dunnettreader + publishing   88

K. Tonry - Agency and Intention in English Print, 1476–1526 | Brepols
K. Tonry Agency and Intention in English Print, 1476–1526 Add to basket -> XV+241 p., 15 b/w ill., 156 x 234 mm, 2016 ISBN: 978-2-503-53576-0 Languages:…
books  history_of_book  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  print_culture  publishing  British_history  cultural_history  cultural_change  from instapaper
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
MELVYN NEW - Review essay: Five Twenty-First-Century Studies of Laurence Sterne and His Works (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 122-135 -- "Read, read, read, read, my unlearned reader!": Five Twenty-First-Century Studies of Laurence Sterne and His Works -- Reviewed Works: Laurence Sterne in France by Lana Asfour; Labyrinth of Digressions: Tristram Shandy as Perceived and Influenced by Sterne's Early Imitators by René Bosch, Piet Verhoeff; Yorick's Congregation: The Church of England in the Time of Laurence Sterne by Martha F. Bowden; Sterne's Whimsical Theatres of Language: Orality, Gesture, Literacy by Alexis Tadié; The Cultural Work of Empire: The Seven Years' War and the Imagining of the Shandean State by Carol Watts -- indirectly a useful overview of shifts in dealing with Sterne, Tristram and Church of England not only in latter part of 18thC but 19thC and 20thC -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  Sterne  French_lit  satire  prose  celebrity  cultural_history  intellectual_history  publishing  publishing-industry  imitation  Church_of_England  scepticism  Swift  self-knowledge  philanthropy  sentimentalism  sincerity  authenticity  politics-and-literature  materialism  sermons  translation  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Carina L. Johnson - Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 597-622 -- describes shifting descriptions across the 15thC-16thC of religious practices and how they were increasingly reported on, analyzed, and categorized, starting with Aristotle's and mutating -- in travel lit, reports from exploration, missionaries, colonization and aggregations in published works from ethnography to large scale "cosmographies" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  15thC  16thC  17thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  publishing  travel_lit  exploration  colonialism  missionaries  religious_belief  religious_practices  religious_imagery  idolatry  ethnography  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  civilization-concept  primitivism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Lauren Kassell - "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 107-122 - in issue devoted to histories of science -- looking at how histories of magic were framed with respect to work in mathematics, medicine and natural philosophy, especially to carve out legitimate intellectual inquiry from derogatory attacks linked to supposed magic -- tracks especially from mid 17thC how the discourses that involved magic were shifting -- probably puts Keith Thomas in more recent historiography on "religion and the decline of magic" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  religious_history  history_of_science  historiography  magic  medicine  natural_philosophy  alchemy  religious_culture  religious_belief  historiography-17thC  evidence  experimental_philosophy  publishing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Grégory Hû , review - Thomas Bouchet, et al, Quand les socialistes inventaient l’avenir (1825-1860) - La Vie des idées - 26 août 2015
Recensé : Thomas Bouchet, Vincent Bourdeau, Edward Castleton, Ludovic Frobert et François Jarrige (dir.), Quand les socialistes inventaient l’avenir (1825-1860), Paris, La Découverte, 2014, 300p., 25€. -- À travers une activité journalistique intense mais peu connue, les socialistes du XIXe siècle ont posé les jalons d’un courant politique aussi inventif que divers. Un ouvrage collectif revient sur les racines longtemps ignorées de ce premier socialisme à l’aune de sa presse . -- Cet ouvrage collectif, issu d’un colloque tenu à l’Université de Stanford aux États-Unis en 2013, entreprend d’analyser les doctrines et les modalités d’action des « premiers socialistes » à partir de l’analyse de leur presse entre 1825 et 1851. Il s’agit d’explorer le long cheminement des aspirations des courants politiques socialistes antérieurs à Karl Marx. Les auteurs s’appuient sur la nouvelle presse périodique qui connaît à cette époque un fort développement. En effet, la révolution de 1848, en plus d’être portée par les ouvriers et le peuple, a aussi été menée par les journalistes de l’époque. -- Cette publication collective s’inscrit dans une entreprise pluridisciplinaire rassemblant des économistes, des philosophes, des historiens et des politistes autour d’axes de réflexion communs (conditions de production d’un journal, thématiques l’animant, réseau des rédacteurs). -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  19thC  French_politics  Industrial_Revolution  capitalism  socialism-19thC  July_Monarchy  1848_revolutions  French_government  political_culture  political_press  political_participation  working_class  public_opinion  publishing  journalism  Restoration-France  parties  political_philosophy  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Aubrey Gwynn - Indentured Servants and Negro Slaves in Barbados (1642-1650) | JSTOR - Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review Vol. 19, No. 74 (Jun., 1930)
Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review, Vol. 19, No. 74 (Jun., 1930), pp. 279-294, Published by: Irish Province of the Society of Jesus -- describes contents of a memoir of 3 years in West Indies, Barbados by a returned "gentleman adventurer", published in 1653 and reissued without dedicatiry material 1673 -- trained in engraving, architecture so detailed descriptions as well as drawings -- deals with topography, natural history, planter society with all the different countries of origin, classes, and the sugar industry from the slaves in fields to the machinery -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  economic_history  social_history  Atlantic  West_Indies  labor_history  English_Civil_War  plantations  planters  sugar  slavery  indentured_labor  British_history  British_Empire  Ireland-English_exploitation  Irish_migration  memoirs  publishing 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
L'Europe des Lumières - Classiques Garnier - collection directors Michel Delon, Jacques Berchtold et Christophe Martin
De ce qu'on appelle la crise de la conscience européenne à la Révolution française, la littérature et la pensée ont pour espace une Europe, souvent francophone, éprise d'idées nouvelles et d'expérimentations formelles. La collection rend compte de recherches qui sollicitent des disciplines et des méthodes diverses pour mieux connaître et comprendre la vie intellectuelle, scientifique, artistique et littéraire du XVIIIe siècle, ainsi que l'histoire des idées et des représentations. -- From what has been designated as a "crisis of conscience" to the Revolution, literature and thought play in a European space, often French-speaking, entranced by new ideas and formal experiments. The collection covers research which calls on a variety of disciplines and methods in order to better know and understand the intellectual, scientific, artistic and literary life of the 18th century, as well as the history of ideas and representations.
books  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  art_history  literary_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  philosophes  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  publishing 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Lucie Campos interview with Gisèle Sapiro - Geopolitics of Translation in Social Sciences and Humanities - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French original 2014)
Translated by Lucy Garnier -- Tags : translation | publishing | Bourdieu -- As publishing markets become increasingly international, sociology looks at the translation of work in the social sciences and humanities. Gisèle Sapiro shows the effects that the crossover between the academic and publishing spheres has on translation practices. -- Gisèle Sapiro is Director of the European Centre for Sociology and Political Science. She edited the collective volumes Pierre Bourdieu, sociologue (Fayard: 2004) and Pour une histoire des sciences sociales (Fayard: 2004) and has written several books of reference on the sociology of knowledge production, the intellectual field, and the international circulation of ideas, including Translatio. Le marché de la traduction en France à l’heure de la mondialisation (CNRS: 2008), Les Contradictions de la globalisation éditoriale (Nouveau Monde: 2009), and L’Espace intellectuel en Europe, XIXe-XXIe siècles: de la formation des États-nations à la mondialisation (La Découverte: 2009). The author and her research team have published a series of reports on literary exchange in the era of globalisation. After Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines and Paris-New York the latest of these accounts, "Les Sciences humaines et sociales françaises en traduction" published online in July 2014, presents some of the directions taken by the European project she is coordinating on international cooperation in the social sciences and humanities. -' saved in Instapaper
19thC  20thC  21stC  Republic_of_Letters  intellectual_history  translation  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  networks  networks-information  intelligentsia  literary_theory  cultural_influence  cultural_exchange  language-national  humanities  publishing  academia  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  globalization  cosmopolitanism  circulation-ideas  Bourdieu  Foucault  Derrida  humanities-finance  social_sciences-finance  education-higher  education-finance  universal_language-Latin  universal_language-English  books  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Bernard, ed. - The Literary Correspondences of the Tonsons - Oxford University Press
The Tonsons were the pre-eminent literary publishers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It is difficult to estimate their contribution to the formation of English literature accurately. Nevertheless, it is clear that they carried Shakespeare into the eighteenth century and started the practice of modern editing of him. Without Rowe's life and without the Pope-Theobald controversy, the history of Shakespeare studies would have been different, perhaps much less illustrious. The same is true of Milton, a figure who through his political sympathies was in disrepute, but on whom Jacob Tonson the elder (and his nephew after him) decided to lavish the care, eventually including illustration and annotation, usually reserved for the classics. Later they issued an edition of Spenser by John Hughes, thus creating the triumvirate who for many years were to dominate the study of English renaissance literature. It is not unreasonable to claim that the house of Tonson invented English literature as matter for repeated reading and study. In addition, of course, the Tonsons were Dryden's main publisher, the first to publish Pope, and the consistent supporters of Addison and Steele and their early periodicals, while Jacob Tonson the elder had earlier shaped the miscellany, the translation of classical poetry into English, the pocket Elzevier series, and the luxury edition - practices carried on by the Tonson firm throughout the eighteenth century. They were at the forefront of the creation of a Whig literary culture and Jacob Tonson the elder was the founder of the famous Whig Kit-Cat Club which, it has been said, saved the nation. This edition brings together the correspondences of the Tonsons for the first time and represents a major intervention in the field of the history of the book and literary production. It includes 158 letters, with translations where necessary, from major authors, politicians, and men and women of letters of the period, discussing their work and the role that the Tonsons played in getting literature to the press and the reading nation. The letters are accompanied by generous and insightful annotation, as well as brief biographies of each of the Tonsons, and special sections on publishing, patronage, and retirement.
