dunnettreader + religious_belief   104

David Loades - Foxe in theological context | The Acts and Monuments Online
Foxe in theological context
by David Loades
The issues covered by the trials and inquisitions which Foxe narrates in these books are limited and endlessly repetitive. Christology is hardly ever discussed. The taking of oaths and obedience to secular authority are raised in some cases, usually when the inquisitors are trying to pin charges of anabaptism on their victims. In the unusual case of Cranmer considerable use is made of 'lawful authority', because of his own high profile insistence upon obedience to the Royal Supremacy. Foxe is always at pains to ensure that his martyrs insist upon the lawfulness of oaths. Obedience is more difficult, and the normal response is 'we must obey God rather than man'. However this is always qualified by some statement to the effect that a Christian who is required by his conscience to disobey a lawful command will submit willingly to the penalties prescribed. Foxe is extremely sensitive to the catholic charge that protestantism is a religion of disobedience.The issues which dominate the great majority of trials are: vernacular liturgy and scripture, and the nature and number of the sacraments.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Reformation  Protestants  religious_belief  religious_practices  sacraments  transubstantiation  priestcraft  priesthood  priests-authority  hierarchy  ecclesiology  Papacy  purgatory  indulgences  dogmatism  church_history  sola_scriptura 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
PJE Kail - UNDERSTANDING HUME'S NATURAL HISTORY OF RELIGION (2007) - The Philosophical Quarterly - Wiley Online Library
Hume's ‘Natural History of Religion’ offers a naturalized account of the causes of religious thought, an investigation into its ‘origins’ rather than its ‘foundation in reason’. Hume thinks that if we consider only the causes of religious belief, we are provided with a reason to suspend the belief. I seek to explain why this is so, and what role the argument plays in Hume's wider campaign against the rational acceptability of religious belief. In particular, I argue that the work threatens a form of fideism which maintains that it is rationally permissible to maintain religious belief in the absence of evidence or of arguments in its favour. I also discuss the ‘argument from common consent’, and the relative superiority of Hume's account of the origins of religious belief.
article  paywall  Wiley  18thC  Hume  Hume-religion  philosophical_anthropology  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  religious_belief  reason  fideism 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Spinoza Research Network - Home
The Spinoza Research Network was set up in 2008 and funded by an AHRC Networks Grant between 2008 and 2010 at the University of Dundee. The funded project focused on contemporary interdisciplinary connections to seventeenth-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza and built up a membership of over 200 members in Philosophy, Politics, Law, Literature, Music, Psychology, History, Medicine, Gender Studies, Education, and many other academic and non-academic disciplines.

The grant has now expired, but the Network continues as an interdisciplinary group of academics, students, and others interested in Spinoza around the world. Working together, sharing research and developing new projects, we investigate how Spinoza is used both within philosophy and beyond it, both inside and outside of academia.

As of 2013 the Network is based at the University of Aberdeen.
moral_philosophy  politics-and-religion  Hobbes  website  philosophy_of_religion  monism  immanence  logic  Spinoza  religious_belief  epistemology  metaphysics  bibliography  political_philosophy  Judaism  Descartes  17thC  religion-established  tolerance  history_of_science  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  scepticism  transcendence  intellectual_history 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Ilkka Pyysiainen - Cognitive Science of Religion: State of the Art (2012) | Academia.edu
Journal for the Cognitive Science of Religion (2012) -- article presents an introduction to the cognitive science of religion. It shows that CSR began with original theoretical approaches within the human sciences and has subsequently developed into a more empirical, interdisciplinary feld of study. The feld is growing rapidly with the appearance of several centers and projects. The most important theories, fndings, and criticisms are presented. Also the various centers of study and recent projects are described. -- Keywords -- cognition, agency, sociality, ritual -- Downloaded to Tab S2
article  downloaded  religion  cognitive_science  sociology_of_religion  religious_belief  religious_experience  religious_culture  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  neuroscience  cultural_transmission  cultural_change  cultural_influence  tradition  Innovation  ritual  agency  agency-structure  social_psychology  social_movements 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Ilkka Pyysiainen - Religon: From mind to society and back (2012) | Academia.edu
Book chapter - Exploring the cognitive basis of the social sciences and trying to ground the social in the cognitive requires taking an explicit stance on reduction(ism) as discussed in philosophy of science. In social science and the humanities, the question of reductionism has been especially salient in the study of religion. This chapter begins with a philosophical analysis of reduction; after that, two relatively new research programs in the study of religious thought and behavior are discussed: the standard model of the cognitive science of religion and approaches based on gene-culture coevolutionary theories. Finally, the question of reductionism is addressed and the possibility of combining multilevel explanations of religious phenomena is evaluated. -- Downloaded to Tab S2
chapter  Academia.edu  downloaded  cognitive_science  religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  level_of_analysis  reductionism  religious_belief  religious_experience  neuroscience  cognition  cognition-social  gene-culture_coevolution  cultural_transmission  cultural_change  sociology_of_religion  naturalism  natural_selection  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  evolution-group_selection 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Tertullian : Ante-Nicene Fathers Translations - The Tertullian Project
Re-keyed html with footnotes and further comments (Elucidations) of widely reproduced 19thC translations - mostly T & F Clark, Edinburgh, or American editions of the same
The website has lots of articles, book chaptersk etc of out-of-copyrjght materials with comments from the site editor of more recent information and his personal verifying of bibliographic info on specific editions
website  etexts  translation  Early_Christian  Tertullian  Roman_Empire  heresy  theology  Trinity  martyrs  manners  apologetics  cultural_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  persecution 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Benjamin D. Crowe - Dilthey's Philosophy of Religion in the "Critique of Historical Reason": 1880-1910 (2005) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 66, No. 2 (Apr., 2005), pp. 265-283 -- The core of Dilthey's philosophy of religion during the period here under consideration is what I call the "immanence thesis," which is a "hermeneutical hypothesis" that Dilthey employs in interpreting various phenomena of religious life. The claim is that the subject matter and source of religion is human life rather than a transcendent reality beyond the bounds of human experience. Put another way Dilthey's view is that religious myths, symbols, concepts, and practices are all ways of articulating the immanent meaning or sense of histori-cal life. This thesis grounds the positive role that religious experience and the history of Christianity play in Dilthey's project in the Einleitung, i.e., the grounding of the human sciences in what he later called a "whole, full, and unmutilated" picture of human life. The "immanence thesis" also provides clues regarding Dilthey's own religious position, which, though certainly not Christian (or even theistic) "in the specific sense," nonetheless bears affinities with Romantic pantheism as well as with the "world-view" that Dilthey later calls "objective idealism." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography-19thC  Germany  German_scholars  Dilthey  religious_belief  religious_practices  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_history  sociology_of_religion  German_historical_school  19thC  immanence  transcendence  theism  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Grell and Scriber eds. -Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation (1996) | Cambridge University Press
This volume offers a re-interpretation of the role of tolerance and intolerance in the European Reformation. It questions the traditional notion of a progressive development towards greater religious toleration from the beginning of the sixteenth century onwards. Instead, it places incidents of religious tolerance and intolerance in their specific social and political contexts. Fifteen leading scholars offer a comprehensive interpretation of this subject, covering all the regions of Europe that were directly affected by the Reformation in the crucial period between 1500, when northern humanism had begun to make an impact, and 1648, the end of the Thirty Years War. In this way, Tolerance and Intolerance in the European Reformation provides a dramatically different view of how religious toleration and conflict developed in early modern Europe. - excerpt is TOC and full Intro including ftnts - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Lutherans  persecution  politiques  social_movements  Huguenots  Erastianism  church_history  Europe-Early_Modern  change-social  Calvinism  religious_wars  heresy  Kirk  religion-established  books  legitimacy  Thirty_Years_War  networks-religious  Papacy  iconoclasm  Counter-Reformation  16thC  Church-and-State  anti-Calvinists  religious_history  godly_persons  Church_of_England  social_order  politico-theology  Wars_of_Religion  Socinians  downloaded  Arminians  religious_belief  Inquisition  religious_culture  17thC  religious_lit  Thirty-Nine_Articles  Reformation  tolerance  Puritans  heterodoxy 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Romanticism, reflexivity, design: An interview with Colin Jager by Nathan Schneider « The Immanent Frame
Colin Jager’s reading of the British romantics places them at the center of debates about religion, secularism, and pluralism today. In The Book of God, he traces the ways in which design arguments for God’s existence — predecessors to the current Intelligent Design movement—were developed and discussed in British literature from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth. His interpretation challenges those in the habit of trying to disentangle the religious and the secular, in both the past and the present. Jager is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University and is currently at work on a second book, After Secularism: Romanticism, Literature, Religion - downloaded pdf to Note
interview  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  literary_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Romanticism  God-existence  secularization  English_lit  religious_culture  religious_belief  design-nature  creation  theology  theodicy  natural_religion  Deism  creationism  intelligent_design  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Sylvie Taussig - La pluralité des mondes au miroir de l'Europe et de la Chine : pluralisme politique et pluralisme religieux dans un monde globalisé (2014) - Cairn.info
