dunnettreader + representative_institutions   37

Simonton, M.: Classical Greek Oligarchy: A Political History. (2017 Princeton UP)
Classical Greek Oligarchy thoroughly reassesses an important but neglected form of ancient Greek government, the "rule of the few." Matthew Simonton challenges scholarly orthodoxy by showing that oligarchy was not the default mode of politics from time immemorial, but instead emerged alongside, and in reaction to, democracy. He establishes for the first time how oligarchies maintained power in the face of potential citizen resistance. The book argues that oligarchs designed distinctive political institutions—such as intra-oligarchic power sharing, targeted repression, and rewards for informants—to prevent collective action among the majority population while sustaining cooperation within their own ranks. - excerpt added to Evernote
institutional_change  political_history  democracy  power-asymmetric  representative_institutions  oligarchy  authoritarian  political_culture  books  kindle-available  ancient_Greece  ancient_history 
august 2017 by dunnettreader
Duncan Kelly - Carl Schmitt's Political Theory of Representation (2004 ) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 113-134 -- As Pitkin suggested, political representation explores the way in which "the people (or a constituency) are present in governmental action, even though they do not literally act for themselves." This paper examines Carl Schmitt's "solution" to this quandary of political representation, which suggests that representation can bring about the political unity of the state, but only if the state itself is properly "represented" by the figure or person of the sovereign. I focus upon his attempted reconciliation of a starkly "personalist" and then Hobbesian account of representation that would justify support for the Reichspraisident under the Weimar Republic, with insights drawn from the constitutional republicanism of the Abbe Sieyes that placed the constituent power of the people at the basis of representative democracy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political-theology  representation  representative_institutions  sovereignty  exec_branch  17thC  Hobbes  corporate_personhood  Sieyes  French_Revolution  republicanism  people_the  collective_action  agency  20thC  Schmitt  Weimar  constitutionalism  constituent_power  social_contract  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
« Lectures. », Mil neuf cent. Revue d'histoire intellectuelle 1/2013 (n° 31) , p. 159-184 - Cairn.info
Titres recensés -- Jacques Julliard, Les gauches françaises, 1762-2012. Histoire, politique et imaginaire, Paris, Flammarion, 2012, 942 p.
Nathalie Richard, Hippolyte Taine. Histoire, psychologie, littérature, Classiques Garnier, 2013, 316 p.
Jean Jaurès, Œuvres, XIII, L’armée nouvelle, Jean-Jacques Becker (ed.), Paris, Fayard, 2013, 574 p.
Olivier Cosson, Préparer la Grande Guerre. L’armée française et la guerre russo-japonaise (1899-1914), Paris, Éd. Les Indes savantes, 2013, 380 p.
Géraldi Leroy, Charles Péguy. L’inclassable, Paris, Armand Colin, 2014, 366 p.
Gabriel Tarde, Sur le sommeil. Ou plutôt sur les rêves, Jacqueline Carroy, Louise Salmon (eds.), Lausanne, Éd. BHMS, 2009, 223 p.
Émile Durkheim, Hobbes a? l’agre?gation. Un cours d’E?mile Durkheim suivi par Marcel Mauss, Paris, Éd. de l’EHESS, coll. « Audiographie », 2011, 64 p.
Michel Murat, Frédéric Worms (eds.), Alain, littérature et philosophie mêlées, Paris, Éd. Rue d’Ulm-Presses de l’École normale supérieure, 2012, 221 p.
Frédéric Audren, Christian Chêne, Nicolas Mathey, Arnaud Vergne (eds.), Raymond Saleilles et au-delà, Paris, Dalloz, coll. « Thèmes
human_rights  representative_institutions  ultramontane  WWII  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  elites  philosophy-French  radicals  laïcité  socialism  France  anarchism  class_conflict  pre-WWI  republicanism  education  reviews  post-WWII  anti-clericalism  French_Revolution-impact  political_history  political_culture  political_press  materialism  political_philosophy  liberalism  democracy  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  French_lit  social_theory  books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_participation  historiography-19thC  historiography  social_history  education-higher  20thC  Fin-de-Siècle  downloaded  social_sciences  Catholics-France  Bonapartism  justice  rule_if_law  19thC 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Christian Ruby - Le « public » contre le « peuple » : une structure de la modernité (2005) - Cairn.info
Plan de l'article

Philosophie et « public », de nos jours
La constitution moderne de l’opposition « public »/« peuple »
Le statut historique de « public »
La formation et l’agencement des publics
L’importance actuelle de cette référence au « public »
La déprise nécessaire
Pour citer cet article

Ruby Christian, « Le « public » contre le « peuple » : une structure de la modernité. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 89-104
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-89.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0089.
