dunnettreader + public_sphere   93

Dmitri N. Shalin - Critical Theory and theh Pragmatist Challenge (1992) | American Journal of Sociology
AJS Volume 98 Number 2 (September 1992): 237-79 -- Habermas's theory breaks with the Continental tradition that has denigrated pragmatism as an Anglo-Saxon philosophy subservient to technocratic capitalism. While Habermas deftly uses pragmatist insights into communicative rationality and democratic ethos, he shows little sensitivity to other facets of pragmatism. This article argues that incorporating the pragmatist perspective on experience and indeterminacy brings a corrective to the emancipatory agenda championed by critical theorists. The pragmatist alternative to the theory of communicative action is presented, with the discussion centering around the following themes: disembodied reason versus embodied reasonableness, determinate being versus indeterminate reality, discursive truth versus pragmatic certainty, rational consensus versus reasonable dissent, transcendental democracy versus democratic transcendence, and rational society versus sane community. -- downloaded via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
article  downloaded  social_theory  political_philosophy  critical_theory  pragmatism  Habermas  Peirce  James_William  Dewey  democracy  community  public_sphere  public_reason  rationality  experience  indeterminacy  dissent  consensus  public_opinion  cultural_critique  change-social 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Codruţa Cuceu, Milestones in the Critique of the Public Sphere: Dewey and Arendt (2011) - PhilPapers
Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):99-110 (2011) -- This paper proposes a turnover to the theories which have fostered the 20th Century discourse upon the public sphere. By depicting the way in which the structural transformations suffered by the public sphere within the framework of modernity have been theorized by the pre-Habermasian discourse upon the public sphere, the present work aims at revealing the similarities as well as the differences between John Dewey‟s approach of the public sphere and Hannah Arendt‟s theory of the political realm. Although Arendt was not so much influenced by pragmatism, their theories share a normative dimension according to which the public sphere is structured in order to achieve certain functions, which were disrupted in modernity. Therefore Dewey‟s eclipse of the public, through the multiplication of its content, corresponds to Arendt‟s decay of the public realm through the rise of the social. -- Keywords Arendt Dewey modernity decay public sphere plurality political sphere
Categories: Political Theory in Social and Political Philosophy
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
article  republicanism  Dewey  social_theory  modernity  political_philosophy  public_opinion  political_culture  Arendt  civic_virtue  democracy  downloaded  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  political_participation  Habermas  public_sphere 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Adil Alkenzawi - Palais-Royal (1624-1986) | Appareil 2008
Summary of thesis « L’architecture comme origine, destination et support d’inscription pour la peinture et la sculpture, le Double Plateau de Buren ». -- La nouveauté et l’originalité du Palais-Royal, dont le Double Plateau de Buren (1985-86) prolonge la fraîcheur et le trait générateur, sont dues à la singularité de son organisation. La genèse du Palais-Royal révèle l’invention d’un mode d’organisation urbaine particulier qu’est le “passage urbain” (W. Benjamin et J.-L. Déotte) appréhendable comme l’invention d’un appareil urbain. Le Palais-Royal est l’expression d’un projet urbain ouvert, continu et inachevé. Il invente un support d’écriture urbaine : le plateau ; lequel en intégrant les plateaux-terrasses de la Seine (schéma n° 1), crée un “lieu-monde” organisé autour d’un jardin habité, un parc des sculptures. Notre analyse des phases de formation du Palais-Royal de J.Lemercier à D.Buren, montre l’ampleur urbaine du Palais et la particularité de son mode d’édification et d’organisation… -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
urban_spaces  lifestyle  article  photos  gardens  movement_patterns  Paris  public_sphere  aesthetics  urban_elites  public_spaces  urbanization  17thC  downloaded  architecture  20thC  France 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Christian Ruby - Le « public » contre le « peuple » : une structure de la modernité (2005) - Cairn.info
Plan de l'article

Philosophie et « public », de nos jours
La constitution moderne de l’opposition « public »/« peuple »
Le statut historique de « public »
La formation et l’agencement des publics
L’importance actuelle de cette référence au « public »
La déprise nécessaire
Pour citer cet article

Ruby Christian, « Le « public » contre le « peuple » : une structure de la modernité. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 89-104
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-89.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0089.
article  public_sphere  public_opinion  representative_institutions  masses-fear_of  political_participation  democracy  media  citizens  parties-transmission_belts  civic_virtue  Habermas  downloaded  interest_groups  consumerism  political_culture  general_will  political_press  solidarity  Dewey  citizenship  political_philosophy  legitimacy  rhetoric-political  modernity  republicanism  mass_culture 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Duvoux - Les grammaires de la modernité. Notices bibliographiques autour de trois débats essentiels (2005) - Cairn.info
Plan de l'article
Une clarification sémantique préalable
I - La querelle de la sécularisation et l’interprétation de la modernité
II - Malaise dans la civilisation post-moderne
III - La modernité sortie de la modernité ?
Duvoux Nicolas, « Les grammaires de la modernité. Notices bibliographiques autour de trois débats essentiels», Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 135-152
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-135.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0135.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
multiculturalism  modernity  psychoanalysis  poststructuralist  social_capital  structuralism  cultural_critique  relativism  modernity-emergence  intellectual_history  identity  French_Enlightenment  constructivism  political_philosophy  subjectivity  alienation  agency-structure  bibliography  social_sciences-post-WWII  classes  community  change-social  phenomenology  mass_culture  popular_culture  secularization  communication  anti-modernity  article  Counter-Enlightenment  downloaded  ideology  Habermas  modernization  mobility  public_sphere  French_intellectuals  political_science  psychology  social_theory  consumerism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Scott Sowerby, review - Brian Cowan, The State Trial of Doctor Henry Sacheverell | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. August, 2014.
Cowan’s erudite edition of primary sources charts contemporary reactions to the Sacheverell trial. Cowan sees the trial as an instance of the personalization of political ideas, as long-standing debates about church and state became “focused on one figure—Sacheverell, who could now be cast as either a hero or a scoundrel, depending upon one’s politics” (p. 15, emphasis in original). Unlike so many studies of print culture that focus on production, this volume is attuned to reception, with reproductions of commonplace books and marginalia that alternately endorsed and disputed the standard printed accounts of the trial. Cowan’s edition assembles sources from eleven libraries on two continents. Most of his selections are from unpublished manuscripts; five are from publications so rare that they are found in only one repository. The footnotes alone are worth the price of admission, providing a blow-by-blow account of the trial for the uninitiated. The volume is splendidly illustrated, with photographs of manuscripts, satirical prints, engravings of Sacheverell’s portrait, and depictions of the courtroom. The extended introduction surveys the history of printed transcripts of the trial, from Jacob Tonson’s official record to competing accounts by Tory and Whig authors. A helpful timeline and a comprehensive biographical guide round out the edition.
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Sacheverell  1710s  1720s  parties  Tories  Whig_Junto  Whigs  Church_of_England  tolerance  comprehension-church  Protestant_International  church-in-danger  Queen_Anne  impeachment  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  Revolution_Principles  Walpole  print_culture  reception  Tonson  rhetoric-political  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church-and-State  manuscripts  primary_sources 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - Religious freedom between truth and tactic « The Immanent Frame - March 2012
In the last issue of First Things, a self-described coalition of “Catholics and Evangelicals together” defends religious freedom. The coalition includes a number of notable Americans, like Charles Colson and George Weigel, with endorsements from the archbishops of Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia, along with many others. According to the statement, the situation is unexpectedly urgent. After the fall of the Soviet Union, “throughout the world, a new era of religious freedom seemed at hand.” But, now it is blatantly clear that the scourge of intolerance—especially secularist intolerance—persists. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  2010s  religious_culture  freedom_of_conscience  Catholics-and-politics  Evangelical  culture_wars  persecution  Vatican_II  Papacy  Protestants  Religious_Right  public_sphere  public_opinion  public_policy  Tocqueville  politics-and-religion  Christian_Right  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  secularism  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
New Books intetview - Tabetha Ewing, "Rumor, Diplomacy, and War in Enlightenment Paris" (2014)
Tabetha Ewing's Rumor, Diplomacy and War in Enlightenment Paris (Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment, 2014) is all about the on dit, the word on the street that everyday Parisians might have picked up, and/or spread around town in the 1740s. Focused on rumor during the War of Austrian Succession that lasted from 1740-1748, Ewing's is a book that examines a range of urban voices and opinions across a pivotal decade of the Enlightenment. Taking very seriously the landscapes of gossip and fantasy, Rumor, Diplomacy, and War is intriguing in its subject matter and its methodology. Interested in the circulation of speech and ideas, Ewing tracks a variety of bruits–open and clandestine media, royal efforts to release and police information about matters of state and military conflict, and oral and written forms of communication. All this, with the aim of exploring a distinctively early-modern brand of political participation, and an "inchoate citizenship" that existed in the decades before the French Revolution. Questions of national identity, loyalty to the regime (or not), and political expression/representation were in the air during these years of war and Enlightenment. Ewing's is a book that shows us how much historians can hear if we listen carefully.
