dunnettreader + reader_response   21

Donald S. Lopez, Jr.- The evolution of a text: The Tibetan Book of the Dead | The Immanent Frame - March 2011
Excerpted from The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography published by Princeton University Press © 2011. -- In a footnote to his introduction, Evans-Wentz writes that he and Kazi Dawa Samdup felt, “that without such safeguarding as this Introduction is intended to afford, the Bardo Thodol translation would be peculiarly liable to misinterpretation and consequent misuse . . .” They could have had little idea of the myriad ways in which their collaboration would be read. Removing the Bardo Todol from the moorings of language and culture, of time and place, Evans-Wentz transformed it into The Tibetan Book of the Dead and set it afloat in space, touching down at various moments in various cultures over the course of the past century, providing in each case an occasion to imagine what it might mean to be dead. This biography tells the strange story of The Tibetan Book of the Dead. It argues that the persistence of its popularity derives from three factors: The first is the human obsession with death. The second is the Western romance of Tibet. The third is Evans-Wentz’s way of making the Tibetan text into something that is somehow American. Evans-Wentz’s classic is not so much Tibetan as it is American, a product of American Spiritualism. Indeed, it might be counted among its classic texts. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder " Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  20thC  21stC  translation  religious_lit  religious_culture  religious_belief  sociology_of_religion  spirituality  readership  reader_response  cultural_exchange  cultural_transmission  esotericism  hermeticism  Buddhism  Tibet  orientalism  New_Age  death  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Martin E. Marty - The birth of a book « The Immanent Frame - March 2011
Excerpted from Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Letters and Papers from Prison: A Biography, published by Princeton University Press © 2011. Posted by permission. Come to the launch of Princeton University Press’s “Lives of Great Religious Books” series on Thursday, March 24, in New York City, hosted by the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU and the SSRC Program on Religion and the Public Sphere.—ed. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder " Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  20thC  21stC  religious_lit  readership  reader_response  Germany  German_theologians  spirituality  Nazis  WWII  religious_experience  religious_culture  contextualism  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Ada Palmer - Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 3 (July 2012), pp. 395-416
In the Renaissance, Epicureanism and other heterodox scientific theories were strongly associated with heresy and atheism, and frequently condemned. Yet, when Lucretius’s Epicurean poem De Rerum Natura reappeared in 1417, these associations did not prevent the poem’s broad circulation. A survey of marginalia in Lucretius manuscripts reveals a characteristic humanist reading agenda, focused on philology and moral philosophy, which facilitated the circulation of such heterodox texts among an audience still largely indifferent to their radical content. Notes in later sixteenth century print copies reveal a transformation in reading methods, and an audience more receptive to heterodox science. Article is on Project MUSE - the jstor archive is open through 2011, closed for 2012, and has no later volumes. The jstor page for articles from 2012 has the advantage of the full set of footnotes. I've copied the footnotes to Evernote. -- update, I've downloaded it to Note
article  jstor  bibliography  intellectual_history  Lucretius  Epicurean  heterodoxy  atheism  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  humanism  philology  moral_philosophy  reading  reader_response  readership  atomism  determinism  cosmology  Scientific_Revolution  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  circulation-ideas  Evernote  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
David A. Bell, review - Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques - The Fault is Not in Our "Stars", but in Ourselves - Books & ideas Jan 2014
Reviewed: Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques. L’invention de la célébrité, 1750-1850, [Public Figures. The Invention of Celebrity, 1750-1850]. Paris, Fayard, 2014. -- Before we start to lament the triumph of celebrity culture over the most basic civic literacy, we might ask if things were truly better in the past. Antoine Lilti’s brilliant book shows that modern celebrity culture had its origins in the age of revolutions, when selfhood and personal authenticity emerged as new notions. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  France  French_Enlightenment  Napoleon  Rousseau  celebrity  scandale  cultural_history  political_press  political_culture  cultural_critique  public_sphere  self  authenticity  popular_culture  mass_culture  media  readership  reader_response  sensibility  empathy  publishing  Habermas  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Gavin Alexander - Fulke Greville and the Afterlife | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 203-231
