dunnettreader + recognition   10

Andrew Koppelman - Does Respect Require Antiperfectionism? Gaus on Liberal Neutrality :: SSRN- September 11, 2015
Andrew Koppelman , Northwestern University School of Law -- Harvard Review of Philosophy, Forthcoming -- Gerald Gaus has developed the most sophisticated presentation of the antiperfectionist idea that official neutrality between contested conceptions of the good is demanded by mutual respect among citizens. However, other aspects of his own political theory -- in particular, his demonstration of the legitimacy of social coordination toward common ends -- inadvertently strengthen the case for perfectionism. -- PDF File: 20 -- Keywords: Gerald Gaus, Perfectionism, Liberalism, Political Theory
political_philosophy  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism  perfectionism  perfectibility  Gaus_Gerald  recognition  common_good  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Ronald Osborn - The Great Subversion: The Scandalous Origins of Human Rights | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Hopgood’s bracing critique of rights talk and his call for a less lofty, more pragmatic dispensation forces us to face the implications of the loss of theological anthropology for concepts of human equality and dignity. Can we have a rationally coherent, morally compelling, and historically sustainable discourse as well as a practice of humanistic values and human rights absent a “thick” metaphysical or religious framework, such as the one provided in the Western tradition for some two millennia by Judeo-Christian sources? Put another way, the question “Can we be good without God?” does not strike nearly deep enough. The urgent question is: Will we still be good to the stranger in our midst, or good in the same ways, once we have fully grasped the contestable character of humanism and once we have utterly abandoned the essentially religious idea that every person is made, in the enigmatic language of Scripture, in the image of God? It is a question that even committed atheists, for the sake of good atheism, should find worthy of consideration. -- balance behind paywall
books  reviews  human_rights  theodicy  teleology  cosmology  modernity  disenchantment  morality-divine_command  philosophical_anthropology  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  imago_dei  recognition  dignity  equality  foundationalism 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nancy Fraser: Rethinking Recognition. New Left Review 3, May-June 2000.
Has the liberating charge of struggles for recognition dissolved into pure identity politics? Do these have to sidestep inequalities of wealth and power? Not, Nancy Fraser contends, if recognition is understood as a question of social status rather than existential address. -- interesting fit from a social justice angle of key themes taken up by Jacib Levy in his new book -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  culture_wars  cultural_authority  classes  status  political_participation  minorities  identity  identity_politics  multiculturalism  communitarian  identity-multiple  wealth  inequality-opportunity  inequality  inequality-wealth  redistribution  reification  recognition  Hegel  dialogue  marginalized_groups  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey Church, review - Lisa Herzog, Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel, and Political Theory // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
In recent years several excellent studies of Adam Smith have appeared which examine the relationship between his moral and economic thought. Scholars have also extensively analyzed Hegel's views of political economy, and have documented the influence of the Scottish Enlightenment on his thought. Herzog, however, provides the first systematic comparison of Smith's and Hegel's conceptions of commercial society. Her book, in line with recent literature, corrects the persisting, one-sided interpretations of Smith as a proto-libertarian and of Hegel as a statist central-planner. One of Herzog's contributions is to show that the two philosophers share much more in common on economic matters than is often thought, and hence that their views are more nuanced than the one-sided interpretations suggest.

Since much of the recent literature has already corrected the misperceptions about Smith's and Hegel's philosophies of the market, ... the strength of the book lies in her application of Smith's and Hegel's views to contemporary debates in political theory concerning personal identity and communal responsibility, social justice, and the nature of freedom. She argues that Smith and Hegel represent two rival visions of commercial society that have animated and divided contemporary theorists on these issues. Herzog demonstrates that by returning to Smith and Hegel, we can bring greater sophistication to contemporary discussions. -- see review for books on Smith and Hegel and recent articles on Hegel interest in political economy and poverty problem
books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  Germany  Smith  Hegel  commerce-doux  economic_growth  luxury  recognition  poverty  inequality  industrialization  working_class  bibliography  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - The Dialogic Experience of Conscience: Adam Smith and the Voices of Stoicism | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Winter, 1992-1993), pp. 233-260
Lots of Shaftesbury and the Stoics as well as Hutcheson before she gets into TMS. Published right before her book, so undoubtedly covers some of the topics in the book -- though don't know how much Bakhtin was in the book -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  18thC  social_theory  moral_philosophy  moral_sentiments  morality-innate  sociability  Stoicism  recognition  self-love  self-and-other  sympathy  conscience  Bakhtin  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mika LaVaque-Manty - Dueling for Equality: Masculine Honor and the Modern Politics of Dignity | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 34, No. 6 (Dec., 2006), pp. 715-740
This essay argues that aristocratic values and social practices were deployed in the transition to modernity, where equal dignity replaced positional honor as the ground on which an individual's political status rests. The essay focuses on dueling, one of the most important practices for the maintenance of aristocratic honor, at the moments of transition, primarily in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The author argues that the practice has resources for an egalitarian refashioning. This is because it is a system for the distribution of respect and because it involves social equals. At the same time, it is necessarily masculine, which limits the degree to which it can realize equality. The essay argues that the egalitarian refashioning emerged in part out of eighteenth-century thinkers' own reinterpretation of the practice. The focal theorist in the essay is Immanuel Kant, whose discussion allows us to weave together theoretical discussions of honor with the social practices of dueling. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_culture  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  aristocracy  rank  status  honor  honnête  equality  dignity  recognition  citizens  Kant  cultural_change  modernity  duels  masculinity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven B. Smith - What Is "Right" In Hegel's Philosophy of Right? | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 83, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 3-18
I provide a thematic reconstruction of Hegel's positive concept of right. Against those who charge that Hegel denies any role to substantive political evaluation, I argue that the Philosophy of Right articulates a notion of the right to recognition (Anerkennung) as the central feature of the modern state. The concept of recognition, I contend, requires not just toleration of others but a more robust notion of respect for the @'free personality@' that is the philosophical ground of right. The right to recognition is, furthermore, intended to provide the foundation for a new form of ethical life (Sittlichkeit), Hegel's modern analogue to classical conceptions of civic virtue. In conclusion I examine briefly two objections that stand in the way of a contemporary rehabilitation of Hegelian political Philosophy.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Hegel  natural_rights  tolerance  recognition  civic_virtue  civil_liberties  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Remy Debes review: Jeremy Waldron, Dignity, Rank, and Rights (2013, rev'd 2009 Tanner Lectures and commentaries by Michael Rosen, Don Herzog, and Wai Chee Dimock) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews
This book, which contains the revised version of his 2009 Berkeley Tanner Lectures, followed by commentaries from Michael Rosen, Don Herzog, and Wai Chee Dimock, succinctly maps crucial new conceptual space, which no one working on human dignity can ignore. Waldron's central claim is that the principle of human dignity, in its juridical meaning in the modern liberal state, should not be understood in moral terms. In particular, it should not be interpreted as a doctrine about the inherent worth of persons, à la Kant, disconnected from all older connotations of social merit and rank. On the contrary, Waldron argues that within the law the principle of dignity is best understood as the assignment of all persons to a very high social rank, in some sense directly continuous with aristocratic notions of dignity once reserved for Lord and Lady. See also discussion of Stephen Darwall's 2 kinds of respect which Waldron doesn't deal with adequately.
books  reviews  metaethics  human_rights  legal_system  EF-add  Kant-ethics  dignity  civil_liberties  civility-political  recognition  respect  status  rank  hierarchy  legal_theory  equality 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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