books  interview  audio  18thC  French_Enlightenment  French_politics  French_foreign_policy  military_history  political_culture  War_of_Austrian_Succession  public_opinion  diplomatic_history  publishing-clandestine  national_ID  national_interest  legitimacy  1740s  Louis_XV  political_press  political_participation  citizenship  representative_institutions  free_speech  public_sphere 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
What Jane Saw - Prof. Janine Barchas, U of Texas-Austin, Department of English
Representation of exhibition rooms at the British Institution in Pall Mall, London, which was the Shakespeare Museum (not done yet) in 1796 and in 1813 a retrospective of the works of Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792). Many details of the exhibit can be reconstructed from the original 1813 "Catalogue of Pictures," a one-shilling pamphlet purchased by visitors as a guide through the 3 large rooms where hung 141 paintings by Reynolds. Armed with surviving copies of this pamphlet, narrative accounts in nineteenth-century newspapers and books, and precise architectural measurements of the British Institution's exhibit space, this website reconstructs the Reynolds show. Even if Jane Austen had not attended this public exhibit, it would still be well worth reconstructing. The British Institution's show was a star-studded "first" of great magnitude for the art community and a turning point in the history of modern exhibit practices. (...) the first commemorative exhibition devoted to a single artist ever staged by an institution. Although Reynolds, ...did not yet qualify as an Old Master, he was already hailed as the founder of the British School and celebrated as a model for contemporary artists to emulate. The preface to the exhibit catalogue, written by Richard Payne Knight, treats the work of Reynolds as a national treasure in order "to call attention generally to British, in preference to Foreign Art". Knight allows that some of Reynolds' paintings are better than others, likening the show to a pedagogical tool for artists and connoisseurs. He also insists upon the show's modernity, hailing "the genuine excellence of modern" artists over the work of their forbearers. In light of the coverage it received in the popular press and the London crowds that attended, the British Institution's Reynolds exhibit presaged the modern museum blockbuster.
website  18thC  19thC  British_history  art_history  public_sphere  culture_industries  exhibition  London  cultural_history  elite_culture  portraits  Reynolds  Regency-British  Austen 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
The Evolution of Phylogenetic Systematics - Edited by Andrew Hamilton - E-Book - University of California Press
.. aims to make sense of the rise of phylogenetic systematics—its methods, its objects of study, and its theoretical foundations—with contributions from historians, philosophers, and biologists. (...) an intellectual agenda for the study of systematics and taxonomy in a way that connects classification with larger historical themes in the biological sciences, including morphology, experimental and observational approaches, evolution, biogeography, debates over form and function, character transformation, development, and biodiversity. It aims to provide frameworks for answering the question: how did systematics become phylogenetic? -- the 1st Chapter excerpt is a fabulous history of "waves" of new species identification of primarily mammals tied to intellectual, social, economic, cultural and geopolitical history -- his case study is the shift to N American museums organizing large numbers of surveys collecting many samples that gave data on varieties within same species, varying ecologies, etc in the "inner frontiers" in the late19thC and early 20thC -- possible due to "the logic of capital" (railroads penetrating regions to foreclose competition, land speculators), curators leaving the city to obtain materials for the fashion in diaoramas, patronage newly attracted, white collar middle class embracing self-improvement via nature study on holiday, new conservationist attitudes toward Nature etc.
books  kindle-available  biology  taxonomies  species  natural_history  evolutionary_biology  phylogenetics  history_of_science  18thC  19thC  20thC  public_sphere  science-public  cultural_history  cultural_change  material_culture  frontier  leisure  exploration  colonialism  imperialism  museums  collections  virtuosos  scientific_culture  nature  nature-mastery  conservation  self-development 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jean-Claude Monod , review essay - Habermas et la dialectique de la sécularisation | La Vie des idées - 8 décembre 2008
Jürgen Habermas, Entre naturalisme et religion. Les défis de la démocratie, traduit de l’allemand par Christian Bouchindhomme et Alexandre Dupeyrix, Paris, Gallimard, 2008, 380 p. 22, 50€. -- Et si la raison, comme le montre aujourd’hui la logique marchande, était finalement bien plus capable de calculer des moyens que de poser des fins ? Le dernier recueil de Jürgen Habermas, le chantre de la raison communicationnelle, témoigne d’un surprenant revirement vers la religion et le registre compassionnel. -- Mots-clés : communication | religion | raison | sécularisation
books  reviews  political_philosophy  social_theory  secularization  post-secular  post-Cold_War  cultural_critique  political_culture  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  values  communication  rationality  empathy  religious_culture  epistemology  epistemology-naturalism  epistemology-moral  means-justify-ends  dialectic-historical  dialogue  public_sphere  public_goods  community  legitimacy  reason  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Interview with Seyla Benhabib - On the Public Sphere, Deliberation, Journalism and Dignity | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 4 August 2008
Yale philosopher Seyla Benhabib interviewed by Karin Wahl-Jorgensen Seyla --“We are facing a generation who is getting all its information online. The consequence is that one’s points of reference are so multiple that they may not intersect and a common world may not emerge. But fragmentation can also bring effervescence - says Seyla Benhabib, philosopher and Professor of political science and philosophy at Yale. - One medium that is in great crisis is television. I would like to see a citizens’ forum, rather than these continuously self-referential talking heads and so-called experts. We extend the boundaries of our sympathy by understanding the conditions of others who may be radically different than us – she concludes – At its best journalism does this; it extends your vision of the world by making you see the world through the eyes of the others.” -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  Internet  information-intermediaries  information-markets  media  public_sphere  Habermas  public_opinion  empathy  citizenship  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jürgen Habermas interviewed by Markus Schwering - Essays: Internet and Public Sphere What the Web Can't Do | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 24 July 2014
"After the inventions of writing and printing, digital communication represents the third great innovation on the media plane. With their introduction, these three media forms have enabled an ever growing number of people to access an ever growing mass of information. These are made to be increasingly lasting, more easily. With the last step represented by Internet we are confronted with a sort of “activation” in which readers themselves become authors. Yet, this in itself does not automatically result in progress on the level of the public sphere. [...] The classical public sphere stemmed from the fact that the attention of an anonymous public was “concentrated” on a few politically important questions that had to be regulated. This is what the web does not know how to produce. On the contrary, the web actually distracts and dispels." This is how, among many more subjects, Jürgen Habermas comments the evolution of democratic participation in the internet era. Reset-DoC is pleased to republish the translated version of a long interview published last June on the "Frankfurter Rundschau" for the philosopher's eighty-fifth birthday. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  public_sphere  information-intermediaries  printing  print_culture  Internet  communication  community-virtual  media  political_culture  political_participation  political_press  Habermas  post-secular  cultural_history  cultural_change  networks-information  networks-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - the three big stories of modernity | TextPatterns July 2015
So far there have been three widely influential stories about the rise of modernity: the Emancipatory, the Protestant, and the Neo-Thomist. (..) all these narrators of modernity see our own age as one in which the consequences of 500-year-old debates conducted by philosophers and theologians are still being played out. I think all of these narratives are wrong. They are wrong because they are the product of scholars in universities who overrate the historical importance and influence of other scholars in universities, and because they neglect ideas that connect more directly with the material world. All of these grands recits should be set aside, and they should not immediately be replaced with others, but with more particular, less sweeping, and more technologically-oriented stories. The technologies that Marshall McLuhan called "the extensions of Man" are infinitely more important for Man's story, for good and for ill, than the debates of the schoolmen and interpreters of the Bible. Instead of grand narratives of the emergence of The Modern we need something far more plural: technological histories of modernity.
Instapaper  cultural_history  cultural_capital  modernity  technology  Tech/Culture  social_theory  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  Thomism-21stC  Reformation  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  modernity-emergence  material_culture  economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  colonialism  Military_Revolution  Scientific_Revolution  consumer_revolution  technology-history  historiography  medicine  public_health  public_sphere  public_goods  media  print_culture  history_of_science  history_of_book  history-and-social_sciences  narrative  narrative-contested  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Heather K. Gerken and Joseph Fishkin - Whose party is it anyway? | Balkinization - June 2015
Description of key portion of paper published *downloaded from SSRN to Note) we imagine three models of who should control a party: 1. The equality model: On this model, each party member should have equal influence over the direction of the party. 2. The elite-driven model: On this model, the parties are not democracies; they are more like firms, competing in the broader democratic arena. In this analogy, party elites are the executives; the donors are the shareholders; and ordinary voters are like consumers who can accept or reject what the elites are selling. This model has its roots in a Schumpeterian conception of democracy. -- Neither of these models, we think, is adequate—either positively or normatively. (..) So we propose 3. The pluralist model: This hybrid model takes into account the party’s multi-layered role in our politics. On this model, the party stands in part for ordinary voters who make up the base of the party, in part for the party elites who run it, and in part for the activists in between—the party faithful, who knock on doors and show up at rallies and caucuses and provide much of the party’s energy. The party faithful are much more heavily involved in the party than ordinary voters, but much less influential than the Koch brothers. One major worry we have about the shift from official parties to shadow parties is that the party faithful may get squeezed out, leaving us with a politics that is more centralized and broadcast-like.