Cet article porte sur les processus de sécularisation, et notamment sur l’avènement du pluralisme religieux et politique et sur le rapport entre monothéisme et pluralisme. Il redonne sa place à un moment souvent ignoré de cette histoire complexe : les échanges fructueux quoique aveugles, ressemblant souvent à un jeu de dupes à somme nulle, entre l’Europe – et particulièrement la France – et la Chine au xviie siècle. L’incompatibilité qui semble se découvrir, dans cette histoire en miroir, concerne le monothéisme et le pluralisme politique. Et, dans notre univers globalisé, il s’agit de gérer la multiplicité des cultures et des religions dans des entités nationales unitaires. - behind a 3-year rolling paywall -- she specializes in 17thC - may be of interest for the Querelle des rites
article  Jesuits  globalization  intellectual_history  pluralism  human_nature  religious_culture  religious_belief  monotheism  China  missionaries  17thC  religious_history  comparative_religion  multiculturalism  universalism  paywall 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Les Cahiers Jules Lequier et la renaissance d'une pensée éternelle (2011) - Cairn.info
The Amis de Jules Lequier have published 2 volumes of his notebooks with lots of related materials on the intellectual mileux that he was responding to and biographical material relevant to his thought -- La deuxième livraison des Cahiers Jules Lequier est surtout biobibliographique. Le dossier central (« Jules Lequier et la Bretagne ») éclaire l’œuvre de l’auteur par sa vie, et sa vie par son enracinement en terre bretonne. Là encore, l’essentiel est à saisir à travers l’accidentel, comme le philosophique à travers le biographique. Outre un entretien avec Jacques Josse, on lira les articles de Jean Grenier, de Yannick Pelletier et de Jean-Marie Turpin. La plus grande partie du numéro est consacrée à la « Bibliographie commentée », établie par D. Wayne Viney et G. Le Brech. Toutes les éditions (posthumes) des œuvres de Lequier sont mentionnées, ainsi que tous les travaux portant explicitement sur le philosophe, ou y faisant référence. Ce recensement exhaustif (qui est aussi un résumé-commentaire de chaque parution) constitue un outil de recherche très précieux
religious_belief  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_religion  19thC  Providence  books  Catholics  Renouvier  free_will  France  reviews  liberty  individualism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
David Wootton - Narrative, Irony, and Faith in Gibbon's Decline and Fall | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 1994)
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 77-105 -- thinks Momigliano didn't see that Gibbon was Hume's follower and their "school" was defining on a number of elements for what "history" came to be understood as - Thinks Wormersley doesn't fully appreciate Gibbon's handling of religion and the various challenges to Christianity in both antiquity and Enlightenment -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  history_of_England  Gibbon  Momigliano  Enlightenment  religious_belief  religious_history  scepticism  miracles  Middleton_Conyers  irony  narrative  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
The real roots of Sunni-Shia conflict: beyond the myth of "ancient religious hatreds" | Vox Jan 2016
The story, as told, usually goes something like this: 1,400 years ago, during the seventh century, there was a schism among Muslims over who would succeed as…
Instapaper  MENA  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  Islam  Shia  Sunni  geopolitics  Islamic_civilization  from instapaper
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Céline Spector - Charles Taylor, philosophe de la culture (career review) - La Vie des idées - 8 avril 2014
Charles Taylor n’a cessé de critiquer l’individualisme des sociétés modernes. La politique de la reconnaissance qu’il prône entend respecter la singularité de chacun et son inscription dans une communauté morale ou politique – quitte à accorder une importance excessive aux convictions religieuses. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  Taylor_Charles  individualism  modernity  secularism  religious_belief  religious_culture  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Job's Complaint in "Paradise Regained" (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 625-660 - reading Milton’s commitment to separation of church and state, against a renewal of an integrated political theology, as also a message for the individual's relation with approaching the reading of scripture -- looks like a link between her work on Milton in Wayward Contracts and her vocal program against reading imperatives of a political theology back into secularization history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  English_lit  17thC  Milton  Restoration  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Bible-as-literature  Job  New_Testament  theodicy  justice  justification  Satan  political-theology  secularism  freedom_of_conscience  temptation  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Carina L. Johnson - Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 597-622 -- describes shifting descriptions across the 15thC-16thC of religious practices and how they were increasingly reported on, analyzed, and categorized, starting with Aristotle's and mutating -- in travel lit, reports from exploration, missionaries, colonization and aggregations in published works from ethnography to large scale "cosmographies" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  15thC  16thC  17thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  publishing  travel_lit  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  religious_belief  religious_practices  religious_imagery  idolatry  ethnography  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  civilization-concept  primitivism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Joan-Pau Rubiés - Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 571-596 -- The article starts out, "Idolatry" ended in the pages of Voltaire's Dictionnaire Philosophique -- Voltaire explains it's an empty term for analytical purposes, just used to condemn others, by contrast with monotheism and polytheism, which is at least a meaningful distinction. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  religious_history  religious_belief  comparative_religion  ethnography  theology  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  idolatry  pagans  religious_imagery  religious_practices  religious_culture  ritual  Voltaire  monotheism  polytheism  sociology_of_religion  Enlightenment  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe - Issue Introduction (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 561-570 **--** Articles in issue on idolatry *--* Jonathan Sheehan, Introduction: Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe (pp. 561-570) *-* Joan-Pau Rubiés, Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (pp. 571-596) *--* Carina L. Johnson, Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (pp. 597-622) *--* Sabine MacCormack, Gods, Demons, and Idols in the Andes (pp. 623-648) *--* Jonathan Sheehan, The Altars of the Idols: Religion, Sacrifice, and the Early Modern Polity (pp. 649-674) *--* Peter N. Miller, History of Religion Becomes Ethnology: Some Evidence from Peiresc's Africa (pp. 675-696) *--* Martin Mulsow, Idolatry and Science: Against Nature Worship from Boyle to Rüdiger, 1680-1720 (pp. 697-712) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  journal  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_experience  ritual  idolatry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  theology  sociology_of_religion  political-theology  science-and-religion  historicism  relativism  demons  devil  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  comparative_history  sacrifice  science_of_man  social_sciences  human_nature  Africa  Latin_America  pagans  nature  natural_religion  nature_worship  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Boyle  Antiquarianism  natural_history  Peiresc  virtuosos  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Lauren Kassell - "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 107-122 - in issue devoted to histories of science -- looking at how histories of magic were framed with respect to work in mathematics, medicine and natural philosophy, especially to carve out legitimate intellectual inquiry from derogatory attacks linked to supposed magic -- tracks especially from mid 17thC how the discourses that involved magic were shifting -- probably puts Keith Thomas in more recent historiography on "religion and the decline of magic" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  religious_history  history_of_science  historiography  magic  medicine  natural_philosophy  alchemy  religious_culture  religious_belief  historiography-17thC  evidence  experimental_philosophy  publishing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Adam Kotsko, review essay - The Devil – Writ Large and in the Details | Marginalia - October 2015
Philip C. Almond, The Devil: A New Biography, Cornell University Press, 2014, 296pp., $29.95 At first glance, these two studies of the place of the devil in the… Kotsko isn't enthusiastic -- the book on Ugartic tablets as evidence of a widely transmitted and shared story of the origins of the devil, demins, etc. that may or not be in the Old Testament but was picked up during the patristic era and passed on -- Kotsko thinks their method is shoddy -' As for Almond, it's too intellectualized, failing to explain the shifts in psychology -- what was going on when belief in devil or witches was viewed as rationality itself, etc
Instapaper  books  reviews  religious_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  religious_culture  Judaism  religious_belief  Old_Testament  apocrypha  witchcraft  devil  angels  sin  supernatural  ancient_Israel  ancient_Near_East  Biblical_criticism  philology  folklore  cultural_transmission  theology  Early_Christian  early_modern  17thC  Enlightenment  from instapaper
october 2015 by dunnettreader
David Sedley - Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom | Classical Literature | Cambridge University Press (hbk 1998)
This book studies the structure and origins of De Rerum Natura (On the nature of things), the great first-century BC poem by Lucretius. By showing how he worked from the literary model set by the Greek poet Empedocles but under the philosophical inspiration of the Greek philosopher Epicurus, the book seeks to characterize Lucretius' unique poetic achivement. It is addressed to those interested both in Latin poetry and in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. [A later chapter concerns the "imprint" of Theophrastus *--* The appearance of this book is a great event - a first class modern philosopher writing on a major Roman author *--* Nothing of this kind available elsewhere *--* Contains the first ever full-scale reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature -- downloaded marketing materials to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  literary_history  Lucretius  ancient_philosophy  cosmology  religious_belief  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  Hellenism  Epicurean  atomism  Empedocles  Theophrastus  poetry  rhetoric-moral_basis  epistemology  nature  perception  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Carlos Fraenkel - Spinoza on Miracles and the Truth of the Bible (JHI 2013) | Academia.edu
Journal of the History of Ideas, Volume 74, Number 4, October 2013,pp. 643-658 (Article) -- DOI: 10.1353/jhi.2013.0038. -- "the God of the Bible is the God of the philosophers" -- reason and revelation have to be totally separate - Maimonides applying reason to Hebrew scripture was in error of "dogmatism" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  politics-and-religion  politico-theology  Spinoza  Judaism  reason  religious_belief  miracles  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Death of God and the Death of Morality [Nietzsche] :: SSRN - September 16, 2015