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  publishing  print_culture  printing  Dryden  Pope_Alexander  Addison  Steele  English_lit  poetry  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-politics  correspondence  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Tim Neff, review - Andrew Pettegree, The Invention of News: How the World Came to Know About Itself | Public Books — April 2015
How did we go from that to the news as we now know it, broadcast across the globe and in cycles measured in milliseconds? Pettegree, a professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews, in Scotland, finds answers by linking the emergence of news as a mass commodity to Western Europe’s development of communications networks between the 15th and 18th centuries. This network perspective decenters news as a singular object. Instead, what we get is a richly detailed history that shows the invention of news as a messy cultural process, with abrupt turns and setbacks. Major advances in information networks were quickly followed by retreats. Printers would reinvent news, only to fold a year or two later. When newspapers first appeared, a mass readership had to learn how to read brief accounts that provided much less context than the narrative histories with which they were familiar. Pettegree’s history of news suggests that crisis has shadowed journalism from the start. The Invention of News divides the earliest stirrings of modern news into three epochs, starting with the 15th and early 16th centuries, when the printing press spurred the transition from largely private news networks to the earliest forms of public news industries. Next, in the 16th and early 17th centuries, improved communications networks enabled the news to spread faster and to more people at less cost. Finally, in the 17th and 18th centuries, advertising expanded circulations, and Enlightenment ideals brought an empirical approach to news that led it to shed moral overtones.
books  reviews  kindle-available  cultural_history  cultural_change  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  news  newspapers  publishing  readership  journalism  communication  information  information-markets  Enlightenment  mass_culture  networks-information  public_sphere  disinformation  witchcraft  public_opinion  public_disorder 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Elmer, review - Paul Kleber Monod, Solomon's Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment (Yale University Press 2013) | Reviews in History
Peter Elmer, University of Exeter -- This important work provides the first informed, well-researched and highly nuanced account of the fortunes of ‘occult’ thought and practice in England from the mid17thC to its demise at the end of the 18thC. Building on the work of a wide range of scholars from various disciplines, (..) the fortunes of the occult are argued to have peaked in the second half of the 17thC, dipped in the period from the Glorious Revolution to 1760, and then re-emerged in the last 4 decades of the 18thC in somewhat different but revitalized form. As Monod shows (..) the occult (defined broadly as alchemy, astrology and natural magic) was rarely perceived as a uniform movement of ideas, its adherents frequently picking and choosing those elements of the ‘occult’ which most appealed to them. It was thus a protean body of ideas, susceptible to frequent re-interpretation according to the personal preoccupations of the initiated. At the same time, while some of its adherents may have (in the earlier period especially) seen it as a body of ideas capable of replacing older systems of science and philosophy, it more often than not was studied and developed alongside other, competing systems of thought. (..) What is invigoratingly original here is Monod’s application of the same accommodating features of occult thinking with regard to Newtonianism and the Enlightenment in the later period. (..) it is hard to disagree with his conclusion that ‘the assumption of many historians, that occult thinking was debunked by experimental science … is essentially wrong’.(..) all the arguments against astrology, alchemy and natural magic had been fully developed long before 1650. This is equally true of witchcraft, (..) The occult was not simply argued out of existence. Only wider factors can help to explain this process. (..) in order to understand this process, we need to pay more heed to the wider social, religious and political context in which these ideas were promoted and debated. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  occult  chemistry  alchemy  medicine  Newtonian  astronomy  astrology  magic  hermeticism  esotericism  publishing  Charles_II  court_culture  Church_of_England  witchcraft  political_culture  Tories  dissenters  Evangelical  Whigs  Defoe  Thompson_EP  rationality  reason  social_history  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Walkowitz — Translating the Untranslatable: An Interview with Barbara Cassin | Public Books July 2014
The US version was published earlier this year ... Edited by Emily Apter, Jacques Lezra, and Michael Wood, the 1,300-page Dictionary retains the original introduction, most of the entries, and an orientation toward Europe, but it has also been adjusted and supplemented for US audiences. Apter’s robust preface documents the enormous complexity and scale involved in translating intraduisibles. One of the most provocative and important contributions of the Vocabulaire is its insistence that philosophical concepts, often assumed to be transhistorical and universal, in fact have a history in languages. The editions, adaptations, and translations of the project are important too, however, because they show that philosophical concepts have a history in books as well. The Vocabulaire may be a multilingual project, whose entries collate and compare terms in more than a dozen languages, but the editions are not all multilingual in the same way and for the same reasons. Whereas the Ukrainian editors sought to expand the vocabulary and prestige of their language, their US counterparts were more concerned to acknowledge and mitigate Anglophone dominance. The books are different structurally and economically as well as linguistically. The Ukrainian and Arabic editions have appeared only in parts, while the US edition appears as a whole. In tongues with fewer readers and fewer resources, publishing one part helps to fund a subsequent part. That kind of funding is not necessary for most books published in English. -- Pocket
interview  books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  language-history  language  translation  philosophy  antiquity  publishing  language-national  concepts-change  Pocket 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Entretien avec Roger Chartier par Ivan Jablonka - Le livre : son passé, son avenir | La Vie des idées 29 septembre 2008
Roger Chartier, professeur au Collège de France, analyse ces bouleversements à la lumière de l’histoire. Une question inédite se pose à nous: sous sa forme électronique, le texte doit-il bénéficier de la fixité, comme les livres de papier, ou peut-il s’ouvrir aux potentialités de l’anonymat et d’une multiplicité sans fin ? Ce qui est sûr, c’est que la multiplication des supports éditoriaux, des journaux et des écrans diversifie les pratiques d’une société qui, contrairement à ce qu’on entend dire ça et là, lit de plus en plus. -- interview available in audio and video plus English text -- downloaded French pdf to Note
interview  history_of_book  media  publishing  etexts  cultural_history  Internet  mass_culture  elite_culture  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
David A. Bell, review - Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques - The Fault is Not in Our "Stars", but in Ourselves - Books & ideas Jan 2014
Reviewed: Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques. L’invention de la célébrité, 1750-1850, [Public Figures. The Invention of Celebrity, 1750-1850]. Paris, Fayard, 2014. -- Before we start to lament the triumph of celebrity culture over the most basic civic literacy, we might ask if things were truly better in the past. Antoine Lilti’s brilliant book shows that modern celebrity culture had its origins in the age of revolutions, when selfhood and personal authenticity emerged as new notions. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  France  French_Enlightenment  Napoleon  Rousseau  celebrity  scandale  cultural_history  political_press  political_culture  cultural_critique  public_sphere  self  authenticity  popular_culture  mass_culture  media  readership  reader_response  sensibility  empathy  publishing  Habermas  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Wallace Hughes - Antidotes to Deism: A reception history of Thomas Paine's "The Age of Reason", 1794--1809 (2013 dissertation) | ProQuest Gradworks