article  public_sphere  public_opinion  representative_institutions  masses-fear_of  political_participation  democracy  media  citizens  parties-transmission_belts  civic_virtue  Habermas  downloaded  interest_groups  consumerism  political_culture  general_will  political_press  solidarity  Dewey  citizenship  political_philosophy  legitimacy  rhetoric-political  modernity  republicanism  mass_culture 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Poirier - Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet (2003) - Cairn.info
Entretien préparé et réalisé par Fouré Lionel, Entretien préparé et réalisé par Poirier Nicolas, « Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet. », Le Philosophoire 1/2003 (n° 19) , p. 23-37
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2003-1-page-23.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.019.0023.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
representative_institutions  metaphysics  democracy  Gauchet  change-social  Freud  phenomenology  France  social_theory  cultural_critique  psychology  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  poststructuralist  French_intellectuals  19thC  governance  social_sciences-post-WWII  subjectivity  common_good  nation-state  republicanism  Lacan  social_history  philosophy_of_history  modernity  German_Idealism  structuralism  civil_liberties  human_nature  downloaded  epistemology  interview  Foucault  intellectual_history  Lefort  political_participation  epistemology-social  citizenship  community 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
books  buy  biography  kindle-available  Bolingbroke  Burke  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  social_sciences  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  imperialism-critique  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  parties  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-grandees  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  representative_institutions  political_participation  political_press  moral_philosophy  psychology  religion-established  Church_of_England  Catholics-and-politics  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  Catholic_emancipation  aesthetics  Montesquieu  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  American_colonies  American_Revolution  India  French_Revolution  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolutionary_Wars  politics-and-religion  politics-and-history  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  hierarchy  George_III  Pitt_the_Elder  Pitt_the_Younger  English_lit  human_rights  human_nature  philosophical_anthropology  sentimentalism  moral_sentiments  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  Enlightenment-conservative  British_Em 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
New Books intetview - Tabetha Ewing, "Rumor, Diplomacy, and War in Enlightenment Paris" (2014)
Tabetha Ewing's Rumor, Diplomacy and War in Enlightenment Paris (Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment, 2014) is all about the on dit, the word on the street that everyday Parisians might have picked up, and/or spread around town in the 1740s. Focused on rumor during the War of Austrian Succession that lasted from 1740-1748, Ewing's is a book that examines a range of urban voices and opinions across a pivotal decade of the Enlightenment. Taking very seriously the landscapes of gossip and fantasy, Rumor, Diplomacy, and War is intriguing in its subject matter and its methodology. Interested in the circulation of speech and ideas, Ewing tracks a variety of bruits–open and clandestine media, royal efforts to release and police information about matters of state and military conflict, and oral and written forms of communication. All this, with the aim of exploring a distinctively early-modern brand of political participation, and an "inchoate citizenship" that existed in the decades before the French Revolution. Questions of national identity, loyalty to the regime (or not), and political expression/representation were in the air during these years of war and Enlightenment. Ewing's is a book that shows us how much historians can hear if we listen carefully.