University of Chicago -' Nietzsche famously proclaimed the "death of God," but in so doing it was not God's death that was really notable -- Nietzsche assumes that most reflective, modern readers realize that "the belief in the Christian god has become unbelievable" (GS 343) -- but the implications of that belief becoming unbelievable, namely, "how much must collapse now that this faith has been undermined," in particular, "the whole of our European morality" (GS 343). What is the connection between the death of God and the death of morality? I argue that Nietzsche thinks the death of God will undermine two central aspects of our morality: its moral egalitarianism, and its belief in moral responsibility and warranted guilt. I offer an account of how Nietzsche sees the connections, and conclude with some skeptical considerations about whether Nietzsche was right that atheism would, in fact, undermine morality. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Nietzsche, theism, morality -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  moral_philosophy  religious_belief  religious_culture  19thC  Nietzsche  theism  atheism  God-existence  moral_psychology  morality-Nietzche  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  morality-objective  Kant-ethics  egalitarian  guilt  norms  obligation  responsibility  free_will  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
The Diverse Diversity of William James | s-usih.org - July 2015
Martin Halliwell and Joel Rasmussen, eds., William James and the Transatlantic Conversation: Pragmatism, Pluralism, and Philosophy of Religion (New York: Oxford…
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  James_William  pragmatism  epistemology  epistemology-naturalism  empiricism  experience  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Hugh McLeod, Werner Ustorf, eds. - The Decline of Christendom in Western Europe, 1750–2000 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
EDITORS: Hugh McLeod, University of Birmingham and Werner Ustorf, University of Birmingham -- 1. Introduction, Hugh McLeod *--* 2. The secularisation decade: what the 1960s have done to the study of religious history, Callum G. Brown *--* 3. Christendom in decline: the Swedish case, Eva M. Hamberg *--* 4. New Christianity: indifference and diffused spirituality, Yves Lambert *--* 5. Established churches and the growth of religious pluralism: a case study of Christianisation and secularisation in England since 1700, David Hempton *--* 6. Catholicism in Ireland, Sheridan Gilley *--* 7. Long-term religious developments in the Netherlands, c. 1750–2000, Peter Van Rooden *--* 8. The potency of 'Christendom': The example of the 'Darmstädter Wort' (1947), Martin Greschat. *--* 9. The dechristianisation of death in modern France, Thomas Kselman *--* 10. The impact of technology on Catholicism in France (1850–1950), Michel Lagrée *--* 11. Semantic structures of religious change in modern Germany, Lucian Hölscher *--* 12. Master-narratives of long-term religious change, Jeffery Cox *--* 13. A missiological postscript Werner Ustorf.
books  kindle-available  religious_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  Christianity  Christendom  religious_culture  religious_belief  religion-established  Europe  Europe-19thC  Enlightenment  secularization  Catholics-English  Catholics-England  Catholics-Ireland  pluralism  Germany  France  anticlerical  spirituality 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Reformed Epistemology | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
A thesis about the rationality of religious belief. A central claim made by the reformed epistemologist is that religious belief can be rational without any appeal to evidence or argument. There are, broadly speaking, two ways that reformed epistemologists support this claim. The first is to argue that there is no way to successfully formulate the charge that religious belief is in some way epistemically defective if it is lacking support by evidence or argument. The second way is to offer a description of what it means for a belief to be rational, and to suggest ways that religious beliefs might in fact be meeting these requirements. This has led reformed epistemologists to explore topics such as when a belief-forming mechanism confers warrant, the rationality of engaging in belief forming practices, and when we have an epistemic duty to revise our beliefs. As such, reformed epistemology offers an alternative to evidentialism (the view that religious belief must be supported by evidence in order to be rational) and fideism (the view that religious belief is not rational, but that we have non-epistemic reasons for believing). Reformed epistemology was first clearly articulated in a collection of papers called Faith and Rationality edited by Alvin Plantinga and Nicholas Wolterstorff in 1983. However, the view owes a debt to many other thinkers
philosophy_of_religion  epistemology  rational_religion  rationality  evidence  religious_belief  fideism  analytical_philosophy  virtue_epistemology  Protestants 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Donald S. Lopez, Jr.- The evolution of a text: The Tibetan Book of the Dead | The Immanent Frame - March 2011
Excerpted from The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography published by Princeton University Press © 2011. -- In a footnote to his introduction, Evans-Wentz writes that he and Kazi Dawa Samdup felt, “that without such safeguarding as this Introduction is intended to afford, the Bardo Thodol translation would be peculiarly liable to misinterpretation and consequent misuse . . .” They could have had little idea of the myriad ways in which their collaboration would be read. Removing the Bardo Todol from the moorings of language and culture, of time and place, Evans-Wentz transformed it into The Tibetan Book of the Dead and set it afloat in space, touching down at various moments in various cultures over the course of the past century, providing in each case an occasion to imagine what it might mean to be dead. This biography tells the strange story of The Tibetan Book of the Dead. It argues that the persistence of its popularity derives from three factors: The first is the human obsession with death. The second is the Western romance of Tibet. The third is Evans-Wentz’s way of making the Tibetan text into something that is somehow American. Evans-Wentz’s classic is not so much Tibetan as it is American, a product of American Spiritualism. Indeed, it might be counted among its classic texts. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder " Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  20thC  21stC  translation  religious_lit  religious_culture  religious_belief  sociology_of_religion  spirituality  readership  reader_response  cultural_exchange  cultural_transmission  esotericism  hermeticism  Buddhism  Tibet  orientalism  New_Age  death  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy F. Walton - Moments from the lives of great religious books « The Immanent Frame - March 2011
“The Lives of Great Religious Books,” a promising new series from Princeton University Press, debuted this month with three titles—Martin E. Marty’s Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Letters and Papers from Prison, Donald Lopez’s The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography, and Garry Wills’ Augustine’s Confessions. On March 24, I had the opportunity to discuss “The Lives of Great Religious Books” with Professor Marty, Professor Lopez, and Vanessa Ochs, another author in the series, who is currently working on a biography of the Passover Haggadah. Above all, our conversation centered on the metaphor of a text’s biography, its purchase and limitations. Just as we might think of a human biography as a series of contexts linked together by a single individual, so too is the biography of a text a series of contexts linked by the text itself. We also weighed the importance of the series to the changing disciplinary purview of Religious Studies. For many years, Religious Studies was defined as a hermeneutical discipline based upon great texts, but the typical disciplinary approach was to treat the texts as hermetic, self-contained wholes upon which the scholar expounds and expands. With this series, however, we are witnessing a new willingness on the part of scholars in Religious Studies to approach the dynamic relationship between theological treatises and their social environments, between texts and contexts, as it were. -- downloaded pdf to Note and in folder "Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series" with the Immanent Frame posts on the 3 recently published "biographies" Waldron mentions
books  religious_lit  intellectual_history  religious_history  sociology_of_religion  hermeneutics  history_of_book  contextualism  religious_culture  religious_belief  disciplines  academia  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Newall interview of Stephen D. Snobelen: Newton Reconsidered - Theology and Alchemy | The Galilean Library
Stephen David Snobelen is Assistant Professor in the History of Science and Technology at University of King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is a founder member of the Newton project and author of many fascinating papers on Newton's alchemy and religious thinking. I was privileged to be able to ask him some questions about his work on Newton. -- helpful re the process by which Newton's papers were hidden, then sold at auction in 1936 and beginning in 1991 being made available for researchers as the dispersed manuscripts have been re-collected - who is working on what issues, as of 2005 -- Snobelen got his degrees in History of Philosophy of Science at Cambridge with Schaffer -- converted page and downloaded pdf to Note
interview  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  religious_history  religious_belief  17thC  18thC  Newton  Socinians  Arian  anti-Trinitarian  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Neoplatonism  immortality  soul  metaphysics  essence  substance  theology  Early_Christian  alchemy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pius XI, Quadragesimo Anno (May 151931) - ENCYCLICAL ON RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOCIAL ORDER | Vatican
Forty years have passed since Leo XIII's peerless Encyclical, On the Condition of Workers, first saw the light, and the whole Catholic world, filled with grateful recollection, is undertaking to commemorate it with befitting solemnity. Other Encyclicals of Our Predecessor had in a way prepared the path for that outstanding document and proof of pastoral care: ...against the tenets of Socialism[5] against false teachings on human liberty,[6] and others of the same nature fully expressing the mind of Leo XIII. Yet the Encyclical, On the Condition of Workers, compared with the rest had this special distinction that at a time when it was most opportune and actually necessary to do so, it laid down for all mankind the surest rules to solve aright that difficult problem of human relations called "the social question." For toward the close of the 19thC, the new kind of economic life that had arisen and the new developments of industry had gone to the point in most countries that human society was clearly becoming divided more and more into two classes. One class, very small in number, was enjoying almost all the advantages which modern inventions so abundantly provided; the other, embracing the huge multitude of working people, oppressed by wretched poverty, was vainly seeking escape from the straits wherein it stood.