Instapaper  paper  SSRN  US_politics  parties  shadow_parties  political_participation  pluralism  voting  elections  democracy  democracy-direct  elites-political_influence  oligarchy  politics-and-money  partisanship  parties-transmission_belts  public_sphere  public_opinion  competition-political  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Christophe Litwin, review essay - Stéphane Van Damme on Living the Enlightenment | Books & ideas -- French original June 2014, translation May 2015 by Michael C. Behrent
Original French http://www.laviedesidees.fr/La-vie-des-Lumieres.html -- Stéphane Van Damme, À toutes voiles vers la vérité [On Course to the Truth]: Une autre histoire de la philosophie au temps des Lumières, Seuil, 2014, 386 p., 24 €.Van Damme’s project is to write an alternative history of philosophy (...) not by writing a history of ideas, but rather a “historian’s history” of philosophy. Rather than beginning with a canonical body of texts or doctrines (the selection of which is frequently incomplete or ideological), Van Damme, building on Bruno Latour’s work in the history of science and Antoine Lilti’s and Etienne Anheim’s work in the journal Annales, (and..) the historical geographer Jean-Marc Besse, approaches the history of philosophy in a manner that is decidedly contextual, material, and pragmatic. Unlike literature, art, and science, Van Damme notes, philosophy had, until the past decade, largely avoided cultural history’s probing gaze. (..) the recent literature in the field is daunting—(see the..)abundant critical and bibliographical apparatus (305-375)—a history of philosophy conceived as an early modern cultural practice had yet to be written. Where, when, how, and in what circumstances were the activities we refer to by such terms as “knowing,” “living philosophically,” “being a philosopher,” and “teaching,” “doing,” “reading,” and “writing” philosophy practiced? Can the tools and methods of cultural history offer insight, in this way, into Enlightenment philosophy’s distinctive “truth regime”? (..)This pragmatic approach covers a remarkably wide range of topics and methodologies (many in) previously published articles (organized..) by situating philosophical practice in 3 types of spaces: the public sphere, geography, and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note for both languages
books  reviews  amazon.fr  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  France  Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  geography  political_history  political_culture  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_history  natural_philosophy  epistemology  epistemology-social  bibliography  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
L'Europe des Lumières - Classiques Garnier - collection directors Michel Delon, Jacques Berchtold et Christophe Martin
De ce qu'on appelle la crise de la conscience européenne à la Révolution française, la littérature et la pensée ont pour espace une Europe, souvent francophone, éprise d'idées nouvelles et d'expérimentations formelles. La collection rend compte de recherches qui sollicitent des disciplines et des méthodes diverses pour mieux connaître et comprendre la vie intellectuelle, scientifique, artistique et littéraire du XVIIIe siècle, ainsi que l'histoire des idées et des représentations. -- From what has been designated as a "crisis of conscience" to the Revolution, literature and thought play in a European space, often French-speaking, entranced by new ideas and formal experiments. The collection covers research which calls on a variety of disciplines and methods in order to better know and understand the intellectual, scientific, artistic and literary life of the 18th century, as well as the history of ideas and representations.
books  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  art_history  literary_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  philosophes  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  publishing 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Karmack - Jonathan Rauch: Political realism - In praise of old fashioned politics | Brookings Institution - May 2015
Jonathan Rauch's paper “Political realism: How hacks, machines, big money and back-room deals can strengthen American democracy” marks the beginning of a serious effort on behalf of Brookings scholars to open up a conversation challenging the reform assumptions of the past few decades. In the coming months we will be convening social scientists and public intellectuals along with politicians and activists in order to explore a new way of looking at solutions to the polarization of contemporary American politics. Not everyone will agree—with Rauch—or with each other. But we feel the time has come to take on the conventional reform wisdom and begin an intellectual dialogue on why our democracy seems to be failing. Taking a page from international relations where realism assumes conflict among nations; political realism also assumes that conflict is a constant part of the system. According to Rauch realism, “…sees governing as difficult and political peace and stability as treasures never to be taken for granted.” He goes on to argue the virtues of transactional politics and to point out how, in the name of reform, weakening the bulwarks of transactional politics has weakened democracy as a whole. “Where the realist tends to believe that governing is inherently difficult, that politics is inherently transactional and that success is best judged in terms of reaching social accommodation rather than achieving some abstract purpose, the progressive tends to see government as perfectible and politics as a path toward a higher public good.” In practice this means that the political realist advocates things that have been anathema to reformers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  democracy  US_politics  US_government  US_legal_system  good_government  sunshine_laws  transparency  realism-political  IR-realism  reform-political  parties  partisanship  faction  extremism  polarization  conflict  common_good  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_sociology  political_participation  political_science  politics-and-money  campaign_finance  elections  public_sphere  public_policy  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Tim Neff, review - Andrew Pettegree, The Invention of News: How the World Came to Know About Itself | Public Books — April 2015
How did we go from that to the news as we now know it, broadcast across the globe and in cycles measured in milliseconds? Pettegree, a professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews, in Scotland, finds answers by linking the emergence of news as a mass commodity to Western Europe’s development of communications networks between the 15th and 18th centuries. This network perspective decenters news as a singular object. Instead, what we get is a richly detailed history that shows the invention of news as a messy cultural process, with abrupt turns and setbacks. Major advances in information networks were quickly followed by retreats. Printers would reinvent news, only to fold a year or two later. When newspapers first appeared, a mass readership had to learn how to read brief accounts that provided much less context than the narrative histories with which they were familiar. Pettegree’s history of news suggests that crisis has shadowed journalism from the start. The Invention of News divides the earliest stirrings of modern news into three epochs, starting with the 15th and early 16th centuries, when the printing press spurred the transition from largely private news networks to the earliest forms of public news industries. Next, in the 16th and early 17th centuries, improved communications networks enabled the news to spread faster and to more people at less cost. Finally, in the 17th and 18th centuries, advertising expanded circulations, and Enlightenment ideals brought an empirical approach to news that led it to shed moral overtones.
books  reviews  kindle-available  cultural_history  cultural_change  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  news  newspapers  publishing  readership  journalism  communication  information  information-markets  Enlightenment  mass_culture  networks-information  public_sphere  disinformation  witchcraft  public_opinion  public_disorder 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Piet Strydom - Discourse and Knowledge: The Making of Enlightenment Sociology, Liverpool University Press, 2000. | -00 Academia.edu
This book offers an original interpretation of the rise of sociology from a contemporary point of view that is both theoretically and historically informed. Rather than assuming the ‘dual revolution’ as watershed, it goes back behind the French Revolution and the industrial revolution in order to start from the more pervasive communication revolution. The central theme of the book is the currently topical one of the role played by discourse in the construction of knowledge. It is substantively developed through an investigation of a neglected period in the history of sociology. By closely analysing the contributions of such theorists as More, Hobbes, Vico, Montesquieu, Ferguson and Millar to the emergence of sociology in its original form, the argument follows the discursive construction of sociology in the context of the society-wide early modern practical discourse about violence and rights – what is here called the rights discourse. Parallels with the nineteenth- and twentieth-century discourse about poverty and justice and the contemporary discourse about risk and responsibility allow the author to reflect not only on the generation of knowledge through discourse, but also on the role that sociology itself plays in this process. The argument draws on the latest epistemological, theoretical and methodological advances. Constructivism is explored, Habermas and Foucault are creatively synthesised to arrive at a new formulation of the theory of discourse, and a finely elaborated frame and discourse analysis is applied – thus making a substantial contribution to the currently emerging cognitive sociology. The contemporary relevance of the analysis lies in its linking of early sociology’s critique of modern society to the need under current conditions of an open history, contingency and uncertainty for cultivating a culture of contradictions and a participatory politics of conflict, contestation and compromise. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  sociology  discourse  discourse-political_theory  discourse_ethics  cognition-social  public_sphere  violence  rights-legal  rights-political  sociology_of_knowledge  cultural_critique  Hobbes  Montesquieu  Scottish_Enlightenment  civil_society  civility-political  politeness  commerce-doux  conflict  political_participation  political_discourse  constructivism  Habermas  Foucault  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
David A. Bell, review essay on Antoine Lilti's new study of The Invention of Celebrity, 1750-1850 - Books & ideas
David A. Bell, « The Fault is Not in Our "Stars", but in Ourselves », Books and Ideas, 8 January 2015. ISSN : 2105-3030. URL : http://www.booksandideas.net/The-Fault-is-Not-in-Our-Stars-but-in-Ourselves.html -- Reviewed: Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques. L’invention de la célébrité, 1750-1850, [Public Figures. The Invention of Celebrity, 1750-1850]. Paris, Fayard, 2014. -- Before we start to lament the triumph of celebrity culture over the most basic civic literacy, we might ask if things were truly better in the past. Antoine Lilti’s brilliant book shows that modern celebrity culture had its origins in the age of revolutions, when selfhood and personal authenticity emerged as new notions.