books  interview  audio  18thC  French_Enlightenment  French_politics  French_foreign_policy  military_history  political_culture  War_of_Austrian_Succession  public_opinion  diplomatic_history  publishing-clandestine  national_ID  national_interest  legitimacy  1740s  Louis_XV  political_press  political_participation  citizenship  representative_institutions  free_speech  public_sphere 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
The Omaha Platform: Launching the Populist Party | History Matters - US History Survey - GMU
Although historians often speak of a “Populist movement” in the 1880s, it wasn’t until 1892 that the People’s or Populist Party was formally organized. The Omaha Platform, adopted by the founding convention of the party on July 4, 1892, set out the basic tenets of the Populist movement. The movement had emerged out of the cooperative crusade organized by the Farmer’s Alliance in the 1880s. The preamble was written by Minnesota lawyer, farmer, politician, and novelist Ignatius Donnelly. Delegates to the convention embraced the platform with great enthusiasm. Many of the specific proposals urged by the Omaha Platform—the graduated income tax, the secret ballot, the direct election of Senators, the eight-hour day—won enactment in the progressive and New Deal eras of the next century. Yet at least one historian has argued that the fundamental cooperative and democratic spirit of the agrarian radicals was lost along the way.
etexts  US_history  19thC  20thC  populism  parties  agrarian_interests  US_politics  reform-political  Progressive_Era  New_Deal  labor_standards  tax_policy  US_constitution  movements-political  democracy  representative_institutions  Gilded_Age  website 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Josh Chafetz - Democracy’s Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions | Yale University Press - 2011
This book is the first to compare the freedoms and protections of members of the United States Congress with those of Britain’s Parliament. Placing legislative privilege in historical context, Josh Chafetz explores how and why legislators in Britain and America have been granted special privileges in five areas: jurisdictional conflicts between the courts and the legislative houses, freedom of speech, freedom from civil arrest, contested elections, and the disciplinary powers of the houses. Legislative privilege is a crucial component of the relationship between a representative body and the other participants in government, including the people. In recounting and analyzing the remarkable story of how parliamentary government emerged and evolved in Britain and how it crossed the Atlantic, Chafetz illuminates a variety of important constitutional issues, including the separation of powers, the nature of representation, and the difference between written and unwritten constitutionalism. This book will inspire in readers a much greater appreciation for the rise and triumph of democracy. -- see kindle sample
books  kindle-available  political_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  democracy  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  representative_institutions  political_participation  UK_Government  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  American_colonies  US_constitution  Congress  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  House_of_Representatives  constituencies  judiciary  judicial_review  exec_branch  monarchy  monarchical_republic  MPs  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_culture  legitimacy  Founders  Madison  Blackstone  Mill  prerogative  bill_of_rights  bills_of_attainder  elections-disputed  Bolingbroke 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Giuseppe Guarino - response to James K. Galbraith re the "Maastricht coup" thesis - The Future of Europe | The American Prospect - August 2015
Professor Giuseppe Guarino, dean of constitutional scholars and the author of a striking small book (called The Truth about Europe and the Euro: An Essay, available here) on the European treaties and the Euro. Professor Guarino's thesis is the following: “On 1st January 1999 a coup d'état was carried out against the EU member states, their citizens, and the European Union itself. The 'coup' was not exercised by force but by cunning fraud... by means of Regulation 1466/97... The role assigned to the growth objective by the Treaty (Articles 102A, 103 and 104c), to be obtained by the political activity of the member states... is eliminated and replaced by an outcome, namely budgetary balance in the medium term.” -- downloaded pdf from Guarino's site to Note
EU-constitution  EU_governance  elections  political_participation  sovereignty  austerity  democracy  sovereign_debt  subsidiarity  budget_deficit  Maastricht  constitutional_law  representative_institutions  democracy_deficit  Europe-federalism  legitimacy  Germany-Eurozone  downloaded  European_integration 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Symposium on "Democracy Disfigured" - An Answer to My Criticis | Nadia Urbinati - Academia.edu