religious_history  economic_history  church_history  19thC  20thC  Catholics  Papacy  Industrial_Revolution  Gilded_Age  labor  labor_history  working_class  poverty  modernity  social_thought  social_problem  social_theory  socialism  liberty  religious_culture  religious_belief  entre_deux_guerres  laisser-faire  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
POPE PAUL VI - Populorum Progressio (March 26, 1967) - ENCYCLICAL ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PEOPLES | Vatican
The progressive development of peoples is an object of deep interest and concern to the Church. This is particularly true in the case of those peoples who are trying to escape the ravages of hunger, poverty, endemic disease and ignorance; of those who are seeking a larger share in the benefits of civilization and a more active improvement of their human qualities; of those who are consciously striving for fuller growth. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  20thC  post-WWII  Catholics  Papacy  Vatican_II  religious_belief  religious_culture  social_thought  social_problem  social_theory  modernity  poverty  inequality  justice  development  progress  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Pope Francis - Lumen Fidei (29 June 2013) - ENCYCLICAL LETTER ON FAITH | Vatican
Thanks to faith we have come to understand the unique dignity of each person, something which was not clearly seen in antiquity. In the second century the pagan Celsus reproached Christians for an idea that he considered foolishness and delusion: namely, that God created the world for man, setting human beings at the pinnacle of the entire cosmos. "Why claim that [grass] grows for the benefit of man, rather than for that of the most savage of the brute beasts?"[46] "If we look down to Earth from the heights of heaven, would there really be any difference between our activities and those of the ants and bees?"[47] At the heart of biblical faith is God’s love, his concrete concern for every person, and his plan of salvation which embraces all of humanity and all creation, culminating in the incarnation, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Without insight into these realities, there is no criterion for discerning what makes human life precious and unique. Man loses his place in the universe, he is cast adrift in nature, either renouncing his proper moral responsibility or else presuming to be a sort of absolute judge, endowed with an unlimited power to manipulate the world around him.
religious_history  21stC  Catholics  Papacy  faith  revelation  reason  religious_belief  Biblical_exegesis  church_history  Early_Christian  Old_Testament  New_Testament  Augustine  human_rights  human_nature  creation  soteriology  dignity  imago_dei  nature  nature-mastery  modernity  environment  social_thought  poverty  religious_experience  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - Fantasy and the Buffered Self - The New Atlantis - Winter 2014
If fantasy rose to centrality as a form of nostalgia for a day when the porous self was at least surrounded by other sentient beings rather than a dark and silent cosmos, it may now have become something else altogether, a kind of ultimate disenchantment where even our own selves are vacated in favor of a world prefabricated for us by others. This raises again that key question from American Gods: Is resistance futile? Is it simply the case that “all we’re facing here is a f — ing paradigm shift”? Or might there be forces of resistance capable of waging a “mighty battle” on behalf of human freedom?(..) we might take comfort from what seems to me the authentic core of the fantastic as a genre, as we see it from the standpoint of late modernity: fantasy may best be taken as an acknowledgment that the great problem of the pagan world — how to navigate as safely as possible through an ever-shifting landscape of independent and unpredictable powers who are indifferent to human needs — is our problem once more. (..) American Gods is an especially important text for this moment, because it rightly identifies technologies as gods and simultaneously sides with the older gods as being intrinsically closer to the proper human lifeworld. Imaginatively, if not in substantive belief, we are pagans once more. (..) We may choose to believe that we can buffer ourselves, protect ourselves against unknown powers. But that’s a kind of wager: if the powers are real, our disbelief won’t deter them. And it may be that certain powers profit from being disregarded or treated as mere fancies. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  SFF  religious_belief  religious_culture  gods-antiquity  technology  self  teleology  cosmology  modernity  disenchantment  sublime  humanism  Taylor_Charles  philosophical_anthropology  cultural_change  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - The Witness of Literature: A Genealogical Sketch | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Intro is afternoon spent at Christian writing conference with his friend the author Frederick Buechner, being constantly interrupted by readers -- almost all of them told the same story: Your writing has meant everything to my Christian faith. I don’t think I could be a Christian without your books.!Throughout that afternoon—rising to greet strangers, then sitting down and striving to remain inconspicuous as they poured out their hearts—I couldn’t help reflecting on the sheer oddity of the situation. These were people, by and large, who knew the Bible, who attended church, who had the benefits of Christian community. Yet they testified, almost to a person, that Christian belief would have been impossible for them without the mediation of the stories told by Frederick Buechner. I know literary history fairly well, especially where it intersects with Christian thought and practice, and it seemed to me that such radical dependence on literary experience would have been virtually impossible even a century earlier. But I also knew that Buechner’s role was anything but unique, that other readers would offer the same testimony to the fiction of Walker Percy or Flannery O’Connor or C.S. Lewis. How did such a state of affairs come about? How did literary writers come to be seen by many as the best custodians and advocates of Christian faith? It is a question with a curious and convoluted genealogy, one worth teasing out. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_lit  reading  fiction  spirituality  Christianity  theology  literary_history  English_lit  faith  religious_experience  identity  subjectivity  self-examination  self-development  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Conscience Wars: Complicity-Based Conscience Claims in Religion and Politics by Douglas NeJaime, Reva Siegel :: SSRN - Yale Law Journal, Vol. 124, pp. 2516-2591, 2015
Douglas NeJaime, University of California, Irvine School of Law -- Reva Siegel, Yale University - Law School -- (...) Complicity claims focus on the conduct of others outside the faith community. Their accommodation therefore has potential to harm those the claimants view as sinning. (..) Some, tacitly acknowledging the democratic contests in which complicity claims are entangled, urge religious accommodation in the hopes of peaceful settlement. Yet, as we show, complicity-based conscience claims can provide an avenue to extend, rather than settle, conflict about social norms. We highlight the distinctive form and social logic of complicity-based conscience claims so that those debating accommodation do so with the impact on third parties fully in view. The Article considers a range of legal and institutional contexts in which complicity claims are arising, paying particular attention to RFRA. We show how concern about the third-party impact of accommodation structured the Court’s decision in Hobby Lobby. And looking beyond Hobby Lobby, we show how this concern with third-party harm is an integral part of the compelling interest and narrow tailoring inquiries that courts undertake in applying the statute. At issue is not only whether but how complicity claims are accommodated. -- Pages in PDF File: 76 -- Keywords: religion, accommodation, complicity, Hobby Lobby, Holt, contraception, abortion, marriage, exemptions, religious liberty, religious freedom, equality, liberty, healthcare, burwell -- saved to briefcase
paper  SSRN  constitutional_law  politics-and-religion  culture_wars  US_politics  US_constitution  religious_belief  religious_culture  health_care  women-rights  liberty  equality  employee_benefits  work-life_balance  labor_law  freedom_of_conscience  norms  discrimination 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Enns - Jesus’s crucifixion: not exactly a selling point in the ancient world - June 2015
If you’re living in the Mediterranean world of the 1st century and you want to promote your religion, a “crucified god” is not your headline. Yet that is…
Instapaper  Early_Christian  Christianity  theology  religious_culture  religious_belief  gods-antiquity  Roman_Empire  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Raymond BOUDON - LA RATIONALITÉ DU RELIGIEUX SELON MAX WEBER | JSTOR - L'Année sociologique - Vol. 51, No. 1 (2001), pp. 9-50
