeenth Century"). -- preliminary to his "Royalist Revolution" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  forum  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Patriot_King  Patriots  American_colonies  American_Revolution  checks-and-balances  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  limited_monarchy  prerogative  liberalism-republicanism_debates  Whigs-Radicals  Commonwealthmen  Charles_I  George_III  Adams_John  US_constitution  Early_Republic  legislature  exec_branch  US_government  US_President  majoritarian  democracy  masses-fear_of  federalism  federal_preemption  national_interest  states_rights  government-forms  constitutions  constitutional_regime  Royalists 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Codruţa Cuceu, Milestones in the Critique of the Public Sphere: Dewey and Arendt (2011) - PhilPapers
Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):99-110 (2011) -- This paper proposes a turnover to the theories which have fostered the 20th Century discourse upon the public sphere. By depicting the way in which the structural transformations suffered by the public sphere within the framework of modernity have been theorized by the pre-Habermasian discourse upon the public sphere, the present work aims at revealing the similarities as well as the differences between John Dewey‟s approach of the public sphere and Hannah Arendt‟s theory of the political realm. Although Arendt was not so much influenced by pragmatism, their theories share a normative dimension according to which the public sphere is structured in order to achieve certain functions, which were disrupted in modernity. Therefore Dewey‟s eclipse of the public, through the multiplication of its content, corresponds to Arendt‟s decay of the public realm through the rise of the social. -- Keywords Arendt Dewey modernity decay public sphere plurality political sphere
Categories: Political Theory in Social and Political Philosophy
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
article  republicanism  Dewey  social_theory  modernity  political_philosophy  public_opinion  political_culture  Arendt  civic_virtue  democracy  downloaded  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  political_participation  Habermas  public_sphere 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
André Lang - La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines (2005) - Cairn.info
I - L’anacyclosis révisée
II - Les constitutions à l’épreuve de l’histoire
III - Le retour au principe
IV - Le moment Romuléen et le moment Numéen
V - Le principe comme puissance de régénération
VI - Les exécutions ou l’équivoque politique du retour à l’origine
VII - Brutus ou la part souveraine de la violence des principes
De l’exécution à l’exécutif : conclusion et perspectives
Pour citer cet article

Lang André, « La part maudite du politique chez Machiavel, ou le retour aux origines. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 213-230
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-213.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0213.
Aristotle  class_conflict  political_participation  Pocock  Polybius  corruption  state_of_exception  republicanism  violence  article  norms  dialectic-historical  common_good  political_philosophy  Machiavelli  interest_groups  civic_virtue  downloaded  politics-and-history  mixed_government  historical_change  history_as_examples  cyclical_history  rule_of_law  cycles  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Quentin Skinner - On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply to My Critics -- in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 127-146 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  genealogy-method  liberty  liberty-positive  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Nadia Urbinati - Sismonde de Sismondi and Republicanism after the French Revolution | JSTOR Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
Republicanism after the French Revolution: The Case of Sismonde de Sismondi -- in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 95-109 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  18thC  19thC  French_Revolution  constitutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  English_constitution  classicism  Roman_Republic  democracy  ancient_Greece  Sismondi  contextualism  Cambridge_School  Skinner  Burke  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Bryan Garsten - Liberalism and the Rhetorical Vision of Politics | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 83-93 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Civil Theology and Church Establishments in Revolutionary America | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1007-1026
The discourse of America's founding generation, it is now widely recognized, was rich and variegated in its composition, drawing upon the commonwealth tradition, the English common law, Montesquieu, Locke, Scottish moral philosophy, and the classics. These sources yield significant clues as to how eighteenth-century Americans viewed religious liberty and church-state relations, subjects of the First Amendment to the Constitution. Supplementing the work of legal historians on the religious provisions of the early state constitutions, the study of political ideas suggests the parameters of the eighteenth-century debate over the effects which various types of religious belief and ecclesiastical establishment had upon manners and institutions. It also reveals the ideological underpinnings of the apparently inconsistent legal provisions for religion at the state level, and, far from settling the elusive question of `original intent', highlights the nature of the divisions within the founding generation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  religious_history  church_history  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_religion  civil_liberties  tolerance  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  Founders  bill_of_rights  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Commonwealthmen  Locke-religion  Hutcheson  Smith  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_legal_system  US_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Clement Fatovic - Reason and Experience in Alexander Hamilton’s Science of Politics | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 1-30
Alexander Hamilton is often described as an enterprising modernist who promoted forward-looking reforms that broke with established institutions and ideas. However, the scale and apparent novelty of his reforms have tended to obscure the extent to which those innovations were rooted in a belief that knowledge and practice must be guided by “experience.” This article argues that even Hamilton’s most far-reaching reforms were grounded in a Humean understanding of the limits of rationality in explaining and controlling the world. Hamilton’s agreement with David Hume on the epistemic authority of experience helps explain his positions on constitutional design, executive power, democratic politics, public opinion, and other important political issues. Moreover, the epistemological underpinnings of Hamilton’s political thought are significant because they suggest that a “science of politics” grounded in experience can avoid some of the dangers associated with more rationalistic approaches yet still be quite open to significant innovation in politics. - as much or more Hume's various essays as Hamilton