An answer to my critics in a symposium, organized by John McCormick, held on her book, Democracy Disfigured, by the journal European Political Science, 2015. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_philosophy  democracy  representative_institutions  democracy-direct  political_culture  republicanism  Machiavelli  political_participation  political_discourse  public_opinion  populism  common_good  community  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
The Populist Phenomenon | Nadia Urbinati - Academia.edu
The paper advances an analytical rendering of populism and argues that the components that make it a recognizable phenomenon are simplification and polarization of political divisions in the view of achieving a deeper unification of the masses against the existing elites and under an organic narrative that most of the time a leader embodies. Populism is thus internal to and a challenge of representative democracy; it competes with it on the meaning and practice of representation since aims at a more genuine identification between the represented and the representatives. After a premise on the distinction between a popular movement and populism, the paper argues that to better understand this phenomenon we should situate it within the republican as Roman tradition. -- Research Interests: Quality of democracy and democratic consolidation. Parties and representative political institutions with a particular focus on legislative assemblies. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  legitimacy  representative_institutions  populism  republicanism  parties  parties-transmission_belts  legislature  legislature-process  deliberation-public  mass_culture  masses-fear_of  polarization  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Nadia Urbinati - Representation as Advocacy: A Study of Democratic Deliberation - Political Theory, December 2000
Representation as Advocacy: A Study of Democratic Deliberation, Political Theory, December 2000 28: 758-786, doi:10.1177/0090591700028006003
article  Academia.edu  political_philosophy  representative_institutions  deliberation-public  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Hélène Landemore- Interview of Bernard Manin and Nadia Urbinati - Is representative democracy really democratic ? - Books & ideas
Interview of Bernard Manin and Nadia Urbinati - New York, April 10, 2007
by Hélène Landemore , 31 March 2008 -- Hélène Landemore : Bernard Manin and Nadia Urbinati, you both have written books with apparently similar titles, respectively The principles of representative government (1997) and Representative Democracy: Principles and Genealogy (2006). I would like to organize the discussion around the question of whether representative democracy is an contradiction in terms or the true essence of democracy. I will break down the theme into more manageable questions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
interview  political_philosophy  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  legitimacy  representative_institutions  democracy-direct  political_history  political_culture  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Emile Chabal - Jeremy Jennings, Revolution and the Republic. A History of Political Thought in France since the 18thC | Books & ideas - Dec 2012
.. the French themselves have rarely agreed on the meaning of politics, let alone the meaning of specific events such as the Revolution or the Commune. This means that, before we can even begin to approach the questiodn of what actually happened in French politics, we have to understand what people thought was happening. This is where Jennings’s vast 500-page book comes into its own. With his encyclopaedic knowledge, he is able to guide us through some of the most impassioned debates in modern French politics. This is not, strictly speaking, an essay; it does not have a clearly defined argument. Rather, it is an examination of the most important political thinkers in modern France brought together in ten thematic chapters.(..)[heavily influenced by recent French historians and political thinkers especially Rosanvallon but also traces of Furet and Claude Lefort -- their focus on the struggles over "indeterminate" representation -- heavy attention to 19thC figures, especially from 1st half gives the discussion 19thC liberal spin -- not really through today as advertised] The cursory treatment of the 20thC implies that the majority of key debates in French politics had, at the very least, been exhaustively addressed by 1918. Whatever came next – whether it was the Popular Front, Vichy, Gaullism or socialist rule in the 1980s – was little more than a rerun of older divisions and disagreements. The remarkably brief discussions of Aron or Foucault contrast sharply with the painstaking reconstructions of a whole host of 19thC figures. But why neglect 20thC political thought when it could have given further strength to an argument about the struggle to define a French political community? Even if one were to remain within the confines of the chapter headings -- treats Gaullism and Marxism as marginal -- can't write about postwar France without De Gaulle or neglect Empire where universalising ideologies confronted reality with feedbacks.
