dunnettreader + reformation_of_manners   15

JAMES LIVESEY, Review Essay - BERKELEY, IRELAND AND 18thC INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (Dec 2014) | Modern Intellectual History - Cambridge Journals Online
Department of History, School of Humanities, University of Dundee -- Books reviewed: (1) Marc A. Hight ed., The Correspondence of George Berkeley (Cambridge University Press, 2013), (2) Scott Breuninger , Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context (Palgrave, 2010), (3) Daniel Carey and Christopher J. Finlay , eds., The Empire of Credit: The Financial Revolution and the British Atlantic World, 1688–1815 (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2011) -- 18thC Irish intellectual history has enjoyed a revival in recent years. New scholarly resources, such as the Hoppen edition of the papers of the Dublin Philosophical Society and the recently published Berkeley correspondence, have been fundamental to that revival. Since 1986 the journal Eighteenth-Century Ireland: Iris an dá chultúr has sponsored a complex conversation on the meaning and legacy of the 18thC in Irish history. Work in the journal and beyond deploying “New British” and Atlantic histories, as well as continuing attention to Europe, has helped to enrich scholarly understanding of the environments in which Irish people thought and acted. The challenge facing historians of Ireland has been to find categories of analysis that could comprehend religious division and acknowledge the centrality of the confessional state without reducing all Irish experience to sectarian conflict. Clearly the thought of the Irish Catholic community could not be approached without an understanding of the life of the Continental Catholic Church. Archivium Hibernicum has been collecting and publishing the traces of that history for a hundred years and new digital resources such as the Irish in Europe database have extended that work in new directions. The Atlantic and “New British” contexts have been more proximately important for the Protestant intellectual tradition. -- paywall
articles  books  reviews  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Catholics-Ireland  Berkeley  Anglo-Irish_constitution  British_politics  reform-social  reformation_of_manners  virtue_ethics  civic_virtue  Protestant_Ascendancy  Whigs-oligarchy  Church_of_England  Church_of_Ireland  patronage  networks-political  networks-social  networks-information  fiscal-military_state  public_finance  taxes  credit  financial_innovation  financial_sector_development  economic_history  political_economy  politics-and-religion  politics-and-money 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Paul Slack, From Reformation to Improvement: Public Welfare in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Winter, 2001), pp. 442-444
The review is a useful summary of Slack's argument re trends and episodic bursts of trying to deal with the poor. Looks at what these episodes show re state capacity, ceter and region relations, movements that cut across other ideological, religious or political alignments, use of appeals to Parliament for lawmaking that were driven by a range of public and private agendas. Download pdf to Note -- see if this is on Questia
books  reviews  jstor  find  social_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  local_government  Parliament  executive  Poor_Laws  poor-working  charity  reformation_of_manners  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Historical Background - Reformation of Manners Campaigns - London Lives
Contents - The First Societies, 1690-1738 *--* 1757-63 Society *--* Opposition to Informers and Reforming Constables. *--* Legal Opposition. *--* The Proclamation Society, 1787. *--* Exemplary Lives. *--* Introductory Reading & Footnotes. -- Largely reliant on private prosecutions, the early modern criminal justice system did not facilitate the prosecution of large numbers of victimless offences such as immorality and irreligion. But despite increasing religious toleration, England in the 18thC remained a strongly Protestant country, and many people were offended by public displays of sin, not least because it was thought that such conduct led sinners down a slippery slope of increasingly criminal conduct which would lead inevitably to the gallows. The 18thC was the first great age of voluntary societies, and concerns about vice led to the formation, over the course of the century, of successive societies which aimed to suppress immorality. While members sought to promote reform through persuasion, in sermons and through the distribution of printed literature, they saw the need for coercion as well. With the Church Courts in decline, the reformers turned to the criminal justice system. Their methods attracted significant opposition, however, and the reformers frequently found themselves at the receiving end of often vexatious litigation aimed at undermining their activities. Ultimately, attempts to use the law to promote a reformation of manners were frustrated by a combination of both legal and popular opposition. The records included in this website provide evidence of both the reformers' activities and the opposition they engender.
website  18thC  British_history  British_politics  reformation_of_manners  1690s  legal_system  judiciary  crime  criminal_justice  gin_craze  Parliament  Church_of_England  church_courts  lower_orders  London  police  parish  litigation  evidence  immorality  prostitution  local_government  religious_lit  social_history  cultural_history  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, Proposed Poor Law Reform (October 1697) - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, H.B. Fox Bourne, The Life of John Locke. In Two Volumes (London: Henry S. King, 1876). Vol. 2 pp. 377-391. 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2331> -- Available as Facsimile PDF 638 KB This is a facsimile or image-based PDF made from scans of the original book. -- Locke’s detailed proposals for the reform of the Poor Laws which was quoted in full in Fox Bourne’s The Life of John Locke (1876), vol. 2, pp. 377-391.