Fascinating re both Grevill's history writing - his discussion of Sir Philip Sidney in publishing his work (Arcadia) not only influenced Sidney reception but framed Queen Elizabeth as a wise ruler in contrast with the Stuarts. Discussion of how, given "nothing new under the sun" and constancy of human nature, poetry, drama and prose could all be read as speaking to current events -- e, g. Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex rebellion. Greville treatment of Sidney as in retrospect prophetic re foreign relations especially with Dutch, forms of government -- Greville using Aristotle and Polybius re patterns of historical change. Greville in both his history and prose writing and his poetry and plays was always looking to readers after his death. Suggestive re development of an increasingly sophisticated historiography in 17thC that wrestled with tensions in using history as exemplary vs informing practical reason for contingencies of statecraft as well as hermeneutics for readers in the present and future. Provides a publication history of Greville's works during Commonwealth and Restoration, how it was used politically at different moments, including Exclusion_Crisis. Worden has published articles or chapters in collections that look at the generation of Sidney and Greville as some proto classical republican writings. Also may be useful for Bolingbroke's treatment of Elizabeth as model in Remarks and Study and Uses -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Anglo-Dutch  English_lit  poetry  poetics  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  historians-and-politics  historical_change  politics-and-literature  hermeneutics  reader_response  readership  publishing  scribal_circulation  manuscripts  Remarks_on_History_of_England  Study_and_Uses  political_philosophy  republicanism  Polybius  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
David Hoover - The End of the Irrelevant Text: Electronic Texts, Linguistics, and Literary Theory | DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly, Vol 1.2 (2007)
David Hoover <david_dot_hoover_at_nyu_dot_edu>, New York University -- The close study of literary texts has a long and illustrious history. But the popularity of textual analysis has waned in recent decades, just at the time that widely available electronic texts were making traditional analytic tools easier to apply and encouraging the development of innovative computer-assisted tools. Without claiming any simple causal relationship, I argue that the marginalization of textual analysis and other text-centered approaches owes something to the dominance of Chomskyan linguistics and the popularity of high theory. Certainly both an introspective, sentence-oriented, formalist linguistic approach and literary theories deeply influenced by ideas about the sign's instability and the tendency of texts to disintegrate under critical pressure minimize the importance of the text. Using examples from Noam Chomsky, Jerome McGann, and Stanley Fish, I argue for a return to the text, specifically the electronic, computable text, to see what corpora, text-analysis, statistical stylistics, and authorship attribution can reveal about meanings and style. The recent resurgence of interest in scholarly editions, corpora, text- analysis, stylistics, and authorship suggest that the electronic text may finally reach its full potential. -- see bibliography re Chomsky Language Instinct debates
article  English_lit  lit_crit  linguistics  innate_ideas  digital_humanities  reader_response  postmodern  poststructuralist  translation  bibliography 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico for Historians: An Introduction [dedicated issue to Vico for historians for our time] | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 479-493
Introduction gives a brief biography and discusses each of the papers in the issue, plus a short "further reading" -- Contents *--* Community, Prereflective Virtue, and the Cyclopean Power of the Fathers: Vico's Reflections on Unexpected Consequences (pp. 495-515) Edmund E. Jacobitti. *--* The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History (pp. 517-535) Alexander U. Bertland. *--* Vico and the End of History (pp. 537-558) Patrick H. Hutton. *--* Vico, Rhetorical Topics and Historical Thought (pp. 559-585) Catherine L. Hobbs. *--* Situating Vico Between Modern and Postmodern (pp. 587-617) Sandra Rudnick Luft. *--* Interpretations and Misinterpretations of Vico (pp. 619-639) Cecilia Miller -- Introduction and all papers downloaded to Note and in separate folder in Dropbox
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Vico  Enlightenment  historicism  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  ancient_history  poetry  rhetoric  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  stadial_theories  Tacitus  oral_culture  postmodern  reading  reader_response  readership  cycles  human_nature  humanism  hermeticism  hermeneutics  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, review - Francis-Noël Thomas and Mark Turner, Clear and Simple as the Truth: Writing Classic Prose | Philosophy and Literature 21 (1997): 504-507
Every once in a while a book comes along with the power to alter permanently the view of a subject you thought you knew well. For me this year, that book is Clear and Simple as the Truth: Writing Classic Prose, Francis-Noël Thomas and Mark Turner (Princeton University Press, $14.95).....But it is actually a treatise on one particular style, which the authors call classic prose. This is a specifiable kind of writing that can be found in every literate culture, they insist, even if their examples are all European. At the center of the classic style is the nonfiction essay, although it is a style used for fiction as well. They begin with a sentence from La Rochefoucauld: [and compare it with a tortured construction by Johnson in his preface to Shakespeare]. -- It may look easy to write, but that is part of the trick of classic prose. It is efficient and precise, and seems utterly spontaneous. However, that natural sound is not the sound of speech, Thomas and Turner say, it is the sound of writing. Writing such as La Rochefoucauld’s embodies or expresses a certain attitude toward the truth. For Johnson’s sentence, writing “hard and noble,” as they call it, and truth is something that cannot be captured in mere speech, but is rather “the reward of effort.” For the classic style, “Truth is a grace that flees from earnest effort. The language of truth is ideally graceful speech.” -- Dutton describes the attitude towards an equality of conversation and interest in pursuing shared knowledge -while acknowledging limits to access to certainty and foibles of prejudices etc - that underpins the classical style. Very applicable to Bolingbroke