Hughes, Patrick Wallace, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 2013, 362 pages; 3573259 - Adviser: Paula M. Kane -- In the Anglo-American world of the late 1790s, Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason was not well received, and his volumes of Deistic theology were characterized as extremely dangerous. Over 70 replies to The Age of Reason appeared in Britain and the US. It was widely criticized in the periodical literature, and it garnered Paine the reputation as a champion of irreligion. This dissertation is a study of the rhetoric of refutation, and I focus on the replies to The Age of Reason that were published during Paine's lifetime (d. 1809). To effectively refute The Age of Reason, Paine's respondents had to contend not only with his Deistic arguments, but also with his international reputation, his style of writing, and his intended audience. I argue that much of the driving force behind the controversy over The Age of Reason stems from the concern that it was geared towards the “uneducated masses” or the “lower orders.” (..) For Paine's critics, when the masses abandon their Christianity for Deism, bloody anarchy is the inevitable result, as proven by the horrors of the French Revolution. (..) Drawing on Habermas's theories of the bourgeois public sphere, I focus on how respondents to The Age of Reason reveal not only their concerns and anxieties over the book, but also what their assumptions about authorial legitimacy and expectations about qualified reading audiences say about late 18thC print culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  Paine  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  Deism  natural_religion  Christianity  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  publishing  pamphlets  journalism  lower_orders  public_opinion  public_sphere  print_culture  hierarchy  mass_culture  anarchy  readership  social_order  public_disorder  Radical_Enlightenment  masses-fear_of  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Joad Raymond - Framing Libery: Marvell's "First Anniversary" and the Instrument of Government | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 313-350
1st Anniversary has been treated as the middle poem in a triptych of Marvell's poems on Cromwell. What Marvell's doing in this poem has been the subject of an extreme variety of interpretations, and the structure criticized as fragmented or reflecting the awkwardness of Marvell's political commitments in an environment in flux, the demands of propaganda, or panageric tainted by patronage. Raymond sees the poem as focused not on Cromwell but on the 1st anniversary of the Instrument of Government. The positions of Cromwell in the poem represent tensions between the logic of the Instrument to shape governmental action and political behavior and conflict vs the outsized person of Cromwell, whose manner of governing and leadership both made the success of the Instrument more likely yet threatened the core logic of the Instrument. He extensively tracks the specific debates in 1654, including ephemeral publications of propaganda and controversy, arguing that one reason later readers don't follow Marvell's structure and argument is that, beyond failing to understand the subject is the constitution, Marvell is engaging in specific contemporary arguments and the language in which they were then framed, which are unfamiliar to later readers. He looks at positions that would later become identified with The Good Old Cause and Commonwealthmen, and Harringtinian republicanism. Interesting bibliography Raymond in recent books has been specializing in the development and changes in 17thC print culture(s) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Interregnum  Restoration  publishing  propaganda  pamphlets  politics-and-literature  political_press  Marvell  Cromwell  government-forms  English_constitution  Harrington  Nedham  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Gavin Alexander - Fulke Greville and the Afterlife | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 203-231
Fascinating re both Grevill's history writing - his discussion of Sir Philip Sidney in publishing his work (Arcadia) not only influenced Sidney reception but framed Queen Elizabeth as a wise ruler in contrast with the Stuarts. Discussion of how, given "nothing new under the sun" and constancy of human nature, poetry, drama and prose could all be read as speaking to current events -- e, g. Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex rebellion. Greville treatment of Sidney as in retrospect prophetic re foreign relations especially with Dutch, forms of government -- Greville using Aristotle and Polybius re patterns of historical change. Greville in both his history and prose writing and his poetry and plays was always looking to readers after his death. Suggestive re development of an increasingly sophisticated historiography in 17thC that wrestled with tensions in using history as exemplary vs informing practical reason for contingencies of statecraft as well as hermeneutics for readers in the present and future. Provides a publication history of Greville's works during Commonwealth and Restoration, how it was used politically at different moments, including Exclusion_Crisis. Worden has published articles or chapters in collections that look at the generation of Sidney and Greville as some proto classical republican writings. Also may be useful for Bolingbroke's treatment of Elizabeth as model in Remarks and Study and Uses -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Anglo-Dutch  English_lit  poetry  poetics  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  historians-and-politics  historical_change  politics-and-literature  hermeneutics  reader_response  readership  publishing  scribal_circulation  manuscripts  Remarks_on_History_of_England  Study_and_Uses  political_philosophy  republicanism  Polybius  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Khan, B. - An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States | EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 16, 2008
The US created a utilitarian market-based model of intellectual property grants which created incentives for invention, with the primary objective of increasing social welfare and protecting the public domain. The checks and balances of interest group lobbies, the legislature and the judiciary worked effectively as long as each institution was relatively well-matched in terms of size and influence. However, a number of scholars are concerned that the political influence of corporate interests, the vast number of uncoordinated users over whom the social costs are spread, and international harmonization of laws have upset these counterchecks, leading to over-enforcement at both the private and public levels. International harmonization with European doctrines introduced significant distortions in the fundamental principles of US copyright and its democratic provisions. One of the most significant of these changes was also one of the least debated: compliance with the precepts of the Berne Convention accorded automatic copyright protection to all creations on their fixation in tangible form. This rule reversed the relationship between copyright and the public domain that the US Constitution stipulated. According to original US copyright doctrines, the public domain was the default, and copyright a limited exemption to the public domain; after the alignment with Berne, copyright became the default, and the rights of the public and of the public domain now merely comprise a limited exception to the primacy of copyright. The pervasive uncertainty that characterizes the intellectual property arena today leads risk-averse individuals and educational institutions to err on the side of abandoning their right to free access rather than invite challenges and costly litigation. Many commentators are also concerned about other dimensions of the globalization of intellectual property rights, such as the movement to emulate European grants of property rights in databases, which has the potential to inhibit diffusion and learning.
article  economic_history  publishing  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_system  IP  regulation-harmonization  natural_rights  natural_law  copyright  patents  US_constitution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  international_law  France  French_Revolution  censorship  British_history  authors  artists  playwrights  democracy  knowledge_economy  Internet  globalization  global_economy  digital_humanities  transparency  open_access  scientific_culture  science-public  education  R&D  education-higher  common_law  civil_code  civil_society  civic_humanism  US_legal_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - Dante, l’Aviso piacevole et Henri de Navarre | Italique, I, 1998, p. 79-94.