etexts  Liberty_Fund  17thC  British_history  British_politics  governmentality  reformation_of_manners  poverty  charity  Poor_Laws  reform-social  Locke  biography  1690s  Whig_Junto  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: John Locke on Property (January, 2013) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Eric Mack discusses John Locke’s theory of property to which Jan Narveson, Peter Vallentyne, and Michael Zuckert respond in a series of essays and comments. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_economy  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  property  property_rights  social_contract  natural_law  natural_rights  state-of-nature  labor  landowners  landed_interest  lower_orders  reformation_of_manners  mass_culture  political_participation  popular_politics  popular_culture  public_disorder  public_goods  Native_Americans  colonialism  development  common_good  commons  liberalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, ed. Mark Goldie - Online Library of Liberty
John Locke, A Letter concerning Toleration and Other Writings, edited and with an Introduction by Mark Goldie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2375> -- Part of the Thomas Hollis Library (series editor David Wormersley) published by Liberty Fund. This volume contains A Letter Concerning Toleration, excerpts of the Third Letter, An Essay on Toleration, and various fragments, including Constitution of Carolina excerpts, pamphlet debates e.g. with Samuel Parker. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  Locke  Locke-religion  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  politics-and-religion  tolerance  dissenters  religion-established  religious_belief  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  Church_of_England  atheism_panic  scepticism  Epicurean  heterodoxy  Christology  salvation  soul  natural_law  natural_rights  obligation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Protestant_International  colonialism  American_colonies  UK_government-colonies  reformation_of_manners  English_constitution  constitutionalism  Carolina  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Board_of_Trade  civil_liberties  civil_religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. Prior, review - Bernard Capp. England's Culture Wars: Puritan Reformation and Its Enemies in the Interregnum, 1649-1660 | H-Net Reviews May 2013
Capp’s new book adds significant depth and nuance to our view of this period, ... Broadly speaking, the reformers were motivated by godly zeal and the desire to establish a civic commonwealth that was animated by humanist values, such as civility and good order. In this sense, the aims of the reformers agreed with the social values of the nobility, magistrates, and city corporations... However, ..a spectrum, along which positions were defined by the relative proportion of godliness to civility. The book is divided into three parts. The first concentrates on the various loci of political power, ...legislative reform carried on by the interregnum parliaments, by the government and the church at the county and local levels, and in an excellent chapter by propaganda and the press. The second part consists of six detailed chapters that take up the puritan “reformation of manners.” The third part of the book looks in some detail at local contexts, illustrating that reform proceeded very much according to the whims and will of local magistrates. Reformers had to contend with a series of structural and practical obstacles. ?..interregnum politics was fragmented. Parliament never really recovered from Pride’s Purge ... In spite of the desire to limit religious expression, a fervent climate of sectarianism remained. The Cromwellian state was obliged to settle for ad hoc compromises on a range of issues. ?...surely all of this detail adds up to something larger. ?...goes some way toward challenging the view that one major effect of the civil war was that the “state” emerged in its modern form. That is, politics transcended confessionalism and embraced legal values, secularism, and the rigid control of religion by the state. By contrast, Capp’s work suggests that religious dispute continued to destabilize politics at all levels, and that the state, if it existed at all, was obliged to defer to local custom.
books  reviews  historiography  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  sectarianism  state-building  nation-state  local_government  local_politics  reformation_of_manners  authority  authoritarian  church_history  commonwealth  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Lincoln - The Culture of War and Civil Society in the Reigns of William III and Anne | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (SUMMER 2011), pp. 455-474
The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it. -- huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  English_lit  poetry  sermons  politeness  reformation_of_manners  militarism  William_III  Marlborough  heroes  Providence  religious_culture  elite_culture  Elias_Norbert  Addison  publishing  public_sphere  civil_society  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review essay by: Dan Beaver - Religion, Politics, and Society in Early Modern England: A Problem of Classification (1994)
JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Jul., 1994), pp. 314-322 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- The Politics of Religion in Restoration England by Tim Harris; Paul Seaward; Mark Goldie; --**-- The Family in the English Revolution by Christopher Durston;  --**-- Death, Ritual, and Bereavement by Ralph Houlbrooke;  --**-- Sin and Society in the Seventeenth Century by John Addy
books  reviews  historiography  religious_history  political_history  church_history  social_history  political_culture  cultural_history  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Church_of_England  dissenters  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  family  population  local_government  provinces  reformation_of_manners  sin  judiciary  Puritans  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael O’Malley : Free Silver and the Constitution of Man | Common-place April 2006
Michael O’Malley is associate professor of history and art history at George Mason University. He is studying the money question in American history, as well as studying the history of recorded sound..... The money debate and immigration at the turn of the century.....In 1889, Harvard economist Francis A. Walker described the "social effects of paper money" that ranged from bad taste—"wanton bravery of apparel and equipage"—to dangerous consumer desires, which undermined the father’s authority. Paper money, Walker observed, led to the "the creation of a countless host of artificial necessities in the family beyond the power of the husband and Father to supply without a resort to questionable devices or reckless speculations." Not only driven to recklessness, these fathers adopted "humiliating imitations of foreign habits of living." Paper money undermined "that fit and natural leadership of taste and fashion which is the best protection society can have against sordid material aims." And it elicited "manners at once gross and effeminate," which led to "democracy without equality or fraternity, and exclusiveness without pride or character." Paper money threatened patriarchy; it drove otherwise respectable men to immoral or dangerous speculations. Paper bills produced both "effeminacy" and coarseness, encouraging foreign habits. How did paper money manage this cultural crime spree? Not by raising prices—in this passage Walker never mentions higher prices. Instead, by removing society from a basis in "real values," paper money overturned natural laws and natural social hierarchies. It decentered the self.
19thC  US_history  economic_history  cultural_history  social_history  patriarchy  masculinity  family  money  monetary_policy  currency  hierarchy  status  migration  racialism  democracy  reformation_of_manners  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
The Christian Monitors by Brent S. Sirota - Yale University Press - pub date Jan 2014
This original and persuasive book examines the moral and religious revival led by the Church of England before and after the Glorious Revolution, and shows how that revival laid the groundwork for a burgeoning civil society in Britain. After outlining the Church of England's key role in the increase of voluntary, charitable and religious societies, Brent Sirota examines how these groups drove the modernization of Britain through such activities as settling immigrants throughout the empire, founding charity schools, distributing devotional literature, and evangelizing and educating merchants, seamen and slaves throughout the British empire - all leading to what has been termed the "age of benevolence".
books  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Church_of_England  missionaries  education  charity  reformation_of_manners  civil_society  colonialism  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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