LA RATIONALITÉ DU RELIGIEUX SELON MAX WEBER - L'Année sociologique (1940/1948-), Troisième série, Vol. 51, No. 1 (2001), pp. 9-50 -- One of the most striking features of Weber's writings on religion is the frequency with which he uses the word rationality. This derives from the metatheory grounding in his mind the interpretative method. This metatheory asserts that the meaning to an individual of his beliefs should be seen as the main cause explaining why he endorses them. Weber's religion sociology owes its strength to this theoretical framework. His « rational » conception of religious beliefs does not imply that these beliefs derive from deliberation. They are rather transmitted to the social subject in the course of his socialisation. But they are accepted only if they are perceived by the subject as grounded. These principles inspire Weber's pages on magical beliefs, on animism, on the great religions, on the diffusion of monotheism, on theodicy or the world disenchantment. He shows that religious thinking cares on coherence, tends to verify and falsify religious dogmas by confronting them with observable facts. He develops a complex version of evolutionism, explaining the cases of irreversibility registered by the history of religions, but avoiding any fatalism. He rejects any depth psychology and any causalist psychology in his sociology of religion, the common rational psychology being the only one that can be easily made compatible with the notion of "Verstehende Soziologie", i.e. of « interpretative sociology ». Weber analyses the evolution of religious ideas supposing that they follow the same mechanisms as the evolution of ideas in other domains, as law, economics or science. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  sociology_of_religion  Weber  Boudon  rationality  causation  causation-social  religious_history  religious_belief  religious_culture  hermeneutics  social_theory  socialization  social_process  rationality-bounded  disenchantment  causation-evolutionary  psychology  mechanisms-social_theory  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Housby - Book Review: American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism by Matthew Avery Sutton | LSE Review of Books
American Apocalypse: A History of Modern Evangelicalism. Matthew Avery Sutton. Harvard University Press. Harvard University Press. 2014. -- With American Apocalypse, Matthew Avery Sutton aims to draw on extensive archival research to document the ways an initially obscure network of charismatic preachers and their followers reshaped American religion, at home and abroad, for over a century. Elaine Housby is impressed with this readable contribution.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_culture  religious_belief  US_politics  evangelical  apocalyptic  right-wing  New_Deal  social_gospel  nativism  GOP  eschatology  millennarian  Israel  US_foreign_policy  segregation  Black_churches  Bible-as-history  Biblical_exegesis  revelation  prophets 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Elmer, review - Paul Kleber Monod, Solomon's Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment (Yale University Press 2013) | Reviews in History
Peter Elmer, University of Exeter -- This important work provides the first informed, well-researched and highly nuanced account of the fortunes of ‘occult’ thought and practice in England from the mid17thC to its demise at the end of the 18thC. Building on the work of a wide range of scholars from various disciplines, (..) the fortunes of the occult are argued to have peaked in the second half of the 17thC, dipped in the period from the Glorious Revolution to 1760, and then re-emerged in the last 4 decades of the 18thC in somewhat different but revitalized form. As Monod shows (..) the occult (defined broadly as alchemy, astrology and natural magic) was rarely perceived as a uniform movement of ideas, its adherents frequently picking and choosing those elements of the ‘occult’ which most appealed to them. It was thus a protean body of ideas, susceptible to frequent re-interpretation according to the personal preoccupations of the initiated. At the same time, while some of its adherents may have (in the earlier period especially) seen it as a body of ideas capable of replacing older systems of science and philosophy, it more often than not was studied and developed alongside other, competing systems of thought. (..) What is invigoratingly original here is Monod’s application of the same accommodating features of occult thinking with regard to Newtonianism and the Enlightenment in the later period. (..) it is hard to disagree with his conclusion that ‘the assumption of many historians, that occult thinking was debunked by experimental science … is essentially wrong’.(..) all the arguments against astrology, alchemy and natural magic had been fully developed long before 1650. This is equally true of witchcraft, (..) The occult was not simply argued out of existence. Only wider factors can help to explain this process. (..) in order to understand this process, we need to pay more heed to the wider social, religious and political context in which these ideas were promoted and debated. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  occult  chemistry  alchemy  medicine  Newtonian  astronomy  astrology  magic  hermeticism  esotericism  publishing  Charles_II  court_culture  Church_of_England  witchcraft  political_culture  Tories  dissenters  Evangelical  Whigs  Defoe  Thompson_EP  rationality  reason  social_history  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jennifer Bishop, review - Brodie Waddell, God, Duty and Community in English Economic Life, 1660-1720 (Boydell Press 2012) | Reviews in History - March 2014
For the majority of ordinary people in early modern England, the moral and the economic were closely aligned. Alongside material changes and a growing market ideology, traditional ideas about religion, duty, and community continued to influence economic relationships and practices well into the 18th century. This is the subject of Brodie Waddell’s new book, which sets out to explore the economic culture of later Stuart England. Focusing on concepts such as divine will, social duty, and communal ties, Waddell shows how these all have an underlying logic in common, combining to form a world view based on notions of reciprocity, hierarchy, mutuality, and order. His central contention is that these cultural ideas and moral codes did not decline in importance over the 17th century, as some historical narratives have suggested, but rather continued to shape and define the social and economic lives of ordinary people in later Stuart England. This in itself is not a new argument, and Waddell acknowledges that there are important existing studies of economic culture in early modern England. However, he suggests that previous scholarship has neglected several essential areas, and his book sets out to remedy these gaps. -- she doesn't think he's as original as he claims and makes some suggestions as to how different pieces might have been knit together a bit better, but generally positive -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  community  moral_sentiments  economic_culture  norms  norms-business  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Stacking the deck: Thomas Pfau’s strange history of the West « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Kahn continues her attack on anti-modernity readings of Renaissance, Reformation and Early Modern intellectual history to justify claims for the "necessity" of political theology, with emphasis on (Catholic Thomist) theology as the foundation and organizing thread. Pfau goes beyond the Schmitt readings of the illegitimacy of the post French Revolution secular political to deny post Ockham intellectual legitimacy to any theorist who follows Ockham's voluntarism -- while totally ignoring the social, political, cultural and religious changes. The result is a Hobbes as villain of the piece that conveniently ignores a century and a half of religious warfare. And as she notes, she neither recognizes herself in any of the roles in Pfau’s morality play, nor can she see where he even offers a place for contemporary secular women. Downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  theology  modernity  self  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Hobbes  secularism  political-theology  Reformation  Europe-Early_Modern  political_philosophy  religious_wars  religious_culture  religious_belief  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Hout, Claude S. Fischer - Explaining Why More Americans Have No Religious Preference: Political Backlash and Generational Succession, 1987-2012 | Sociological Science, October 13, 2014
Twenty percent of American adults claimed no religious preference in 2012, compared to 7 percent twenty-five years earlier. Previous research identified a political backlash against the religious right and generational change as major factors in explaining the trend. That research found that religious beliefs had not changed, ruling out secularization as a cause. In this paper we employ new data and more powerful analytical tools to: (1) update the time series, (2) present further evidence of correlations between political backlash, generational succession, and religious identification, (3) show how valuing personal autonomy generally and autonomy in the sphere of sex and drugs specifically explain generational differences, and (4) use GSS panel data to show that the causal direction in the rise of the “Nones” likely runs from political identity as a liberal or conservative to religious identity, reversing a long-standing convention in social science research. Our new analysis joins the threads of earlier explanations into a general account of how political conflict over cultural issues spurred an increase in non-affiliation.