Italique [En ligne], I | 1998, mis en ligne le 05 mars 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.89. **--** re reception of Dante in France - in fight against Papacy, both French Catholics and Huguenots could use his attacks on the Papacy -- a familiar publication that combined anti -Papal comments in Date, Boccaccio and Petrarch, had a bizarre history linked to Henry IV- -' L’Aviso piacevole était une des nombreuses variations sur ce lieu rhétorique de la pensée protestante. Ce livre étrange, composé d’une matière italienne, édité en Angleterre, opportunément publié pour servir l’action de Henri de Navarre, était destiné à des lecteurs italiens ou italianisants de Genève, de Bâle, de Londres ou de Paris plus qu’aux Italiens de Florence ou de Rome qu’il ne pouvait guère toucher. Le nonce Ragazzoni, dans deux lettres adressées au cardinal Rusticucci, évoquait les autres livres suscités par le bref de Sixte Quint, le Brutum Fulmen de Hotman et le traité de Pierre de Belloy, dont il désignait le commanditaire, le garde des Sceaux Cheverny. Ces deux ouvrages, que le nonce avait eu beaucoup de peine à se procurer furent immédiatement mis à l’Index. L’Aviso piacevole au contraire semble être passé presque inaperçu. Il ne put échapper toutefois ... à la vigilance de Robert Bellarmin, venu en France avec la légation du cardinal Caetani. Bellarmin citait le recueil dans son appendix au traité De summo Pontefice publié dans le De Controversiis christianae fidei, et il entreprit de le réfuter. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  religious_history  Dante  reception  16thC  France  Wars_of_Religion  Henri_IV  Gallican  Huguenots  Protestant_International  publishing  publishing-clandestine  Papacy  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Machiavelli  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alessandra Villa - Le partage des ‘droits’ sur l’œuvre littéraire à la renaissance. Les cas d’Isabella d’Este | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 45-71
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.116. **--** la marquise s’avéra préférer, lorsqu’une œuvre lui était offerte, l’exclusivité de l’objet et le privilège de posséder une œuvre peu répandue et dont elle pouvait contrôler la diffusion ultérieure. Tout en répondant parfaitement à l’image d’une femme que l’historiographie dépeint véhémente, voire tyrannique, cette idée était très familière aux mécènes de la Renaissance et, à vrai dire, de tous les temps, du fait que la rareté est l’un des critères principaux pour estimer la valeur d’une quelconque collection, qu’elle soit d’œuvres d’art ou de livres. D’autre part, si les reproductions des œuvres d’art ne gardaient pas aux yeux des contemporains toute la valeur des originaux, les œuvres littéraires, ainsi que les œuves théâtrales et musicales, possédaient un haut degré de ‘volatilité’, pouvant être copiées à peu de frais et sans porter préjudice à leur valeur intrinsèque. Leur reproduction n’impliquait pas une perte d’aura. -- Pour protéger les trésors de leurs bibliothèques, les seigneurs se montraient jaloux et méfiants : ils prêtaient peu volontiers, et seulement à des amis fiables, auxquels ils demandaient cependant des garanties, parfois même en argent. Le prêt des œuvres était réglé par la loi du do ut des, et l’emprunteur était soumis au serment, implicite ou explicite, de ne pas trahir la confiance du prêteur en divulguant ultérieurement le manuscrit. Selon Luzio et Renier, on pourrait écrire une histoire de la littérature italienne de la période en étudiant les dédicaces offertes à Isabella. Vu la qualité et la quantité des œuvres et des auteurs intéressés par un tel recensement, cela paraît une affirmation bien fondée. Mais outre l’honneur, Isabella semble avoir réclamé un autre genre de prérogatives, plus matériel et à la fois plus indéterminé : le droit de partager avec l’auteur leur gestion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  15thC  16thC  cultural_history  literary_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Italian_lit  Renaissance  court_culture  courtiers  elite_culture  patronage  patrons  authors  playwrights  publishing  publishing-piracy  IP  copyright  property_rights  dedications-author  economics_of_cultural_production  bibliophiles  manuscripts  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lina Bolzoni - Les Asolani de Pietro Bembo, ou le double portrait de l’amour | Italique, IX, 2006, p. 9-27
Italique [En ligne], IX | 2006, mis en ligne le 29 mai 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.103. **--** Les Asolani réalisent en outre une synthèse complexe de traditions et de modèles différents, littéraires et philosophiques, anciens et modernes, latins et en langue vulgaire. Ainsi la tradition du dialogue latin, classique et humaniste, est réécrite en vulgaire et utilisée également comme cadre et comme commentaire à un choix de poésies ; si le cadre narratif renvoie à son tour au Décaméron, le choix de poésies s’inspire de plus en plus du Pétrarque du Canzoniere. Différentes traditions philosophiques – en particulier la réflexion moderne sur l’amour des néoplatoniciens florentins – sont utilisées pour donner une nouvelle dignité théorique à la tradition lyrique en vulgaire et en même temps pour réaliser une difficile réconciliation entre vie et littérature, entre autobiographie et création d’un modèle idéal. La célébrité des asolani n’est pas seulement italienne : une traduction française, par Jean Martin, est publiée à Paris en 1545 et elle sera réimprimée plusieurs fois au cours du XVIe siècle.En outre, il ne faut pas oublier que Bembo est le protagoniste du dernier livre du cortegiano grâce justement à l’autorité dont il jouissait pour avoir écrit les asolani ; la célébrité européenne du cortegiano contribue à amplifier aussi la renommée de notre texte. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Venice  France  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  16thC  Bembo  Petrarch  Dante  Boccaccio  poetry  poetics  prose  style  style-philosophy  elite_culture  Renaissance  courtiers  sprezaturra  love  humanism  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  reception  vernacular  neo-Latin  dialogue  publishing  manners  gentleman  otium  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Brooke Palmieri - The Wild, The Innocent, and The Quaker’s Struggles—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix
Although they were notorious for appearing naked in marketplaces, interrupting sermons, and calling for the overthrow of the church, the Quakers were extraordinarily disciplined about running riot. It made sense for the Quakers to cultivate an exaggerated presence in order to make their voices heard among the clamor of other religious sects formed after English Civil War. But what set them apart was the volume of their printed works. During the early years of their establishment in the 1650s, Quakers published about a pamphlet a week, paid for through a collectively managed fund, and distributed by a network of itinerant preachers known as the “Valiant Sixty.” The Sixty, which were in fact more than sixty people, included George Fox, Margaret -- [collective control of publishing] The Meeting format, which had its origins in collective, mystical experiences of trembling and Quaking in fear of the Lord, and which had formed part of the basis for Quaker survival through terrible persecution, also became a forum for collective skills-sharing in reading, writing, and publication. And in turn, a sense of collective education and advocacy. After all, the subject matter taken up by the Quaker press in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries included a number of incredibly progressive issues: pacifism, gender equality, racial equality, and prison reform. The potential futures imagined by a few seventeenth-century hellraisers have underpinned issues of social justice that still matter today, and may have even helped give rise to them. In other words, when Hell Broke Loose, the outcome wasn’t entirely pandemonium.
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  dissenters  publishing  pamphlets  religious_lit  reform-social  reform-legal  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Togy Mundy re Amazon pricing fight - THE PRICE OF BOOKS, THE VALUE OF CIVILIZATION | Pandaemonium
Was head of Atlantic Books -- What has got cheaper in that period is information, which has been subjected during the digital revolution to massive deflationary forces. It is now wonderfully easy to find things out. Another by-product, however, is that book pricing (and especially e-book pricing) has been enveloped by this economy of information. To price a book in the way information is priced is based on a rather one-eyed view of its value. As any textbook author will tell you, information is undoubtedly part of a book’s utility. But that is only part of the story. A second purpose is to provide readers with transporting experiences, usually from reading fiction, which enable us to glimpse oursevles in ‘the other’. (The French philosopher Paul Ricoeur said of this: ‘As a reader, I find myself only my losing myself’.)The third thing a book does is impart current knowledge. When TS Eliot asked plaintively in The Rock, ‘Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?’, he was reminding us that these two things are not the same. Knowledge comes from the interpretation of information, experience and facts. It comes from the stories we tell about those things. Perhaps it is the capacity to create these stories that make us human. Generally speaking, ‘Experiences’ and ‘Knowledge’ have also increased in price over the years, yet publishers have been very slow to reflect that in the prices of their physical books, especially their paperbacks. (Since 1994, consumer prices in the UK have risen by around 105%, whereas the price of a paperback novel seems to have increased by around 15%.) Publishers have been slower still to argue that books are a different class of object, and that they should not be priced (or perhaps given away) like information.