books  reviews  social_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  France  public_sphere  celebrity  self  authenticity  Rousseau  Napoleon  propaganda  biography-writing 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Milton, the Metaphysicals, and Romanticism | Renaissance and early modern literature | Cambridge University Press
Lisa Low, Pace University, New York - Anthony John Harding, University of Saskatchewan -- Both the English Civil War and the French Revolution produced in England an outpouring of literature reflecting intense belief in the arrival of a better world, and new philosophies of the relationship between mind, language and cosmos. This is the first book to explore the significance of the connections between the literature of these two periods. The volume analyses Milton's influence on Romantic writers including Blake, Beckford, Wordsworth, Shelley, Radcliffe and Keats, and examines the relationships between other 17thC poets - Donne, Marvell, Vaughan, Herrick, Cowley, Rochester and Dryden - and Romantic writers. Representing a wide range of theoretical approaches, it is a provocative and challenging assessment of the relationship between two of the richest periods of British literary history. **--** Introduction - Milton, the metaphysicals, and romanticism: reading the past, reflecting the present - Lisa Elaine Low and Anthony John Harding *-* 1. The other reading transactional epic in Milton, Blake, and Wordsworth - Tilottama Rajan *-* 2. Newton's pantocrator and Blake's recovery of Miltonic prophecy - G. A. Rosso *-* 3. Milton's hell: William Beckford's place in the graphic and the literary tradition - Elinor Shaffer *-* 4. How theories of Romanticism exclude women: Radcliffe, Milton, and the legitimation of the gothic novel - Annette Wheeler Cafarelli *-* 5. Wordsworth, Milton, and the inward light - Nicola Zoe Trott *-* 6. De-fencing the poet: The political dilemma of the poet and the people in Milton's Second Defense and Shelley's Defence of Poetry - Michael Chappell *-* 7. Keats's Marginalia in Paradise Lost - Beth Lau *-* 8. What the mower does to the meadow: action and reflection in Wordsworth and Marvell - Frederick Burwick *'* 9. Kidnapping the poets: the Romantics and Henry Vaughan - John T. Shawcross *-* 10. 'Against the Stream Upwards': Coleridge's Recovery of John Donne - Anthony John Harding *-* 11. Coleridge, Keats, Lamb and 17thC drinking songs - Anya Taylor *-* 12. Marvell, Keats, Wallace Stevens, and the (early) modern meditation poem - Lisa Elaine Low. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  Romanticism  poetry  Metaphysicals  English_Civil_War  French_Revolution-impact  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Keats  Shelley  Newtonian  Blake_William  authors-women  Radcliffe  novels  Gothic-fiction  subjectivity  Milton  Paradise_Lost  Marvell  Donne  politics-and-literature  politics-and-art  public_sphere  cultural_critique  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Walton, « Politics and Economies of Reputation », | Books and Ideas - La Vie des Idèes, 30 October 2014
Reviewed: (1) Jean-Luc Chappey, Ordres et désordres biographiques: Dictionnaires, listes de noms, réputation des Lumières à Wikipédia, Seyssel: Champ Vallon, 2013. (2) Clare Haru Crowston, Credit, Fashion, Sex: Economies of Regard in Old Régime France, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013. -- Historians of 18thC France have become increasingly interested in the ‘individual’. Inspired by the conceptual framework of such theorists as Foucault and Bourdieu, research on identity, self-fashioning and reputation has in recent years become bound up with the study of historical processes (social mobility, rising consumption, public opinion) that reveal a historically unstable and contingently produced ‘self’. The two monographs under consideration here investigate these themes, especially the problem of ‘regard’, that is, how individuals saw and assessed each other. Although the authors analyze different phenomena – biographical notices for Jean-Luc Chappey, fashion and credit for Clare Haru Crowston – both explore the practices that developed in the 18thC and early 19thC for representing and managing reputations. To be sure, the use of print and fashion to assert one’s standing in society had existed for centuries. Two developments, however, altered their importance in the 18thC. First, the consumer revolution, which made print and fashion increasingly accessible. This revolution offered new means for understanding the world (print) and expressing oneself (fashion). Second, the rise of a critical public sphere in which moral assessments about individuals – what they wrote, for example, and what they wore – became increasingly difficult to control. Struggles over social standing took place in an increasingly competitive world, where textual accounts of one’s life and work (Chappey) and sartorial strategies (Crowston) became vulnerable to the vicissitudes of market forces and public opinion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  France  cultural_history  social_history  social_order  status  identity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  public_sphere  celebrity  consumers  consumerism  public_opinion  reputation  social_capital  Bourdieu  Foucault  biography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
David A. Bell, review - Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques - The Fault is Not in Our "Stars", but in Ourselves - Books & ideas Jan 2014
Reviewed: Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques. L’invention de la célébrité, 1750-1850, [Public Figures. The Invention of Celebrity, 1750-1850]. Paris, Fayard, 2014. -- Before we start to lament the triumph of celebrity culture over the most basic civic literacy, we might ask if things were truly better in the past. Antoine Lilti’s brilliant book shows that modern celebrity culture had its origins in the age of revolutions, when selfhood and personal authenticity emerged as new notions. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  France  French_Enlightenment  Napoleon  Rousseau  celebrity  scandale  cultural_history  political_press  political_culture  cultural_critique  public_sphere  self  authenticity  popular_culture  mass_culture  media  readership  reader_response  sensibility  empathy  publishing  Habermas  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Solutions Journalism - Toolkit for Reporting Internationally
Downloaded guide to iPhone -- This meaty guidebook has two objectives: (1) to highlight and dissect the solutions-oriented work of four Pulitzer Center grantees; and (2) to offer general guidance about howto report on solutions stories internationally – and how to get your story idea funded. This guidebook has been produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which supports international journalism across media platforms.
report  downloaded  journalism  narrative  public_sphere  public_policy  development  urbanism  family  migration  public_health  education  women-education  public_disorder  racism  civil_wars  environment  climate  poverty  access_to_services  labor  labor_standards  political_participation  gender  violence  norms 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Wallace Hughes - Antidotes to Deism: A reception history of Thomas Paine's "The Age of Reason", 1794--1809 (2013 dissertation) | ProQuest Gradworks
Hughes, Patrick Wallace, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 2013, 362 pages; 3573259 - Adviser: Paula M. Kane -- In the Anglo-American world of the late 1790s, Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason was not well received, and his volumes of Deistic theology were characterized as extremely dangerous. Over 70 replies to The Age of Reason appeared in Britain and the US. It was widely criticized in the periodical literature, and it garnered Paine the reputation as a champion of irreligion. This dissertation is a study of the rhetoric of refutation, and I focus on the replies to The Age of Reason that were published during Paine's lifetime (d. 1809). To effectively refute The Age of Reason, Paine's respondents had to contend not only with his Deistic arguments, but also with his international reputation, his style of writing, and his intended audience. I argue that much of the driving force behind the controversy over The Age of Reason stems from the concern that it was geared towards the “uneducated masses” or the “lower orders.” (..) For Paine's critics, when the masses abandon their Christianity for Deism, bloody anarchy is the inevitable result, as proven by the horrors of the French Revolution. (..) Drawing on Habermas's theories of the bourgeois public sphere, I focus on how respondents to The Age of Reason reveal not only their concerns and anxieties over the book, but also what their assumptions about authorial legitimacy and expectations about qualified reading audiences say about late 18thC print culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  Paine  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  Deism  natural_religion  Christianity  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  publishing  pamphlets  journalism  lower_orders  public_opinion  public_sphere  print_culture  hierarchy  mass_culture  anarchy  readership  social_order  public_disorder  Radical_Enlightenment  masses-fear_of  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere, eds. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen (2011) — Social Science Research Council - Publications
The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere (Columbia University Press, 2011) represents a rare opportunity to experience a diverse group of preeminent philosophers confronting one pervasive contemporary concern: what role does—or should—religion play in our public lives? Reflecting on her recent work concerning state violence in Israel-Palestine, Judith Butler explores the potential of religious perspectives for renewing cultural and political criticism, while Jürgen Habermas, best known for his seminal conception of the public sphere, thinks through the ambiguous legacy of the concept of “the political” in contemporary theory. Charles Taylor argues for a radical redefinition of secularism, and Cornel West defends civil disobedience and emancipatory theology. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen detail the immense contribution of these philosophers to contemporary social and political theory, and an afterword by Craig Calhoun places these attempts to reconceive the significance of both religion and the secular in the context of contemporary national and international politics. The essays comprising this volume include Habermas’s “The Political: The Rational Meaning of a Questionable Inheritance of Political Theology,” Taylor’s “Why We Need a Radical Redefinition of Secularism,” Butler’s “Is Judaism Zionism?” and West’s “Prophetic Religion and the Future of Capitalist Civilization.” Each chapter was originally presented as a talk at a recent symposium co-hosted by the SSRC, the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, and the Humanities Institute at SUNY Stony Brook. -- Excerpt from the afterword by Craig Calhoun downloaded pdf to Note -- the Taylor essay responded to at The Immanent Frame starting with Bigrami's paper
books  sociology_of_religion  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  politics-and-religion  political_participation  secularism  public_sphere  IR  IR-domestic_po  litics  Judaism  diasporas  exiles  Habermas  Taylor_Charles  Butler_Judith  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Urbinati, Nadia - The context of religious pluralism « The Immanent Frame - 26 Jan. 2012
Akeel Bilgrami’s article, “Secularism: Its Content and Context,” is an important and welcome contribution .... Bilgrami clarifies in a penetrating and lucid way, three fundamental ideas on secularism: first, that it is “a stance to be taken about religion”; second, that it is not an indication of the form of government or the liberal nature of a regime; and third, that the context is a crucial factor in issues concerning the relationship between politics and religion. The first two arguments are intertwined and pertain to the identity and function of secularism, while the latter brings us directly to the role of religion in the public sphere (...) in what follows [I] is propose some specifications and exemplifications that may enrich or complete [Bigrami's analysis]. -- In matters that have a direct impact on the individual freedom of religion and social peace such as the presence of religion in the public sphere, political theorists should pay close attention to the ethical context and the historical tradition of a given society without deducing practical conclusions from an ideal conception of democracy and liberalism. This pragmatic suggestion of going back and forth from the ideal norm to the context is an admission of the fact that a political practice that is liberal in a pluralistic religious environment may turn to be anti-liberal in a mono-religious society. Pluralism is the essential condition within which we should situate the discourse of the role of religions in the public sphere and the issue of secularism. Without pluralism (as a social fact or as an actual plurality of religions, not only a formal declaration of rights) a constitutional democracy has a weaker liberal nature and may generate decisions that are not more liberal or tolerant than those made in a non-constitutional democracy (or in a decent illiberal society, to paraphrase Rawls). -- example of "liberal public square" in a mono-religious society Catholic Thomist positions advocated in Italian artificial insemination debates producing very restrictive legislation of majority religion restricting rights of minority