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  British_history  British_politics  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  US_economy  political_economy  political_culture  economic_culture  epistemology  epistemology-social  US_government  public_opinion  public_finance  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  Hume  Hume-politics  Hamilton  Founders  Early_Republic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Xavier Marquez -Cicero and the Stability of States by (2010) :: SSRN
Victoria University of Wellington -- APSA 2009 Toronto Meeting Paper -- History of Political Thought, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp. 397-423, 2011 -- I argue for the originality and interest of Cicero’s views on the stability of political communities. After a survey of ancient ideas on the mixed constitution (the framework for thinking about the stability of political communities in the ancient world), I show how Cicero adapted these ideas to analyze the Roman situation of his time. Cicero’s version of the theory of the mixed constitution is notable for two innovations: an argument that stability is possible even under conditions of high inequality, and an account of constitutional mixture that emphasizes the role of the “monarchic” element in promoting concord and stability and meeting unexpected challenges. I show, however, that this account unfortunately made it clear that the Roman crisis of Cicero’s time was more or less insoluble in ways that would preserve the republic. -- PDF File: 42 pgs -- Keywords: Cicero, History of Political Thought, States, Stability, Plato, Aristotle -- downloaded to Dropbox
article  SSRN  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  Cicero  Plato  Aristotle  stability  Roman_Republic  government-forms  adaptability  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  inequality  class_conflict  limited_monarchy  monarchical_republic  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? (2012) Kindle Price:$17.60 - 840 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
Includes Scottish late transition from feudalism and a different angle on Scot and English historiography in 17thC re "feudal law", "ancient constitution", James I & VI etc than Pocock's version -- earlier books on 16thC-18thC Scotland look very interesting -- In this panoramic historical analysis, Davidson defends a renovated concept of bourgeois revolution. He shows how our globalized societies of the present are the result of a contested, turbulent history marked by often forceful revolutions directed against old social orders, from the Dutch Revolt to the English and American Civil Wars and beyond. -- Review *--* " What should our conception of a bourgeois revolution be, if it is to enlighten rather than to mislead ? Davidson’s instructive and provocative answer is given through a history both of a set of concepts and of those social settings in which they found application.His book is an impressive contribution both to the history of ideas and to political philosophy.” —ALASDAIR MACINTYRE. *--* “Davidson wends his way through the jagged terrain of a wide range of Marxist writings and debates to distill their lessons in what is unquestionably the most thorough discussion of the subject to date. If the paradox at the heart of the bourgeois revolutions was that the emergence of the modern bourgeois state had little to do with the agency of the bourgeoisie, then Davidson’s study is by far the most nuanced and illuminating discussion of this complex fact.” —JAIRUS BANAJI, Theory as History “[This] is a monumental work. ...easily the most comprehensive account yet of the ‘life and times’ of the concept of ‘bourgeois revolution.’ . . . He has also provided us with a refined set of theoretical tools for understanding the often complex interactions between political revolutions which overturn state institutions and social revolutions which involve a more thoroughgoing transformation of social relations.” —COLIN MOOERS, The Making of Bourgeois Europe
books  kindle-available  buy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_history  social_history  intellectual_history  social_order  Europe-Early_Modern  revolutions  bourgeoisie  Marxist  Dutch_Revolt  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  1707_Union  Jacobites  1745_rebellion  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  German_unification  Italian_unification  Russian_revolution  class_conflict  feudalism  ancient_constitution  aristocracy  Ancien_régime  liberalism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_Civil_War  political_culture  political_economy  capitalism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Historical, Political, and Diplomatic Writings of Niccolo Machiavelli, Vol. 1. (Life of Machiavelli, History of Florence), tr. from the Italian, by Christian E. Detmold (Boston, J. R. Osgood and company, 1882). - Online Library of
<http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/774> - Volume 1 of a 4 volume set of Machiavelli’s writings which contains a lengthy introduction on the life of Machiavelli, the History of Florence, The Prince, Discourses on Livy, and his letters and papers from his time as a diplomat. This volume contains his famous History of Florence. - life and historical context based especially on 19thC Italian historiography -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Machiavelli  Italy  Florence  Italian_Wars  Papacy  France  Louis_XI  nation-state  state-building  military_history  militia  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercenaires  diplomatic_history  IR_theory  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, Il Principe, edited by L. Arthur Burd, with an Introduction by Lord Acton (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1891) - Online Library of Liberty
Facsimile PDF 23.8 MB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- A heavily annotated edition by Burd with the famous introduction by Lord Acton. The text is in the original Italian. -- Burd has an enormous amount of context- historical background for all the players before and after invasion of Italy - and cross-references to other works by Machiavelli, Guicciardini etc -picks up language usage, concepts etc - and comments on previous commentaries on The Prince with which he agrees or has differences -- downloaded pdf to Note -- probably available in Google_Books
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_history  Renaissance  Italian_Wars  15thC  16thC  Machiavelli  Guiccidarini  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Italy  Florence  Papacy  France  raison-d'-état  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  institutions  legal_history  state-building  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Ian Ward - Quentin Skinner, Hobbes and Republican Liberty | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 8, No. 3 (September 2010), pp. 948-949
