dunnettreader + religious_culture + thesis   3

Richard Andrew Berman - The Architects of Eighteenth Century English Freemasonry, 1720 - 1740 (2010 thesis) | University of Exeter
Advisors: Black, Jeremy & Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas -- Date Issued: 2010-09-22 --
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/2999 -- Following the appointment of its first aristocratic Grand Masters in the 1720s and in the wake of its connections to the scientific Enlightenment, ‘Free and Accepted’ Masonry rapidly became part of Britain’s national profile and the largest and arguably the most influential of Britain’s extensive clubs and societies. (..) Freemasonry became a vehicle for the expression and transmission of the political and religious views of those at its centre, and for the scientific Enlightenment concepts that they championed. The ‘Craft’ also offered a channel through which many sought to realise personal aspirations: social, intellectual and financial. Through an examination of relevant primary and secondary documentary evidence, this thesis seeks to contribute to a broader understanding of contemporary English political and social culture, and to explore the manner in which Freemasonry became a mechanism that promoted the interests of the Hanoverian establishment and connected and bound a number of élite metropolitan and provincial figures. A range of networks centred on the aristocracy, parliament, the magistracy and the learned and professional societies are studied, and key individuals instrumental in spreading and consolidating the Masonic message identified. The thesis also explores the role of Freemasonry in the development of the scientific Enlightenment. The evidence suggests that Freemasonry should be recognised not only as the most prominent of the many 18thC fraternal organisations, but also as a significant cultural vector and a compelling component of the social, economic, scientific and political transformation then in progress. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  British_history  British_politics  Enlightenment  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-politics  Freemasonry  cultural_history  intellectual_history  networks-social  networks-political  networks-business  sociology_of_science_&_technology  elites  aristocracy  Parliament  MPs  political_nation  economic_sociology  economic_culture  commerce-doux  finance_capital  banking  capital_markets  capital_as_power  history_of_science  historical_sociology  historical_change  center-periphery  provinces  clubs  social_capital  judiciary  professions  professionalization  religious_culture  science-and-religion  latitudinarian  natural_religion  Newtonian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Wallace Hughes - Antidotes to Deism: A reception history of Thomas Paine's "The Age of Reason", 1794--1809 (2013 dissertation) | ProQuest Gradworks
Hughes, Patrick Wallace, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 2013, 362 pages; 3573259 - Adviser: Paula M. Kane -- In the Anglo-American world of the late 1790s, Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason was not well received, and his volumes of Deistic theology were characterized as extremely dangerous. Over 70 replies to The Age of Reason appeared in Britain and the US. It was widely criticized in the periodical literature, and it garnered Paine the reputation as a champion of irreligion. This dissertation is a study of the rhetoric of refutation, and I focus on the replies to The Age of Reason that were published during Paine's lifetime (d. 1809). To effectively refute The Age of Reason, Paine's respondents had to contend not only with his Deistic arguments, but also with his international reputation, his style of writing, and his intended audience. I argue that much of the driving force behind the controversy over The Age of Reason stems from the concern that it was geared towards the “uneducated masses” or the “lower orders.” (..) For Paine's critics, when the masses abandon their Christianity for Deism, bloody anarchy is the inevitable result, as proven by the horrors of the French Revolution. (..) Drawing on Habermas's theories of the bourgeois public sphere, I focus on how respondents to The Age of Reason reveal not only their concerns and anxieties over the book, but also what their assumptions about authorial legitimacy and expectations about qualified reading audiences say about late 18thC print culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  Paine  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  Deism  natural_religion  Christianity  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  publishing  pamphlets  journalism  lower_orders  public_opinion  public_sphere  print_culture  hierarchy  mass_culture  anarchy  readership  social_order  public_disorder  Radical_Enlightenment  masses-fear_of  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Catherine Tinsley Tuell: "By His Majestie's Special Command": William III and Uncommon Prayer - thesis 2011 - Udini
William III ascended to the throne of England in 1689 following his military intervention in support of the erstwhile claim to the throne by his wife (Mary II) as a replacement for the sitting Roman Catholic king, who was also her father James II. During the ideological and theological conflict that followed William's invited invasion, public worship and public prayer in the Church of England was used by Williamite propagandists to promote and legitimize a monarchy that re-fashioned the concept of a sovereign who ruled by divine right in spite of Parliament into one where the sovereign's divine right was determined by Parliament. Using what I term "uncommon prayer" as supplements to the liturgy of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer , church divines promoted the political agenda and ideology of the Williamite regime. Most often crafted for use on royally designated days of national fasting or thanksgiving, these occasional Forms of Prayer required the active participation of all of their Majesties' subjects during public worship. Satirical balladry during the Irish conflict with James II lampooning the royal proclamation for public fasting and uncommon prayer confirms their Majesties' adversaries recognized the effectiveness of the royal polemical campaign conducted by and through the church. The examination of uncommon prayers reveals that the revolutionary government used language familiar to the people in radically new ways to justify the invasion by a foreign prince, the forced "abdication" of a sitting monarch, and a re-shaping of not only the monarchy, but the Church of England and Parliament. It defined the role of William as the instrument of God's divine providence and emphasized the responsibility of the people for the nation's misfortunes because of their individual and collective sin. The sustained use of uncommon or occasional prayer throughout the years of the Williamite monarchy (1689-1702) to bring before the people the royal agenda attests to the vitality of public worship, the perceived efficacy of public prayer, and the importance of the Church of England on the social and political landscape of late-seventeenth century England.
thesis  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  Glorious_Revolution  propaganda  William_III  Providence  Church_of_England  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  Jacobites  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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