21stC  political_philosophy  democracy  liberalism  secularism  public_sphere  Rawls  Habermas  sovereignty  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  civil_liberties  minorities  majoritarian  Italy  Catholics  Catholics-and-politics  Thomism-21stC  reproductive_rights  women-rights  democratic_theory  democratization  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Vincent Dubois - Les champs de l'action publique (2010) in Hilgers (M.), dir., Utiliser la théorie des champs pour comprendre le monde social
L'analyse des politiques publiques a forgé ses propres notions pour décrire les espaces relationnels dans lesquels les politiques sont conduites. La sociologie des champs demeure en revanche très peu mobilisée dans ce domaine. Elle peut pourtant s'avérer utile pour objectiver l'espace de production des politiques, reconstituer les relations entre cet espace spécifique et ceux auxquels les politiques sont destinées ou, plus largement, ceux qui prennent part aux échanges qui les constituent. Elle offre ce faisant un point d'appui décisif pour la sociologie de l'action publique. -- Politique, Religion, Institutions et Sociétés : Mutations Européennes - Groupe de Sociologie Politique Européenne (PRISME-GSPE) CNRS : UMR7012 – Université de Strasbourg -- Mots-Clés : Politique publique – sociologie des champs – champs – action publique – rapports – domination – légitimation -- site archives HAL-SHS :: [halshs-00498020, version 1] -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  social_sciences  public_policy  sociology_of_fields  public_sphere  legitimacy  domination  political_science  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Den Hartog, review - Religion in American History: Reviewing Eric Schlereth's "An Age of Infidels" | Religion in American History
Eric Schlereth's An Age of Infidels: The Politics of Religious Controversy in the Early United States, University of Pennsylvania Press -- Schlereth's work fits within a percolating academic study of unbelief in American history. The topic was really opened up with James Turner's Without God, Without Creed: The Origins of Unbelief in America. J. Rixey Ruffin's A Paradise of Reason: William Bentley and Enlightenment Christianity in the Early Republic traced how rationalism might alter belief even among clergy. Christopher Grasso's "Deist Monster" article in the Journal of American History, which looked at the perceived threat of deism in the 1780s, has quickly become an oft-cited piece on this topic. ...other scholars such as Kirsten Fischer ...doing significant research. -- In defining infidelity, Schlereth notes that by the later 18th century, the concept of infidelity expanded out of an attack on deism to conflate it "with all forms of religious disbelief, doubt and anti-Christian sentiment." Infidelity became shorthand for its opponents, while the religious skeptics admitted to being deists or claimed such mantles as "Theophilanthropists" or "Free Enquirers." They stressed their Rationalist credentials and questioned received religious truths.Chronologically, the book stretches from 1770 to 1840, although the bulk of the text is devoted to two periods of especially intense debate over religious infidelity--the 1790s and the 1820s-1830s.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  US_history  US_politics  Early_Republic  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Deism  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  public_sphere  religious_lit  Evangelical  atheism_panic  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - A Religious View of the Foundations of International Law (2011) :: SSRN - Charles E. Test Lectures in the James Madison Program at Princeton University
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-29 -- Lecture 1 begins from a specifically Christian point of view, though it also addresses the difficulties of sustaining a viewpoint of this kind in a multi-faith and indeed increasingly secular world. Lecture 2 considers nationhood, sovereignty, and the basis for the division of the world into separate political communities. A religious approach to international order will endorse the position of most modern international jurists that sovereign independence is not to be made into an idol or a fetish, and that the tasks of order and peace in the world are not to be conceived as optional for sovereigns. But sovereigns also have their own mission, ordering particular communities of men and women. Lecture 3 considers the rival claims of natural law and positivism regarding sources of international law. The most telling part of natural law jurisprudence from Aquinas to Finnis has always been its insistence on the specific human need for positive law. This holds true in the international realm as much as in any realm of human order - perhaps more so, because law has to do its work unsupported by the overwhelming power of a particular state. Lecture 3 addresses, from a religious point of view, the sources of law in the international realm: treaty, convention, custom, precedent, and jurisprudence. It will focus particularly on the sanctification of treaties. -- No of Pages : 73 -- Keywords: customary international law, international law, ius cogens, nationalism, natural law, positivism, public reason, religion, self-determination, sovereignty, treaties -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  international_law  natural_law  positivism-legal  IR  IR_theory  diplomacy  international_organizations  legal_system  international_system  sovereignty  nation-state  nationalism  public_sphere  liberalism-public_reason  deliberation-public  decision_theory  customary_law  self-determination  national_interest  national_security  responsibility_to_protect  treaties  universalism  precedent  conflict_of_laws  dispute_resolution  human_rights  community  trust  alliances  politics-and-religion  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Two-Way Translation: The Ethics of Engaging with Religious Contributions in Public Deliberation (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-84 -- Using as an exemplar, the 2007 "Evangelical Declaration against Torture," this paper examines the role of religious argument in public life. -- It argues for an absolute ban on the use of torture deploying unashamedly Christian rhetoric, some of it quite powerful and challenging. -- The present paper considers whether there is any affront to the duties of political civility in arguing in these terms. There is a line of argument, associated with John Rawls's book, "Political Liberalism," suggesting that citizens should refrain from discussing issues of public policy in religious or deep-philosophical terms that are not accessible to other citizens. The present paper challenges the conception of inaccessibility on which this Rawlsian position is based. It argues, with Jurgen Habermas, that all sides in a modern pluralist society have a right to state their views as firmly and as deeply as they can, and all sides have the duty to engage with others, and to strain as well as they can to grasp others' meanings. It is not enough to simply announce that one can not understand religious reasons, especially if no good faith effort has been made, using the ample resources available in our culture, to try. Of course, many peoeple will not be convinced by the reasons that are offered in religious discourse; but to argue for their rejection - which is always what may happen in respectable political deliberation - is not to say that the presentation of those reasons was offensive or inappropriate. (This paper was originally presented as the 2010 Meador Lecture at the University of Virginia Law School). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Absolute Principles, Pluralism, Public Reason, Rawls, Religious Reasons, Torture
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  public_sphere  political_discourse  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  political_culture  pluralism  liberalism-public_reason  Rawls  Habermas  communication  community  deliberation-public  torture  civic_virtue  civility-political  respect  hermeneutics  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Toleration and Calumny: Bayle, Locke, Montesquie and Voltaire on Religious Hate Speech (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-80 -- There is a considerable literature on the issue of hate speech. And there is a considerable literature on religious toleration (both contemporary and historic). But the two have not been brought into relation with one another. In this paper, I consider how the argument for religious toleration extends beyond a requirement of non-persection and non-establishment. I consider its application to the question of religious vituperation. The focus of the paper is on 17th and 18th century theories. Locke, Bayle and other Enlightenment thinkers imagined a tolerant society as a society free of hate speech: the kind of religious peace that they envisaged was a matter of civility not just non-persecution. The paper also considers the costs of placing limits (legal or social limits) on religious hate-speech: does this interfere with the forceful expression of religious antipathy which (for some people) the acceptance of their creed requires? -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Bayle, Defamation, Enlightenment, Hate Speech, Locke, Toleration -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  tolerance  religious_belief  religious_wars  religious_lit  anticlerical  anti-Catholic  persecution  free_speech  civil_society  civic_virtue  politeness  hate_speech  freedom_of_conscience  Bayle  Locke  Locke-religion  Montesquieu  Voltaire  universalism  heresy  politics-and-religion  political_culture  minorities  public_sphere  public_disorder  civility-political  respect  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Case Against Free Speech (July 2014 working paper) :: SSRN
Free societies employ a variety of institutions — including courts and schools — in which speech is heavily regulated on the basis of its content ... in order to promote other desirable ends, including discovery of the truth. I illustrate this with the case of courts and rules of evidence. Three differences between courts and the polity might seem to counsel against extending that approach more widely. First, the courtroom has an official and somewhat reliable (as well as reviewable) arbiter of the epistemic merits, while the polity may not. Second, no other non-epistemic values of speech are at stake in the courtroom, whereas they are in the polity. Third, the courtroom’s jurisdiction is temporally limited in a way the polity’s may not be. I argue that only the first of these poses a serious worry about speech regulation outside select institutions like courts. I also argue for viewing "freedom of speech" like "freedom of action": speech, like everything else human beings do, can be for good or ill... and thus the central question in free speech jurisprudence should really be how to regulate speech effectively — to minimize its very real harms, without undue cost to its positive values — rather than rationalizing (often fancifully) the supposed special value of speech. In particular, I argue against autonomy-based defenses of a robust free speech principle. I conclude that the central issue in free speech jurisprudence is not about speech but about institutional competence; I offer some reasons — from the Marxist "left" and the public choice "right"— for being skeptical that capitalist democracies have the requisite competence; and make some suggestive but inconclusive remarks about how these defects might be remedied. - No of Pages: 41
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  free_speech  Mill  Hayek  Adorno  Frankfurt_School  Kant  Kant-ethics  Marx  autonomy  networks-information  evidence  epistemology-social  education  regulation  public_choice  public_sphere  public_opinion  political_participation  competition 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R. Westphal - Enlightenment Fundamentals: Rights, Responsibilities & Republicanism | Diametros