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  France  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  politics-and-religion  liberalism-19thC  French_Revolution-impact  Tocqueville  Constant  de_Staël  Guizot  Michelet  historiography-19thC  Terror  violence  revolutions  representative_institutions  representation  democracy  republicanism  Catholics-and-politics  Papacy  secularism  Bonapartism  universalism  historiography-postWWII 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Stéphanie Novak & Will Slauter - Interview with David Stasavage - Small States, Big Credit? | March 2012 - Books & ideas
Tags : state | political representation | the elite | debt | Italy
-- In States of Credit, David Stasavage explains why city-states were able to create long-term debt as early as the 13th century, whereas territorial states began to do so only in the 16th century. This research has major implications for our understanding of state formation and economic growth. Re his book -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle  economic_history  political_economy  political_culture  sovereign_debt  city_states  13thC  property_rights  property-confiscations  default  representative_institutions  state-building  creditors  North-Weingast  institutional_economics  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - More Social Movements or Fewer? Beyond Political Opportunity Structures to Relational Fields | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 3/4, (Jun. - Aug., 2004), pp. 333-365
Theory and Society - Special Issue: Current Routes to the Study of Contentious Politics and Social Change -- If social movements are an attempt by "outsiders" to gain leverage within politics, then one might expect the global spread of democracy to reduce social movement activity. This article argues the reverse. Granted, many past social movements, such as women's rights and civil rights, were efforts to empower the disenfranchised. However, this is not typical. Rather, social movements and protest tactics are more often part of a portfolio of efforts by politically active leaders and groups to influence politics. Indeed, as representative governance spreads, with the conviction by all parties that governments should respond to popular choice, then social movements and protest will also spread, as a normal element of democratic politics. Social movements should therefore not be seen as simply a matter of repressed forces fighting states; instead they need to be situated in a dynamic relational field in which the ongoing actions and interests of state actors, allied and counter-movement groups, and the public at large all influence social movement emergence, activity, and outcomes. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  power  power-asymmetric  democracy  political_participation  government-forms  governing_class  elites  grassroots  representative_institutions  reform-political  reform-social  reform-economic  franchise  accountability  interest_groups  voice  civil_liberties  women-rights  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ronald Collins - Ask the author: Robert Post – Citizens Divided : SCOTUSblog - August 2014
The following is a series of questions posed by Ronald Collins on the occasion of the publication of Citizens Divided: Campaign Finance Reform & the Constitution by Robert C. Post, with commentaries by Pamela Karlan, Lawrence Lessig, Frank Michelman, and Nadia Urbinati. -- The central thesis of my book is to distinguish between two forms of American constitutional self-government. In the first and historically prior form of self-government, self-determination consists of a process of representation mediated by elections. I call this view of self-government “representation.” In the second form of self-government, which did not emerge until the twentieth century, self-determination consists of processes of ongoing communication constituted by First Amendment rights. I call this view of self-government “discursive democracy.” It turns out that representation and discursive democracy possess entirely different constitutional structures and properties. The tension between representation and discursive democracy is at the heart of the doctrinal confusion of cases like Citizens United. -- Question: You write that the “Justices who joined the majority opinion in Citizens United did not seem aware that the constitutional value of electoral integrity is implicit in their own reliance on First Amendment rights.” In this regard you add that your hope in this book is to “build a bridge between the majority and the dissent by illuminating the entailments of our own contemporary commitment to First Amendment ideals.” Tell us about that “bridge” you hope to construct between the Court’s so-called conservative and liberal wings?
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_constitution  SCOTUS  free_speech  elections  political_participation  legitimacy  campaign_finance  corporate_citizenship  corporate_law  democracy  discourse-political_theory  deliberation-public  representative_institutions  oligarchy  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Accountability: Fundamental to Democracy (2014, updated March 2015) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-13 -- This paper defends a new and aggressive version of the agency model of accountability. It argues that officials and representatives in a democracy have an obligation to make available to citizens full information about what they have been doing. It is not permissible for them to sit back and see if the citizens can find out for themselves what they have been doing, any more than such a posture would be admissible in a commercial agent such as a realtor or an accountant. The paper also does several other things: (1) it develops a contrast between agent-accountability and forensic-accountability; (2) it distinguishes between political uses of "agency" and political uses of "trust" in political theory; (3) it develops a layered account of the principals in the democratic relation of agent-accountability, rejecting the reidentification of "the people"; (4) it develops an account of the relation between accountability and elections, emphasizing that elections play an important role in the fair settlement among principals as to how they should deal with their agents; (5) it shows that Burkeian representation is not incompatible with agent-accountability; and (6) it uses the notion of agent-accountability to illuminate the distinction between non-democratic and democratic republics. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 32 -- Keywords: accountability, agency, Burke, democracy, elections, representation, republic, transparency, trust