books  reviews  kindle-available  English_lit  French_lit  17thC  18thC  writing  style-philosophy  prose  conversation  epistemology-social  Rochefoucauld  Johnson  classicism  neoclassical  reader_response  intentionality  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation | Philosophy and Literature 16 (1992): 432-37
Delightful Denis Dutton review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation (Cambridge University Press, $39.95 hardbound, $11.95 paper) -- presents three lectures by Umberto Eco, with responses by Richard Rorty, Jonathan Culler, and Christine Brooke-Rose, a final rejoinder by Eco, and a general introduction by Stefan Collini. The occasion was the Clare Hall Tanner Lectures, and they apparently packed out one of the biggest auditoriums at Cambridge University in 1990. There was more debate, including Frank Kermode, Malcolm Bradbury, and David Lodge, than is included here, and one imagines it was an exciting occasion. -- quite splendid description of debate between Eco and Rorty. Culler who is more open ended than Eco on limits to interpretation turns his guns on the self described American pragmatists, Rorty and Stanley Fish. Needless to say Dutton is reluctant to put Rorty in the same tradition as Dewey - Eco's voracious curiosity and wonder about the world is more in Dewey’s line - and is appalled at labeling Fish a pragmatist. Definitely to buy.
books  reviews  find  amazon.com  lit_crit  literary_theory  hermeneutics  hermeticism  gnostic  interpretivism  deconstruction  reader_response  intentionality  Eco  Rorty  pragmatism 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack Selzer - Kenneth Burke among the Moderns: "Counter-Statement" as Counter Statement | JSTOR: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring, 1996), pp. 19-49
"Counter-Statement" (Burke's 1st book of essays written from mid 1920s to 1931) - by tracking the modernist elements that Burke incorporated and those he was starting to challenge, within a modernist conversation, this article looks like an quick education in literary_history and criticism from the 19thC esthetes (eg Flaubert, Pater) onwards. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  lit_crit  19thC  20thC  Burke_Kenneth  esthetes  Modernism  Symbolists  judgment-aesthetics  form-poetic  form-theory  reader_response  fiction  philosophy_of_language  poetry  art_history  art_criticism  music_history  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Lawrence E. Klein - Anthony Ashley Cooper, Third Earl of Shaftesbury, Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times by Philip Ayres | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 529-537
Discussion of differences among Klein’s Cambridge 1 volume student edition, Ayres 2 volume Oxford critical edition (looks great as a critical) and Liberty Fund's 3 volume (I have) -- references to recent works on 18thC culture and intellectual history that has considerable attention to Shaftesbury, including importance of rhetoric, history of book and reader reception, and issues like masculinity. --didn't download
article  jstor  books  reviews  bookshelf  cultural_history  literary_history  intellectual_history  18thC  Shaftesbury  moral_philosophy  rhetoric  images  publishing  readership  reader_response  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Raven - New Reading Histories, Print Culture and the Identification of Change: The Case of 18thC England | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Oct., 1998), pp. 268-287
This article considers the consequences of new reading histories that have pursued the question of reading practices -- how people read texts, rather than just who readers were and what it was that they read. New theoretical considerations widen our appreciation of the difficulty in recovering the history of reading, but they must also confront the limitations and peculiarities of the evidence available. Using eighteenth-century England as a case study, the article reviews recent work -- much from diverse research not usually associated with reading history -- and assesses the potential for future study. Important questions about the relationship between literature, belief and action, about the nature of 'popular' and 'elite' culture, about the archaeology of political and social thought, and about the dissemination and control of ideas, cannot be determined without asking what reading meant. Such enquiry is particularly rewarding in writing the history of the transitional and diverse society of eighteenth-century England. It also reinforces concern that pursuit of new reading histories through an exploration of reading practice can marginalise the evaluation of change by concentrating on an examination of the singular and the synchronic. Only by the broadest research strategies, the article suggests, can new reading history most fully contribute to an understanding of eighteenth-century English social history. -- interesting bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  historiography  historical_change  literacy  reading  reader_response  readership  popular_culture  elite_culture  intelligentsia  public_opinion  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Jackson - Approaches to the History of Readers and Reading in 18thC Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 47, No. 4 (Dec., 2004), pp. 1041-1054