21stC  cultural_critique  books  publishing  information-markets  information  humanities  social_sciences  fiction  political_economy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
LLOYD BOWEN -- ROYALISM, PRINT, AND THE CLERGY IN BRITAIN, 1639–1640 AND 1642. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 297-319. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
LLOYD BOWEN - University of Cardiff -- Charles I and his clerical supporters are often said to have been wary of print and public discussion, only entering the public sphere reluctantly and to comparatively little effect during the political crisis of 1642. This article challenges such views by focusing on the neglected role of official forms of print such as proclamations, declarations, and state prayers and their promulgation in the nation's churches. It traces the ways in which the king utilized the network of parish clergy to broadcast his message and mobilize support during the Scottish crisis of 1639–40 and again in the ‘paper war’ of 1642. The article argues that traditional forms of printed address retained their potency and influence despite the proliferation of polemical pamphlets and newsbooks. The significance of these mobilizations is demonstrated by the profound disquiet they caused among the king's Covenanter and parliamentarian opponents as well as the ‘good effects’ they had in generating support for the royalist cause. -* I am most grateful to Mark Stoyle, Mark Kishlansky, John Walter, Jacqueline Eales, and the anonymous reviewers for comments on earlier drafts of this article. -- available for download
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Charles_I  propaganda  monarchy  Church_of_England  clergy  parish  politics-and-religion  political_culture  public_opinion  religious_culture  authority  political_order  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  prayers-state  religion-established  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
ALEXIS D. LITVINE, review essay - THE INDUSTRIOUS REVOLUTION, THE INDUSTRIOUSNESS DISCOURSE, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN ECONOMIES (2014) | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 531-570. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
ALEXIS D. LITVINE - Trinity College, Cambridge -- The idea of industriousness has been an ever-recurring issue since Max Weber launched it as a putative explanation of the advent of economic modernity. The notion of ‘industrious revolution’ has provoked a renewed flourishing of publications focusing on this issue. Although most historians agree on the emergence of industriousness in seventeenth-century Europe, there is no consensus regarding the chronology, hence the real causes, of this mental and discursive shift. This article emphasizes the problematic role played by literary evidences in these social and cultural models of diffusion of new consumer values and desires. It then establishes the timing of the emergence of the ‘industriousness discourse’ using an original approach to diffusion based both on the quantitative analysis of very large corpora and a close reading of seventeenth-century economic pamphlets and educational literature. It concludes first that there was not one but several competing discourses on industriousness. It then identifies two crucial hinges which closely match the chronology proposed by Allen and Muldrew, but refutes that championed by de Vries and McCloskey. The industrious revolution as described by these authors would have happened both too late to fit its intellectual roots and too early to signal the beginning of a ‘consumer revolution’. -- * I am extremely grateful to Peter Mandler, Craig Muldrew, participants in the Early Modern Economic and Social History seminar, and two anonymous referees, for their comments on previous versions of this article. I am also indebted to Andrew Hardie, Jean-Baptiste Michel, and Paul Schaffner for allowing me to use their data and to Billy Janitsch, Andreas Vlachos, and Andrew Wilson for technical assistance.
article  paywall  find  historiography  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  economic_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  social_order  consumerism  Industrial_Revolution  industriousness  virtue  discourse  bourgeoisie  modernity-emergence  education  values  publishing  readership  Protestant_Ethic  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Cogswell - John Felton, Popular Political Culture, and the Assassination of the Duke of Buckingham | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 2 (Jun., 2006), pp. 357-385
This article analyses the motivation behind John Felton's assassination of the duke of Buckingham in August 1628. It focuses attention on his family's tortured relationship with the regime, and it highlights Felton's military service in Spain, Ireland, and France. Wounded in the disastrous withdrawal from the Ile de Ré, he returned to London to convalesce, and there he slipped into the metropolitan 'underground' manuscript culture that was saturated with poems and tracts excoriating the duke. Finally he was able to witness the mounting violence in the city in the summer of 1628 that culminated in the murder of the duke's sorcerer, Dr Lamb. Felton's murder of the duke was far from inevitable, but as this article hopes to show, his ability to slot his own personal frustration into the increasingly virulent hostility to the favourite ultimately transformed Felton into the instrument of public retribution. -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  public_opinion  publishing  political_press  popular_politics  underground_culture  Charles_I  Buckingham_1st_Duke  public_disorder  violence  London  City_politics 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
F. P. Lock - The Text of "Gulliver's Travels" | JSTOR: The Modern Language Review, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Jul., 1981), pp. 513-533
Discusses which version should be copy text, Swift's practices of drafting, revisions. Follows his 1980 book, The Politics of Gulliver's Travels -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  18thC  Swift  Gulliver  publishing  British_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Slauter, review essay - History, Literature, and the Atlantic World | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 153-186
Looks at the way historians and literary studies of early America confront each other in methods, interdisciplinary work etc - reviewing extensive number of works from past decade or so. Of interest re methodology for intellectual_history, reception theory, public opinion, publishing, bottom up and top down approaches, etc of potential use for writings by Bolingbroke, Swift and Pope. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  literary_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Atlantic  British_Empire  American_lit  English_lit  literary_theory  literacy  publishing  public_sphere  political_culture  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Linda Kirk, historiographical review - The Matter of Enlightenment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1129-1143
Recent work on the Enlightenment continues to bear out the importance of context in shaping both what is written and how it is read. In the case of the French Revolution, largely thanks to the work of Robert Darnton, studies have come to focus on how, if at all, different layers and styles of dissidence helped to bring down the French monarchy. But not all writing has, or need be suspected of, such an obvious or immediate outcome. This period, for instance, sees the birth of `philosophical' history, as John Pocock and others have made us aware. Here again, contexts and individual experience shape what is studied and written, but it is clear that the project common to the best-selling work of, for instance, Gibbon, Hume and Robertson was to explain how civil society emerged and thrived. This inquiry, and what it says about the separate states and common principles of Europe then and now, is unfinished business; so, too, is determining what historical knowing is, and cannot be. What the eighteenth century undeniably saw, even from the slightly educated, was a growing appetite for understanding and for improvement: these have proved necessary, if not sufficient, conditions for modernity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  historiography  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  historians  public_sphere  publishing  improvement  French_Revolution  Radical_Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Trenchard & Girdon - The Independent Whig, 4 vols. - Online Library of Liberty
Thomas Gordon, The Independent Whig: or, a Defence of Primitive Christianity, And of Our Ecclesiastical Establishment, against The Exorbitant Claims and Encroachments of Fanatical and Disaffected Clergymen. (London: J. Peele, 1743-47). 4 vols. 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2381> Trenchard and Gordon wrote articles for this weekly journal during the period 1720-21 just before they began work on their better known periodical Cato’s Letters which appeared 1720-23. In a total of 53 essays they criticized the power and abuses of the ecclesiastical establishment in Britain. As Trenchard died in 1723, Gordon edited the essays for later publication. The second edition was published in 1741. -- The text is in the public domain. It was scanned and originally put online by Google for non-commercial, educational purposes. We have retained the Google watermark as requested but have added tables of contents, pagination, and other educational aids where appropriate
etexts  18thC  British_politics  1720s  Whigs-opposition  journalism  publishing  public_opinion  theology  Early_Christian  anticlerical  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Pierre Bayle - A Philosophical Commentary on These Words of the Gospel, Luke 14.23, ‘Compel Them to Come In, That My House May Be Full’ - Online Library of Liberty
Pierre Bayle, A Philosophical Commentary on These Words of the Gospel, Luke 14.23, ‘Compel Them to Come In, That My House May Be Full’, edited, with an Introduction by John Kilcullen and Chandran Kukathas (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/163> This edition of the Philosophical Commentary is an amended version of the first English translation, which appeared in London in 1708. The author of the translation, which remains the only complete rendering of the Commentary into English, is unknown. A more recent translation by Amie Godman Tannenbaum was published in 1987, but it omits Part III and the Supplement. We have checked the text of the 1708 translation against the French text and made silent changes to correct omissions, misprints, and mistranslations and to clarify places where change in the meaning of English words would make the translation unintelligible or misleading to the modern reader.2 We have also implemented the corrigenda of the 1708 edition. We have not tried to make the translation more literal; in our judgment it is rather free (in the manner of the time), but substantially very faithful, and lively. We have identified and supplied details for Bayle’s various references and translated passages quoted in foreign languages, unless Bayle himself supplies a translation or paraphrase -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  translation  17thC  Bayle  tolerance  Augustine  Biblical_exegesis  Huguenots  Edict_of_Nantes  1700s  London  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Letter from the Exec Committee for Late-18c English Literature re the Proposed Reorganization | The Long Eighteenth - Seot 2013
Nice overview of developments over past couple of decades in late 18thC and early 19thC English_lit (not just better understanding of diversity of new or shifting genres and identification of important but marginalized authors especially women, but connections with political, imperial changes, intellectual_history including science studies, the phenomenon of sentiment, emergence of new publishing, authorial and critical patterns and personas) -- Here is the very thorough response that last year’s Late Eighteenth-Century Division made to the proposal to reorganize the 18c group and reduce its conference panels. The writers of this letter are making it available to the Long 18th and its readers, so that the 18th century scholarly community can see the efforts they have made to work with the MLA in its ongoing development. It is clear, however, that this letter was not taken into consideration when MLA moved forward with the proposal.