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  constitutionalism  democracy  accountability  transparency  agents  representative_institutions  common_good  national_interest  elections  fiduciaries  trust  trusts  government-forms  governing_class  government_officials  office  Burke  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Isaiah Berlin's Neglect of Enlightenment Constitutionalism (2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-12 -- One of the most important achievements of the Enlightenment is what I shall call Enlightenment constitutionalism. It transformed our political thinking out of all recognition; it left, as its legacy, not just the repudiation of monarchy and nobility in France in the 1790s but the unprecedented achievement of the framing, ratification, and establishment of the Constitution of the United States. It comprised the work of Diderot, Kant, Locke, Madison, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Sieyes, and Voltaire. It established the idea of a constitution as an intricate mechanism designed to house the untidiness and pluralism of human politics. Yet Isaiah Berlin, supposedly one of our greatest interpreters of the Enlightenment, said almost nothing about it. The paper develops this claim and it speculates as to why this might be so. Certainly one result of Berlin's sidelining of Enlightenment constitutionalism is to lend spurious credibility to his well-known claim that Enlightenment social design was perfectionist, monastic, and potentially totalitarian. By ignoring Enlightenment constitutionalism, Berlin implicitly directed us away from precisely the body of work that might have refuted this view of Enlightenment social design. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  French_Enlightenment  American_colonies  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  Enlightenment_Project  Berlin_Isaiah  rationalist  perfectibility  progress  Montesquieu  Founders  Madison  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  Glorious_Revolution  constitutionalism  government-forms  Sieyes  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  Absolutism  institutions  institutional_change  representative_institutions  tyranny  limited_monarchy  limited_government  rule_of_law  Diderot  Voltaire  Locke-2_Treatises  Kant  historical_sociology  social_sciences  social_process  pluralism  conflict  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, ed. Blair Worden - Online Library of Liberty
Marchamont Nedham, Excellencie of a Free-State: Or, The Right Constitution of a Commonwealth, edited and with an Introduction by Blair Worden (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2011). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2449> -- This edition brings back into print, after two and a half centuries, the pioneering work of English republicanism, Marchamont Nedham’s The Excellencie of a Free-State, which was written in the wake of the execution of King Charles I. First published in 1656, and compiled from previously written editorials in the parliamentarian newsbook Mercurius Politicus, The Excellencie of a Free-State addressed a dilemma in English politics, namely, what kind of government should the Commonwealth adopt? One possibility was to revert to the ancient constitution and create a Cromwellian monarchy. The alternative was the creation of parliamentary sovereignty, in which there would be a “due and orderly succession of supreme authority in the hands of the people’s representatives.” Nedham was convinced that only the latter would “best secure the liberties and freedoms of the people from the encroachments and usurpations of tyranny.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_philosophy  English_constitution  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  Charles_I  politics-and-religion  political_press  commonwealth  Cromwell  political_participation  historiography-17thC  ancient_constitution  mixed_government  government-forms  representative_institutions  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliamentarians  Nedham  newspapers  tyranny  civil_liberties  constitutionalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern [1947] - Online Library of Liberty
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2145> -- Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern explores the very roots of liberty by examining the development of modern constitutionalism from its ancient and medieval origins. Derived from a series of lectures delivered by Charles Howard McIlwain at Cornell University in the 1938–39 academic year, these lectures provide a useful introduction to the development of modern constitutional forms. -- Introduction states the "problem" beginning with Bolingbroke's definition of the Septennial Act and Whig abandonment of Revolution Principles, and Burke, Paine, arbitrary government and written constitutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  government-forms  constitutionalism  English_constitution  US_constitution  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  judiciary  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  