Overview of debates re different types of liberty, what relations between liberalism and republicanism, etc in both intellectual_history and political_philosophy in the decades after Skinner's Foundations in 1978. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  Hobbes  social_contract  liberty  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberalism  liberty-positive  liberty-negative  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  civic_virtue  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Scott D. Gerber, review essay - The Republican Revival in American Constitutional Theory | JSTOR: Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 47, No. 4 (Dec., 1994), pp. 985-997
Reviewed work(s): We the People: Foundations by Bruce A. Ackerman; Traces of Self-Government by Frank I. Michelman; Laws Republic; The Partial Constitution by Cass R. Sunstein - 1980s interest in classical republicanism, citizen participation and common good and how to reconcile with a liberalism of private interests and rights -- all 3 authors criticized for (1) excessive reliance on the "least dialogic" institution, the judiciary, as protector an/or promoter of the republican dimension of "liberal republicanism" and (2) a selective misreading of the Founders -- didn't download
article  review  jstor  US_constitution  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  US_politics  judiciary  judicial_review  natural_rights  property_rights  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberalism  legal_history  legal_theory  Congress  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Two contemporary quandaries in legal theory provide an occasion for a revival of interest in natural law theories of law. First, the debate about legal indeterminacy has made it clear that law cannot function autonomously—as a self-contained set of rules—but requires a normative justification of judges’ decisions in hard cases. In addition, Steven D. Smith has persuasively argued that there is an "ontological gap" between the practice of law, which presupposes a classical or religious ontology, and legal theory, which presupposes a scientific ontology (i.e., scientific materialism) that rejects religious ontology. This article demonstrates how the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and the radical empiricism of William James support a new process theory of natural law. Under this theory, judges resolve legal indeterminacy by determining what maximizes the telos beauty—in accordance with the circumstances of the case and the social perfection possible within that society—rather than by relying on fixed, antiquated natural laws. Process natural law also closes the ontological gap by providing an ontology that unifies the moral insights of religion with the insights of modern science. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" HANDBOOK OF WHITEHEADIAN PROCESS THOUGHT (1st ed). Ed. Michel Weber and Will Desmond. Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag, 2008. 507-536. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  legal_history  legal_theory  natural_law  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  social_theory  process_theology  laws_of_nature  divine_command  divine_right  legitimacy  authority  Whitehead  James_William  moral_philosophy  materialism  reductionism  science-and-religion  theology  ancient_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  pragmatism  legal_indeterminancy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Citizenship and Dignity (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-74 -- Theories of dignity have to navigate between two conceptions: the egalitarian idea of human dignity and the old idea of dignitas, connected with hierarchy, rank, and office. One possible way of bridging the gap between the two is to talk of the dignity of the citizen. In modern republics and democracies, the dignity of the citizen extends to a large sector of the population and connotes something about the general quality of the relation between the government and the governed. This chapter first explores Immanuel Kant’s account of the dignity of the citizen, and then it pursues the implications of the dignity of the citizen for modern society and modern theories of human dignity. Though the dignity of the citizen and human dignity are not the same concept, they are congruent in many respects and the former casts considerable light on the latter — in particular on the connection between dignity and responsibility and dignity and transparency in social and political relations. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: citizenship, contractarianism, dignity, human dignity, Kant, responsibilities, transparency -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  Enlightenment  modernity  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  citizenship  citizens  dignity  Kant  Kant-politics  Kant-ethics  egalitarian  rank  social_order  social_contract  responsibility  office  commonwealth  common_good  fiduciaries  accountability  governing_class  transparency  inequality  political_participation  political_nation  political_economy  political_culture  governmentality  power-asymmetric  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Comte Destutt de Tracy A Commentary and Review of Montesquieu’s ’Spirit of Laws’ (and comments by Condorcet and Helvetius) (trans. Thomas Jefferson, 1811- Online Library of Liberty
Antoine Louis Claude, Comte Destutt de Tracy, A Commentary and Review of Montesquieu’s ’Spirit of Laws’: To which are annexed, Observations on the Thirty First Book by the late M. Condorcet; and Two Letters of Helvetius, on the Merits of the same Work, trans. Thomas Jefferson (Philadelphia: William Duane, 1811). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/960> -- One of two books by the French liberal Destutt de Tracy which were translated and published by Thomas Jefferson A COMMENTARY AND REVIEW OF MONTESQUIEU'S 'SPIRIT OF LAWS' TO WHICH ARE ANNEXED, OBSERVATIONS ON THE THIRTY-FIRST BOOK, BY THE LATE M. CONDORCET, AND TWO LETTERS OF HELVETIUS, ON THE MERITS OF THE SAME WORKPREPARED FOR PRESS FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT, IN THE HANDS OF THE PUBLISHER -- downloaded French version
books  etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Montesquieu  Condorcet  Helvetius  Jefferson  liberalism  French_politics  Ancien_régime  comparative_history  government-forms  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
David Womersley, ed. - Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century (2006) - Online Library of Liberty