English_lit  18thC  19thC  literary_history  lit_crit  cultural_history  British_history  British_Empire  novels  publishing  public_sphere  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Alan D. Chalmers, review essay - "To Curse the Dean, or Bless the Draper": Recent Scholarship on Swift | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Summer, 2003), pp. 580-585
Reviewed work(s): (1) Jonathan Swift and the Church of Ireland, 1710-1724 by Christopher J. Fauske; *--* (2) Jonathan Swift and the Popular Culture: Myth, Media, and the Man by Ann Cline Kelly; *--* (3) The Skeptical Sublime: Aesthetic Ideology in Pope and the Tory Satirists by James Noggle; *--* (4) Reading Swift:Papers from the Third Münster Symposium on Jonathan Swift by Hermann J. Real; Helgard Stover-Leidig
books  reviews  article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  cultural_history  Swift  Church_of_England  Anglican  Pope  Gay  Arbuthnot  satire  scepticism  heterodoxy  popular_culture  publishing  Grub_Street  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Nineteenth-Century British and American Copyright Law | Victorian Web
Nineteenth-Century British and American Copyright Law Philip V. Allingham, Faculty of Education, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario
19thC  cultural_history  legal_history  British_politics  copyright  Parliament  legislation  publishing  publishing-piracy  US_history  Australia  Canada  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Lincoln - The Culture of War and Civil Society in the Reigns of William III and Anne | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (SUMMER 2011), pp. 455-474
The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it. -- huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  English_lit  poetry  sermons  politeness  reformation_of_manners  militarism  William_III  Marlborough  heroes  Providence  religious_culture  elite_culture  Elias_Norbert  Addison  publishing  public_sphere  civil_society  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Brody Miller - "Proper Subjects for Public Inquiry": The First Unitarian Controversy and the Transformation of Federalist Print Culture | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 101-135
Lots of primary and secondary references - continues debate against seeing Jeffersonians as innovative in using press to expand public sphere and speak for common man but Federakists as reactive and manipulative for similar activity that in fact did more for wider public participation and voice -- episode also sets pattern for triumph of non-sectarian, Trinitarian, evangelical, bible and tract version of Christianity as public sphere religion -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  religious_history  public_sphere  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  New_England  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  civic_virtue  public_opinion  political_participation  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  republicanism  publishing  deference  consensus  anti-Trinitarian  Unitarian  Calvinist  Evangelical  religion-established  clergy  education-higher  Federalist  Jeffersonians  political_press  community  elites  elite_culture  cultural_critique  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Lawrence E. Klein - Anthony Ashley Cooper, Third Earl of Shaftesbury, Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times by Philip Ayres | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 529-537
Discussion of differences among Klein’s Cambridge 1 volume student edition, Ayres 2 volume Oxford critical edition (looks great as a critical) and Liberty Fund's 3 volume (I have) -- references to recent works on 18thC culture and intellectual history that has considerable attention to Shaftesbury, including importance of rhetoric, history of book and reader reception, and issues like masculinity. --didn't download
article  jstor  books  reviews  bookshelf  cultural_history  literary_history  intellectual_history  18thC  Shaftesbury  moral_philosophy  rhetoric  images  publishing  readership  reader_response  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert D. Hume - The Economics of Culture in London, 1660–1740 JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 69, No. 4 (December 2006), pp. 487-533
Robert D. Hume asks four principal questions in this article: (1) Who were the consumers of elite culture, and what could and would they pay? (2) What could be earned by writers, actors, singers, musicians, painters? (3) Who actually profited from the sale of culture? (4) How did patronage affect the production of culture? A survey of surviving figures for income strata and the prices paid by buyers suggests that the consumers of elite culture belonged largely to the wealthiest two percent of the population. Analysis of incomes shows that trying to earn a living as a writer, actor, or musician was a tough proposition. Patronage turns out to be surprisingly important, but more in terms of jobs, sinecures, and subscriptions than from individual largesse. Exact equivalencies to modern buying power are impossible to calculate, but scholars need to realize, for example, that in 1709 fully two-thirds of the books advertised in the Term Catalogues cost two shillings or less: a five-shilling book was pricey.
article  jstor  cultural_history  social_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  elite_culture  court_culture  theater  publishing  actors  authors  patronage  patrons  prices  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Ian Jackson - Approaches to the History of Readers and Reading in 18thC Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 47, No. 4 (Dec., 2004), pp. 1041-1054
The history of reading can link intellectual and cultural developments with social or political change in the eighteenth century. Historians of the book increasingly argue that an understanding of historical reading practices is essential if we are to understand the impact of texts on individuals and on society as a whole: textual evidence alone is inadequate. Recent work on eighteenth-century readers has used sources including book trade records, correspondence, and diaries to reconstruct the reading lives of individuals and of groups of readers. Such sources reveal the great variety of reading material many eighteenth-century readers could access, and the diversity and sophistication of reading practices they often employed, in selecting between a range of available reading strategies. Thus, any one theoretical paradigm is unlikely to capture the full range of eighteenth-century reading experience. Instead, we can trace the evolution of particular reading cultures, including popular and literary reading cultures, the existence of cultures based around particular genres of print, such as newspapers, and reading as a part of social and conversational life. There is now a need for a new synthesis that combines the new evidence of reading practice with textual analysis to explain continuity and change across the century. -- didn't download
article  jstor  cultural_history  intellectual_history  social_history  political_history  historical_change  historiography  reading  reader_response  publishing  readership  18thC  British_history  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Miscellaneous Methods: Authors, Societies and Journals in Early Modern England | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 159-186
Historians of science have long acknowledged the important role that journals play in the scientific enterprise. They both secure the shared values of a scientific community and certify what that community takes to be licensed knowledge. The advent of the first learned periodicals in the mid-seventeenth century was therefore a major event. But why did this event happen when it did, and how was the permanence of the learned journal secured? This paper reveals some of the answers. It examines the shifting fortunes of one of the earliest of natural-philosophical periodicals, the "Philosophical Transactions," launched in London in 1665 by Henry Oldenburg. The paper shows how fraught the enterprise of journal publishing was in the Europe of that period, and, not least, it draws attention to a number of publications that arose out of the commercial realm of the Restoration to rival (or parody) Oldenburg's now famous creation. By doing so it helps restore to view the hard work that underpinned the republic of letters. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  journals-academic  publishing  satire-and-science  professionalization  academies  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
David Randall, review essay - Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 67, No. 3 (September 2004), pp. 457-472
In “Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera,” David Randall reviews several monographs and essays concerning aspects of print culture in early modern Britain. These include (1) Paul J. Voss, Elizabethan News Pamphlets: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marlowe, and the Birth of Journalism (Pittsburgh, 2001); (2) three essays by Sabrina Baron, Michael Mendle, and Daniel Woolf in Brendan Dooley and Sabrina Baron, eds., The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe (London and New York, 2001); (3) Jason Peacey, Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum (Aldershot, U.K., 2004); and (4) Joad Raymond, Pamphlets and Pamphleteering in Early Modern Britain (Cambridge, 2003). As the review shows, scholars of ephemeral print culture disagree as to just why this material should be studied, and they have come up with different reasons, asked different questions, and therefore developed very different ways of organizing and interpreting printed ephemera. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  16thC  17thC  British_history  English_lit  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  political_culture  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Shakespeare  Elizabethan  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kate Loveman, review essay - Political Information in the Seventeenth Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 555-565
(1) Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England by Kevin Sharpe; Steven N. Zwicker; (2) The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe by Brendan Dooley; Sabrina A. Baron; (3) Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State by Andrew McRae; (4) The Writing of Royalism, 1628-1660 by Robert Wilcher; (5) Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum by Jason Peacey; (6)The Ingenious Mr. Henry Care, Restoration Publicist by Lois G. Schwoerer -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  censorship  reader_response  readership  reading  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  English_lit  satire  pamphlets  Grub_Street  history_of_book  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Catherine M. S. Alexander, review essay - Re-viewing Shakespeare in the Long Eighteenth Century | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 3 (Spring, 2008), pp. 426-429
Review of (1) Marketing the Bard: Shakespeare in Performance and Print 1660-1740 by Don-John Dugas; (2) Painting Shakespeare: The Artist as Critic, 1720-1820 by Stuart Sillars -- She was underwhelmed by the style and production of Marketing, and it seems heavy on quantitative measures, but looks useful in tracking changes in producing and consuming Shakespeare texts and performances that looks at commercial rather than political factors, as have recent studies. His commercial angle re publishing looks useful for Pope’s edition vs eg Rowe in c 1709 and competitors to Pope's edition. She thinks he does a lot with the staging in the 17thC by Davenant and Killigrew. "Painting Shakespeare" gets high marks for intelligent reading of the visual effects of artists from Hogarth to Fusilli, standalone paintings, narrative print series and illustrations in published texts from early 18thC to early19thC.