Absolutism  representative_institutions  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  medieval_history  feudalism  monarchy  limited_monarchy  resistance_theory  social_contract  public_opinion  political_participation  reform-political  reform-legal  Bolingbroke  Revolution_Principles  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Burke  Paine  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Adams, Revolutionary Writings, ed. C. Bradley Thompson - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Revolutionary Writings of John Adams, Selected and with a Foreword by C. Bradley Thompson (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/592> -- This volume contains the principal shorter writings in which Adams addresses the prospect of revolution and the form of government proper to the new United States. There are pieces on the nature of the British Constitution and the meaning of rights, sovereignty, representation, and obligation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  Adams_John  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_history  British_politics  English_constitution  US_constitution  American_colonies  US_politics  American_Revolution  citizenship  natural_rights  civil_liberties  sovereignty  representation  representative_institutions  obligation  authority  legitimacy  Early_Republic  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert M. Calhoon, review - Craig Yirush. Settlers, Liberty, and Empire: The Roots of Early American Political Theory, 1675-1775 | H-Net Reviews - (May, 2012
Complex enthusiastic review - Calhoon 2009 book on "moderate" mid century - This attractively written, venturesome book is going to start several academic conversations because Yirush makes several intelligent, counterintuitive choices. At 277 pages, this is not a BIG book, not big like J. G. A. Pocock’s The Machiavellian Moment but big like, say, volume 2 of Barbarism and Religion, Pocock’s revisionist study of 18thC political culture in Scotland. Settlers, Liberty, and Empire could easily have been a hundred pages longer, much to the book’s benefit. When Yirush recommends to his readers Lee Ward, The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America [bookshelf], he already knows that a longer book on the roots of early American political thought would complement and overlap Ward’s magisterial study. The stark conciseness and precision of his book sends a signal more pointed than a conventional preface or introduction. Indeed, the first five pages of his introduction (on Massachusetts colonial agent Jasper Maudit) is an artful prologue in disguise. Teachers should schedule one class session for those five pages alone. Another hundred pages would have allowed Yirush to deal not just with identity in settler political thought, which he does with brio, but also with character--that older neo-Whig historical preoccupation that came alive in the 1950s in the scholarship of Edmund S. Morgan, Bernard Bailyn, Jack P. Greene, and Douglass Adair that Yirush knows well and has employed with implicit effect. In eighteenth-century usage, character meant both personal integrity and also reputation and credible public self-presentation. Choosing his battles thoughtfully, Yirush chose to subordinate character to identity. Reversing those priorities remains a road less travelled
books  reviews  kindle  bookshelf  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Atlantic  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  English_constitution  political_press  Board_of_Trade  citizenship  liberty  Native_Americans  expansionism  conquest  Coke  Blackstone  land-grabs  British_foreign_policy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  property_rights  representative_institutions  national_ID  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Shannon Stimson - Representative Democracy: Principles and Genealogy by Nadia Urbinati | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (Jun., 2007), pp. 360-361
Viewing representation and democracy on a continuum rather than antithetical. 18thC theories of representation classed as Rousseau (juridical), Siėyes (institutional) and Condorcet (political). Only the third works after democratization of politics and society -connected with a shift in sovereignty from ontological to unity via political process. She sees Mill as developing this modern representative democracy. Not clear how valid this is as a contemporary vision for democratizing our politics, but the historical analysis looks intriguing. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  political_culture  18thC  19thC  21stC  democracy  representative_institutions  Rousseau  French_Revolution  Mill  sovereignty  legitimacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
NADIA URBINATI - Competing for Liberty: The Republican Critique of Democracy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 106, No. 3 (August 2012), pp. 607-621
Freedom as non-domination has acquired a leading status in political science. As a consequence of its success, neo-roman republicanism also has achieved great prominence as the political tradition that delivered it. Yet despite the fact that liberty in the Roman mode was forged not only in direct confrontation with monarchy but against democracy as well, the relationship of republicanism to democracy is the great absentee in the contemporary debate on non-domination. This article brings that relationship back into view in both historical and conceptual terms. It illustrates the misrepresentations of democracy in the Roman tradition and shows how these undergirded the theory of liberty as non-domination as a counter to politial equality as a claim to taking part in imperium. In so doing it brings to the fore the "liberty side" of democratic citizenship as the equal rights of all citizens to exercise their political rights, in direct or indirect form. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall Cambridge