The history of reading can link intellectual and cultural developments with social or political change in the eighteenth century. Historians of the book increasingly argue that an understanding of historical reading practices is essential if we are to understand the impact of texts on individuals and on society as a whole: textual evidence alone is inadequate. Recent work on eighteenth-century readers has used sources including book trade records, correspondence, and diaries to reconstruct the reading lives of individuals and of groups of readers. Such sources reveal the great variety of reading material many eighteenth-century readers could access, and the diversity and sophistication of reading practices they often employed, in selecting between a range of available reading strategies. Thus, any one theoretical paradigm is unlikely to capture the full range of eighteenth-century reading experience. Instead, we can trace the evolution of particular reading cultures, including popular and literary reading cultures, the existence of cultures based around particular genres of print, such as newspapers, and reading as a part of social and conversational life. There is now a need for a new synthesis that combines the new evidence of reading practice with textual analysis to explain continuity and change across the century. -- didn't download
article  jstor  cultural_history  intellectual_history  social_history  political_history  historical_change  historiography  reading  reader_response  publishing  readership  18thC  British_history  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - How to Be an Intentionalist | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 209-217
See Brown article in same issue - The general aim of this paper is to establish the plausibility of a postfoundational intentionalism. Its specific aim is to respond to criticisms of my work made by Vivienne Brown in a paper "On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History." Postfoundationalism is often associated with a new textualism according to which there is no outside to the text. In contrast, I suggest that postfoundationalists can legitimate our postulating intentions, actions, and other historical objects outside of the text. They can do so by reference to, first, philosophical commitments to general classes of objects, and, second, inference to the best explanation with respect to particular objects belonging to such classes. This postfoundational intentionalism sets up a suitable context within which to address Brown's more specific questions.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  author_intention  reader_response  intertextual  Derrida  postmodern  hermeneutics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 198-208
See response from Bevir - This paper argues that the notion of weak intentionalism in Mark Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas is incoherent. Bevir's proposal for weak intentionalism as procedural individualism relies on the argument that the object of study for historians of ideas is given by the beliefs that are expressed by individuals (whether authors or readers) since these beliefs constitute the historical meaning of the work for those individuals as historical figures. Historical meanings are thus hermeneutic meanings. In the case of insincere, unconscious, and irrational beliefs, however, the beliefs expressed by individuals are not in fact their actual beliefs, and their actual beliefs are now taken to be those expressed by the works. It thus turns out that it is not the beliefs expressed by individuals that are the object of study for historians but the works themselves, since the overriding requirement for historians of ideas is to "make sense of their material" and it is this requirement that determines whether or not the beliefs are to be construed as expressed by individuals or by the works. But once it is accepted that the beliefs that are the object of study for historians are expressed by the works and not by individuals, the original argument that such beliefs are historical hermeneutic meanings for historical figures no longer applies. The argument for weak intentionalism thus turns out to be incoherent. Bevir's argument fails to establish that the object of study for the history of ideas is external to the works, and the attempted distinction between interpreting a work and reading a text also fails.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  author_untention  reader_response  hermeneutics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kate Loveman, review essay - Political Information in the Seventeenth Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 555-565
(1) Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England by Kevin Sharpe; Steven N. Zwicker; (2) The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe by Brendan Dooley; Sabrina A. Baron; (3) Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State by Andrew McRae; (4) The Writing of Royalism, 1628-1660 by Robert Wilcher; (5) Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum by Jason Peacey; (6)The Ingenious Mr. Henry Care, Restoration Publicist by Lois G. Schwoerer -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  censorship  reader_response  readership  reading  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  English_lit  satire  pamphlets  Grub_Street  history_of_book  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Paige - Rousseau's Readers Revisited: The Aesthetics of La Nouvelle Héloïse | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Fall, 2008), pp. 131-154
The reading "revolution" wrought by Rousseau's Julie has been characterized, by Robert Darnton and others, as the triumph of a nearly quixotic investment in fiction: sentimental readers, it would seem, believed in the reality of the characters they read about. Yet the archive of letters to Rousseau reveals readers quite attuned to the novel's exploration of different types, good and bad, of emotional involvement. Julie and the enthusiasm it provoked must be understood as rejecting previously dominant aesthetic theories predicating audience emotion on mimetic fusion between reader and text, in favor of emotions proper to distanced, even unbelieving, spectators.
article  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  18thC  French_lit  sentimentalism  reading  reader_response  Rousseau  novels  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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