Kenneth R. Westphal is Professorial Fellow in the School of Philosophy, University of East Anglia (Norwich), and currently Visiting Professor of Philosophy at the Martin-Luther-Universität Halle Wittenberg. -- This essay re-examines some key fundamentals of the Enlightenment regarding individual rights, responsibilities and republicanism which deserve and require re-emphasis today, insofar as they underscore the character and fundamental importance of mature judgment, and how developing and fostering mature judgment is a fundamental aim of education. These fundamentals have been clouded or eroded by various recent developments, including mis-guided educational policy and not a little scholarly bickering. Clarity about these fundamentals is more important today than ever. Sapere aude! -- Keywords - Hobbes Hume Rousseau Kant Hegel, rational justification, mature judgment, moral constructivism, realism objectivity rights responsibilities republicanism media culture, Euthyphro question, natural law, Dilemma of the Criterion -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  French_Enlightenment  Germany  German_Idealism  voluntarism  obligation  morality-conventional  morality-objective  natural_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  civic_virtue  Hobbes  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  Kant  Kant-ethics  Hegel  judgment-political  public_sphere  media  political_culture  values  education-civic  education-higher  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  21stC  Dewey  Quine  Sellars  analytical_philosophy  academia  professionalization 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Paolo Ramazzotti - Policymaking and Learning Actors, or Is a 'Double Movement' in Cognition Possible? | JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 41, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 765-781
Focus is on Polanyi's theory of implications of widening split between economic and societal goals - posits market efficiency and prices etc functions as coordination mechanisms require broadly shared images of the political economy. Uses Simon's bounded rationality to examine how learning happens, why business is likely to have oversized influence on shared images, and that policy changes may require a commitment to influencing the learning process so alternatives to business images can be shared basis of action -- interesting bibliography of classic political economy and social theory. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_economy  social_theory  rationality-economics  economic_culture  moral_economy  capitalism  political_culture  common_good  reform-economic  efficiency  public_policy  public_sphere  public_opinion  Polanyi_Karl 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stéphane Courtois, review essay - Jürgen Habermas, Entre naturalisme et religion. Les défis de la démocratie - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 265-269 | Érudit 
English translation - Between Naturalism and Religion, Polity Press (2008) -- Stéphane Courtois - Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières --- Naturalisme et religion est la traduction française de Zwischen Naturalismus und Religion. Philosophische Aufsätze, paru chez Suhrkamp en 2005. Il s’agit d’un recueil d’essais rédigés par Habermas à diverses occasions et qui ne forment pas un tout systématique, bien qu’ils soient animés par une intention commune dont je discuterai plus loin. Qu’il me soit permis, avant de discuter plus avant de la teneur de l’ouvrage, de faire quelques brèves remarques sur l’édition française. Comme c’est souvent leur habitude, les éditeurs français se sont permis quelques libertés par rapport à l’ouvrage d’origine -- chose que l’on n’observe pas, par exemple, du côté anglophone où Between Naturalism and Religion, paru chez Polity Press en 2008, respecte scrupuleusement l’édition originale. Des onze essais qui la composent, les éditeurs français ont choisi de n’en conserver que sept, auxquels ils ont joint un court essai de Habermas, « Une conscience de ce qui manque », originellement paru dans un ouvrage du même titre
books  reviews  Habermas  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  culture_wars  secularism  civil_liberties  civil_society  moral_philosophy  public_sphere  Kant  Enlightenment_Project  Adorno  scientism  multiculturalism 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Den Hartog - Trans-Atlantic Anti-Jacobinism: Reaction and Religion | Project MUSE - Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal Volume 11, Issue 1, Winter 2013 pp. 133-145
This article identifies an important transnational political ideology and identity in the Atlantic world in the 1790s-1810s: trans-Atlantic Anti-Jacobinism. Opposition to the French Revolution, although present in individual nations, gained force and variety through connections forged between individuals from the European Continent to Great Britain, Canada, and the United States. Lines of communication that were formed through the practices of writing and printing, correspondence, diplomacy, and travel kept the movement unified against a common enemy. The two most salient elements of this Anti-Jacobinism were concerns over political reaction and religion or, stated differently, vigorous defenses of the established political order and the received religious belief, Protestant or Catholic Christianity. Interlocked, these two main concerns of Anti-Jacobins inspired active response. Ironically, a desire to defend individual nations, political arrangements, and faith traditions led to a political alignment that crossed national boundaries and bound individuals together in a common cause. The formation and operation of Anti-Jacobinism thus occurred simultaneously on subnational and supranational levels, demonstrating the multiple valences of political opinion in the Age of Revolutions. -- paywall
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  18thC  19thC  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  political_press  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  anti-Jacobin  networks-information  networks-policy  diplomatic_history  Atlantic  public_sphere  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Isabel Karremann and Anja Müller, eds. - Mediating Identities in Eighteenth-Century England (2011) | Ashgate
This volume engages in a critical discussion of the connection between historically specific categories of identity determined by class, gender, nationality, religion, political factions and age, and the media available at the time, including novels, newspapers, trial reports, images and the theatre. Recognizing the proliferation of identities in the epoch, these essays explore the ways in which different media determined constructions of identity and were in turn shaped by them. *--* Introduction: mediating identities in 18th-century England, Isabel Karremann; *--* Identifying an age-specific English literature for children, Anja Müller; *--* Found and lost in mediation: manly identity in Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year, Isabel Karremann; *--* Gender identity in sentimental and pornographic fiction: Pamela and Fanny Hill, Franz Meier; *--* Paratexts and the construction of author identities: the preface as threshold and thresholds in the preface, Katharina Rennhak; *--* Owning identity: the 18th-century actress and theatrical property, Felicity Nussbaum; *--* Constructing identity in 18th-century comedy: schools of scandal, observation and performance, Anette Pankratz; *--* Material sites of discourse and the discursive hybridity of identities, Uwe Böker; *--* Constructions of political identity: the example of impeachments, Anna-Christina Giovanopoulos; *--* The public sphere, mass media, fashion and the identity of the individual, Christian Huck; *--* Topography and aesthetics: mapping the British identity in painting, Isabelle Baudino; *--* The panoramic gaze: the control of illusion and the illusion of control, Michael Meyer; *--* Peripatetics of citizenship in the 1790s, Christoph Houswitschka; *--* Critical responses, Rainer Emig, Hans-Peter Wagner and Christoph Heyl - downloaded introduction to Note
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  politics-and-literature  English_lit  literary_history  novels  theater  theatre-Restoration  gender  masculinity  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  impeachment  Somers  Harley  public_sphere  Habermas  aesthetics  consumers  children  family  citizenship  national_ID  identity  identity_politics  Defoe  comedy  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Cressy - Revolutionary England 1640-1642 | JSTOR: Past & Present, No. 181 (Nov., 2003), pp. 35-71
Both an historiographical review of the revisionism debates on the English Civil War and n elaboration of Cressy views that inform his work on the 17thC -- Sees decline and rise of Charles I position linked to explosion of revolutions in every category of English society - not only political and religious - and Parliamentarians failure to manage or bring under control. Civil War when governing class, long anxious re social change, took different sides in what to be done. The conflict continued to play out the next 2 decades. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  change-social  social_history  cultural_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  church_history  politics-and-religion  monarchy  Absolutism  mixed_government  middle_class  lower_orders  public_sphere  public_opinion  local_government  godly_persons  Laudian  Church_of_England  Puritans  Presbyterians  City_politics  merchants  mercantilism  Protestant_International  anti-Catholic  elite_culture  landed_interest  gentry  court_culture  courtiers  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  James_I  Charles_I  downloaded  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
John Walter - Confessional Politics in Pre-Civil War Essex: Prayer Books, Profanations, and Petitions | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 677-701
This article contributes to the debate over the value of petitions for the recovery of 'public opinion' in early modern England. It argues for a greater attentiveness to the politics and processes in their production. An analysis of a hitherto unknown draft Essex 'prayer book' petition explores the construction of contrasting royalist and parliamentarian confessional politics. A reading of the content of the petitions offers evidence of the popular response to the Laudian ceremonialism; a reconstruction of the politics of its production provides evidence of the attempt to construct a political alliance in support of the crown around defence of the prayer book; a reconstruction of the occasion for the petition - the capture of the Essex grand jury by the godly and well affected - suggests a very different, and ultimately more successful, confessional parliamentarian politics. In identifying the critical role played by the middling sort - translating their role in the politics of the parish to the politics of the state - the article argues that a marriage of the research strategy of the social historian with the agenda of a 'new political history' will help to establish the enlarged social depth to the public sphere in early modern England. -- huge bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  political_history  historiography  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  religious_history  Laudian  godly_persons  Puritans  political_culture  religious_culture  petitions  Royalists  Parliamentarians  Church_of_England  local_politics  local_government  middle_class  public_sphere  public_opinion  Bolingbroke-family  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Petitions and the "Invention" of Public Opinion in the English Revolution | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 101, No. 6 (May, 1996), pp. 1497-1555
Current accounts of the capitalist and Protestant origins of the democratic public sphere are inconsistent and speculative. This empirical account explains the transition in political communication from norms of secrecy to appeals to public opinion. Popular communicative change in the English Revolution anticipated, in practice, the democratic theory of the public sphere when printing transformed a traditional instrument of communication-the petition. Petitions had medieval origins and traditions that upheld norms of secrecy and privilege in political communication. Economic and technical properties of printing-namely, heightened commercialism and the capacity to reproduce texts-demolished these norms by changing the scope and content of communication by petition. This practical innovation appears in all factions in the revolution. But among radical groups, the political use of printed petitions led to novel theories and to democratic speculation on constitutional provisions that would ensure the authority of public opinion in politics. This analysis contradicts key assumptions on communicative change that fuel pessimistic assessments of the modern public sphere in post-modernism and critical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  public_sphere  social_process  change-social  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  mixed_government  public_opinion  democracy  arcana_imperii  political_culture  social_order  printing  print_culture  communication  political_press  political_participation  petitions  radicals  commonwealth  Levellers  postmodern  critical_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Slauter, review essay - History, Literature, and the Atlantic World | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 153-186