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  republicanism  democracy  citizens  domination  political_participation  concepts-change  neo-republicanism  Europe-Early_Modern  17thC  18thC  Harrington  Sidney  commonwealth  common_good  representative_institutions  liberty-positive  liberty  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Archon Fung - Associations and Democracy: Between Theories, Hopes, and Realities | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 29 (2003), pp. 515-539
Over the past decade, there has been a resurgence of interest and research into the connections between associations and democracy. This article divides the question of associative contributions to democracy into four component parts: What (a) contributions do (b) different kinds of associations make to advance (c) contesting ideals of democratic governance in various (d) political contexts? Associations enhance democracy in at least six ways: through the intrinsic value of associative life, fostering civic virtues and teaching political skills, offering resistance to power and checking government, improving the quality and equality of representation, facilitating public deliberation, and creating opportunities for citizens and groups to participate directly in governance. These contributions are not all mutually consonant with one another, and different forms of associations are better suited to advance some contributions than others. Furthermore, those who propose bolstering associations as a strategy for revitalizing democracy frequently have quite different ideals of democracy in mind. The forms and contributions of associations appropriate to three contesting notions of democratic governance-liberal minimalism, conventional representation-cum-administration, and participatory democracy-are also discussed. Finally, the democratic priority of associative contributions depends crucially on contextual features of particular societies. Under tyrannical regimes, for example, associations that resist government authority are more crucial than those that foster compliance and respect for political institutions. -- heavily cited in jstor -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_culture  demography  popular_politics  political_participation  representative_institutions  civic_virtue  equality  deliberation-public  governance  liberalism  libertarianism  resistance_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Davide Panagia - Delicate Discriminations: Thomas Hobbes's Science of Politics | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Oct., 2003), pp. 91-114
In the following, I argue that the Cold War image of Hobbes that presents him as a proponent of a state-centered conception of political power is misguided: it overlooks the aesthetic dimensions of 'representation' (a term that Hobbes infamously introduces in Leviathan, Chapter XVI) that, for someone writing in the seventeenth century, could not be distinguished from an account of 'political representation.' By focusing on Hobbes's scientific experiments in optics (within the Mersenne Circle) and the trompe-l'oeil artistic heritage whence these experiments derive, I show how Hobbes could not have been the kind of nominalist many historians of political thought make him out to be. Furthermore, Hobbes's persistent use of the theatre metaphor exemplifies a twinned aesthetic and political aspect of representation suggesting that citizens do not stop 'representing' once they consent to a sovereign. Rather, as the frontispiece Hobbes designed for Leviathan suggests, the sovereign is perpetually visible and hence subject to the spectator's ongoing discrimination and evaluation. In this regard, the sovereign is as much a subject of the citizen's opinion as she is a centripetal force guaranteeing stability; and, as an object of aesthetico-political evaluation, the sovereign occasions the perpetual production and circulation of opinions rather than merely unifying individual wills into a coherent and stable whole. -- a useful point re Hobbes needing to account for change, though not sure where "nominalism" comes in, but this doesn't contradict a state centric notion of power
jstor  article  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  optics  representation  representative_institutions  political_spectacle  public_opinion  sovereignty  authority 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Edgar Kiser and April Linton: Determinants of the Growth of the State: War and Taxation in Early Modern France and England (2001)
JSTOR: Social Forces, Vol. 80, No. 2 (Dec., 2001), pp. 411-448 -- downloaded pdf to Note -'- Although the causal impact of war on state-making in the early modern era is now widely accepted, there is less consensus about the way in which war affects levels of taxation, and the factors that might strengthen or weaken the relationship. Two questions can be posed: Do individual wars produce immediate effects on taxes, or is the cumulative effect of long periods of warfare more important? How do variations in administrative capacity and the strength of representative institutions affect the extent to which war pushes the growth of the state? This article attempts to answer these questions with a quantitative analysis of the effects of war on taxation in early modern England and France. We find that the cumulative effect of war is strong in both cases, suggesting that war made states via a "ratchet effect," and that this effect is much stronger when the administrative capacity of states is improved by centralization and bureaucratization. Strong representative assemblies decrease the effect of war on state growth in France but increase it in England, due to the very different characteristics of these institutions in the two countries.
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august 2013 by dunnettreader

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