paper  US_history  US_politics  US_society  secularization  religious_belief  religious_culture  20thC  21stC  culture-American  culture_wars  cultural_change  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Regina Schwartz - Secularism, belief, and truth « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2011
Triggered by Bilgrami’s paper and Taylor's thoughts on respect of multicultural communities, becomes a meditation on the virtues of open, vigorous debate in endless truth-seeking stimulated by Milton. -- It is because that Truth of how best to live together is a mystery, not fully graspable, knowable, manipulable, after all, that we need to approach the dialogue with the other with full respect—to listen, learn, and evaluate. So I guess mystery turns out not to be so woosie for politics, after all. Another way to say this is that I agree with Taylor’s assessment that we are in an era of reflexivity regarding religion in which belief is always questionable and there are many different positions, that this is a good, the outcome of the Enlightenment and the romantic Counter-Enlightenment, and surely, we need that same reflexivity in our secular beliefs. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
epistemology-social  religious_belief  multiculturalism  Taylor_Charles  secularism  free_speech  freedom_of_conscience  reflexivity  liberalism  Milton  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Gerald Newman - Voltaire in Victorian Historiography | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 49, No. 4, On Demand Supplement (Dec., 1977), pp. D1345-D1359
Type script supplement - Page Count: 15 - emergence mid-century of freethought along with cultural and social critique of the smug, moralistic rising money-grubbing middle class - after Burke and the French Revolution the sort of scepticism of a Hume or Gibbon was hushed or condemned, and open freethinkers from Godwin to Mill were ostracized and attacked as immoral monsters. Newman thinks that the intellectual shift away from the post revolutionary moral straitjacket on social, religious and philosophical thought is well-known but hasn't focused on the roles of historiography in this shift of intellectual milieu, hence Voltaire and the Victorians. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  literary_history  historiography-19thC  19thC  English_lit  cultural_critique  British_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  religious_belief  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_authority  free-thinkers  Voltaire  Carlyle  Emerson  Dickens  Trollope  Bagehot  Stephen_Leslie  middle_class  atheism_panic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Seidler, review essay - Religion, Populism, and Patriarchy: Political Authority from Luther to Pufendorf | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Apr., 1993), pp. 551-569
Review of volumes in Cambridge University Press series of history of political thought classic texts (Skinner, Tuck et al series editors) -- Luther and Calvin on Secular Authority by Martin Luther; John Calvin; Harro Hopfl; *--* The Radical Reformation by Michael G. Baylor; *--* Political Writings by Francisco de Vitoria; Anthony Pagden; Jeremy Lawrance; *--* Patriarcha and Other Writings by Robert Filmer; Johann P. Sommerville; *--* On the Duty of Man and Citizen According to Natural Law by Samuel Pufendorf; James Tully; Michael Silverthorne -- lengthy essay that discusses the works themselves and the political-theology issues emerging in the aftermath of the Reformation across the 16thC and 17thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  reviews  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  politics-and-religion  Reformation  Lutherans  Calvin  Calvinist  Absolutism  divine_right  divine_command  office  ecclesiology  religion-established  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_wars  scholastics  Filmer  Pufendorf  natural_law  Holy_Roman_Empire  Germany  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  secularization  Erastianism  resistance_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE DEATH OF GOD AND THE FALL OF MAN | Pandaemonium July 2014
Transcript of talk for Institute of Ideas -- The moral vision of modernity may have been, in other words, nourished by the crumbling of the God-ordained order. It was – it had to be – however, also rooted in faith, but a faith of a different kind – faith that humans were capable of acting rationally and morally without guidance from beyond. It was through the 19thC that religious faith truly began to crumble. But it was also in the 19thC that faith in the human capacity to act without God began also to erode. The optimism that had once suffused the humanist impulse began to ebb away and there began to develop a much darker view of what it meant to be human. By the late 19thC European societies came to experience both a crisis of faith and a ‘crisis of reason’, the beginnings of a set of trends that were to become highly significant in the 20thC – the erosion of Enlightenment optimism, a disenchantment with ideas of progress, a disbelief in concepts of truth, the growth of a much darker view of human nature. -- The death of God, in other words, went hand in hand with what we might call, if we were to continue to use religious symbolism, the Fall of Man. And the Fall of Man transformed the meaning of the Death of God. God is a metaphor for the desire for an authority beyond ourselves to frame our existence and guide our lives, the death of God for the insistence on acting without guidance from beyond. There are two aspects to the death of God. The decline of religious belief and the growth of a new faith in the capacity of humans to act without guidance from beyond. The first has always been overstated. The second has always been undervalued. - frames talk around Anscombe and MacIntyre
intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  morality-Christian  religious_belief  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  pagans  gods-antiquity  monotheism  teleology  human_nature  morality-conventional  morality-objective  progress  Enlightenment  Fin-de-Siècle  humanism  anti-humanism  Counter-Enlightenment  political_philosophy  reason  Anscombe  MacIntyre  tradition  identity  autonomy  individualism  community  communitarian  social_order  change-social  historical_change  historicism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
RICHARD REX -- THE RELIGION OF HENRY VIII (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 1-32. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RICHARD REX - University of Cambridge --This article takes issue with the influential recent interpretation of Henry VIII's religious position as consistently ‘Erasmian’. Bringing to the discussion not only a re-evaluation of much familiar evidence but also a considerable quantity of hitherto unknown or little-known material, it proposes instead that Henry's religious position, until the 1530s, sat squarely within the parameters of ‘traditional religion’ and that the subsequent changes in his attitudes to the cult of the saints, monasticism, and papal primacy were so significant as to be understood and described by Henry himself in terms of a veritable religious ‘conversion’. This conversion, which was very much sui generis, is not easily to be fitted within the confessional frameworks of other sixteenth-century religious movements (though it was by no means unaffected by them). It hinged upon Henry's new understanding of kingship as a supreme spiritual responsibility entrusted to kings by the Word of God, but long hidden from them by the machinations of the papacy. His own providential deliverance from blindness was, he believed, but the beginning of a more general spiritual enlightenment
article  paywall  religious_history  church_history  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Henry_VIII  Reformation  Erastianism  religion-established  religious_belief  Church_of_England  divine_right  kingship  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Erasmus  Providence  Absolutism  Tudor  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Ward, review - Charles Taylor, A Secular Age | JSTOR: The Journal of Religion, Vol. 88, No. 3 (July 2008), pp. 420-422
Certain aspects of A Secular Age are bound to generate controversy, particularly among scholars trained in the study of religion. Those suspicious of the category of religious “experience,” given the ahistorical and covertly apologetic uses to which it has been put in the past, will be wary of Taylor’s idea of a “sense of fullness,” which draws upon the earlier work of Mircea Eliade, Rudolf Otto, and William James. --Most importantly, there is also the issue of where to place A Secular Age—who is Taylor arguing against and engaging in dialogue with? What are the relevant competitor views upon which we should bring it to bear? Given its size and complexity, one of the most obvious competitor accounts of secularity and modernity would be Hans Blumenberg’s The Legitimacy of the Modern Age, but Taylor’s explicit references to Blumenberg, while suggestive, are infrequent and parenthetical. Taylor does, more explicitly, situate his account against what he calls “subtraction” theories of secularity, which posit a “uniform and unilinear effect of modernity on religious belief and practice” (461). However, given that prominent scholars of secularization (such as Peter Berger and Jürgen Habermas) do not defend such a position, we might ask whether Taylor’s scholarly target remains a live one. -- didn't download
books  reviews  kindle-available  jstor  religious_history  cultural_history  secularization  secularism  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  sociology_of_religion  modernity  Blumenberg  Enlightenment  progress  Providence  Taylor_Charles 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan Carter - On Pascal's Wager, or Why All Bets Are Off | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 50, No. 198 (Jan., 2000), pp. 22-27
Short demonstration that if Pascal succeeds in showing it's rational to bet on a good god and lead a morally upstanding life, it's similarly rational to believe in an evil god and attempt to earn divine rewards by conducting our lives in the most morally repugnant way we can. - starts with a discussion of prior, less dramatic, objections to Pascal's Wager from e.g. Diderot onwards -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Pascal  religious_belief  God-existence  God-attributes  theodicy  universalism  comparative_religion  immortality  immorality  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  Diderot  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
James Mawdesley, review - Leif Dixon, Practical Predestinarians in England, c. 1590-1640 ( 2013) | Reviews in History - IHR
Mr James Mawdesley, University of Sheffield --- Preaching before James I early in his reign, Anthony Maxey told the King that predestination ‘containeth the whole summe of our religion’ (p. 1). The 17th article of the Church of England’s doctrinal statement, the Thirty-Nine Articles, had been statutory since 1571, and outlined a belief in predestination. In this interesting book, Leif Dixon is keen that the historian leaves their modern assumptions at the door of historical investigation. The idea of predestination is one which leaves many people today feeling theologically cold, and it has become fair game to presume that those who attended Church of England services at the turn of the 16th and 17th centuries probably felt the same, especially given that their parish minister probably not only believed in the doctrine, but actively preached it too, at least in some form. (1) Dixon, though, does not believe this, and boldly proclaims in his introduction that rather than predestinarian beliefs resulting in a generation of spiritually anxious English parishioners, the doctrine and its promotion actually had much potential for providing spiritual comfort (p. 7). Indeed, the Jacobean preacher Richard Crakanthorp told a congregation at St. Mary’s church in Oxford that predestination was ‘the chiefest comfort which can enter into the heart of a mortall man’ (p. 2).