books  reviews  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  British_history  English_lit  theater  publishing  readership  audience  Pope  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Allison Muri - The Grub Street Project: The Dunciad as Heterotopia and "Social Text"
Web page illustrates how texts with related themes, echos, allusions create an intertextual social reading - further extended with illustrations from the works, maps and other contemporary publications -- includes Fleet Street as "sable stream" 1st in Garth, picked up by Gay in Trivia and later by Pope in the Dunciad, and earlier descriptions of Fleet Street from eg Ned Ward scatological and salacious anecdote. Similar elaboration of Dunciad's Bridewell including Hogarth Rake's Progress.

If we imagine a particular digital edition within this edition of London, we can imagine another way of mapping space to books, that is, visualizing the materiality of the city alongside its imagined literary topographies, as a heterotopia (as first described by Foucault and first posited in terms of The Dunciad by Brean Hammond in "The Dunciad and the City: Pope and Heterotopia") or as social text (as described by McGann).
18thC  British_history  London  cultural_history  maps  poetry  English_lit  Gay  Pope  Dunciad  Hogarth  publishing  prints  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Allison Muri - The Grub Street Project :: Owls, Print Culture, and Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century Britain: the Iconography of Grub Street
Page of reproductions from 18thC maps and editions of the Dunciad -- Grub Street Project takes its name both from the street in London that became part of Milton Street in 1830 (figure 1) and from the derogatory term for a rising breed of hack writers scribbling away in a marketplace greedy for the latest news, politics, scandals, novels, and commentaries. Once home to the printers Bernard Alsop, Thomas Fawcett, and John Clowes, the historical Grub Street represents a particular moment in print culture and in the city's topography. Figuratively, Grubstreet has no particular topography or temporality: it is a fog of dulness inhabited by owls and dunces. In this sense, the term characterizes the tension between the idealized classical city and culture of the Augustans, with London imagined as a new Athens or Augustan Rome (figure 2) or print culture itself as an idealized purveyor of knowledge and wisdom bestowed upon Europe by Athena (figure 3), and the inversion of all such principles in a world of ill-educated literary hacks and unscrupulous money-grubbing printers (figure 4). Accordingly, it signifies for this project both a qualitatively defined cultural space both "high" and "low," and a measurable and computable topographical one.

The owl, both Athenian and Grub-streetian, represents an aspect of London as heterotopia (see also "Graphs, Maps, and Digital Topographies: Visualizing The Dunciad as Heterotopia," Lumen 30 (2011)). The Grub-street owl appeared repeatedly in Pope's Dunciad (figures 5-9), and represents both the dunces of Augustan London and, indirectly, the ideals that have supposedly been superseded by the "taste of the rabble."
18thC  British_history  cultural_history  publishing  Pope  Dunciad  iconography  digital_humanities  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Mason - Literary Advertising and the Shaping of British Romanticism - Project MUSE books
Literary Advertising and the Shaping of British Romanticism investigates the entwined histories of the advertising industry and the gradual commodification of literature over the course of the Romantic Century (1750–1850). In this well-written and detailed study, Nicholas Mason argues that the seemingly antagonistic arenas of marketing and literature share a common genealogy and, in many instances, even a symbiotic relationship. Drawing from archival materials such as publisher account books, merchant trade cards, and author letters, Mason traces the beginnings of many modern advertising methods—including product placement, limited-time offers, and journalistic puffery—to the British book trade during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Until now, Romantic scholars have not fully recognized advertising’s cultural significance or the importance of this period in the origins of modern advertising. Mason explores Lord Byron’s appropriation of branding, Letitia Elizabeth Landon’s experiments in visual marketing, and late-Romantic debates over advertising's claim to be a new branch of the literary arts. Mason uses the antics of Romantic-era advertising to illustrate the profound implications of commercial modernity, both in economic practices governing the book trade and, more broadly, in the development of the modern idea of literature.
books  18thC  19thC  English_lit  publishing  advertising  commercialization  Romanticism  literary_history  magazines 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Urmi Bhowmik: Facts and Norms in the Marketplace of Print: John Dunton's Athenian Mercury (2003)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 36, No. 3 (Spring, 2003), pp. 345-365 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay discusses the division of knowledge within the context of a popular periodical, the Athenian Mercury (1691-1697). The separation of fields of knowledge in the Enlightenment was merely the prelude to the attempt to establish disciplines on a common basis. I trace a similar process in the Mercury', which treated questions about natural science and moral dilemmas as if they shared an analogous structure—of particular instantiations of universal laws. I argue that this identification of facts and norms constituted the public subject simultaneously as subject to the law and the authority before which the law must legitimate itself.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  17thC  1690s  publishing  Dunston  public_sphere  sociology_of_knowledge  disciplines  natural_law  natural_philosophy  moral_philosophy  norms  facts  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Bernhard Fabian - THE RECEPTION OF BRITISH WRITERS ON THE CONTINENT: PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS (2007)
JSTOR: Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies (HJEAS), Vol. 13, No. 1/2 (Spring-Fall, 2007), pp. 7-21 - nice essay on issues of theory and method studying what used to be "comparative literature" - now reception theory (suggests what got picked up in different countries at various times had much to do with which particular English work or author or genre filled a gap that may not have even been noticed until someone came in contact with a bit of English culture or an English work), history and sociology of the book, history of translation, channels of cultural influence, "representations" of England or part of English culture (eg Voltaire's Lettres)
article  jstor  English_lit  literary_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  France  Germany  Eastern_Europe  publishing  translation  history_of_book  reading  readership  reception  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Mary Waters, review: April London, Literary History Writing, 1770–1820 | Eighteenth-Century Studies (2011)
Project MUSE -- downloaded pdf to Note -- London rejects the widely held notion that literary history writing was relatively homogenous in form and that literary historians have concerned themselves primarily with constructing a transcendent literary canon. Rather, she argues that, originating in opposition to such hegemonic efforts as Samuel Johnson’s Lives of the Poets, early instances of literary history take an array of forms, including biography, autobiography, memoir, antiquarianism, bibliography, specimens, anecdotes, and “secret history” (5). This variety accommodated a diverse readership much broader than the traditional reading audiences among the learned classes while allowing literary historians to embed into discussions of Britain’s literary past implicit or even overt stances on the nation’s political culture...... The book’s entire third section, “Isaac D’Israeli and Literary History,” reads D’Israeli’s forty-year literary career as engaging questions of historiographic method and text reception from a vantage point of progressive political disillusionment. Its two chapters show that D’Israeli’s emphasis on opinion and anecdotal material undermines classical historiographic methods and brings questions about evidence and the grounds of knowledge into the construction of literary history. Initially espousing a belief that intellectual change precedes social change, D’Israeli reveals in his late career greater consciousness of limits on the remediating power of literary history and a solemn prognosis for the future reputations of socially marginalized writers like him.