David Womersely, Liberty and American Experience in the Eighteenth Century, edited and with an Introduction by David Womersley (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1727> -- This volume is a collection of essays which examines some of the central themes and ideologies central to the formation of the United States including Edmund Burke’s theories on property rights and government, the influence of Jamaica on the American colonies, the relations between religious and legal understandings of the concept of liberty, the economic understanding of the Founders, the conflicting viewpoints between moral sense theory and the idea of natural rights in the founding period, the divisions in thought among the revolutionaries regarding the nature of liberty and the manner in which liberty was to be preserved, and the disparity in Madison’s political thought from the 1780s to the 1790s. -- authors include Jack Greene, David Wootton, Gordon Wood. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  West_Indies  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  colonialism  British_Empire  Anglo-American  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  property  property_rights  liberty  liberalism-republicanism_debates  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  natural_law  human_nature  Founders  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  Burke  Madison  Hume  Scottish_Enlightenment  commerce  luxury  commerce-doux  corruption  tyranny  Absolutism  US_constitution  American_Revolution  UK_government-colonies  partisanship  common_good  common_law  Whigs  democracy  political_participation  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, ed. Blair Worden - Online Library of Liberty
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, edited and with an Introduction by Blair Worden (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2011). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2449> -- This edition brings back into print, after two and a half centuries, the pioneering work of English republicanism, Marchamont Nedham’s The Excellencie of a Free-State, which was written in the wake of the execution of King Charles I. First published in 1656, and compiled from previously written editorials in the parliamentarian newsbook Mercurius Politicus, The Excellencie of a Free-State addressed a dilemma in English politics, namely, what kind of government should the Commonwealth adopt? One possibility was to revert to the ancient constitution and create a Cromwellian monarchy. The alternative was the creation of parliamentary sovereignty, in which there would be a “due and orderly succession of supreme authority in the hands of the people’s representatives.” Nedham was convinced that only the latter would “best secure the liberties and freedoms of the people from the encroachments and usurpations of tyranny.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_press  commonwealth  Cromwell  political_participation  historiography-17thC  ancient_constitution  mixed_government  government-forms  representative_institutions  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Nedham  newspapers  tyranny  civil_liberties  constitutionalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Lamp of Experience - Online Library of Liberty
Trevor Colbourn, The Lamp of Experience: Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/674> -- In a landmark work, a leading scholar of the eighteenth century examines the ways in which an understanding of the nature of history, seen as as a continual struggle between liberty and virtue on one hand and arbitrary power and corruption on the other, influenced the thinking of the founding fathers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Founders  English_constitution  history_of_England  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) - Online Library of Liberty
M.J.C. Vile, Constitutionalism and the Separation of Powers (2nd ed.) (Indianapolis, Liberty Fund 1998). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/677> -- Arguably no political principle has been more central than the separation of powers to the evolution of constitutional governance in Western democracies. In the definitive work on the subject, M. J. C. Vile traces the history of the doctrine from its rise during the English Civil War, through its development in the eighteenth century – when it was indispensable to the founders of the American republic – through subsequent political thought and constitution-making in Britain, France, and the United States. The author concludes with an examination of criticisms of the doctrine by both behavioralists and centralizers – and with “A Model of a Theory of Constitutionalism.” The new Liberty Fund second edition includes the entirety of the original 1967 text published by Oxford, a major epilogue entitled “The Separation of Powers and the Administrative State,” and a bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_philosophy  political_history  constitutionalism  government-forms  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  American_colonies  American_Revolution  US_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  Patriot_King  judiciary  rule_of_law  French_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Third_Republic  Napoleonic_Empire  Directoire  Fifth_Republic  administrative_agencies  executive  legislation  liberalism-republicanism_debates  federalism  Founders  Federalist  Bolingbroke  Montesquieu  patronage  corruption  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern [1947] - Online Library of Liberty
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2145> -- Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern explores the very roots of liberty by examining the development of modern constitutionalism from its ancient and medieval origins. Derived from a series of lectures delivered by Charles Howard McIlwain at Cornell University in the 1938–39 academic year, these lectures provide a useful introduction to the development of modern constitutional forms. -- Introduction states the "problem" beginning with Bolingbroke's definition of the Septennial Act and Whig abandonment of Revolution Principles, and Burke, Paine, arbitrary government and written constitutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  government-forms  constitutionalism  English_constitution  US_constitution  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  judiciary  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  Absolutism  representative_institutions  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  medieval_history  feudalism  monarchy  limited_monarchy  resistance_theory  social_contract  public_opinion  political_participation  reform-political  reform-legal  Bolingbroke  Revolution_Principles  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Burke  Paine  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 4 (Novanglus, Thoughts on Government, Defence of the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 4. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2102> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 4 contains Novanglus [history of the American colonies and their relations with Britain from 1754 to 1774], Thoughts on Government, and Defence of the Constitutions [descriptions of modern and ancient republics (categorized as democratic, aristocratic and, some ancient, as monarchic), and writings on the history and theories of forms of government by ancient and modern historians and philosophers. Lists Dr Swift as well as Hume -must have read 4 Last Years. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Adams_John  ancient_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  government-forms  historians-and-politics  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_foreign_policy  Swift  Hume  American_colonies  American_Revolution  George_III  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  English_constitution  UK_government-colonies  British_Empire  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  Medieval  13thC  14thC  15thC  Renaissance  Italy  city_states  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Florence  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_order  faction  class_conflict  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 6 (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 6. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2104> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 6 contains (Defence of the Constitutions Vol. III cont’d, Davila, Essays on the Constitution. The last continued part of the Defence of the Constitutions deals with Marchmont Nedham and writings on the commonwealth. Davila is the history of the 16thC French Wars_of_Religion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  political_history  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  English_constitution  US_constitution  state_government  federalism  commonwealth  historiography  France  Wars_of_Religion  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Terror  Directoire  Napoleon  Napoleonic_Wars  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  centralization  central_government  local_government  parties  partisanship  faction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 1 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 1. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/810> -- Volume I consists of pamphlets written from the reign of James I to the Restoration (1620-1660). -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations [1737] with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull trans., eds. Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder - Online Library of Liberty
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius, A Methodical System of Universal Law: Or, the Laws of Nature and Nations, with Supplements and a Discourse by George Turnbull. Translated from the Latin by George Turnbull, edited with an Introduction by Thomas Albert and Peter Schröder (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2305> -- The natural law theory of Johann Gottlieb Heineccius was one of the most influential to emerge from the early German Enlightenment. Heineccius continued and, in important respects, modified the ideas of his predecessors, Samuel Pufendorf and Christian Thomasius. He developed distinctive views on central questions such as the freedom of the human will and the natural foundation of moral obligation, which also sharply distinguished him from his contemporary Christian Wolff. The Liberty Fund edition is based on the translation by the Scottish moral philosopher George Turnbull (1698–1748). It includes Turnbull’s extensive comments on Heineccius’s text, as well as his substantial Discourse upon the Nature and Origin of Moral and Civil Laws. These elements make the work into one of the most extraordinary encounters between Protestant natural law theory and neo-republican civic humanism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Germany  Heineccius  Pufendorf  Thomasius  Wolff  Turnbull_George  natural_law  international_law  legal_theory  legal_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  obligation  free_will  state-of-nature  government-forms  authority  legitimacy  natural_rights  natural_religion  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Israel - “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850) | Diametros
“Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was neither peripheral to the Enlightenment as a whole, nor dominant, but rather the “other side of the coin” an inherent and absolute opposite, always present and always basic to the Enlightenment as a whole. Several different constructions of “Radical Enlightenment” have been proposed by the main innovators on the topic – Leo Strauss, Henry May, Günter Mühlpfordt, Margaret Jacob, Gianni Paganini, Martin Mulsow, and Jonathan Israel – but, it is argued here, the most essential element in the definition is the coupling, or linkage, of philosophical rejection of religious authority (and secularism - the elimination of theology from law, institutions, education and public affairs) with theoretical advocacy of democracy and basic human rights. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Radical Enlightenment moderate Enlightenment democracy aristocracy universal education equality emancipation republicanism mixed government poverty economic oppression crypto-radicalism positivism American revolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  historiography  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  religious_culture  authority  anticlerical  Absolutism  secularism  democracy  natural_rights  civil_liberties  egalitarian  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  Spinozism  education  aristocracy  poverty  Ancien_régime  mixed_government  tolerance  positivism  natural_law  domination  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  natural_philosophy  British_history  Dutch  Germany  Atlantic  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Republic_of_Letters  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Claire Judde de Larivière - The 'Public' and the 'Private' in 16thC Venice: From Medieval Economy to Early Modern State | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 4 (142) (2012), pp. 76-94
This article analyses the Venetian public galleys' expeditions during the sixteenth century, as a case study for understanding the relationships between patricians and the State, and the way in which the 'public' and the 'private' roles were reorganized in the late Middle Ages. Going further the explanations usually given, the article tries to explain the decline of the public galleys, and emphasizes the symbolic, cultural, political and ideological factors that had also led to the abandonment of public navigation. It seeks to reintegrate economic considerations, practices, actions and actors into their social, political and ideological contexts, and thus avoids isolating economic phenomena and economic thinking from their political background. Doing so, it argues that the abandonment of public navigation in Venice was the corollary of the gradual differentiation between the State and the ruling class that was typical of the earliest stages of modernity. -- interesting bibliography ranging from Frederic Lane to Craig Muldrew -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  16thC  Venice  shipping  public_goods  public_enterprise  private_enterprise  elites  stratification  privatization  capitalism  imperialism  political_culture  economic_culture  elite_culture  political_economy  Renaissance  modernity-emergence  social_order  public_finance  financial_economics  financial_innovation  common_good  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercantilism  empire-and_business  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel Dennis Glover - The Putney Debates: Popular versus Élitist Republicanism | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 164 (Aug., 1999), pp. 47-80