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  British_history  religious_history  Calvinist  predestination  Church_of_England  Thirty-Nine_Articles  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  godly_persons  Arminian  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Toleration and Calumny: Bayle, Locke, Montesquie and Voltaire on Religious Hate Speech (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-80 -- There is a considerable literature on the issue of hate speech. And there is a considerable literature on religious toleration (both contemporary and historic). But the two have not been brought into relation with one another. In this paper, I consider how the argument for religious toleration extends beyond a requirement of non-persection and non-establishment. I consider its application to the question of religious vituperation. The focus of the paper is on 17th and 18th century theories. Locke, Bayle and other Enlightenment thinkers imagined a tolerant society as a society free of hate speech: the kind of religious peace that they envisaged was a matter of civility not just non-persecution. The paper also considers the costs of placing limits (legal or social limits) on religious hate-speech: does this interfere with the forceful expression of religious antipathy which (for some people) the acceptance of their creed requires? -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Bayle, Defamation, Enlightenment, Hate Speech, Locke, Toleration -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  tolerance  religious_belief  religious_wars  religious_lit  anticlerical  anti-Catholic  persecution  free_speech  civil_society  civic_virtue  politeness  hate_speech  freedom_of_conscience  Bayle  Locke  Locke-religion  Montesquieu  Voltaire  universalism  heresy  politics-and-religion  political_culture  minorities  public_sphere  public_disorder  civility-political  respect  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Foundations of Religious Liberty: Toleration or Respect? (2010) :: SSRN - Freedom of Conscience symposium, San Diego Law Review, Forthcoming
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 275 -- Should we think of what I will refer to generically as “the law of religious liberty” as grounded in the moral attitude of respect for religion or in the moral attitude of tolerance of religion? I start with a well-known treatment of the idea of “respect” by the moral philosopher Stephen Darwall. Re toleration, I shall draw on my own earlier discussion, though now emphasizing the features of toleration that set it apart from one kind of respect. In deciding whether “respect” or “toleration” can plausibly serve as the moral foundation for the law of religious liberty we will need to say something about the nature of religion. I shall propose a fairly precise analysis of what makes a belief and a concomitant set of practices “religious” (again drawing on earlier work). That will then bring us to the central question: should our laws reflect “respect” for religion” or only “toleration”? Martha Nussbaum has recently argued for “respect” as the moral foundation of religious liberty, though, as I will suggest, her account is ambiguous between the two senses of respect that emerge from Darwall’s work. In particular, I shall claim that in one “thin” sense of respect, it is compatible with nothing more than toleration of religion; and that in a “thicker” sense (which Nussbaum appears to want to invoke), it could not form the moral basis of a legal regime since religion is not the kind of belief system that could warrant that attitude. To make the latter case, I examine critically a recent attack on the idea of "respect" for religious belief by Simon Blackburn. -- Leiter changed his mind on some of this for his book on Toleration of Religion but discussion of Nussbaum et al looks useful -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  freedom_of_conscience  religious_belief  tolerance  respect  civic_virtue  civil_liberties  sociology_of_religion  Nussbaum  Darwall  Blackburn  epistemology-moral 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature [1646], ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum - Online Library of Liberty
Nathaniel Culverwell, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature, ed. Robert A. Greene and Hugh MacCallum, foreword by Robert A. Greene (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/900> -- An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature is a concerted effort to find a middle way between the two extremes that dominated the religious dispute of the English civil war in the seventeenth century. At one extreme end of the spectrum was the antinomian assertion that the elect were redeemed by God’s free grace and thereby free from ordinary moral obligations. At the other end of the spectrum was the Arminian rejection of predestination and assertion that Christ died for all, not just for the elect. Faced with the violence of these disputes, Nathaniel Culverwell attempted a moderate defense of reason and natural law, arguing, in the words of Robert Greene, that “reason and faith are distinct lights, yet they are not opposed; they are complementary and harmonious. Reason is the image of God in man, and to deny right reason is to deny our relation to God.” -- Culverwell clearly intended to respond to Francis Bacon’s call for “a temperate and careful treatise … which as a kind of divine logic, should lay down proper precepts touching the use of human reason in theology.” -- Although, unlike the Cambridge Platonists, he quotes or refers to Bacon’s writings frequently enough to indicate considerable knowledge and approval of the Baconian gospel, the spirit of the Discourse is basically at odds with Bacon’s plan for man’s intellectual progress. In his emphasis upon scholastic psychology and his indebtedness to Aristotle, Aquinas, and Suarez, as well as in his flourishing rhetoric and richly metaphorical style, Culverwell does not forward the Great Instauration.
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  theology  natural_law  English_Civil_War  Cambridge_Platonists  Calvinist  antinomian  Presbyterians  Arminian  reason  revelation  faith  religious_belief  Aristotelian  Aquinas  Suarez  Bacon  moral_psychology  obligation  religious_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull (1698), ed. Simone Zurbuchen - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, Of the Nature and Qualification of Religion, in Reference to Civil Society, trans. Jodocus Crull, ed. and with an introduction by Simone Zurbuchen (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/10/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/887> -- written in response to Revocation of the Edict of Nantes -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  Pufendorf  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Edict_of_Nantes  religion-established  civil_society  tolerance  sovereignty  ecclesiology  natural_law  natural_rights  religious_belief  British_politics  1690s  dissenters  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Anthony Froude - Historical and Other Sketches (US collection 1883) - Google Books
Editor David Hilton Wheeler - Issue 95 of Standard library, Funk & Wagnalls, 1883 -- Contents - doesn't include essays for which Froude was (in)famous - some of his travel writings as well as a few substantive historical pieces, though more biography *--* Introduction pgs 5-40 (lengthy history of controversies Froude involved in, starting with his attachment to Newman and Tractarians at Oxford pre Newman going over to Rome, Froude not only not following him, but left the Anglican ministry, and since that made him ineligible for other profession, made his subsequent living as a man of letters) *--* A Siding at a Railway Station *--* IT The Nobway Fjords *--* A Cagliostro of the Second Century *--* Social Condition of England in the Sixteenth Century *--* Coronation of Anne Boleyn *--* John Bunyan *--* Leaves from a South African Journal *--* A Days Fishing at Cheneys *--* Thomas Carlyle and His Wife *--* Political Economy of the Eighteenth Century *--* Reynard the Fox -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  religious_history  church_history  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Church_of_England  university  historiography-19thC  historians  historians-and-religion  Tractarians  Newman_JH  Catholics-England  British_history  British_politics  social_history  political_economy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Henry_VIII  Tudor  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarah Mortimer, review - Charles W. A. Prior. A Confusion of Tongues: Britain's Wars of Reformation, 1625-1642 | H-Net Reviews - Sept 2012
His aim is to challenge interpretations of the civil war that prioritize one element of the English mixture and instead that religion, political thought, and law cannot be separated. ...he claims that it was the very confusion and instability that this mixture created, rather than deep ideological divisions, that led to the civil wars. ... “driven by a complex struggle to define the meaning” of the key religious and political texts. Prior argues that we have concentrated too much on the doctrinal divisions... we need to broaden our perspective to include issues of law, ecclesiology, and church history. Prior provides case studies demonstrating the interaction between these subjects. --...issue of religious conformity, which drew together questions of spiritual and temporal obedience; ...the ensuing debate fostered the creation of rival narratives of English religious history. These narratives are then examined in more detail ....the disputes over ceremonies in worship -- the role played by these different versions of history. The Scots had their own, self-conscious, history of ecclesiastical liberty which could be deployed against Charles; and the events of the late 1630s served to link in Scottish minds liberty and purity of doctrine. ....Charles’s position in Dec 1640, when the canons were condemned by the Commons, was weak. Prior’s focus, though, is resolutely on arguments rather than events, and the debate over the canons is, for him, ...an intensification of positions that had been current since at least 1604. .... the tension between the powers of the Crown and bishops, and the institutions of law and Parliament. ....further constitutional questions generated a plurality of narratives, exacerbating the problem. -- the efforts of two men to overcome this tension: Thomas Aston insisted that episcopacy was part of the English constitution, but Henry Parker refused to accept the legitimacy of custom and precedent. Instead he developed a more complicated argument, which, at root, linked authority to the consent of the governed. ?...neither of these attempted solutions worked, and the continuing instability led to war.