books  reviews  literary_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  biography-writing  anecdotes  lit_crit  literary_journals  popular_culture  high_culture  readership  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Trevor Ross: Copyright and the Invention of Tradition (1992)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 26, No. 1 (Autumn, 1992), pp. 1-27 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- limits on perpetual copyright of 1710 upheld in1774 -- creation of defined property rights simultaneously creates the public domain -- by 1774 a notion that English culture involved a tradition that belonged to everyone -- bibliography on 2ndry sources that have tracked the legal details and booksellers practices, cartel etc
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  canon  cultural_history  legal_history  18thC  1710s  laws  litigation  intellectual_property  publishing  consumers  reading  creativity  authors  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
David Hopkins: Dryden and the Garth-Tonson Metamorphoses (1988)
JSTOR: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 39, No. 153 (Feb., 1988), pp. 64-74 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  literary_history  17thC  18thC  1690s  1710s  Dryden  Pope  Addison  publishing  imitation  translation  poetry  Ovid  networks-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Randy Robertson: Swift's "Leviathan" and the End of Licensing (2005)
JSTOR: Pacific Coast Philology, Vol. 40, No. 2 (2005), pp. 38-55 -- a close reading of Tale of the Tub as a Hobbesian attack on pernicious political and religious controversialist press in wake of lapse of Licensing Act -- in lieu of censorship, shut down Grub Street with ridicule -- lots of references to evolution of law on freedom of the press, libel etc and history of the book
article  jstor  literary_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  publishing  public_sphere  political_press  politics-and-literature  religious_lit  censorship  free_speech  17thC  1690s  Swift  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Donald S. Lutz: The Relative Influence of European Writers on Late Eighteenth-Century American Political Thought (1984)
JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 78, No. 1 (Mar., 1984), pp. 189-197 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Drawing upon a comprehensive list of political writings by Americans published between 1760 and 1805, the study uses a citation count drawn from these 916 items as a surrogate measure of the relative influence of European writers upon American political thought during the era. Contrary to the general tendencies in the recent literature, the results here indicate that there was no one European writer, or one tradition of writers, that dominated American political thought. There is evidence for moving beyond the Whig-Enlightenment dichotomy as the basis for textual analysis, and for expanding the set of individual European authors considered to have had an important effect on American thinking. Montesquieu, Blackstone, and Hume are most in need of upgrading in this regard. The patterns of influence apparently varied over the time period from 1760 to 1805, and future research on the relative influence of European thinkers must be more sensitive to this possibility.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  US_history  Founders  US_constitution  political_culture  reading  publishing  Whigs  Montesquieu  Blackstone  Locke  Cato's_Letters  Hume  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Mark G. Spencer - Locke and Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy: Recent Tools and Resources (2001)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 34, No. 4 (Summer, 2001), pp. 642-645 -- Works reviewed: --**-- The Reception of Locke's Politics: From the 1690s to the 1830s, by Mark Goldie ** vol. 1, The Glorious Revolution Defended, 1690-1704;  ** vol. 2, Patriarchalism, the Social Contract and Civic Virtue, 1705-1760; ** , vol. 3, The Age of the American Revolution, 1760-1780 ; ** vol. 4, Political Reform in the Age of the French Revolution, 1780-1838; ** vol. 5, Church, Dissent and Religious Toleration, 1689-1773; ** vol. 6, Wealth, Property and Commerce, 1696-1832;  --**-- John Locke: A Descriptive Bibliography by Jean S. Yolton; --**  The Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century British Philosophers by John W. Yolton, John Valdimir Price, John Stephens
books  reviews  jstor  reference  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Locke  reading  audience  publishing  reception  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
René Pomeau: Introduction to articles from a roundtable on Voltaire's Dictionnaire Philosophique (1995)
JSTOR: Revue d'Histoire littéraire de la France, 95e Année, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1995), pp. 147-150 -- Introduction to articles from a roundtable on Voltaire's Dictionnaire Philosophique
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Voltaire  Biblical_criticism  satire  natural_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  anticlerical  publishing  philosophes  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Dániel Margócsy - Encyclopedias, the Exchange of Curiosities, and Practices of Identification before Linnaeus (2010)
Project MUSE - Dániel Margócsy. ""Refer to folio and number": Encyclopedias, the Exchange of Curiosities, and Practices of Identification before Linnaeus." Journal of the History of Ideas 71.1 (2010): 63-89. Project MUSE. Web. 28 Aug. 2013. <http://muse.jhu.edu/>...... Available as html and pdf...... The Swiss natural historian Johann Amman came to Russia in 1733 to take a position as professor of botany and natural history at the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences. As part of the job, he corresponded, and exchanged plant specimens, with the English merchant collector Peter Collinson in London, and the Swedish scholar Carolus Linnaeus, among others. After briefly reviewing Amman's correspondence with these scholars and the growing commerce in exotic specimens of natural history, I explore how encyclopedias came to facilitate the exchange of zoological specimens in particular. I argue that, during the seventeenth century, a new genre of zoological encyclopedias appeared on the scene whose design was particularly well-suited for the purposes of identification, a key practice in long-distance exchanges.

?....-- Of interest on several counts. 1) classification and taxonomy process extending Foucault observation re shift from Renaissance representation to Enlightenment classification - not just driven by demands for new forms of intelligibility, but parallel to what happening in commerce, need to support communications needed for ling distance exchange. 2) stages leading to Linnaeus. 3) encyclopedia phenomenon more generally as Republic of Letters expands geographically and in membership and becomes increasingly specialized. How new types of authority asserted, contested and accepted. Also suggestive re how garden, herb, exotic specimens ID'd, info circulated internationally - Bolingbroke's grandmother, Trumbull letter, Pope's gardening.
article  Project_MUSE  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  biology  species  natural_history  publishing  commerce  Republic_of_Letters  Scientific_Revolution  gardens  Foucault  Linnaeus  Bolingbroke  Pope  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard B. Sher (excerpt):The Enlightenment and the Book: Scottish Authors and Their Publishers in Eighteenth-Century Britain, Ireland, and America | U Chicago Press
Reviews: " 'The Enlightenment and the Book' is the missing link in the history of publishing. It connects the traditions of Britain and America and explains how the people and practices of the book trade shaped the very culture of intellectual tolerance that defined the Enlightenment. This is a remarkable achievement of social and intellectual history that will become a classic." —Barbara M. Benedict, author of Curiosity: A Cultural History of Early Modern Inquiry ----- “This is a pioneering work that constitutes a really important contribution to book history and Enlightenment studies.”—Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, University of Michigan
books  18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  publishing  public_sphere  Britain  US_history  Ireland  Scotland  intellectual_history  cultural_history  tolerance  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert D. Hume: The Economics of Culture in London, 1660–1740 (2006)
JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 69, No. 4 (December 2006), pp. 487-533.....
Robert D. Hume asks four principal questions in this article: (1) Who were the consumers of elite culture, and what could and would they pay? (2) What could be earned by writers, actors, singers, musicians, painters? (3) Who actually profited from the sale of culture? (4) How did patronage affect the production ofculture? A survey of surviving figures for income strata and the prices paid by buyers suggests that the consumers of elite culture belonged largely to the wealthiest two percent of the population. Analysis of incomes shows that trying to earn a living as a writer, actor, or musician was a tough proposition. Patronage turns out to be surprisingly important, but more in terms of jobs, sinecures, and subscriptions than from individual largesse. Exact equivalencies to modern buying power are impossible to calculate, but scholars need to realize, for example, that in 1709 fully two-thirds of the books advertised in the Term Catalogues cost two shillings or less: a five-shilling book was pricey.

Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  Britain  London  cultural_history  English_lit  theater  patronage  publishing  elites  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Stephen H Gregg: Defoe and Descartes’ beast-machine: a brief bibliography | The Daniel Defoe Blog
Recently, I became rather obsessed with two small pieces in Defoe’s Review of March 27th, 1705 and the ‘Supplement of January 1705’ (published after March). They debate the extent to which dogs can reason. Researching the contexts for this involved a deep dive into the complex history of the debate about reasoning animals, the animal soul, and Descartes’ ‘beast-machine’ as outlined in his Discourse on Method. The debate spun across religious, philosophical, classical, literary, journalistic and scientific writings for over a century after. But I particularly needed to map out the writings published in the years immediately before Defoe’s 1705 piece.[1] The results revealed a gratifying surge in the English debate from around 1690.
Britain  17thC  18thC  1690s  1700s  cultural_history  intellectual_history  Defoe  Descartes  metaphysics  theology  publishing  public_sphere  bibliography  soul  reason  human_nature  animals  Bolingbroke  EF-add  Montaigne  Lucretius  Locke 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
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