Looks at the way historians and literary studies of early America confront each other in methods, interdisciplinary work etc - reviewing extensive number of works from past decade or so. Of interest re methodology for intellectual_history, reception theory, public opinion, publishing, bottom up and top down approaches, etc of potential use for writings by Bolingbroke, Swift and Pope. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  literary_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Atlantic  British_Empire  American_lit  English_lit  literary_theory  literacy  publishing  public_sphere  political_culture  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Linda Kirk, historiographical review - The Matter of Enlightenment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 4 (Dec., 2000), pp. 1129-1143
Recent work on the Enlightenment continues to bear out the importance of context in shaping both what is written and how it is read. In the case of the French Revolution, largely thanks to the work of Robert Darnton, studies have come to focus on how, if at all, different layers and styles of dissidence helped to bring down the French monarchy. But not all writing has, or need be suspected of, such an obvious or immediate outcome. This period, for instance, sees the birth of `philosophical' history, as John Pocock and others have made us aware. Here again, contexts and individual experience shape what is studied and written, but it is clear that the project common to the best-selling work of, for instance, Gibbon, Hume and Robertson was to explain how civil society emerged and thrived. This inquiry, and what it says about the separate states and common principles of Europe then and now, is unfinished business; so, too, is determining what historical knowing is, and cannot be. What the eighteenth century undeniably saw, even from the slightly educated, was a growing appetite for understanding and for improvement: these have proved necessary, if not sufficient, conditions for modernity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  historiography  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  historians  public_sphere  publishing  improvement  French_Revolution  Radical_Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Letter from the Exec Committee for Late-18c English Literature re the Proposed Reorganization | The Long Eighteenth - Seot 2013
Nice overview of developments over past couple of decades in late 18thC and early 19thC English_lit (not just better understanding of diversity of new or shifting genres and identification of important but marginalized authors especially women, but connections with political, imperial changes, intellectual_history including science studies, the phenomenon of sentiment, emergence of new publishing, authorial and critical patterns and personas) -- Here is the very thorough response that last year’s Late Eighteenth-Century Division made to the proposal to reorganize the 18c group and reduce its conference panels. The writers of this letter are making it available to the Long 18th and its readers, so that the 18th century scholarly community can see the efforts they have made to work with the MLA in its ongoing development. It is clear, however, that this letter was not taken into consideration when MLA moved forward with the proposal.
English_lit  18thC  19thC  literary_history  lit_crit  cultural_history  British_history  British_Empire  novels  publishing  public_sphere  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Kelly Sorensen, review - Nicholas Wolterstorff, Terence Cuneo (ed.), Understanding Liberal Democracy: Essays in Political Philosophy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Sept 2013
Public reason liberalism -- the form of liberalism defended by Rawls, Larmore, Audi, Gaus, Rorty, Nussbaum, and to some degree Habermas -- usually requires citizens to publicly discuss and vote based on only those reasons that pass some sort of test that sifts away religious and comprehensive non-religious reasons. In the public sphere, those with such views are required by the role of citizenship to shape up or shut up -- "shape up" in the sense of offering instead reasons that can or could be shared by all other citizens. Nicholas Wolterstorff argues that public reason liberalism is a dead end, and defends instead what he takes to be a more defensible form of liberalism ("equal political voice liberalism"). His book is fresh and compelling, and an important contribution to political philosophy. This is a collection of 15 mostly new essays: Ten concern public reason liberalism. The rest take up the nature of rights (extending the account he has been developing in Justice: Rights and Wrongs and Justice in Love), the nature and source of citizens' political obligations to the state, and other issues in political philosophy. Wolterstorff calls his alternative form of liberal democracy "equal political voice liberalism," and he thinks it better accounts for the "governing idea" found in the longer historical tradition of liberalism, before public reason liberalism seized the spotlight in recent decades.
books  reviews  political_philosophy  liberalism  public_sphere  politics-and-religion  citizens  liberalism-public_reason  Rawls  Habermas  Rorty  justice  obligation  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDALL GERMAIN - Financial governance and transnational deliberative democracy | JSTOR: Review of International Studies, Vol. 36, No. 2 (April 2010), pp. 493-509
Recent concern with the institutional underpinning of the international financial architecture has intersected with broader debates concerning the possibility of achieving an adequate deliberative context for decisions involving transnational economic governance. Scholars working within traditions associated with international political economy, deliberative democracy, cosmopolitanism and critical theory have informed this broader debate. This article uses this debate to ask whether the structure of financial governance at the global level exhibits the necessary conditions to support deliberative democracy. In particular, it considers the extent to which publicness and a public sphere have become part of the broader structure of financial governance. Although in some ways financial governance is a hard case for this debate, an argument can be made that a public sphere has emerged as an important element of the international financial architecture. At the same time, the analysis of the role of the public sphere in financial governance reveals important lessons which public sphere theorists and deliberative democracy advocates need to consider in order to extend their analysis into the realm of global political economy. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  IR_theory  finance_capital  global_governance  international_political_economy  international_finance  financial_regulation  democracy  deliberation-public  political_participation  public_sphere  international_system  international_law  international_organizations  nation-state  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Gary Remer - Political Oratory and Conversation: Cicero versus Deliberative Democracy | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Feb., 1999), pp. 39-64
Investigates pre "bourgeois public sphere" deliberation, similarities and differences between forms of Cicero rhetoric (political and conversation) and Habermas style dialogue or discourse forms of political deluberation. Interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  rhetoric-political  conversation  deliberation-public  public_sphere  Habermas  Cicero  Europe-Early_Modern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexander Livingston - Avoiding Deliberative Democracy? Micropolitics, Manipulation, and the Public Sphere | JSTOR: Philosophy & Rhetoric, Vol. 45, No. 3 (2012), pp. 269-294
This article examines the critique of deliberative democracy leveled by William Connolly. Drawing on both recent findings in cognitive science as well on Gilles Deleuze's cosmological pluralism, Connolly argues that deliberative democracy, and the contemporary left more generally, is guilty of intellectualism for overlooking the embodied, visceral register of political judgment. Going back to Deleuze and Guattari's A Thousand Plateaus, this article reconstructs the working assumptions of Connolly's critique and argues that it unwittingly leads to an indefensible embrace of manipulation. Against his micropolitics of visceral manipulation, I propose an alternative route for realizing Connolly's politics of agonistic negotiation in the form of a critical theory of the public sphere. -- paywall
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_science  democracy  deliberation-public  political_participation  political_spectacle  political_press  public_sphere  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Lincoln - The Culture of War and Civil Society in the Reigns of William III and Anne | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 44, No. 4 (SUMMER 2011), pp. 455-474
The essay examines the representation of war in poems and church services during the reigns of William III and Queen Anne. It identifies relations between social discipline and the imaginative participation in violence, and considers how war—described by poets as a test of heroism, and represented by the church as the occasion for spiritual purgation—served the interests of those who wanted to regulate and refine the manners of civil society. It argues that the promotion of gentler manners did not undermine the commitment to military aggression, but worked in the service of it. -- huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  English_lit  poetry  sermons  politeness  reformation_of_manners  militarism  William_III  Marlborough  heroes  Providence  religious_culture  elite_culture  Elias_Norbert  Addison  publishing  public_sphere  civil_society  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Brody Miller - "Proper Subjects for Public Inquiry": The First Unitarian Controversy and the Transformation of Federalist Print Culture | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 101-135
Lots of primary and secondary references - continues debate against seeing Jeffersonians as innovative in using press to expand public sphere and speak for common man but Federakists as reactive and manipulative for similar activity that in fact did more for wider public participation and voice -- episode also sets pattern for triumph of non-sectarian, Trinitarian, evangelical, bible and tract version of Christianity as public sphere religion -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  religious_history  public_sphere  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  New_England  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  civic_virtue  public_opinion  political_participation  politics-and-religion  political_culture  religious_culture  republicanism  publishing  deference  consensus  anti-Trinitarian  Unitarian  Calvinist  Evangelical  religion-established  clergy  education-higher  Federalist  Jeffersonians  political_press  community  elites  elite_culture  cultural_critique  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Anthony J. La Vopa - The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer" from Luther to Kant | JSTOR - Huntington Library Quarterly (1997)
The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer": On the Career of a German Epithet from Luther to Kant -- Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, Enthusiasm and Enlightenment in Europe, 1650-1850 (1997), pp. 85-115 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  religious_culture  religious_belief  enthusiasm  Pietist  Reformation  politics-and-religion  sectarianism  Luther  Kant  imagination  rationality  rational_religion  clergy  authority  self  self-knowledge  self-control  public_sphere  public_disorder  status  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan G. W. Conlin - High Art and Low Politics: A New Perspective on John Wilkes | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 356-381