books  reviews  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  ecclesiology  legal_history  English_Civil_War  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  common_law  English_constitution  ancient_constitution  historians-and-religion  historians-and-politics  historiography-17thC  historians-and-state  episcopacy  precedent  custom  legitimacy  consent  social_contract  monarchy  divine_right  apostolic_succession  authority  hierarchy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Leng, review - Brodie Waddell. God, Duty and Community in English Economic Life, 1660-1720 (2012) | H-Net Reviews April 2013
In his first book, Brodie Waddell seeks to bring the realm of culture to bear upon the economic life of late Stuart England. This period has tended to be subsumed within the story of how the “moral economy” was vanquished by the market in the 18thC, to the neglect of what Waddell sees as its distinctive econom -- a larger question for historians interested in reconciling the cultural and the economic: what do we do with the concept of “interest”? ...is there a danger of replacing the “undersocialized” caricature of “homo economicus” with economic actors that sociologists would describe as “oversocialized,” the passive bearers of internalized norms and values? Doubtless “religiously inspired archetypes ... left an indelible impression on the economic lives of ordinary people”, but we should not neglect the role of material self-advancement or preservation (and other forms of “acquisitive” behavior—the acquisition of reputation, for example) as a motive force in economic life. ...we need to find a place for “interest,” which, after all, was a concept with which early modern English people were very familiar. -- But a full picture of economic lives and cultures needs to consider the interaction of potentially rival values and those who bore them. And this links back to the changing economic context of the period. Increasing engagement in long-distance markets could encourage farmers or manufacturers to refashion their communal loyalties in a way that undermined neighborly commitments; participation in the emerging stock market might suggest a different scale of economic values to those recounted in this book. -- the volume of printed attacks on various forms of economic immorality might suggest that the confrontation of divergent moral economies was far from uncommon in the period. In which case, does the clash between the market and other moral economies, if not the moral economy, have some explanatory power still?
books  reviews  historiography  change-social  17thC  18thC  British_history  economic_history  economic_culture  interest_groups  community  patriarchy  religious_culture  religion-established  religious_lit  religious_belief  mercantilism  local_government  local_politics  elites  popular_culture  moral_economy  self-interest  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll, review essay - His Kingdom Stretch from Shore to Shore - Christianity worldwide 16thC-18thC | Books and Culture
Books review : David Hempton, The Church in the Long Eighteenth Century: The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church; Dale T. Irvin, ed, History of the World Christian Movement, Vol. 2: Modern Christianity from 1454-1800 -- .. intriguing that books written for such different ends coalesce in making some of the same larger judgments. Both books, thus, stress the delicate interplay between Christian expansion outside Europe and the fragmentation of Christianity within Europe. ...how, as divisions within Europe hardened between Catholics and Protestants, and soon between established churches and sectarian opponents of state churches, Christianity became the genuinely world religion. Hempton is equally perceptive on how 18th-century Europe witnessed intellectual, social, and political "challenges from which Christianity at least among educated elites, has never fully recovered," even as Western Protestants initiated the missionary efforts that successfully planted Christian faith around the globe. Both books also agree that the Jesuits were the era's most farsighted and effective "world Christians." ..the particular disaster for Latin America when Spanish and Portuguese officials sent the Jesuits packing in order to preserve the top-down, exploitative, and often syncretistic faith that best served the colonizers' interests. And they record the significance of the Moravians—so to speak, married Jesuits with children—who pushed Protestants beyond the identification of Christianity as such with European Christianity. The books are also agreed that the great Christian scandal of the early modern era was slavery. - ... both books clarify what most centrally defines the Christian faith itself. For Hempton it is the recognition at "the most profound level that Christianity is in its essence a missionary religion." For Irvin and Sunquist, it is the claim that Christian faith can never be adequately grasped except as a "world movement." Walls describes this dual character as "the indigenous principle" in constant tension with "the pilgrim principle."
books  reviews  religious_history  Christianity  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  Jesuits  Moravians  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  religious_culture  religious_belief  Latin_America  Africa  African_trade  West_Indies  China  querelle_des_rites  theology  heterodoxy  Papacy  sectarianism  slavery  Enlightenment  Spanish_Empire  universalism  monotheism  intellectual_history  social_history  church_history  enthusiasm  spirituality  self  rational_religion  ecclesiology  Protestants  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Noll - American Christian Politics, review essay - Michael P. Winship, Godly Republicanism: Puritans, Pilgrims, and a City on a Hill | Books and Culture 2012
Fabulous summary by Noll of the different religious groups in 17thC England and the New England migrations -- Winship also challenges the many accounts of early-modern republicanism that have pictured it as an essentially secular ideology strongly inimical, with its all-out focus on worldly power, to the Puritans' strict Calvinism. Instead, he argues that the "godly republicanism" of early New England came directly from spiritual sources. The Puritans' greatest desire was to bring about biblical reform of churches corrupted by abuses of unchecked power. -- Explicitly Christian virtue thus grounded the health of the "commonwealth," an expressly republican term. Those scholars, including myself, who have described the republicanism of the Revolutionary era as secular may reply that the early Puritan arrangement was soon modified by the Puritans themselves and then completely abrogated when Massachusetts was taken over as a royal colony in 1684. But Winship nonetheless makes a strong case for a definite Christian root to the founding republican principles of the United States. This re-interpretation of early New England history hinges on careful discrimination among the different varieties of English and American Puritans. Never, one might think, has a scholar made so much of so little. Yet paying close heed to how he describes these Puritan varieties is, in the end, convincing. The following chart, which sets things out as an "invention" in the Ramist logic so beloved by the Puritans, summarizes those distinctions, though it would have clarified Winship's argument if he himself had provided such a scorecard.
books  reviews  kindle-available  historiography  17thC  British_history  US_history  British_politics  religious_history  church_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  religious_belief  Puritans  Arminian  Presbyterians  Congregationalist  English_Civil_War  New_England  Massachusetts  political_philosophy  political_culture  republicanism  politics-and-religion  Biblical_authority  civic_virtue  American_colonies  Charles_II  James_II  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  UK_government-colonies  commonwealth  Christendom  religion-established  abuse_of_power  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Lincoln Mullen - Religion in American History: Where Are the Histories of American Irreligion?
Very good historiography post (or more about lack thereof) -- one of the comments has a great bibliography, not just for American history but also people working on Britain and Europe
religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_belief  18thC  19thC  20thC  US_history  American_colonies  Early_Republic  atheism  atheism_panic  Deism  rational_religion  free-thinkers  secular_humanism  secularism  anti-Trinitarian  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
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