Disagrees with Worden and others who don't see Levellers and civil war radicals as source of republicanism - traces influence of ancient historians, radicals during Dutch Revolt etc on mid 17thC English radical republicanism - extensive bibliography - downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Dutch_Revolt  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  radicals  Levellers  Cromwell  Tacitus  Machiavelli  commonwealth  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Cromartie - Harringtonian Virtue: Harrington, Machiavelli, and the Method of the Moment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 987-1009
This article presents a reinterpretation of James Harrington's writings. It takes issue with J. G. A. Pocock's reading, which treats him as importing into England a Machiavellian `language of political thought'. This reading is the basis of Pocock's stress on the republicanism of eighteenth-century opposition values. Harrington's writings were in fact a most implausible channel for such ideas. His outlook owed much to Stoicism. Unlike the Florentine, he admired the contemplative life; was sympathetic to commerce; and was relaxed about the threat of `corruption' (a concept that he did not understand). These views can be associated with his apparent aims: the preservation of a national church with a salaried but politically impotent clergy; and the restoration of the royalist gentry to a leading role in English politics. Pocock's hypothesis is shown to be conditioned by his method; its weaknesses reflect some difficulties inherent in the notion of `languages of thought'. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Harrington  landed_interest  Machiavelli  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  commerce  common_good  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  Stoicism  gentry  Royalists  mixed_government  English_constitution  politics-and-theory  religion-established  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  Church_of_England  corruption  Cambridge_School  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue - Civic Republicanism and Political Philosophy | JSTOR: The Monist, Vol. 84, No. 1, JANUARY 2001
(1) Cosmopolitan Republicanism: Citizenship, Freedom and Global Political Authority (pp. 3-21) James Bohman. *--* (2) On the Modern Relevance of Old Republicanism (pp. 22-44) Alain Boyer. *--* (3) Republican Liberty and Resilience (pp. 45-59)
Geoffrey Brennan and Alan Hamlin. *--* (4) Self-government: The Master Trope of Republican Liberty (pp. 60-76) Vivienne Brown. *--* (5) Pettit's Republic (pp. 77-97) John Ferejohn. *--* (6) Domination: A Preliminary Analysis (pp. 98-112)
Francis N. Lovett. *--* (7) Prospects for a Contemporary Republicanism (pp. 113-130) Gurpreet Rattan
journal  article  jstor  political_philosophy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  neo-republicanism  domination  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  cosmopolitanism  citizens  political_participation  governance  global_governance  sovereignty  authority  Pettit  Rawls 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Hankins - Exclusivist Republicanism and the Non-Monarchical Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 452-482
The idea that a republic is the only legitimate form of government and that non-elective monarchy and hereditary political privileges are by definition illegitimate is an artifact of late eighteenth century republicanism, though it has roots in the "godly republics" of the seventeenth century. It presupposes understanding a republic (respublica) to be a non-monarchical form of government. The latter definition is a discursive practice that goes back only to the fifteenth century and is not found in Roman or medieval sources. This article explains how the definition emerged in Renaissance Italy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  concepts-change  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_Civil_War  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  city_states  monarchy  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  Old_Testament  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel I. O'Neill, review essay - Whither Democracy? | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 564-575
Reviewed -- (1) Liberal Beginnings: Making a Republic for the Moderns by A. Kalyvas; I. Katznelson; *--* (2) James Madison and the Spirit of Republican Self-Government by C. Sheehan; *--* (3) French Political Thought from Montesquieu to Tocqueville by A. de Dijn; *--* (4) Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect by P. Rahe
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  liberalism  republicanism  US_constitution  France  French_Revolution  Montesquieu  Rousseau  Hobbes  Locke  Founders  Madison  democracy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism-republicanism_debates  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Cotton - James Harrington as Aristotelian | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Aug., 1979), pp. 371-389
Rather than Harrington within tradition of Machiavelli and Aristotle (Pocock), Cotton argues for direct appropriation from Aristotle -Oceana as polity, Agrarian Law etc. Contra Strauss who denies Harrington as Aristotelian. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_politics  Harrington  Machiavelli  civic_humanism  mixed_government  classes  property  Agrarian_Laws  social_order  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Aristotle  Pocock  Strauss  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Raynor - Hume on Wilkes and Liberty: Two Possible Contributions to The London Chronicle | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 13, No. 4 (Summer, 1980), pp. 365-376
Hume less positive re continued excellence in the arts in a commercial republic without an aristocracy in a monarchical system to enduce emulation, encourage excellence - would prefer enlightened absolutism to Wilkes type of republicanism -- check Hume Studies and Google if these attributions have been challenged or accepted -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  cultural_critique  18thC  Hume  Hume-politics  commerce-doux  arts-promotion  enlightened_absolutism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Wilkes  progress  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan G. W. Conlin - High Art and Low Politics: A New Perspective on John Wilkes | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 356-381