Fascinating for mid to late 18thC issues for both Continental Enlightenment and British thinkers and artists re scope of public sphere and state responsibility for promotion of the arts, its benefits for polite culture including middle classes with polite aspirations -- Wilkes connections with philosophes including Holbach and Diderot -- and how Wilkes wove his political reforms and promotion of arts and industry together. Useful discussion of range of historian takes on Wilkes, who he mobilized, relation with older republican opposition and later dissenters and radical opposition. Hume opposition to Wilkes' anti monarchy and anti aristocracy republicanism leads to different assessment of progress in civilizing arts and role of doux commerce. Each historian seems to put Wilkes in their own narrative resulting in dramatically different assessments of both Wilkes himself and his impact. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  art_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  George_III  Wilkes  Hume  Diderot  d'Holbach  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  opposition  public_sphere  public_opinion  governing_class  political_nation  political_culture  accountability  Parliament  franchise  Septennial_Act  nationalism  national_ID  xenophobia  anti-monarchy  anti-aristocracy  middle_class  merchants  state-roles  Grand_Tour  patriotism  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Catherine_the_Great  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  museums  academies  bibliography  enlightened_absolutism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kate Loveman, review essay - Political Information in the Seventeenth Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 555-565
(1) Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England by Kevin Sharpe; Steven N. Zwicker; (2) The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe by Brendan Dooley; Sabrina A. Baron; (3) Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State by Andrew McRae; (4) The Writing of Royalism, 1628-1660 by Robert Wilcher; (5) Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum by Jason Peacey; (6)The Ingenious Mr. Henry Care, Restoration Publicist by Lois G. Schwoerer -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  censorship  reader_response  readership  reading  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  English_lit  satire  pamphlets  Grub_Street  history_of_book  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Boyd - Reappraising the Scottish Moralists and Civil Society | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 33, No. 1 (Autumn, 2000), pp. 101-125
Michael Sandel and others have faulted liberal constitutionalism for its "proceduralism," its "bracketing" of divisive moral issues, and its pursuit of the "unencumbered self." As a contemporary diagnosis, there is much to be said on behalf of these criticisms. Yet in recounting the story of liberalism's development as the deliberate and inevitable pursuit of moral individuality, these accounts fail to consider the anticipated benefits-as well as the costs-of modern constitutionalism that were evident to eighteenth-century thinkers like David Hume and Adam Smith. We will see that classical liberals like Hume and Smith did not defend liberal constitutionalism in the name of the "unencumbered self." Instead they saw liberal neutrality, the separation between public and private, and the relegation of religion to a private matter of civil society as the best way to accommodate sectarianism, ethical pluralism and the religious conflicts of the post-Reformation world. Only by challenging contemporary presumptions of liberal teleology and by understanding classical liberalism's development as the product of eighteenth-century encounters with the perils of pluralism can we fully reckon the advantages and disadvantages of liberal constitutionalism. These lessons of classical liberalism suggest both the presumptive virtues of liberalism and the dangers of communitarian efforts to encourage shared purposes and a thicker public life in the modern polity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  liberalism  communitarian  pluralism  constitutionalism  18thC  Scottish_Enlightenment  civil_society  public_sphere  individualism  religious_wars  politics-and-religion  political_culture  Hume  Smith  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. J. Withers and Robert J. Mayhew - Rethinking 'Disciplinary' History: Geography in British Universities, c.1580-1887 | JSTOR: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, New Series, Vol. 27, No. 1 (2002), pp. 11-29
Downloaded pdf to Note -- Against a background of recent work in the history of geography and of geographical knowledge, the paper considers evidence for the place of geography within British universities before the formal establishment of the first departments of geography. Attention is paid to geography's discursive connections with other subjects within given university curricula, and to the values placed upon its teaching by contemporaries. The paper argues that extant historiographies for British geography should be revised in the light of such evidence. More importantly, the paper raises questions about the sites and intellectual spaces in which geography has been situated and about the content, nature and purpose of writing geography's 'disciplinary' history.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  colonialism  exploration  public_sphere  university  history_of_science  geography  sociology_of_knowledge  education  Royal_Society  military_history  maps  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Dan M. Kahan : Making Climate-Science Communication Evidence-Based — All the Way Down :: SSRN
Chapter in Culture, Politics and Climate Change (eds. M. Boykoff & D. Crow, Routledge Press, 2014 Forthcoming) - Date posted: February 14, 2013 ; Last revised: August 31, 2013 -- downloaded pdf to Note

Abstract:
Scientists and science communicators have appropriately turned to the science of science communication for guidance in overcoming public conflict over climate change. The value of the knowledge that this science can impart, however, depends on it being used scientifically. It is a mistake to believe that either social scientists or science communicators can intuit effective communication strategies by simply consulting compendiums of psychological mechanisms. Social scientists have used empirical methods to identify which of the myriad mechanisms that could plausibly be responsible for public conflict over climate change actually are. Science communicators should now use valid empirical methods to identify which plausible real-world strategies for counteracting those mechanisms actually work. Collaboration between social scientists and communicators on evidence-based field experiments is the best means of using and expanding our knowledge of how to communicate climate science
paper  SSRN  climate  political_culture  public_sphere  public_opinion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Darrick N. Taylor -thesis - L'Estrange His Life: Public and Persona in the Life and Career of Sir Roger L'Estrange, 1616-1704 (2011)
KU ScholarWorks: Authors: Taylor, Darrick N. Advisors: Clark, Jonathan C.D. .....Downloaded pdf to Note..... The subject of this dissertation is the life and career of Roger L'Estrange, who was a licenser of Books and Surveyor of the Press for Charles II, as well as a royalist pamphleteer. It seeks to answer the question of how conceptions of public and private changed in late seventeenth century England be examining the career of L'Estrange, which involved him in many of the major pamphlet campaigns of the Restoration period. It argues that there was no stable "public sphere" in seventeenth century England, one that clearly marked it off from a private sphere of domesticity. It argues that the classical notion of office, in which reciprocal obligation and duty were paramount, was the basic presupposition of public but also private life, and that the very ubiquity of ideals of office holding made it semantically impossible to distinguish a stable public realm from a private one. Furthermore, the dissertation also argues that the presupposition of officium not only provided the basis for understanding relationships between persons but also of individual identity in seventeenth century England. It argues that L'Estrange saw his own identity in terms of the offices he performed, and that his individual identity was shaped by the antique notion of persona--of a mask that one wears, when performing a role--than to modern notions of individual identity. Lastly, it will argue that people in seventeenth century England still understood their world in terms of offices, but that changes in the way they understood office, visible in L'Estrange's writings, helped prepare the way for the reception of more modern ideas about public and private spheres that would eventually come to fruition in the nineteenth century.
thesis  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  1680s  1690s  1700s  L'Estrange  Charles_II  James_II  Whigs  Tories  political_press  pamphlets  censorship  propaganda  politics-and-religion  public_sphere  office  persona  identity  self  obligation  moral_philosophy  domesticity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Urmi Bhowmik: Facts and Norms in the Marketplace of Print: John Dunton's Athenian Mercury (2003)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 36, No. 3 (Spring, 2003), pp. 345-365 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay discusses the division of knowledge within the context of a popular periodical, the Athenian Mercury (1691-1697). The separation of fields of knowledge in the Enlightenment was merely the prelude to the attempt to establish disciplines on a common basis. I trace a similar process in the Mercury', which treated questions about natural science and moral dilemmas as if they shared an analogous structure—of particular instantiations of universal laws. I argue that this identification of facts and norms constituted the public subject simultaneously as subject to the law and the authority before which the law must legitimate itself.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  17thC  1690s  publishing  Dunston  public_sphere  sociology_of_knowledge  disciplines  natural_law  natural_philosophy  moral_philosophy  norms  facts  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Mark Schmeller: The Political Economy of Opinion: Public Credit and Concepts of Public Opinion in the Age of Federalism (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 29, No. 1 (Spring, 2009), pp. 35-61 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- public opinion and public finance often developed together -- tracks shift in "public opinion" from British 18thC usage as foundation of government to a concept that was politicized, defined and appealed to as support, in debates over Early Republic public finance
article  jstor  political_economy  political_history  economic_history  public_finance  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  public_sphere  public_opinion  parties  political_press  sovereign_debt  currency  central_banks  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Randy Robertson: Swift's "Leviathan" and the End of Licensing (2005)
JSTOR: Pacific Coast Philology, Vol. 40, No. 2 (2005), pp. 38-55 -- a close reading of Tale of the Tub as a Hobbesian attack on pernicious political and religious controversialist press in wake of lapse of Licensing Act -- in lieu of censorship, shut down Grub Street with ridicule -- lots of references to evolution of law on freedom of the press, libel etc and history of the book
article  jstor  literary_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  publishing  public_sphere  political_press  politics-and-literature  religious_lit  censorship  free_speech  17thC  1690s  Swift  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Amanda Vickery: Golden Age to Separate Spheres? A Review of the Categories and Chronology of English Women's History (1993)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1993), pp. 383-414 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Two very powerful stories structure the history of the changing roles of English women. The tale of the nineteenth-century separation of the spheres of public power and private domesticity relates principally to the experience of middle-class women. The other story, emerging from early modern scholarship, recounts the social and economic marginalization of propertied women and the degradation of working women as a consequence of capitalism. Both narratives echo each other in important ways, although strangely the capacity of women's history to repeat itself is rarely openly discussed. This paper critically reviews the two historiographies in order to open debate on the basic categories and chronologies we employ in discussing the experience, power and identity of women in past time.
article  jstor  social_theory  cultural_history  historiography  Britain  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  women  women-work  women-property  public_sphere 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
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