Fascinating for mid to late 18thC issues for both Continental Enlightenment and British thinkers and artists re scope of public sphere and state responsibility for promotion of the arts, its benefits for polite culture including middle classes with polite aspirations -- Wilkes connections with philosophes including Holbach and Diderot -- and how Wilkes wove his political reforms and promotion of arts and industry together. Useful discussion of range of historian takes on Wilkes, who he mobilized, relation with older republican opposition and later dissenters and radical opposition. Hume opposition to Wilkes' anti monarchy and anti aristocracy republicanism leads to different assessment of progress in civilizing arts and role of doux commerce. Each historian seems to put Wilkes in their own narrative resulting in dramatically different assessments of both Wilkes himself and his impact. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  art_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  George_III  Wilkes  Hume  Diderot  d'Holbach  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  opposition  public_sphere  public_opinion  governing_class  political_nation  political_culture  accountability  Parliament  franchise  Septennial_Act  nationalism  national_ID  xenophobia  anti-monarchy  anti-aristocracy  middle_class  merchants  state-roles  Grand_Tour  patriotism  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Catherine_the_Great  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  museums  academies  bibliography  enlightened_absolutism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Moore - Hume's Political Science and the Classical Republican Tradition | JSTOR: Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue canadienne de science politique, Vol. 10, No. 4 (Dec., 1977), pp. 809-839
La science politique de Hume et la tradition républicaine classique. La science politique de Hume marque un point tournant dans l'histoire de la pensée politique. On peut mieux apprécier sa signification si on la considère comme une réponse structurée aux essais de construction d'une science politique fondée sur l'expérience tentés par les théoriciens de la tradition républicaine classique. Sa discussion des formes de gouvernement, du régime mixte en Grande Bretagne, du rôle des législateurs, de l'influence du gouvernement sur le comportement social, des sources de la puissance militaire, de la sagesse d'acquérir des colonies, des mérites de la politique de la Grèce et de Rome dans l'Antiquité, et en dernier lieu, sa conception d'une république parfaite, tous ces thèmes font partie d'une réponse systématique aux oeuvres de Machiavel, Harrington, Bolingbroke et autres. La conception de Hume du gouvernement constitutionnel dérive d'une application plus consistante du raisonnement expérimental au domaine politique. Sa science politique offre donc une nouvelle théorie du gouvernement républicain qui a eu une profonde influence sur les penseurs américains, notamment Hamilton et Madison. Ces derniers y trouvèrent une conception du politique qui pouvait être appliquée aux grandes sociétés mercantiles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_politics  Hume-politics  Machiavelli  Harrington  Bolingbroke  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  US_constitution  Founders  Madison  Hamilton  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John M. Warner and John T. Scott - Sin City: Augustine and Machiavelli's Reordering of Rome | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 3 (JULY 2011), pp. 857-871
We examine Machiavelli's critical appropriation of Augustine's analysis of Rome's decline and fall in order to understand his own interpretation of Rome and the lessons it offers for a successful republic. If Machiavelli's departure from Augustine is obvious, as seen for example in his exculpation of Romulus for the fratricide Augustine condemns, equally illuminating is what Machiavelli borrows from him. For Augustine, Romulus' fratricide discloses the limits of pagan virtue and politics and reveals that the civic republican view of an early virtuous republic is nostalgic if not impossible. Machiavelli agrees with Augustine about the character of Rome, yet embraces the ambitious and acquisitive politics Augustine rebuffs. Machiavelli not only excuses Romulus' fratricide in "ordering" Rome, but makes it the archetypal act that must be repeated through "reordering" to sustain the state against the perennial problem of corruption. We thereby address two of the primary issues in Machiavelli scholarship—the character of his republicanism and the nature and extent of his innovation with regard to his ancient sources—and suggest that the "civic republican" or "neo-Roman" interpretation of Machiavelli is incorrect in its conclusions concerning his republicanism as well as his relationship to his ancient sources. -- paywall Cambridge journals -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Renaissance  Machiavelli  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Livy  Augustine  pagans  civic_virtue  neo-Roman  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Strauss  Skinner  Pocock  Cambridge_School  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Gourevitch - Labor Republicanism and the Transformation of Work | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 41, No. 4 (August 2013), pp. 591-617
In the nineteenth century a group of "labor republicans" argued that the system of wage-labor should be replaced by a system of cooperative production. This system of cooperative production would realize republican liberty in economic, not just political, life. Today, neo-republicans argue that the republican theory of liberty only requires a universal basic income. A non-dominated ability to exit is sufficient to guarantee free labor. This essay reconstructs the more radical, labor republican view and defends it against the prevailing the neo-republican one. It argues that neorepublicanism lacks an adequate conception of structural domination, which leaves it without theoretical resources to address certain forms of economic domination. The concept of structural domination allows us to comprehend the coherence of the nineteenth century, labor republican view and identify its relevance to modern labor markets. Labor republicanism takes us beyond a universal basic income to a concern with control over productive assets and workplace organization. As such, it shows us how the republican theory of liberty can support an argument for the transformation of work, not just the escape from it. -- paywall Sage
article  jstor  paywall  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  19thC  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  neo-Roman  political_economy  class_conflict  liberty  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick Deneen - The Representation We Deserve | The American Conservative Oct 2013
it is at least instructive to stand back from the current moment and consider the curious status of representation itself in today’s political circumstance. For we have neither of the two proposed forms of representation that were debated at the creation of America, but instead a hybrid that, arguably, combines the worst of both without the virtues of either.

Mostly forgotten today is that a major source of debate during the original ratification debates between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists was the very nature of representation, and in particular, the role that would be played by elected officials along with their relationship to the citizenry. The debate especially touched on respective views of the organization of the House of Representatives, but more broadly implicated the very nature of representation itself.
US_politics  US_history  US_constitution  Founders  faction  political_philosophy  political_culture  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Quentin Skinner - On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply to My Critics (2012)
Project MUSE - Journal of the History of Ideas Volume 73, Number 1, January 2012 pp. 127-146 | 10.1353/jhi.2012.0010 -- A symposium, held at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in October 2009, marked the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Quentin Skinner's essay "Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas." Four scholars, Melissa Lane, Bryan Garsten, Nadia Urbinati, and Philip Pettit, presented appraisals of Skinner's work. In his "Reply to My Critics" Skinner addresses the papers of each of the four scholars.
article  paywall  Project_MUSE  intellectual_history  historiography  Cambridge_School  17thC  Hobbes  liberty  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Rahe: Republicanism Modernized - review of A Kalyvas & I Katznelson, Liberal Beginnings: Making a Republic for the Moderns
Project MUSE - Reviews in American History Volume 37, Number 2, June 2009 pp. 205-210 | 10.1353/rah.0.0100 -- This slim volume consists of 7 chapters: an intro situating its argument with regard to the 2ndry lit on republicanism and liberalism; substantive chapters on A Smith, A Ferguson, T Paine and J Madison, G de Staël, and B Constant; and a five-page concluding chapter suggesting what these figures have in common. It is in the subdtantive chapters, taken individually, that the value of the book lies...... Had they read more widely in the 2ndry lit, had they taken the trouble to study with care the writings of Nedham, Harrington, Henry Neville, John Wildman, Algernon Sidney, Moyle, Trenchard, Gordon, and James Burgh (among others), [they] would have seen that the analytical accounts of the history of republicanism provided by [ Pocock and Skinner] are fundamentally at odds; they would have been forced to consider whether there was not a profound difference between the early modern republicanism inspired by Machiavelli and that of the Greeks and Romans; and they would have been driven to ponder whether the liberal beginnings to which the title of this book refers do not, in fact, go back to the 1650s. Moreover, had they done so, they would have been in a better position to define with precision what they mean by republicanism and liberalism. .... [and] whether constitutional monarchies should be regarded as republics and, if so, why; and whether there were any liberals in the second half of the eighteenth century and the first two decades of the nineteenth century who were not also republicans and what would define them as such. Alternatively, [they] could have dismissed the republicanism-liberalism debate as beside the point.... [Rather it's] the distinction drawn by Montesquieu (whom they mention only in passing) between the democratic republics of classical antiquity and the strange, new commercial republic disguised as a monarchy that he discovered during the months he spent in England. It was, after all, The Spirit of Laws that inspired the ruminations of Smith, Ferguson, Paine, Madison, de Staël, and Constant; and it was in response to his political typology that they framed their arguments. Montesquieu was the superintending spirit of the age.
books  bookshelf  reviews  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  liberalism  republicanism  17thC  18thC  19thC  French_Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  US_constitution  Founders  Napoleonic_Wars  Constant  de_Staël  Madison  Paine  Smith  Ferguson  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Montesquieu  civic_virtue  commerce  monarchy  limited_monarchy  Britain  France  British_politics  French_politics  paywall  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Andrea Radasanu- Montesquieu on Ancient Greek Foreign Relations: Toward National Self-Interest and International Peace | Political Research Quarterly
Political Research Quarterly March 2013 vol. 66 no. 1, 3-17 -- Andrea Radasanu - Political Science Department, Northern Illinois University, 417 Zulauf Hall, DeKalb, IL 60115, USA. Email: aradasanu@niu.edu - Published online before print January 20, 2012, doi: 10.1177/1065912911431246 -- Montesquieu peace ancient republicanism empire confederate republic -- Montesquieu famously claims that modernity ushered in gentle mores and peaceful relations among countries. Consulting Montesquieu’s teaching on Greek foreign policy, both republican and imperial, elucidates the character of these peaceful mores. Montesquieu weaves a modernization tale from primitive ancient Greece to modern commercial states, all to teach the reader to overcome any lingering attachment to glory and to adopt the rational standards of national interest and self-preservation. This account provides important insights on the relationship between realism and idealism in Montesquieu’s international relations teaching and helps scholars to rethink how these categories are construed.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  IR  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  commerce  political_culture  political_economy  lessons-of-history  national_interest  glory  balance_of_power  international_system  imperialism  federalism  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
J. G. A. Pocock: The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Pocock, J. G. A.. “The Atlantic Republican Tradition: The Republic of the Seven Provinces.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts2, no. 1 (December 15, 2010): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/72. In "Limits of the Atlantic Republican Tradition" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note-- Hence the debate between ancient and modern liberty, to be found in Britain a century before it was taken up by Benjamin Constant. It was a debate by no means uniquely British, but in the form it took in Britain a class of free landholders, whose history could be traced back through Gothic to classic and Greco-Roman times, played a crucial role. The image of the republic, it needs repeating, was not presented as a norm to be imitated; it was a bench­mark for the interpretation of history, for measuring the gains and losses of movement away from it. This narrative, shaped by a succession of historians from Bruni to Robertson, developed concurrently with a “philosophic” history of human (but European) society, based on the stadial sequence from hunter-gatherers to merchants and capitalists and culminating in the political economy of Adam Smith. In this complex historiography, the role of medieval leagues of merchant republics, Lombard, Hanseatic, and Dutch, was important but problematic; and it is here that the anglophone and Atlantic reader, rightly or wrongly, finds the key to the problem of Dutch republican thought.
article  16thC  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  historiography  lessons-of-history  republicanism  Machiavelli  Britain  British_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Dutch  city_states  Holy_Roman_Empire  commerce  trade  landed_interest  burghers  oligarchy  corruption  civic_virtue  William_III  Queen_Anne  George_III  tyranny  Stadholder  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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